US2864438A - Upholstered furniture - Google Patents

Upholstered furniture Download PDF

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US2864438A
US2864438A US587563A US58756356A US2864438A US 2864438 A US2864438 A US 2864438A US 587563 A US587563 A US 587563A US 58756356 A US58756356 A US 58756356A US 2864438 A US2864438 A US 2864438A
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frame
members
front
angle
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Levine Elroi
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Levine Elroi
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C4/00Foldable, collapsible or dismountable chairs
    • A47C4/02Dismountable chairs
    • A47C4/028Upholstered chairs, e.g. metal, plastic or wooden chairs
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C4/00Foldable, collapsible or dismountable chairs
    • A47C4/02Dismountable chairs

Description

Dec. 16, 1958 E. LEvlNE UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 28, 1956 INVENTOR. 2420/ 5V/fyi 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 28, 1956 .amwil INVENTOR.

Dec. 16, 1958 Filed May 28. 1956 E. LEVINE UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 fi- 5. BY

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Dec. 16, 1958 E. LEVINE UPHOLSTERED FURNI TURB 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 28, 1956 lUnited States Patent 2,864,438 UPHOLSTERED' FURNITURE Elroi Levine, New Rochelle, N. Y. Application May 28,1956, Serial No. 587,565 8Claims.l (Cl. 155-191) This invention relates to improvements in upholstered furniture, and inparticular relates to improvements in the frames of upholstered chairs and sofas.

While the'invention will be described -primarily with referenceto a chair, it will be apparent that the invention is also applicable to sofa construction.

A`n important object of this invention is to provide a chair frame which is made of metal. In a preferred emb'odiment of the invention, I make the chair frame of lightweight metal, preferably magnesium, in the form of angle bai-s -Which are welded together'. Y

An important advantage of'making theframe of metal is that the finished upholsteredchair has approximately one-third less weight than that of a chair of comparable size having a conventional wood frame. Another important advantage of this construction is that the parts of the frame `may be pre-frabricated on a r'nassy produc'- tion basis. Another important advantage of this construction is that the frame is much4 stronger than a wood frame. There is virtually no danger vof the metal frame cracking, splintering or breaking in normal handling, in contrast to a wood framewhich is frequently broken in shipment, in storage, in the home or in other handling.

Another important object of the invention is to provide an improved chair or the like having a frame comprising a plurality of metal angle bars, said metal angle bars serving to define the base, the ba'c'k fr'ar'neand the arm frames of the chair. Another important objectof the invention is to provide a webbed seat frame which is adapted tobe'secured between said arm frames'.

Another important object ofthe invention'is tov pro"- videa resilient metal back plate which maybe vmounted on' said back frame and said ar'm frames in the desired inclined position so as to serve to support ythe'back cushion of the chair. Preferably, said resilient metal back plate is secured only at its two upper corners to the back frame', and said back plate is mounted insuch a manner that vit yields backwardly when 'a person sits in the chair', and'then returns to its normal position when the person ceases to sit on the chair. The provision of vthis resilient back plate make it unnecessary to support the back cushion by means of springs. f

The provision of the separate seat fra'rne and separate back rest plate, both elements beingv supported bylthe ar'mframes and the back frame, simplifies the constru'c# tion ofthe Vframe and makes possible the use of metal angle bars as the main structural elements of the'cha'ir frame.

Another important object of the invention is to pro` vide an improved chair having a webbed'seat framewhich may be removed for repair or replacement of 'the webbing without the necessity of removing the upholstery from the chair.

Other objects and advantages ofthe in vention will become apparent from the following description, in conjunction with the annexed drawings, inY which a preferred embo'dimentof the invention is disclosed'.

' In the drawings:

2,864,438 flirter???Reflet??? Fig. 1 is al perspective view of'a completely assembled and upholstered chair made in` accordance with my invention.

Fig.` 2 is a perspective view of the frame `ofthe chair shown in Fig. 1, prior to the upholstering thereof.'` "In Fig. 2, the chair as shown is viewed' from the" front thereof. L Y

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of theframe 'of'4 the chair;`

Fig.-4 is aperspective view ofthe chair frame, viewed from the rear'thereof. i

Fig. 5 isvan exploded perspective view"of"the'i"seit frame ofthe chair. v

. Fig. 6 is av perspective View ofthe" assmbledf'seat frame. d

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary `detail"v'iew' on 1ine'7-7 of Fig. 8 isa-section on line"8"`-8 of Fig: 1,v and"is"pat1y broken away.

Fig. 9 is a section on line 99of Fig.' 1, andisp'afrtly broken away. l

Fig;` 10 isafragmentar'y section on line 10'-10"f Fig. 9.

Fig;v 11 is a fragmentary section on line n11``11"f Fig. 9.

Fig. 13 is'a"fragrnentarydetailof Fig. l2"drawi to enlargedscale. h A

Fig. 14' is'a View similar to Fi`g."12, `but showing Athe chair` inverted'. Also, Fig.'` 14 shows' Va platev inserted within'ithechair frame, and the w'ebbed seat'frameremoved; n n

The drawings are substantially to'y scale 'of'a Working model-'of the invention and're'feren'ce is made to the drawingl to` complete the disclosure.

Upon reference to thev drawings` in detail, `it 'vv'vill be noted-'thatframe 10 'of theimprovedchair is made'up of a plurality of angle bars which'niay besecilieditogether by-anyv suitablemeans. Thesee angle Vbas'are preferablyV made of 'metal and are optionally'and prefer ably made-of'magnesium. 'Magnesium is' highlyzady'antageous becauselof its' lightness'and its"'relative' strength. However,v the invention is"no`t liniited'td the nuse of'm nesium for therframe'.` Preferably,said"angle` ba'r'sar'e welded' together;y 0 u l Frame 10 includes a base4 portion which'is generally rectangular in shape andfwhichpomprises front angle bar 11, rear langle Abar 12' andv` respective "sid'e' angle bars 13. Each an'gle 'bar' 1'1, 12and 13ha'sa`horizontal ilange and a vertical flange extending` upwardly froir'i'the outer edge of the horizontal flange." Angle'ba'r 11""'is slightly-longer than angle bar 12, and angle 'bars 13 vcon verge slightly from f ront to rear. Y y

Saidfr'a'me 10 also4 includes a pair of vertically extending rear cornerjangle byars14. Each said angle bar 14 has a side ilage4 connected to the vertical flange ofa respecj tive' angle bar 13, and a1 `rearflan`ge connected to thg verticallflange'lof angle bar 12. Anglebars 14 are up wardly rearwardly inclined. l v y l, i ,n PrairieV 10`also comprises a pairgofvertically extending front corner angle barsv 15. Eaclifsafid angle bar 15 liafs` a side ange which is y`ccl nn`ected to the respective' vertical ilan'ge' of a respectiveangle" bar 13,` and a front` flange which'iscon'nected'to the verticlla'nge ofan'gle bar 11; AngleL bars `15 are slightlyupwardly rearwardly inclined; but'not asY muchas angle bars 1'4.' AngleI bars 15 are lshorter than angle bars 14.

Inner front langle bars 16 are respectively-connected to t'hefront` angle bars n ected to the' vertical 16 lare connected'to thel proximate 11 inwardly ofthe front corner'anglev bars 15. The fr ont-ilangeof each anglebar 16 isconf edges of the front flanges thereof. Optionally and preferably, angle bars 15 and 16 are all of substantially the same height, and their front flanges are co-planar.

Each pair of angle bars 15 and 16 are connected at their upper ends by angle bar 17. Said angle bar 17 has a vertical flange which is connected to the front flanges of angle bars 15 and 16, and a horizontal flange connected to the upper edge of said vertical flange and extending rearwardly thereof.

Frame 10 also includes a pair of outer upper side angle bars 18. Each said outer upper side angle bar 18 respectively connects corner angle bars 14 and 15. Said angle bar 18 has a horizontally extending flange and has a vertical flange depending from the outer side edge of the horizontal flange and connected to the respective vertical anges of the angle bars 14 and 15. The horizontally lextending flanges of angle bars 17 and 18l are preferably located in substantially a common plane and are optionally appropriately mitered at their junctions, as is clearly shown in the drawings. The horizontally extending flanges of angle bars 18 are optionally slightly inclined downwardly rearwardly.

Upper rear angle bar 19 connects the upper ends of the respective rear corner angle bars 14. Said angle bar 19 has a horizontal flange and also has a vertical flange depending from the rear edge of said horizontal flangeand connected to the respective rear flanges of the angle bars 14.

A pair of vertically extending inner rear angle bars 20 respectively extend between the rear base angle bar 12 and the rear upper angle bar 19. These angle bars 20 are respectively located inwardly of the respective angle bars 14. Each angle bar 20 has a rear flange which is connected to the respective vertical flanges of angle bars 12 and 19, and a side flange which extends forwardly from the side edge of angle bar 20 which is remote from angle bar 14. The rear flanges of angle bars 20 and 14 are preferably co-planar. The side anges of the respective sets of angle bars 20 and 16 are preferably located in respective common planes which are parallel to each other and which extend in the front-to-rear or longitudinal direction of the chair.

Frame 10 also includes a pair of inner upper side angle bars 21. Each said angle bar 21 extends between a respective angle bar 16 and a respective angle bar 20. Said angle bar 21 has a horizontally extending flange and a vertical yflange depending from the inner edge of said horizontal flange. This vertical flange of angle bar 21 is connected to the side flanges of respective angle bars 16 and 20. Said horizontally extending flange of angle bar 21 is optionally and preferably in a common plane with the horizontally extending flanges of angle bars 17 and 18. Optionally and preferably, the horizontally extending flanges of angle bars 17 and 21 are mitered at their junction, as is clearly shown in the drawings.

Optionally, each pair of side angle bars 13 and 18 are connected by a reinforcing angle bar 22 which extends diagonally upwardly from the front corner of frame 10 to an intermediate point of angle bar 18. Each said angle bar 22 has an outer side flange which is connected to the respective side flanges of angle bars 13 and 18.

Frame 10 is provided with legs 23 at each corner thereof. Leg 23 is fixed to a support plate 23a which is in turn fixed to the horizontal flanges of angle bars 11 and 13, or 12 and 13, as the case may be.

Frame 10 is provided with additional angle bars suitable for supporting a back rest 24 and a seat frame 25. At each side of frame 10, an angle bar 26 extends between the respective angle bars 20 and 16 located at said side of the frame. Said angle bar 26 has a vertical side flange which is connected to the inner faces of the respective vertical flanges of angle bars 20 and 16, and has a horizontally extending flange 26a which extends inwardly from the upper edge of said vertical flange of angle bar 26u.

4 f Optionally, said angle bars 26 are slightly inclined downwardly rearwardly.

The upper front angle bar extends between the respective angle' bars 16. Said angle bar 5 has a front vertical flange which is secured to the vertical flanges of angle bar 16, and has a horizontal flange which extends rearwardly from the upper edge of the vertical flange of angle bar 5.

Preferably, the horizontal flange of angle bar 5 is in substantially the same plane as the respective horizontal flanges 26a of angle bars 26.

Vertically inclined angle bars 27 are respectively connected to the respective angle bars 26 and extend upwardly therefrom, and the upper ends of said angle bars 27 are joined by a horizontally extending angle bar 28 which is in turn secured to the rear horizontal angle bar 19.

Said angle bar 28 has a horizontal flange which is secured to the horizontal flange of angle bar 19, and also has a vertically inclined flange which extends downwardly from the front edge of the horizontal flange of angle bar 28. Each said angle bar 27 has a front flange and a side flange which extends rearwardly from the inner edge of said front flange. This side flange of angle bar 27 is connected to the side flange of angle bar 26, intermediate the ends thereof. Each said angle bar 27 extends inwardly of a respective arm angle 'bar 21. The front flange of angle bar 27 is interrupted to provide clearance for angle bar 21. The upper end of the front flange of angle `bar 27 is connected to the front flange of angle bar 28. Angle bar 27 is inclined rearwardly upwardly.

For further support of back plate 24, angle bars 29 are respectively connected to angle bar 28 outwardly of angle bars 27 and are inclined forwardly downwardly from said angle bar 28. Each said angle bar 29 has a side flange which is connected to the side flange of angle bar 18, and also has a front flange which extends inwardly from the front edge of the side flange of angle bar 29. The front flange of angle bar 29 is connected to the front flange-of angle bar 28. The front flanges of angle bars 27, 29 and 28 are. preferably in a common plane.

Plate 24 is optionally provided with a plurality of perforatons 30 which serve to lighten its weight. The upper part of said plate 24 is sized to fit against the front flanges of angle bars 27, 28 and 29 and to extend the full width of the chair. Said plate 24 is cut away to provide horizontal edges 24a which rest upon the arm angle bars 18 and 21, and vertical edges 25a which abut the vertical flanges of angle bars 21. Below angle bars 18 and 21, the width of plate 24 is reduced and it fits against the front flanges of angle bars 27. The lower edge of plate 24 is preferably spaced above the angle bars 26.

Plate 24 is secured at its upper corners to the front flanges of angle bars 29, by means of sheet metal screws 31 or the like. Optionally and preferably, plate 24 is otherwise not secured to angle bars 27 and 29. Said plate 24 is thin and somewhat flexible and resilient. It will be noted that plate 24 is only supported adjacent the periphery thereof and the central portion of plate 24 is unsupported. As a result, when a person sits in the finished and completely upholstered chair, and leans against the back thereof, plate 24 tends to be rearwardly bowed, as a result of the weight bearing thereagainst. However, plate 24 tends to return to its normal flat condition, and as a result plate 24 exerts a spring action. Said plate 24 replaces the conventional inner spring unit commonly found in the back of a conventional club chair or the like.

Said angle bars 26 'are also part of a vframe which supports the seat of the chair. A further angle bar 32 is mounted above each angle bar 26. Each said angle bar 32 comprises a vertical flange which rests upon the upper edge of the vertical flange of angle bar 26 and which is secured at its respective ends to the responsive vertical flanges of respective angle bars 16 and 27. Said angle bar; 32 also comprises an Vupper horizontal ange 33 which `extends inwardly from the upperv edge of the vertical ange of angle bar 32, and an4 optional lower horizontal flange 34 which extends inwardly from the vertical ange of angle bar 32 at -a point intermediate the ends thereof. Preferably, the vertical distance between anges 33 and 34 is only suciently great to accommodate slidingly the temporary insertion plate 35 shown in Fig. 14, and the function of which will be described in detail below. The vertical distance-between anges 34 and the respective horizontal flanges 26a of angle bars 26-is1greater so as to accommodate the vertical thickness of the Y removable seat frame 25.

As'indicated in the preceding paragraph, flange 34 is optional. In actual practice, for simplicity of construction, I prefer to omit tlange 34. In that case, the height of the vertical flange of angle 32 is reduced so that horizontal vange 33 will be spaced above the assembled seat frame 25 by an amount lonly suticiently great to accommodate slidingly the temporary insertion plate 35.

Said seat frame 25 is shown in detail in Figs. 5', 6 and 7 and is also shown in other views. The seat frame 25 comprises a fiat, rectangular bottom member 36 and a corresponding and registering flat, rectangular upper member 37. Each of these members 36 and 37 consists of laterally and longitudinally extending peripheral legs. Member 36 has a rectangularly shaped groove 38 in the upper face thereof and extending around the entire periphery thereof. Member 37 has 'a corresponding rectangular groove 39 in the lower face thereof and extending around the entire periphery thereof. These grooves 38 and 39 register when the frame is assembled. Rectangular splines 40 kare inserted in each leg of groove 39 so that said splines 40 project below the lower face of member 37, into groove 38. The chair frame 25 `also includes interlaced webbing strips 41 made of any suitable material, which may be hard rubber, and suitably interlocked in a rectangular pattern, as is clearly shown in thefdrawings. These strips 41 are flexible and are slight- 1yv stretchable and are resilient. The ends ofthe respective webs 41 are clamped between the members 36 and 37 when the frame is assembled.

Each end of said web 41 extends outwardly of a respective groove 38 and spline 40 and is frictionally clamped by spline 4t) within groove 38. This is best shown in the detail view of Fig. 7. The frame members 36 and 37 are secured together by sheet metal screws 42 which extend through appropriate holes in member37 and into appropriate registering recesses in member 36.

The assembled frame 25 represents a desirable construction because of the effective manner in which the endsY of webs 41 are clamped between the frame members 36 and 37, thereby resulting in a relatively taut but appropriately resilient structure which may be easily assembled.

The assembled frame 25 may be inserted slidably into the respective side channels between the respective anges 26a and 34, as is best shown in the detail of Fig. 13. When thus inserted, the front edge of frame 25 is optionally ush with the front flanges of angle bars 16, and-the rear edge of frame 25 is optionally approximately iiush with the front flanges of angle bars 27.

The inserted seat frame 25 is optionally and preferably held in place merely by means of two sheet metal screws 8. Each said screw 8 is inserted upwardly through a suitable opening in ange 26a and is then screwed into the respective members 36 and 37. Optionally, each screw 8 is located approximately in the central region of the respective side legs of the respective members 36 and 37.

In order to upholster frame 10, wood protecting strips are secured to frame at appropriate places so that upholstery material may be tacked to the frame. These strips may be secured to frame 10 by any suitable means,vsuch as sheet metal screws 9. One of said screws 6 9Lis shown in FigiV 9; elsewhere-said screws' 9f'aretmntted for simplicityI of illustration.

Thev wood racking slats v1'r1'clude-=slats;143afwliclxare secured to the outer faces of the vertical flanges'vof angle bars 26; forwardly of angle bars 27;` slats 4312` which are secured to the lowerfaces of thee horizontal; flanges ofangley bars 13; slat 43g which is'secured to.-the;1owler face of the horizontal flange of anglebar 11; .5191.430 whichis secured to the rear face of the vertical ange of angle bar.12; slat 43dfwhich is secured to the-'rear face of the rear flange ofangle. bar 19; ,slats 43ewhich are ysecured to therear faces of the'rear flanges-of angle bar 14 and yslat 43h'which is'securedto the bottom face of the horizontalrange ofzangle'bar 12.1.

The various vfabrics used inthe upholsteryi ofthe'chair are secured to the aforementioned slats lby means .ofza plurality of tacks 48, very much inthe-.usual manner.

`Burlap 44e is extended over the seat"fram`e25iand over anges 33, and issecuredr to slats-43u.. Saidi'bu'rlap 44a` is normally depressed somewhat between .an'ges 33 to rest upon the webbing 41, with` thei depression holding a vlling consisting lofxa lower layer'of rubberized hairor the.like.44a and an yupper vsheet 'of sponge rubber 45; The ;burlap-44c alsoextends rearwardlyfof seat frame k25 `and is secured to slat-43c. Theburlap 44C and the rubberized hairxlling 44a also `ext'endrin front of the chair,V with theY burlap 44C being secured to slat 43g. Finally, any appropriate outer` fabric 56 covers filling material 44a and 45 and isfalso tacked at front and rear `to the respective seats .43gy and "43e and at the sides to therespective slats 43a.

In order to cover the arms of the. chair, burlap 49.is extended over the angle bars 18 and 21. Saidburlap 49 also 'extends on the outerside of rthe chair frame Sand is secured to slat 43b. Said burlap 49 also extends linwardly of angle bars 21 and is secured to slat 43a. Said burlap 49 alsoextends down the front of thearm and is secured to slat 43g. On thevouter side'of the arm, burlapis connected at its rear to slat 43e. y

In order to facilitate upholstery of thechair, plate 24 is provided with a pair of vertically extending-and vertically elongated slots 7 adjacent the sideedges thereof. Each slot 7 is located just inwardly of angle bars 21 and extends downwardly from the lower edge of angle bar 21 to a point slightly Iabove the lower edge of plate 24. The burlap covering 49for each arm is extended rearwardly through a respective slot 7 and is secured to slat 43e.

The burlap 49 is covered over thetop andv two 'sides and front of the arm by rubberized hair 50, which is in turn covered by any suitable outer fabric 51. Said fabric 51 is tacked to the same slats as burlap 49";and is pulled through slot 7 in substantially the same manner. Optionally, the rubberized 'hair 50 terminates on the inner side of the arm just forwardly of slot 7. And is there tapered in the manner shown in Fig. 11.

The front face of back plate 24 is covered by `burlap 44b. This burlap 44h also extends below and rearwardly of plate 24 and is tacked to slat 43C. Burl'ap 441: also extends over angle bars 28 and 19 and istacked to slat 43d. At each side of plate 24, burlap 44b is'ex tended through slot 7 and is secured to slat 43e. A filling 60 of rubberized hair or the like is mounted against burlap 44hopposite the front face of Vplate l24, and this filling 60 also extends over the vangle bars 28 and 19. Any suitable outer fabric' 47a is provided for the back of the chair, and this outer'fabric 47a' is tacked to the same slats as the burlap 44b and is pulled through slots 7 in the same manner.

It will be apparent that the various upholstered'pob tions of the chair may also include layers of 'felt or other material, as is conventional, and such additional layers of' lling material are omitted inthe drawings for simplicity of illustration.` Optionally,-the^bottomof the chair is covered `by fabric 53 which isb'tacked'fiat it'smargins to the respective slats 43b, 43g and 43h. Optionally, also, the rear of the chair is covered with a. fabric 52 which is tacked to the respective slats 43e, 43dr and 43e.

As is conventional, the various outer fabrics 47a, 56 and 51 may be secured together at their junctions on the outside of the chair by any suitable seams 4, and

`selected seams may be inished with appropriate welding or the like, if desired. Such seams 4 are conventional and will not be described in detail.

In one instance, the usual seams 4 are omitted. This occurs at the respective junctions between the arm cover- 4ing 51 and the seat covering 56, at the front of the chair. These lines of junction are designated by the reference numeral 2. At .each of these lines of junc- .tion 2, the arm covering 49 and 51 on the one hand, .and the seat covering 44C and 56, on the other hand, are

securedtogether along the length of the junction line Y2 by means of a conventional slide fastener or the like 3.

In addition, slat 43g is interrupted at the junction lines 2. As a result, the covering 44e and 56 on the front of the chair, together with the filling therebetween, may

` be considered as a ap which may be raised by unscrewing the portion of slat 43g to which they are tacked and then by opening the respective slide fasteners 3.

The chair is completed by means of the usual seat cushion having a covering fabric 46 and-a lling 47 which is optionally a molded slab of foam rubber.

An important feature of the invention resides in the ease with which the seat frame may be removed for Vreplacement purposes.

yIn order to replace seat frame 25, the portion of slat 43g to which fabric 44C and 56 is tacked is nnscrewed Aand slide fasteners 3 are opened, inthe manner previously mentioned. The chair is inverted, to the position shown plate 35 removed, and the fabric covering restored to its It will also be apparent that the re- 25 and the temporary insertion original condition. placement seat frame 4,plate 35 may be supplied in kit form, and that the replacement of seat frame 25 may readily be accomplished 'by the average householder.

In the event of the preferable omission of flange 34. `the replacement plate 35 is inserted between said frame 25 and flange 33, and this obviously presents no difficulty when the chair is inverted in the manner shown in Fig. 14.

'It willbe apparent from the foregoing that my improved frame for chairs and the like is particularly rugged and is particularly adaptable to be made out of angle bars, extrusions or the like. As a particularly important feature of the invention, the seat and the back plate are supported by the frame, rather than being structural mem bers of the frame as is common in the conventional chair frame. Thus, in the preferred embodiment shown in the drawings, my improved frame comprises the longitudinal base members 13 and lateral -base members 11 and 12. `Pairs of rear members 14 and 20 extend upwardly from the rear base member 12 adjacent the respective ends thereof, and corresponding pairs of front members 15 and 16 extend upwardly from the front lateral base member .11 adjacent each end thereof.

Lateral upper member' 19 connects the upper ends of the rear legs to impart structural rigidity thereto, and angles 17 connect the respective front pairs of front members 15 and 16 to impart further structural rigidity. The

uppermembers -18 and 21 connect the upper ends of the '-8 front members 15 and 16 with intermediate portions of the respective rear members 14 and 20, thereby adding further structural rigidity to the frame, and also serving to define the respective arms ofthe complete chair.

Finally, to complete the basic frame, the longitudinal seat arms 26 respectively connect intermediate portions of the respective inner front members 16 with lower portions of the respective inner rear members 20, and member 5 connects the members 16. Of course, additional strengthening members such as members 22, may also be provided.

With this basic frame, to provide a seat it is merely necessary to mount the separate seat frame 25 upon the members 26, in the manner previously described. To provide a backrest, it is merely necessary to incline members 27 downwardly from member 19 to intermediate portions of the respective members 26, and of course the additional optional members 29 may also be provided.

AThe resilient back plate 24 is then merely mounted against the front of the members 27 and 29, and the inclination of these members 27 and 29 is determined in such a manner as to impart the desired angle of inclination of back plate 24 relative to seat frame 25.

It will be apparent `that apart from the inherent strength of metal such as magnesium, my improved frame provides a rigidity which cannot exist when the back and the seat must -serve as inherent structural members of the frame. In addition, of course, as previously explained, my improved construction makes possiblethe provision of a readily replaceable wcbbed seat frame, and also makes use of. the provision of the resilient back plate 24. Accordingly, springs are completely eliminated 4 in my improved chair construction, which nevertheless provides comfort fully comparable to that commonly `associated with conventional inner spring units.

While I have disclosed a preferred embodiment of my invention and have indicatedvarious changes, omissions and additions which may he made therein, it will be apparent that various other Changes, omissions and additions may be made in the invention without departing from the scope and spirit thereof.

In particular, although the specic embodiment of my invention which has been shown in the drawings and described in this specification has been in the form of an upholstered chair, it will be apparent, as previously pointed out, that my invention is also applicable to a sofa or the like. In the case of a sofa, the laterally extending elements would be appropriately widened in order to provide an increased distance between the arms. Optionally, the rear of the frame can be strengthened by additional members, and optionally the base can be strengthened -by additional members. Other appropriate optional modifications may be made in order to provide a suitable wide frame for the upholstered sofa or the like.

I claim:

l. A frame for chairs and the like, comprising front and rear lateral base members, longitudinal, base members connecting said lateral base members, rear upstanding members connecting with the rear lateral base member adjacent the respective ends thereof, means connecting the upper ends of said rear upstanding members, front upstanding members connecting with the front lateral base member adjacent the respective ends thereof, upper longitudinal members connecting the upper ends of respective front upstanding members with intermediate portions of the respective rear upstanding members, longitudinal seat members connecting intermediate portions of respective front upstanding members with lower portions of the respective rear upstanding members, a seat mounted upon said seat members, further members connecting said connecting means with intermediate portions of said seat members, and a back mounted upon said further members.

2. A frame for upholstered chairs and the like, con prising lateral base members and longitudinal base members connected to form a generally rectangular base, a pair of rear upstanding members connecting with the rear lateral base member adjacent each end thereof, means connecting the upper ends of said rear upstanding members, a pair of front upstanding members connecting with the front lateral base member adjacent each end thereof, upper longitudinal members connecting the upper ends of respective front upstanding members with intermediate portions of respective rear upstanding members, longitudinal seat members respectively connecting intermediate portions of the respective inner front upstanding members with lower portions of the respective inner rear upstanding members, a seat mounted upon said seat members, further members connecting said connecting means with intermediate portions of said seat members, and a back mounted upon said further members.

3. A frame in accordance with claim 2, said frame also including longitudinally extending channels respectively mounted upon said seat members, said seat comprising a generally rectangular frame having opposed edge portions slidably positioned within the respective channels.

4. A frame in accordance with claim 2, said back comprising a generally rectangular, flexible and resilient plate positioned against the front faces of said further members, said plate being iixed to said frame only at the uppercorners thereof and being substantially unsupported inwardly of the peripheral edge portion thereof.

5. In a frame for an upholstered chair and the like, having a back, a seat and arms, back support means comprising struts connected to the upper edge of said back and extending forwardly and downwardly therefrom, the lower ends of said struts being connected to said seats, and a ilexible and resilient plate mounted upon the front faces of said struts and extending downwardly from the upper edge of said 'back toward said seat, said plate being unsupported inwardly of the periphery thereof, said plate being secured to said frame only at the upper corners of said plate.

6. A rigid frame assembly for seating use comprising a supporting frame having a base and an upstanding back attached to the rear of said base, an auxiliary frame having a seat portion, means connecting said seat portion to the front of said base with said seat portion positioned over said base, and a back portion connecting between the top of said supporting frame back and the rear of said seat portion, and bracing means connecting between said supporting frame and said auxiliary frame substantially at the junction between said seat portion and said back portion.

7. A seating member comprising a supporting frame, said supporting frame comprising a base having a front 10 and a rear and sides, front support means extending upwardly from said front, spaced rear upstanding members extending upwardly from said rear, means connecting the upper ends of said rear upstanding members longitudinal upper members connecting the top of said front support means with intermediate portions of the respective rear upstanding members, longitudinal seat members connecting with intermediate portions of the respective front support means and extending rearwardly thereof and entirely above said base, further members extending downwardly from said connecting means and forwardly of said rear upstanding members and connesting with said seat members, and bracing means connecting between said supporting frame and the respective further members and seat members at the junction thereof, a seat mounted upon said seat members, and a back mounted upon said further members.

8. A seating member comprising a supportingv frame, a seat, and a back, said supporting frame comprising front and rear lateral base members, base longitudinal members connecting said lateral 'base members, rear upstanding members extending upwardly from the rear lateral base member adjacent the respective ends thereof, means connecting the upper ends of said rear legs, front upstanding members extending upwardly from the front lateral base member adjacent the respective ends thereof, longitudinal upper members connecting the upper ends of respective front upstanding members with intermediate portions of the respective 'rear upstanding members, longitudinal seat members connecting with intermediate portions of the respective front upstanding members and extending rearwardly thereof and above said base members, further members extending downwardly from said connecting means and forwardly of said rear upstanding members and connecting with said' seat members, and bracing means connecting between said supporting frame and the respective further members and seat members at the junction thereof, said seat being mounted upon said seat members, said back being mounted upon said further members.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 253,921 Green Feb. 2l, 1882 1,886,434 Valentine Nov. 8, 1932 2,169,197 Reed Aug. 8, 1939 2,826,243 Smilow et al Mar. 11, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 564,525 Great Britain Oct. 2, 1944

US587563A 1956-05-28 1956-05-28 Upholstered furniture Expired - Lifetime US2864438A (en)

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Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3107944A (en) * 1961-09-14 1963-10-22 Prestige Furniture Corp Seat construction for articles of furniture
US3181912A (en) * 1963-07-10 1965-05-04 Nielsen Jens Georg Martinus Frame for upholstery in pieces of sitting furniture
US3301591A (en) * 1965-03-17 1967-01-31 Edward N Jacobs Auto seat cover with support inserts
US3517963A (en) * 1968-08-20 1970-06-30 John Thomas Woods Chair insert with upholstered appearance
US4305616A (en) * 1978-10-25 1981-12-15 Societe G.M. S.A. Modular elements having shapes and contours whereby when assembled produce armchairs, sofas and the like
US4580839A (en) * 1983-07-07 1986-04-08 Louis Hatte Cane-bottomed chairs
WO1989010079A1 (en) * 1988-04-21 1989-11-02 Equatorial Bank Plc Furniture
EP0607115A1 (en) * 1993-01-15 1994-07-20 Johann Sandler Upholstered furniture
US6145924A (en) * 1997-05-13 2000-11-14 La-Z-Boy Incorporated All-linkage recliner with reinforced chair frame construction
US6409262B1 (en) 1997-05-13 2002-06-25 La-Z-Boy Incorporated All-linkage reclining chair with improved tensioning mechanism
US20020089221A1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2002-07-11 Vanderiet Douglas M. Office chair
US6491345B1 (en) 2000-09-08 2002-12-10 Mcguire Furniture Company, Inc. Seat having interchangeable inserts
WO2003099072A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2003-12-04 Tuscarora Incorporated Upholstered furniture inserts
US20090284057A1 (en) * 2008-05-14 2009-11-19 Michigan Tube Swagers & Fabricators, Inc. Stackable chair
US20100187894A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2010-07-29 The Boeing Company Composite Seat Pan Structure For A Lightweight Aircraft Seat Assembly
US8550564B1 (en) 2010-04-01 2013-10-08 The Boeing Company Composite seat pan structure for a lightweight aircraft seat assembly
TWI466647B (en) * 2011-10-11 2015-01-01
US20170055716A1 (en) * 2015-08-29 2017-03-02 Furniture of America, Inc. Bench

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US253921A (en) * 1882-02-21 Joseph geeen
US1886434A (en) * 1931-06-26 1932-11-08 Lewis S Valentine Chair seat
US2169197A (en) * 1935-12-09 1939-08-08 Reynolds Spring Co Seat structure
GB564525A (en) * 1943-04-29 1944-10-02 James Norwood Improvements in frames for upholstered chairs, settees and the like
US2826243A (en) * 1953-12-30 1958-03-11 Smilow Melvin Seating furniture of minimum parts

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US253921A (en) * 1882-02-21 Joseph geeen
US1886434A (en) * 1931-06-26 1932-11-08 Lewis S Valentine Chair seat
US2169197A (en) * 1935-12-09 1939-08-08 Reynolds Spring Co Seat structure
GB564525A (en) * 1943-04-29 1944-10-02 James Norwood Improvements in frames for upholstered chairs, settees and the like
US2826243A (en) * 1953-12-30 1958-03-11 Smilow Melvin Seating furniture of minimum parts

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3107944A (en) * 1961-09-14 1963-10-22 Prestige Furniture Corp Seat construction for articles of furniture
US3181912A (en) * 1963-07-10 1965-05-04 Nielsen Jens Georg Martinus Frame for upholstery in pieces of sitting furniture
US3301591A (en) * 1965-03-17 1967-01-31 Edward N Jacobs Auto seat cover with support inserts
US3517963A (en) * 1968-08-20 1970-06-30 John Thomas Woods Chair insert with upholstered appearance
US4305616A (en) * 1978-10-25 1981-12-15 Societe G.M. S.A. Modular elements having shapes and contours whereby when assembled produce armchairs, sofas and the like
US4580839A (en) * 1983-07-07 1986-04-08 Louis Hatte Cane-bottomed chairs
WO1989010079A1 (en) * 1988-04-21 1989-11-02 Equatorial Bank Plc Furniture
GB2236051A (en) * 1988-04-21 1991-03-27 Equatorial Bank Plc Furniture
GB2236051B (en) * 1988-04-21 1993-03-10 Equatorial Bank Plc Furniture
EP0607115A1 (en) * 1993-01-15 1994-07-20 Johann Sandler Upholstered furniture
US6145924A (en) * 1997-05-13 2000-11-14 La-Z-Boy Incorporated All-linkage recliner with reinforced chair frame construction
US6409262B1 (en) 1997-05-13 2002-06-25 La-Z-Boy Incorporated All-linkage reclining chair with improved tensioning mechanism
US20040231129A1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2004-11-25 Herman Miller, Inc. Office chair
US6955402B2 (en) * 2000-05-22 2005-10-18 Herman Miller Inc. Office chair
US20020089221A1 (en) * 2000-05-22 2002-07-11 Vanderiet Douglas M. Office chair
US6491345B1 (en) 2000-09-08 2002-12-10 Mcguire Furniture Company, Inc. Seat having interchangeable inserts
WO2003099072A1 (en) * 2002-05-28 2003-12-04 Tuscarora Incorporated Upholstered furniture inserts
US20100187894A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2010-07-29 The Boeing Company Composite Seat Pan Structure For A Lightweight Aircraft Seat Assembly
US8336965B2 (en) * 2006-12-22 2012-12-25 The Boeing Company Composite seat pan structure for a lightweight aircraft seat assembly
US20090284057A1 (en) * 2008-05-14 2009-11-19 Michigan Tube Swagers & Fabricators, Inc. Stackable chair
US8550564B1 (en) 2010-04-01 2013-10-08 The Boeing Company Composite seat pan structure for a lightweight aircraft seat assembly
TWI466647B (en) * 2011-10-11 2015-01-01
US20170055716A1 (en) * 2015-08-29 2017-03-02 Furniture of America, Inc. Bench
US10165866B2 (en) * 2015-08-29 2019-01-01 Furniture of America, Inc. Bench

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