US2864229A - Apparatus for thermally processing yarns - Google Patents

Apparatus for thermally processing yarns Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2864229A
US2864229A US663726A US66372657A US2864229A US 2864229 A US2864229 A US 2864229A US 663726 A US663726 A US 663726A US 66372657 A US66372657 A US 66372657A US 2864229 A US2864229 A US 2864229A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
yarn
tension
yarns
feed
heater
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US663726A
Inventor
Warren A Seem
Nicholas J Stoddard
Kirkland H Gibson
Harry B Miller
Richard G Hilbert
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Leesona Corp
Original Assignee
Leesona Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation
Application filed by Leesona Corp filed Critical Leesona Corp
Priority to US663726A priority Critical patent/US2864229A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2864229A publication Critical patent/US2864229A/en
First worldwide family litigation filed litigation Critical https://patents.darts-ip.com/?family=24663034&utm_source=google_patent&utm_medium=platform_link&utm_campaign=public_patent_search&patent=US2864229(A) "Global patent litigation dataset” by Darts-ip is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02JFINISHING OR DRESSING OF FILAMENTS, YARNS, THREADS, CORDS, ROPES OR THE LIKE
    • D02J1/00Modifying the structure or properties resulting from a particular structure; Modifying, retaining, or restoring the physical form or cross-sectional shape, e.g. by use of dies or squeeze rollers
    • D02J1/22Stretching or tensioning, shrinking or relaxing, e.g. by use of overfeed and underfeed apparatus, or preventing stretch
    • D02J1/225Mechanical characteristics of stretching apparatus
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02GCRIMPING OR CURLING FIBRES, FILAMENTS, THREADS, OR YARNS; YARNS OR THREADS
    • D02G1/00Producing crimped or curled fibres, filaments, yarns, or threads, giving them latent characteristics
    • D02G1/20Combinations of two or more of the above-mentioned operations or devices; After-treatments for fixing crimp or curl
    • D02G1/205After-treatments for fixing crimp or curl
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02JFINISHING OR DRESSING OF FILAMENTS, YARNS, THREADS, CORDS, ROPES OR THE LIKE
    • D02J1/00Modifying the structure or properties resulting from a particular structure; Modifying, retaining, or restoring the physical form or cross-sectional shape, e.g. by use of dies or squeeze rollers
    • D02J1/22Stretching or tensioning, shrinking or relaxing, e.g. by use of overfeed and underfeed apparatus, or preventing stretch
    • D02J1/224Selection or control of the temperature during stretching
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D02YARNS; MECHANICAL FINISHING OF YARNS OR ROPES; WARPING OR BEAMING
    • D02JFINISHING OR DRESSING OF FILAMENTS, YARNS, THREADS, CORDS, ROPES OR THE LIKE
    • D02J13/00Heating or cooling the yarn, thread, cord, rope, or the like, not specific to any one of the processes provided for in this subclass
    • D02J13/003Heating or cooling the yarn, thread, cord, rope, or the like, not specific to any one of the processes provided for in this subclass by contact with at least one stationary surface, e.g. a plate

Description

Dec. 16, 1958 w. A. SEEM ETAL 2,364,229

APPARATUS FOR THERMALLY PROCESSING YARNS Filed June 5, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 l i E--- NICHOLAS J.STODDARD KIRKLAND H. GIBSON HARRY B. MILLER RICHARD G. HILBERT BY WW ATTYS.

Dec. 16, 1958 w. A. SEEM ET AL APPARATUS FOR THERMALLY PROCESSING YARNS 4 SheetsSheet 2 Filed June 5, 1957 INVENTORS m w T T AN 1 W1 MOB m ET I ES J ASW mA m & OL A WHKWH mmAm NKHR Dec. 16, 1958 w. A. SEEM ET AL 2,854,229

APPARATUS FOR THERMALLY PROCESSING YARNS Filed June 5, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INV ENTORSZ LWARREN A. SEEM NICHOLAS J. STODDARD KIRKLAND H.GIBSON HARRY B. MILLER RICHARD G. HILBERT ATTYS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4' 0 5 2 f 4 0 7 5 5 WwHrIT\| .IN 7 9 I 5 4 M .UII h L 6 m w L i L 5 v 0 In "5 #/.m 73 I c I 2 w 7 6 W 2% J m m 4 Iv. W W MI W L L :1. L A A Y I A 6 0 0 n I 4 IUH A THIN 5 I m M 6, W

Dec. 16, 1958 w. A. SEEM ETAL APPARATUS FOR THERMALLY PROCESSING YARNS Filed June 5, 1957 INVENTORS' WARREN A. SEEM NICHOLAS J. STODDARD KIRKLAND H. GIBSON HARRY B. MILLER RICHARD G. HILBERT BY WW AT'TYS,

with and/ or without correlated heat.

United tes Patent APPARATUS FOR THERMALLY PROCESSING YARNS Warren A. Seem, Chester Springs, and Nicholas J. Stod- (lard, Berwyn, Pa., and Kirkland H. Gibson, North Kingstown, Harry B. Miller, Lakewood, and Richard G. H lbert, Smithtieid, R. 1., assignors to Universal Winding Company, Cranston, R. I., a corporation of Massachusetts Application June 5, 1957, Serial No. 663,726 17 Claims. (c1. s7 34 The present invention relates to apparatus for thermally processing continuous and discontinuous multifilament and monofilament yarns. The invention has particular utility in reprocessing torque stretch yarns and other textured yarns.

The primary object of the present invention is to provide an improved apparatus for processing yarns to produce regulated or controlled characteristics in the processed yarn. Yarns having thermoplastic qualities mani fest certain characteristics, but also possess certain latent characteristics, which are induced in the yarn by the processing of them. The latent characteristics may become activated or manifest themselves during subsequent operations or storage of the yarn or of the gray or finished fabric formed therefrom.

Yarns have been thermally processed for a number of years in discontinuous operations where the yarn is subjected to heat while it is in a package such as a spool, bobbin or the like. When thermally processing yarn in packages, the position of each yarn section in the package determines the amount of tension and lateral com-.

pression upon it. Throughout the package the amount of tension and lateral compression varies and accordingly, some sections of the yarn have different manifest characteristics than other sections, thus producing a non-uniform yarn. The non-uniform yarn, when it is fabricated, may cause streaks or other undesirable irregularities in the fabricsv The present invention provides apparatus for thermally processing yarn to uniformly control or regu late its characteristics.

More specifically, the present invention provides apparatus for thermally processing yarn having thermoplastic qualities during its continuous travel, wherein the yarn is subjected to controlled degrees of tensile stress, The apparatus also provides means for imparting a twist to the yarn following its processing.

The preferred embodiment of the present invention constitutes a down-twister which operates in a conventional manner to impart twist to the yarn as it is wound on the take-up package. The apparatus of the present invention also includes accurately regulatable tension controlling devices along with a heating element. The tension controlling devices may take various forms, and the heatting devices may be of different forms.

All of the objects of the present invention are more fully set forth hereinafter With reference to the accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a vertical transverse sectional view illustrating an apparatus made in accordance with the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view in front elevation of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view in perspective of the heating elements of the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view taken in section on line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Figs. 5, 6, and 7 are detached perspective views of selected contact plates which may be used in conjunction with the heating elements illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4;

Fig. 8 is a view in perspective of a yarn feed device of the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 9 is a vertical transverse sectional view diagrammatically illustrating the travel of the yarn through the apparatus shown in Figs. 1 and 2;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 9 in front elevation;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary view similar to Fig. 9 at a reduced scale showing a modification within the scope of the present invention;

Figs. 12 and 13 are fragmentary views similar to Figs.

1 and 2 of the modification illustrated diagrammatically The apparatus of the present invention provides means for mounting one of more supply packages from which the yarns are drawn and advanced to a take-up package where the yarn is twisted as it is wound onto the package. Tension controlling devices are mounted on the apparatus intermediate the supply and take-up packages to apply selected degrees of tension to the yarn during its travel from the supply package to the take-up package. A heater is provided to heat the yarn as it is continuously traveled from the supply to the take-up packages. Regulating devices are provided for the tension controlling devices and the heating devices to enable correlation of the tension and heat applied to the yarn to thereby provide accurate and precise control of the physical characteristics of the yarn produced by the correlated heat and tension. The invention has particular utility in practicing the methods disclosed in the copending U. S. patent applications of Stoddard and Seem, Serial Number 401,803, filed January 4, 1954, now Patent Number 2,803,108, and Serial Number 653,953, filed April 19, 1957.

Referring nowto the drawings, the apparatus illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 comprises a stationary frame 20 forming at its upper end a creel 21 for receiving one or more yarn packages. In the present instance, the creel 21 comprises a plurality of outwardly projecting pins or arms 22, projecting towards thread guide loops 23 having associated therewith disc tension controlling devices 24 and yarn rollers 25. In the present instance, the pins 22 are mounted in tiers of six in each. section of the creel 21. Underlying the guide loops 23, disc tensions 24 and rollers 25, is a guide bar 26 extending across the full width of the machine. Below the creel 21, the frame 20 mounts stop motion drop eyes 27. The drop eyes 27 operate in a conventional manner to interrupt the advance of the yarns in the associated section of the machine in the event of breakage or run-out of the yarns passing therethrough. A second guide bar 28 extends across the full width of the machine to engage the yarns when they are drawn from the side of the package and bypass the guide loops 23, disc tensions 24 and rollers 25. The creel and stop motion drop eyes are conventional elements of a down-twister and are not described in further detail.

In accordance with the present invention, a second tension controlling device is mounted on the frame 20 below the stop motion drop eyes 27. In the illustrated embodia ment of the invention, the second tension controlling device is shown at 30 and comprises a housing rotatably mounting large and small feed rolls 31 and 32 respectively. The feed rolls 31 and 32 are geared to a drive shaft 33 through a clutch (not shown) in the housing. A nip r011 34 is mounted in engagement with the feed Patented Dec. 16, 1958 roll 31 and is guided for a vertical displacement thereagainst by a guide member (see Fig. 8). The weight of the roll 34 biases it against the feed roll 31 to firmly nip the yarn against the feed roll and provide a positive drive for the yarn by the feed roll. The yarn from the stop motion drop eye 27 is guided into engagement with the feed roll 32 by a pigtail 36 mounted on the housing of the tension device 30.

Heating means for the yarn is mounted on the frame 20 below the tension controlling device 30. To this end, an insulating block 44) is mounted on the frame 20 by a channel 39 as clearly shown in Figs. 1 and 4, and extends across the full width of the machine. The channel 39 mounts a heating plate 41, which may extend across several sections of the machine or may be coextensive in width with only one section. The heating plate 41 embodies electrical heater elements 43 which are energized by electric conductors (not shown) embedded in the insulating block 4!} and connected to a source of electric current. A thermostat 44 is mounted in the heating plate 41 and connections are provided to control the supply of energy to the heating element in response to the thermostat 44. Substantial heat loss to the surrounding atmosphere from the heating plate 41 is prevented by an insulated cover element 45 surrounding the plate 41 on opposite sides of the path of travel of the yarn thereacross. If desired, the heating plate 41 may be provided with a grooved contact element 46 secured to the plate to supply heat to the yarns in the groove thereof both by conduction and by radiation. The insulating block and the insulating cover thermally isolate to a substantial degree the path of travel of the yarn from the surrounding atmospheric conditions, and the thermostat 44 operates to control the temperature of the plate 41'and element 46 with a high degree of accuracy to guard against changes in temperature due to changes in ambient temperature and the change in the rate of heat absorption by the yarn traveling thereover. Yarn separators 47 and 48 are mounted on the channel 39 above and below the heating plate 41 to direct the plurality of yarn ends passing over the plate in parallel relation and guard against inferengagement of adjacent yarn ends and consequent interference of the yarn ends with the travel of the adjacent yarn ends.

Means is provided following the heater to supply oil or other liquid to the yarn after passage over the heating zone. In the present instance, the liquid applicator or lubricator comprises a driven roll 50 mounted for rotation with a shaft 51 extending the full width of the apparatus. The shaft is journaled for rotation on the frame 20 as indicated at 52. The driven roll 50 picks up oil or other liquid from a supply 54 thereof (see Fig. 9) contained in a trough 53 mounted on the frame 20. The shaft 51 operates to drive the roll 50 at a sufficient rate to carry liquid from the supply 54 to the yarn traveling past the roll 50 in tangential engagement therewith.

In accordance with the invention, feed means or a second tension controlling device is provided which cooperates with the tension controlling device 30 to insure a proper tension on the yarn as it passes through the heating zone aiforded by the heater assembly. To this end, a feed roll assembly is mounted on the frame 20 below the liquid applicator roll 50. The assembly 60 comprises a housing rotatably mounting large and small feed rolls 61 and 62, which are geared to a drive shaft 63 through a clutch (not shown) in the housing. A nip roll 64 is mounted in engagement with the feed roll 61 to insure engagement of the yarn with the feed roll. The nip roll 64 is mounted for vertical sliding movement in a guide element 65 similar to the guide element 35, and is biased by its own weight to engage against the feed roll 61. The yarn is guided from the roll 50 into engagement with the feed roll 62 by means of a pigtail eye 66 mounted on the housing 60. The yarn leaving the feed means 60 is passed over a stop motion roller 67 which operates to disengage the clutches of the feed roll assemblies 30 and 60 when the yarn breaks.

Conventional means is provided to collect the yarn from the feed means 60 and twist it as it is wound on the take-up package. To this end, a conventional yarn twister spindle 70 is mounted on the frame 20 for rotation by 'a belt 71. A traveler ring 72 is mounted for vertical reciprocation on the frame as indicated at 73, and a conventional centering eye 74 is provided. The usual traveler 75 is engaged with the traveler ring 72 to apply the desired tension to the yarn as it is fed by the feed means 60 to the packages on the spindle 70.

Referring now to Figs. 9 and 10, the apparatus operates to thermally process several strands of yarn and twist them together while winding them on the take-up package. As shown in these figures, supply packages S are mounted on the arms 22 of the creel 21 and the yarns Y from the packages S are threaded through the loop guide 23, the disc tension 24, over the roller 25 and guide bar 26 to the stop motion drop eyes 27.

From the stop motion drop eyes, the yarns are passed in side by side relation to the collecting eye 36 on the tension controlling device 30, and are wrapped around the feed rolls 31 and 32 a plurality of times. The nip roll 34 insures that the yarns are engaged with the feed roll to be positively driven thereby.

From the feed rolls 31 and 32, the yarns are passed to the thread separator 47 which separates the individual yarns Y for passage over the heater contact element 46. The yarns are maintained in parallel relation on the heater contact element 4-6 by the second thread separator 48, and are held against the roll 50 by the pigtail eye 66 of the tension controlling device 60.

After being lubricated by the roll 5%), the yarns are wrapped several times around the feed rolls 61 and 62 of the device 66, firm engagement of the yarns with the feed roll 61 being insured by the nip roll 64. The yarns are then passed over the stop motion roller 67, through the centering eye 74, the traveler 75, and are wound up on the take-up spool T, as it is rotated by the spindle 70.

To insure the proper tension on the yarn as it passes the contact element 46, the rotary speed of the feed rolls in the tension controlling devices 30 and 60 are correlated. To this end, as shown diagrammatically in Fig. 2, the shafts 33 and 63 are driven from the main drive mechanism through gear trains indicated at 81 and 82. The gear trains 81 and 82 include suitable change gears or other variable transmission means to afford proper correlation of the speeds of the shafts 33 and 63. The spindles 70 and the traveler ring motion 73, are driven in the conventional manner, as indicated diagrammatically at 83 from the main drive 80. Likewise, the applicator roll shaft 51 is driven by the main drive mechanism, as indicated at 84.

Thus, as the yarn is drawn from the supply packages S, an initial tension is applied by the disc tension 24.

Thereafter, as the yarn passes the tension controlling device 30, a different tension may be applied to the yarn in accordance with the ratio between the speed of the shaft 33 and 63. For example, if the shaft 33 is driven faster than the shaft 63, the yarn is overfed by the feed rolls 31 and 32, and minimum tension is applied to the yarn as it is traveled over the heater plate 41. Suecessively greater tension can be applied to the yarn in this portion of its travel by decreasing the speed of the shaft 33 relative to the shaft 63, until the shaft 63 is traveling sufficiently faster than the shaft 33 to exert maximum tension on the yarns. The amount of tension on the yarn is limited by the strength of the yarn at the temperature to which the yarn is heated by the heater element 46. After the yarn passes the feed rolls 61 and 62, the tension on the yarn is that applied by the traveler 75.

In the operation of the apparatus, the heat applied to the yarn is correlated with the tension to produce the desired results. To this end, the thermostat 44 is adjusted to maintain the heater plate 41 at the temperature necessary to heat the yarn traveling over the contact element 46 to the desired temperature. The thermostat is adjusted by an adjusting screw 86. Access to the adjusting screw 86 is provided by an aperture 87 in the insulating cover 45 (see Fig. 2). A reading of the temperature of the heater plate 41 is taken from a thermometer block 88 mounted on the heater plate 41 adjacent the thermostat 44. Access to the thermometer block is provided by an aperture 89 in the insulating cover 45 surrounding the block 88 whereby a thermometer 90 may be engaged in the thermometer block 88 when adjusting the thermostat 44. It is noted that the reading given by the thermometer 90 does not indicate the temperature of the yarns passing over the contact element 46, but only indicates the temperature of the heater plate 41, but also upon the rate of travel of the yarn across the contact element 46.

The contact element 46 is formed with a relatively wide groove therein. If desired, a flush contact element 46a may be substituted for the element 46. The contact element 46a may be preferred in certain installations, or When handling specified yarns, in lieu of the relatively widely grooved element 46. When processing only one or two strands of yarn in the apparatus of the present invention, it may be preferred to use a contact element which has a narrow groove. Such an element is shown at 46b in Fig. 6. This element may be mounted in lieu of the element 46 on the heater plate 41 to provide a combined contact and radiant heat upon the yarn traveling across the heater. To increase the radiant heat upon a plurality of yarns over that provided by the grooved contact element 46, a contact element 46c may be mounted in the place of the contact element 46. The contact element 460 is provided with a plurality of grooves wherein each yarn traveling across the contact element is contained within a single groove to thereby receive full radiant heat as well as conductive heat. In the drawings, the contact element has been shown as detachably mounted on the heater plate 41, but it is within the scope of the invention to form the contact element integrally with the heater plate 41. It is preferred, however, to removably mount the contact element in order to provide for replacement after prolonged periods of use.

Various modifications are possible within the scope of the present invention. For example, if greater tension is desired in the yarn in the initial stage of its travel, a tension controlling device similar to the tension controlling devices 30 and 60 may be mounted on the frame 20. As

shown in Figs. 11, 12 and 13, the tension controlling device may be mounted intermediate the stop motion drop eyes 27 and the tension controlling device 30 as indicated at 90. The tension controlling device 90 comprises feed rolls 91 and 92 which are driven by a shaft 93 through a clutch (not shown) in the housing. A nip roller 94 is provided and is slidably mounted in the housing as indicated at 95. A suitable pigtail guide 96 may also be provided.

When modified in this manner, the yarns from the supply packages on the creel 21 need not pass through the guides 23, disc tensions 24 and rollers 25, and guide bar 26. Instead, the yarns Y may be taken from the side of the packages S as indicated in Fig. 11 and passed over a guide bar 28 directly to the stop motion drop eyes 27. In this embodiment of the invention, the tension in the yarn during the first stage of its travel through the apparatus is controlled by controlling the relative speed of the shafts 93 and 33. To accomplish this control, the shaft 93 is driven from the main drive, as indicated schematically at 99 in Fig. 13 by a gear train including change gears or other variable transmission means. Thus, by regulating the relative speeds of the shafts 93. 33, and 63, the tension on the yarn during its travel from the feed rolls 91 and 92 to the feed rolls 61 and 62, may be accurately controlled to provide two degrees of tension.

6 Other modifications of the apparatus are possible within the scope of the invention. For example, the heaters need not take the form of heater plates as shown in Figs. 3 to 7, but may be embodied in the form of radiant heater devices wherein the yarn is heated solely by radiant heat. The radiant heater may be in the form shown in Figs. 14

and 15 which is similar to the heater described and claimed in the copending application of Nicholas J. Stoddard and Warren A. Seem, Serial Number 503,672, Heating Device for Use in Processing Textile Yarns.

There is a single radiant heating device 100 for each section of the machine. The device 100 is electrically heated, current being conducted to it through two fixed horizontal bus bars 102 and 103 which take the form of angle irons mounted on the frame 20 of the machine by insulating mounting means (not shown). The device 100 is mounted on the machine by the bus bars and screws 104 and 105. The device comprises a cylindrical casing 106 which is supported by the screws 104 and and insulating bushings 107 and 108 respectively. A tube 111 of small diameter and bore is mounted within the cylindrical casing 106 to define an elongated restricted passage or zone through which the yarn is passed. The tube is exteriorly insulated and is surrounded by a coil 112 of resistance wire. The interior of the casing 106 contains electric and thermal insulation which may be of fiberglass or insulating granules. At the top and the bottom of the casing 106, covers 113 and 114 are provided which are insulated as indicated at 115 and 116 respectively and which mount the central tube 111 coaxially within the housing 106. Wear-resisting bushings 117 and 118 are fitted over the opposite ends of the tube 111 which prevents cutting of the tube by the yarn passing through it.

The opposite ends of the heating coil 112 are electrically connected to the screws 104 and 105 and thereby to the bus bars 102 and 103 by means of leads, 121 and 122. If desired, one of the leads may include a switch (not shown) for disconnecting the coil 112 from the bus bars. It is noted that the winding pitch of the heating coil increases progressively from the opposite ends of the tube progressively toward the center. As a result, a greater amount of electrical energy is provided at the entrant and exit ends of the tube, thereby making possible the maintenance of a desired uniform temperature throughout the tube and the use of a much shorter tube than otherwise would be required. A thermostatic sensing means 124 is mounted in the heating device 100 to control the voltage applied to the coil 112 to uniformly heat the yarn passing through the tube 111 to the desired temperature.

It is understood that the illustrated apparatus is de- I signed to be adjusted for processing yarn under any prescribed conditions, but in the event that it is desired to operate the apparatus under only a single set of conditions, many of the control elements may be omitted or by-passed.

While particular embodiments of the present invention have been herein illustrated and described, it is not intended to limit the invention to such disclosure, but changes and modifications may be made therein and thereto within the scope of the following claims.

We claim:

1. Apparatus for processing yarns comprising a creel for mounting at least one supply package of said yarn, a twister spindle, a traveler ring, a traveler, and feed means to ravel yarn from said supply package and feed the same at a preselected speed to the traveler and takeup package, spaced guide means intermediate said creel and said twister spindle to direct the yarn in a generally straight-line path during at least a portion of its travel, and heater means intermediate said spaced guide means operable to uniformly heat the yarn to a selected temperature during said portion of its travel.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said spaced guide means are mounted intermediate said creel and said feed means.

3. Apparatus according to claim 2 including tension controlling means intermediate said creel and said feed means to apply a selected degree of tension to the yarn drawn from said supply package during a first portion of its travel from said supply package to said feed means.

4. Apparatus according to claim 3 including a second tension controlling means intermediate said first tension controlling means and said heater means to apply a second selected degree of tension to the yarn during a second portion of its travel from said supply package to said feed means and including said portion of its travel between said spaced guide means.

5. Apparatus according to claim 3 wherein said tension controlling means comprises at least one feed roller and means to drive said roller at a speed relative to the speed of the feed means for the yarn to produce the desired degree of tension.

6. Apparatus according to claim 4 wherein both said first and said second tension controlling means comprise a feed roller for frictionally engaging the traveling yarn and drive means, the drive means of said first tension controlling means driving its roller at a predetermined peripheral speed relative to the roller of said tension controlling means, and the drive means of said second tension controlling means driving its roller at predetermined peripheral speed relative to the feed means.

7. Apparatus according to claim 5 wherein said tension controlling means includes a nip roller mounted'adjacent said feed roller for engagement therewith.

8. Apparatus according to claim 7 wherein said nip roller is mounted above said feed roller for free rotation therewith and is slidable vertical-1y under its weight into engagement with said feed roller.

9. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said heater means comprises a heated contact plate for engaging the yarn.

10. Apparatus according to claim 9 wherein said heater plate is formed with a flush arcuately convex surface for engaging the yarn.

11. Apparatus according to claim 9' wherein said heater plate is formed with a grooved arcuately convex surface for receiving the yarn.

12. Apparatus according to claimll wherein said plate comprises a series of grooves disposed in spaced parallel relation across said plate.

13. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said heater comprises a radiant heater having an elongated heated tube for passing the yarn and means to guide the yarn through said tube out of contact therewith.

14. Apparatus for processing yarns comprising a frame, a creel at the upper portion of said frame for mounting a plurality of supply packages of said yarn, a plurality of twister spindles, traveler rings, travelers, and feed means at the bottom of said frame to ravel yarn from said supply packages and feed the same at a preselected speed to the traveler and on a take-up package, a like number of spaced guide means mounted on said frame intermediate said creel and said twister spindles to direct the yarns in generally straight-line paths during a portion of their travel, and heater means intermediate each of said spaced guide means operable to uniformly heat the yarns to a selected temperature during said portion of its travel.

15. Apparatus according to claim 14 wherein said yarn twister spindles, traveler rings, and travelers are mounted at spaced intervals transversely of said frame, and wherein further said heater means comprises a heater plate mounted transversely of said frame to overlie said plurality of spindles, said heater plate including a contact element for each twister spindle positioned on said plate in generally vertical alignment with said spindle to heat the yarn traveling to the take-up package thereon.

16. Apparatus according to claim 15 including a thermostat mounted on said heater plate operable to control the temperature thereof for the full width of said plate.

17. Apparatus according to claim 16 including a thermometer block mounted on said heater plate adjacent said thermostat.

No references cited.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE Certificate Patent No. 2,864,229 Patented December 16, 1958 Warren A. Seem, Nicholas J. Stoddard, Kirkland H. Gibson, Harry B. Miller, Richard G. Hilbert Application having been made jointly by Warren A. Seem, Nicholas J. Stoddard, Kirkland H. Gibson, Harry B. Miller and Richard G. Hilbert, the inventors named in the patent above identified, and Leesona Corporation, Warwick, Rhode Island, a corporation of Massachusetts, the assignee, for the issuance of a certificate under the provisions of Title 35, Section 256 of the United States Code, deleting the names of the said Kirkland H. Gibson, Harry B. Miller and Richard G. Hilbert from the patent as joint inventors, and a showing and proof of facts satisfying the requirements of the said section having been submitted, it is this 2nd day of June 1964:, certified that the names of the said Kirkland H. Gibson, Harry B. Miller and Richard G. Hilbert are hereby deleted from ghe dstld patent as joint inventors with the said Warren A. Seem and Nicholas J.

to ard.

EDWIN L. REYNOLDS, First Assistant Commissioner 0 f Patents.

Disclaimer 2,864,229.-Warren A. Seem, Chester Springs, and Nicholas J. Stoddard,

' Bei'wyn, Pm, and Kirkland H. Gibson, North Kingstown, H arry B.

Miller, Lakewood, and Richard G. Hilbert, Smithfield, RI. APPA- RATUS FOR THERMALLY PROCESSING YARNS. Patent dated Dec. 16, 1958.

Disclaimer filed Sept. 25, 1963, by the assignee, Leesona Corporation.

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 14 of said patent.

[Oyfioial Gazette December 3, 1963.]

US663726A 1957-06-05 1957-06-05 Apparatus for thermally processing yarns Expired - Lifetime US2864229A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US663726A US2864229A (en) 1957-06-05 1957-06-05 Apparatus for thermally processing yarns

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US663726A US2864229A (en) 1957-06-05 1957-06-05 Apparatus for thermally processing yarns
DE1958U0002074 DE1795323U (en) 1957-06-05 1958-01-24 Apparatus for the treatment of yarns with thermoplastic properties.
GB648758A GB890332A (en) 1957-06-05 1958-02-28 Apparatus for thermally processing yarns having thermoplastic qualities

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2864229A true US2864229A (en) 1958-12-16

Family

ID=24663034

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US663726A Expired - Lifetime US2864229A (en) 1957-06-05 1957-06-05 Apparatus for thermally processing yarns

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US2864229A (en)
DE (1) DE1795323U (en)
GB (1) GB890332A (en)

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2977746A (en) * 1958-06-09 1961-04-04 Deering Milliken Res Corp Apparatus for processing thermoplastic yarns
US3041814A (en) * 1960-07-07 1962-07-03 Heberlein Patent Corp Apparatus for producing crimped yarn
US3041813A (en) * 1959-07-09 1962-07-03 Heberlein Patent Corp Method and apparatus for producing crimped synthetic yarn
US3071838A (en) * 1958-08-19 1963-01-08 Scragg & Sons Apparatus for heat treating thermoplastic yarns
US3094761A (en) * 1961-03-28 1963-06-25 Leesona Corp Yarn guiding device
US3165881A (en) * 1960-02-03 1965-01-19 Moncuit Yves De Production of high bulk yarns
US3230347A (en) * 1962-06-15 1966-01-18 Beck Rudolf Electric heating appliances
US3238592A (en) * 1964-04-15 1966-03-08 Chemcell 1963 Ltd Device for heating and stretching yarn
US3336738A (en) * 1962-12-03 1967-08-22 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Apparatus for false twist-crimping of yarn
US3343364A (en) * 1965-01-26 1967-09-26 Monsanto Co Manufacture of textured filament yarns
US3367006A (en) * 1964-05-27 1968-02-06 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Heating apparatus
US3382656A (en) * 1966-01-03 1968-05-14 Chavanoz Moulinage Retorderie False-twist frames and method for texturing synthetic filaments
US3396524A (en) * 1966-03-01 1968-08-13 Scragg & Sons Yarn heating means in textile apparatus
US3421192A (en) * 1966-03-01 1969-01-14 Scragg & Sons Heater for textile apparatus
DE1287250B (en) * 1959-07-15 1969-01-16 Monsanto Co A device for stretching and twisting of filament yarn material made of orientable
DE1288733B (en) * 1964-10-01 1969-02-06 Celanese Corp Apparatus for applying a suture Praeparationsfluessigkeit
US3533146A (en) * 1967-08-31 1970-10-13 Heberlein Patent Corp Heating system for yarns and threads
US3723709A (en) * 1971-10-21 1973-03-27 Dow Badische Co Strand heating device

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
None *

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2977746A (en) * 1958-06-09 1961-04-04 Deering Milliken Res Corp Apparatus for processing thermoplastic yarns
US3071838A (en) * 1958-08-19 1963-01-08 Scragg & Sons Apparatus for heat treating thermoplastic yarns
US3041813A (en) * 1959-07-09 1962-07-03 Heberlein Patent Corp Method and apparatus for producing crimped synthetic yarn
DE1287250B (en) * 1959-07-15 1969-01-16 Monsanto Co A device for stretching and twisting of filament yarn material made of orientable
US3165881A (en) * 1960-02-03 1965-01-19 Moncuit Yves De Production of high bulk yarns
US3041814A (en) * 1960-07-07 1962-07-03 Heberlein Patent Corp Apparatus for producing crimped yarn
US3094761A (en) * 1961-03-28 1963-06-25 Leesona Corp Yarn guiding device
US3230347A (en) * 1962-06-15 1966-01-18 Beck Rudolf Electric heating appliances
US3336738A (en) * 1962-12-03 1967-08-22 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Apparatus for false twist-crimping of yarn
US3238592A (en) * 1964-04-15 1966-03-08 Chemcell 1963 Ltd Device for heating and stretching yarn
US3367006A (en) * 1964-05-27 1968-02-06 Klinger Mfg Co Ltd Heating apparatus
DE1288733B (en) * 1964-10-01 1969-02-06 Celanese Corp Apparatus for applying a suture Praeparationsfluessigkeit
US3343364A (en) * 1965-01-26 1967-09-26 Monsanto Co Manufacture of textured filament yarns
US3382656A (en) * 1966-01-03 1968-05-14 Chavanoz Moulinage Retorderie False-twist frames and method for texturing synthetic filaments
US3421192A (en) * 1966-03-01 1969-01-14 Scragg & Sons Heater for textile apparatus
US3396524A (en) * 1966-03-01 1968-08-13 Scragg & Sons Yarn heating means in textile apparatus
US3533146A (en) * 1967-08-31 1970-10-13 Heberlein Patent Corp Heating system for yarns and threads
US3723709A (en) * 1971-10-21 1973-03-27 Dow Badische Co Strand heating device

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
DE1795323U (en) 1959-09-10
GB890332A (en) 1962-02-28

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3230598A (en) Apparatus for crimping of natural and synthetic textile materials
US2455173A (en) Yarn treating apparatus
US2682144A (en) Control method and means
US3160923A (en) Crimping apparatus
US2881504A (en) Process for crimping textile threads
CN100587140C (en) Method of assuring yarn quality and yarn processing machine
US2758358A (en) Filament crimping apparatus
US2343535A (en) Mechanism for twisting together a plurality of strands
US3124924A (en) System and apparatus for making elastic yarn
US2734251A (en) Crimping apparatus
US2115737A (en) Process and apparatus for measuring running webs
US3041814A (en) Apparatus for producing crimped yarn
US3077724A (en) Apparatus for processing yarns
US2974391A (en) Process and apparatus for making crimped filaments
US3316699A (en) Apparatus for twisting yarn
US3092953A (en) Method and apparatus for forming yarn
US3083924A (en) Yarn furnishing device
US2936567A (en) Twisting of textile filaments
US5342000A (en) Strand braking apparatus
US2950067A (en) Winding machine
US3098347A (en) Elastic yarn and method of making the same
US3325985A (en) Draw-twisting method and yarn tension adjusting apparatus
US3165881A (en) Production of high bulk yarns
RU2093621C1 (en) Method for manufacture of fused stitching thread (variants) and method for manufacture of twist thread
US3404525A (en) Low-torque multifilament compact yarn