US2858584A - Spline for hanging tile - Google Patents

Spline for hanging tile Download PDF

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Publication number
US2858584A
US2858584A US466635A US46663554A US2858584A US 2858584 A US2858584 A US 2858584A US 466635 A US466635 A US 466635A US 46663554 A US46663554 A US 46663554A US 2858584 A US2858584 A US 2858584A
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tile
spline
fastener
kerf
staple
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US466635A
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Eugene F Gaines
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Eugene F Gaines
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04FFINISHING WORK ON BUILDINGS, e.g. STAIRS, FLOORS
    • E04F13/00Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings
    • E04F13/07Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor
    • E04F13/08Coverings or linings, e.g. for walls or ceilings composed of covering or lining elements; Sub-structures therefor; Fastening means therefor composed of a plurality of similar covering or lining elements
    • E04F13/0801Separate fastening elements
    • E04F13/0803Separate fastening elements with load-supporting elongated furring elements between wall and covering elements

Description

Nov. 4, 1958 E. F. GAlNEs 2,858,584

SPLINE FOR HANGING TILE Filed Nov. 5, 1954 United States Patent O M SPLINE FOR HANGING TILE Eugene F. Gaines, Joplin, Mo.

Application November 3, 1954, Serial No. 466,635

2 Claims. (Cl. 20-92) This invention relates generally to the hanging of tile, and more particularly, to the installation of edgekerfed tile by means of splines.

My copending application Serial No. 296,919, led Iuly 2, 1952 discloses a method whereby tile are conveniently and expeditiously secured to a pre-existing ceiling structure in edge-abutting relationship with one another, but without exposing the fastening devices or requiring fancy congurations of the tile edges. For various reasons, the knownmethods of hanging tile were not satisfactory; and accordingly, my earlier application contemplates the use of tile having a low-cost saw kerf extending along its edges. The kerfs are designed to receive splines, which splines, in turn, are adapted to be penetrated by fasteners. The fasteners are driven utilizing a device of the type disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 296,920, led July 2, 1952, now Patent No. 2,765,466, this device having a spacer lip which extends about and holds the spline outwardly from the supporting structure as the fastener is driven through the spline and into the structure.

This method is particularly adopted for installation of so-called acoustical tile which is formed of somewhat soft fibrous material. Usually the supporting structure comprises a series of wood furring strips secured in such spaced parallel relationship that one tile may bridge the space therebetween, which is to say that the center-tocenter spacing of the furring strips corresponds to the length or width of a tile. In installing a tile ceiling, a spline lis fitted within the kerf at one edge of a tile and the tile is positioned with this edge extending coextensively along one of the furring strips. Fasteners are then driven through the spline and into the overlying furring strip, the fasteners being located immediately adjacent the edge of the tile, preferably at intervals of from three to four inches therealong. A second spline within the kerf at the opposite edge is similarly secured to the next furring strip, and a second tile is then positioned in edgeabutting relationship with the rst tile, the kerf in the second tile receiving the projecting portion of the second spline. The tile may also have kerfs for receiving splines extending at right angles, to the attached splines, such additional splines being provided for leveling purposes.

It is preferably to employ a staple fastener, the base of which extends parallel with and adjacent the edge of the tile and the legs of which may be clinched or spread, as they are embedded, particularly when the supporting structure is of a type having low nail-holding strength, as in the case of gypsum board. When the tile is formed of soft material, two panels may be readily pushed into abutting relationship with oneanother, the legs of the staples becoming indented within the edge portion of the tile that lies above the spline. In the case of tile whose physical properties are such as to prevent easy indentation but which are, nonetheless, penetratable by the point of the fastener, the fastener is driven through the splines at an angle so as to toe nail through the substance of the tile above the kerf, thereby removing the legs of 2,858,584 Patented Nov. 4, 1958 ICC the fastener from the region where they would interfere with movement of the next adjacent tile into edgewise contiguity.

This method of hanging tile necessarily requires a spline of particular characteristics, which are not attainable in splines of the type heretofore proposed. For example, Wood strips are not satisfactory, because they tend to split, especially when a staple fastener is utilized. Steel strips are generally unsatisfactory because they must be prepared with fastener openings and because such openings must then be aligned with the supporting structure, and the fastener driving device must be carefully positioned with respect to the openings. Accordingly, my previous application proposes the use of flat strips of vulcanized ber or other grainless material. While they are somewhat satisfactory, there are certain disadvantages. It will be understood that fastener driving devices of the type customarily employed for this purpose are springactuated or power driven. In other words, the fastener is driven with predetermined force, as by-a compressed spring. Also, the base or head of the fastener should be 'driven up against the spline, yet in some instances, the force of the fastener driving implement may be such as to embed the head of the fastener Within the spline to an extent such as to weaken the fastening connection. A thick spline, even when formed of vulcanized ber, may present excessive resistance to penetration and require a wide kerf. Wide kerfs are undesirable because they weaken the margins of the tile. In addition, a spline formed from a at smooth-faced strip should have a close t with the kerf so as not to be readily displaced preparatory to and during the driving of the fasteners, yet such a close t interferes with insertion of the spline.

Accordingly, it is an object of the invention to provide an improved spline for use in the above-described method of hanging tile. Among the more specific objects of the I invention may be noted the provision of a spline having 'uniform low resistance topenetration, yet which resists indentation by the head of the fastener; the provision of a spline that is easily inserted within a kerf, yet which resists displacement therefrom; the provision of a spline of the character described having a reasonably secure t within a kerf which is approximately three sixty-fourths inch in width, it being understood that saw kerfs of lesser size are generally impractical; the provision of a spline such as described which is readily cut to size;` and the provision of a spline which is relatively stiff, yet lightweight.

In the attainment of these objectives, briefly, I contemplate the use of a spline which is formed of thin, soft metal, such as aluminum. In particular, a strip of aluminum which may be approximately 0.01 inch thick is formed with hemmed edges, the hems being left open so as to catch within the material of the tile after insertion of the spline. The open hems are of a thickness corresponding generally to the width of the kerf, and the strip may otherwise have ribs of hollow arcuate deformation extending continuously in the longitudinal direction, such ribs having a stiifening effect and also serving to increase the effective thickness of the spline. Necessarily, the metal strip from which the spline is formed should also be reasonably rigid in the transverse direction and should be suiciently thick to prevent puncture of the head of the fastener while permitting puncture by the legs of a staple. It may be noted that such a thin metal spline offers little resistance to passage of the fastener after initial puncture and that such puncture is usually a predetermined quantity which can be readily controlled. V

Other features of the invention will be in part apparent from and in part pointed out in the following detail description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is an oblique exploded view illustrating a part of a tile and a cooperating spline embodying features of this invention;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section showing the spline situated within the kerf of a tile and secured against an overlying furring strip;

Fig. 3 is a section taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a section taken generally on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2 but showing a second tile positioned in edgewise continuity with the first tile;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged view similar to that of Fig. 3, but showing a spread staple and part of the stapler therefor;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged view similar to that of Fig. 3, but showing a clinched staple and part of a stapler therefor; and

Fig. 7 is a view similar to that of Fig. 2, but illustrating an alternative method of securing the spline.

Referring now to the drawings, there is shown a tile 1, it being understood that the invention is particularly adapted to the hanging of so-called acoustical tile. Such acoustical tile is generally formed 'from soft fibrous material as a panel measuring one or two feet on the side and being from one-half to one inch thick. Although the invention permits hanging of such tile upon many types of pre-existing structures, such as gypsum board and other material of low nail-holding power, a frequent practice is to provide furring strips 3 which are secured in parallel relationship to one another. The furring strips are spaced apart an amount such that the center-tocenter distance corresponds to the length or width of a tile. For example, where the tile is two feet square, the center-to-center spacing of the furring strips would be two feet. Each tile is formed with a kerf 5 extending along two opposite edges and preferably along all four edges, the kerf being a conventional saw cut of about three sixty-fourths inch width. The depth or extent to which the kerf extends into the tile may be one-half inch.

These tile are used with a spline 7, which is of a width slightly less than one inch, so as to tit within the kerf of two abutting tile. The spline 7 is formed from a strip of aluminum or other soft but rigid metal that may be penetrated by a staple. For example, the aluminum alloy 3F (Aluminum Company of America designation) is satisfactory in a thickness of about 0.01 inch. The margins of the strip are folded over at 9 to tiare inwardly as an open hem, the maximum thickness of which is approximately one-sixteenth inch. As such, the margins of the spline tit snugly within the kerf of the tile, and the inwardly directed edges 11 catch within the kerf to hold the spline against displacement. The spline is easily inserted since it is otherwise thin in comparison with the width of the kerf.

In addition, it may be desirable to provide hollow generally arcuate ribs 13 extending continuously the length of the spline. Such ribs increase the resistance of the spline to longitudinal bending and also serve to provide a good tit within the kerf. Inasrnuch as the spline is of soft metal and is relatively thin, the resistance to puncture is relatively low and once punctured, there is substantially no resistance to further passage of the fastener until the head thereof engages the spline.

The invention contemplates, in particular, that a staple fastener 15 will be employed to secure the spline to the furring strip 3. The device F for driving the fastener has a spring or power unit, which is actuated by manipulation of a handle H, whereupon a trip is released so that an anvil A drives the staple through the spline with predetermined force. Such mechanism is disclosed in U. S. Patent No. 2,137,642 granted November 22, 1930, to Cavanagh.

While the staple 15y is driven, the outwardly projecting portion of the spline (Fig. 2) is supported by a metal lip L, which extends between the spline and supporting structure 3. This aspect of the invention is more particularly described in my copending application Serial No. 296,920, iled July 2, 1952, but briefly, the lip L is formed with walls which guide the legs 17 of the staple as they pass from the spline to the furring strip 3. In Fig. 3, the legs 17 of the staple remain straight as they are driven into the supporting structure 3, this being satisfactory when the structure is wood. Should the structure be relatively weak, however, the stapler may be designed to detiect the legs of the staple out of parallelism, thereby to provide greater holding strength. For example, Fig. 5 illustrates how the lip L1 of the stapler is formed with guide walls that spread the legs 117 of a staple; whereas Fig. 6 illustrates a lip L2 that clinches the staple legs 217. In this respect, the thin soft metal spline of this invention is superior to the thicker at splines heretofore proposed.

As indicated, the legs 17 of the fastener extend closely adjacent the edge 19 of the tile, and the base or head 21 of the fastener is driven against the lower face of the spline. For the latter reason, a metal spline is especially desirable, when backed by a metal lip L, inasmuch as the metal resists weakening by indentation of the fastener head 21.

In practice, a spline is inserted with the kerf at one edge of the tile (the infolded edges 11 being below the body of the spline) and this edge of the tile is aligned with the nailable supporting structure 3. Fasteners are then driven along this edge at intervals of about four inches, and a second tile 23 is then positioned up against the edge 19 of the first tile as indicated in Figs. 3 and 4, the second tile would normally have a spline at its opposite edge which would be similarly secured.

In most instances, the material from which the tile is formed is sufficiently soft to permit indentation by the legs 17 of the fastener in the regions between the supporting structure 3 and spline 7, thus assuring an abutting contiguous tit beneath the spline and concealment of the fastener. In some instances, however, the tile may be of a somewhat harder material but which permits penetration by the legs of the fastener. In that event, the staple may be driven obliquely, as illustrated in Fig. 7, so as to toe nail through that portion of the tile lying above the spline 7. As such, the legs 317 of the staple are clear of the edge of the tile, thereby permitting movement of the next tile into abutting relationship with the first tile. In either instance, the head 21 of the fastener is accommodated in the kerf of the second tile 23 which is only partly filled by the thin metal spline.

Although it is only necessary to secure the splines at two edges of a tile, splines may be inserted in the other two edges for the purpose of leveling the several tile with one another. Such level splines may be rather short and are readily cut from a long spline.

From the foregoing description, it is apparent that those skilled in the art will understand the structure, function and mode of operation of the invention herein disclosed, and appreciate the advantages thereof. Although several embodiments have been disclosed in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited thereto, but the drawings and description thereof are to be understood as being merely illustrative. It is realized that many modifications and variations will present themselves to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of this invention or the scope thereof as set forth in the appended claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

l. A spline for securing a single-kerfed tile to an overlying structure by means of a conventional staple fastener, comprising an elongate strip of thin, resilient nailable metal, the gauge of which is such as to permit puncture by a conventional staple, the margins of said strip being infolded to form open hems, the infolded edges of the herns being widely spaced from one another so as to leave a single-ply open gap in the center portion through which the fastener may be driven, said open gap being of a width at least as great as the hem width, said open hems aring outwardly in the inward direction to have a spring gripping action when inserted in the kerf of a tile.

2. A spline for securing a single-kerfed tile to an overlying structure by means of a conventional staple fastener, comprising an elongate strip of nailable metal, the gauge of which is such as to permit puncture by a conventional staple, the margins of said strip being infolded to form open hems, but terminating short of one another so as to leave a single-ply gap in the center portion through which the fastener may be driven, said open hems flaring outwardly in the inward direction to have a spring gripping action when inserted in the kerf of a tile, and hollow generally arcuate rib-like projections extending on opposite sides of the center line and in inwardly spaced relationship from the edges of the strip and on that side of the strip opposite from that on which the inturned margins lie.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Publication: The Magazine of Building Architectural Forum, page 177, published Feb. 1924 by Time, Inc.

US466635A 1954-11-03 1954-11-03 Spline for hanging tile Expired - Lifetime US2858584A (en)

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Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2993240A (en) * 1955-01-03 1961-07-25 Airson Co Inc Ceiling tile mounting construction
US2993308A (en) * 1958-09-08 1961-07-25 Donn Prod Inc Spline for connecting ceiling tile
US3059293A (en) * 1961-03-28 1962-10-23 Carl L Eddleblute Truss connection
US3156022A (en) * 1960-03-18 1964-11-10 Schlegel Werner Corner joint for wooden frame
US5553434A (en) * 1994-08-31 1996-09-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Chugiken Plate for connecting elongated plates
US5992110A (en) * 1995-09-07 1999-11-30 Clear; Theodore E. Wall panels and joint structures
US20050076611A1 (en) * 2003-10-14 2005-04-14 Crawford Richards H. Insulated sheathing panels
US20060174577A1 (en) * 2005-01-27 2006-08-10 O'neil John P Hidden stiffening panel connector and connecting method
US20100107524A1 (en) * 2008-11-06 2010-05-06 Codel Entry Systems, Corp Sealing spline connector
US8161697B1 (en) * 2007-06-27 2012-04-24 Bamcore LLC Studless load bearing panel wall system
US20130042564A1 (en) * 2010-02-04 2013-02-21 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8857126B2 (en) 2011-08-15 2014-10-14 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8898988B2 (en) 2010-01-12 2014-12-02 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8959866B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2015-02-24 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a glued tongue
US9027306B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2015-05-12 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9068360B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2015-06-30 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US9238917B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2016-01-19 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9284737B2 (en) 2011-07-19 2016-03-15 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9366036B2 (en) 2012-11-22 2016-06-14 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9382716B2 (en) 2006-07-11 2016-07-05 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US9458634B2 (en) 2014-05-14 2016-10-04 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panel with a mechanical locking system
US9725912B2 (en) 2011-07-11 2017-08-08 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US10017948B2 (en) 2013-06-27 2018-07-10 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panel with a mechanical locking system
US10138636B2 (en) 2014-11-27 2018-11-27 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US10240348B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2019-03-26 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible tongue
US10246883B2 (en) 2014-05-14 2019-04-02 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panel with a mechanical locking system

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US185883A (en) * 1877-01-02 Improvement in battening for roofs
GB189811345A (en) * 1898-05-18 1899-03-25 Alice Maria Tasman Improvements in Packing Cases.
US623562A (en) * 1899-04-25 Parquetry
US850275A (en) * 1906-10-27 1907-04-16 George B Staples Tiling.
US963456A (en) * 1909-07-07 1910-07-05 George H Metzer Construction of tiled walls, ceilings, and the like.
US1320303A (en) * 1919-10-28 Edward b
GB179840A (en) * 1921-06-03 1922-05-18 Conrad Esdaile Tyrrell Lewis Improvements in wooden ships and the like
US1889138A (en) * 1930-05-20 1932-11-29 Concrete Wood Floor Clip Co In Flooring
US1951711A (en) * 1932-05-19 1934-03-20 United States Gypsum Co Reenforcing and fastening means for tile
US1984028A (en) * 1932-05-03 1934-12-11 F E Berry Jr & Co Inc Wall or ceiling construction
US2340911A (en) * 1939-10-18 1944-02-08 Leon F Urbain Means for assembling construction units
US2389573A (en) * 1941-10-27 1945-11-20 United States Gypsum Co Building structure

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US185883A (en) * 1877-01-02 Improvement in battening for roofs
US623562A (en) * 1899-04-25 Parquetry
US1320303A (en) * 1919-10-28 Edward b
GB189811345A (en) * 1898-05-18 1899-03-25 Alice Maria Tasman Improvements in Packing Cases.
US850275A (en) * 1906-10-27 1907-04-16 George B Staples Tiling.
US963456A (en) * 1909-07-07 1910-07-05 George H Metzer Construction of tiled walls, ceilings, and the like.
GB179840A (en) * 1921-06-03 1922-05-18 Conrad Esdaile Tyrrell Lewis Improvements in wooden ships and the like
US1889138A (en) * 1930-05-20 1932-11-29 Concrete Wood Floor Clip Co In Flooring
US1984028A (en) * 1932-05-03 1934-12-11 F E Berry Jr & Co Inc Wall or ceiling construction
US1951711A (en) * 1932-05-19 1934-03-20 United States Gypsum Co Reenforcing and fastening means for tile
US2340911A (en) * 1939-10-18 1944-02-08 Leon F Urbain Means for assembling construction units
US2389573A (en) * 1941-10-27 1945-11-20 United States Gypsum Co Building structure

Cited By (43)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2993240A (en) * 1955-01-03 1961-07-25 Airson Co Inc Ceiling tile mounting construction
US2993308A (en) * 1958-09-08 1961-07-25 Donn Prod Inc Spline for connecting ceiling tile
US3156022A (en) * 1960-03-18 1964-11-10 Schlegel Werner Corner joint for wooden frame
US3059293A (en) * 1961-03-28 1962-10-23 Carl L Eddleblute Truss connection
US5553434A (en) * 1994-08-31 1996-09-10 Kabushiki Kaisha Chugiken Plate for connecting elongated plates
US6065259A (en) * 1995-09-07 2000-05-23 Clear Family Limited Partnership Wall panels and joint structures
US5992110A (en) * 1995-09-07 1999-11-30 Clear; Theodore E. Wall panels and joint structures
US20050076611A1 (en) * 2003-10-14 2005-04-14 Crawford Richards H. Insulated sheathing panels
US10240348B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2019-03-26 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible tongue
US9347469B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2016-05-24 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9238917B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2016-01-19 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9376821B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2016-06-28 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US20060174577A1 (en) * 2005-01-27 2006-08-10 O'neil John P Hidden stiffening panel connector and connecting method
US9359774B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2016-06-07 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US9068360B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2015-06-30 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US10113319B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2018-10-30 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US9803375B2 (en) 2005-03-30 2017-10-31 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US9027306B2 (en) 2005-05-20 2015-05-12 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9382716B2 (en) 2006-07-11 2016-07-05 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a flexible bristle tongue
US8161697B1 (en) * 2007-06-27 2012-04-24 Bamcore LLC Studless load bearing panel wall system
US20100107524A1 (en) * 2008-11-06 2010-05-06 Codel Entry Systems, Corp Sealing spline connector
US9453347B2 (en) 2010-01-12 2016-09-27 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8898988B2 (en) 2010-01-12 2014-12-02 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8776473B2 (en) * 2010-02-04 2014-07-15 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US20130042564A1 (en) * 2010-02-04 2013-02-21 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9428919B2 (en) * 2010-02-04 2016-08-30 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US20150068151A2 (en) * 2010-02-04 2015-03-12 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8959866B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2015-02-24 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a glued tongue
US9856656B2 (en) 2011-07-05 2018-01-02 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking of floor panels with a glued tongue
US9725912B2 (en) 2011-07-11 2017-08-08 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9874027B2 (en) 2011-07-19 2018-01-23 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US10240349B2 (en) 2011-07-19 2019-03-26 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9284737B2 (en) 2011-07-19 2016-03-15 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US10180005B2 (en) 2011-08-15 2019-01-15 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9051738B2 (en) 2011-08-15 2015-06-09 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US8857126B2 (en) 2011-08-15 2014-10-14 Valinge Flooring Technology Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9388584B2 (en) 2011-08-15 2016-07-12 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9366036B2 (en) 2012-11-22 2016-06-14 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US9771723B2 (en) 2012-11-22 2017-09-26 Ceraloc Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels
US10017948B2 (en) 2013-06-27 2018-07-10 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panel with a mechanical locking system
US10246883B2 (en) 2014-05-14 2019-04-02 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panel with a mechanical locking system
US9458634B2 (en) 2014-05-14 2016-10-04 Valinge Innovation Ab Building panel with a mechanical locking system
US10138636B2 (en) 2014-11-27 2018-11-27 Valinge Innovation Ab Mechanical locking system for floor panels

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