US2856909A - Engine - Google Patents

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US2856909A
US2856909A US319952A US31995252A US2856909A US 2856909 A US2856909 A US 2856909A US 319952 A US319952 A US 319952A US 31995252 A US31995252 A US 31995252A US 2856909 A US2856909 A US 2856909A
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engine
walls
cylinders
passages
heads
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US319952A
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Joseph D Turlay
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Motors Liquidation Co
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Motors Liquidation Co
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Priority to US319952A priority Critical patent/US2856909A/en
Priority claimed from US57473356 external-priority patent/US2838941A/en
Priority claimed from US57608956 external-priority patent/US3011591A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/16Engines characterised by number of cylinders, e.g. single-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/18Multi-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/22Multi-cylinder engines with cylinders in V, fan, or star arrangement
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/16Engines characterised by number of cylinders, e.g. single-cylinder engines
    • F02B75/18Multi-cylinder engines
    • F02B2075/1804Number of cylinders
    • F02B2075/1832Number of cylinders eight
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B2275/00Other engines, components or details, not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • F02B2275/34Lateral camshaft position

Description

Oct. 21, 1958 J. D. }TURLAY 2,356,909

ENGINE Filed NOV. 12, 1952 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR ATTORN EYS 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 a?! B a WATTOR N EYS xvi bi$z2gy Oct. 21, 1958 J TURLAY ENGINE Filed NOV. 12, 1952 J. D. TURLAY Oct. 21, 1958 ENGINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed NOV. 12, 1952 INVENTOR c/f's'e'p/ Q 75 1/6 BY ,9 1/ I f ATTORNY$ ENGWE Joseph D. Turlay, Flint, Mich, assignor to General Motors Corporation, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Delaware Application November 12, 1952, Serial No. 319,952

3 Claims. (Cl. 123-59) This invention relates to engines and particularly to V-type internal combustion engines for automotive and other uses.

It has been the practice to build V-type engines more or less by putting together upon a single crankshaft two engines with aligned cylinders; Except for a single crankshaft, camshaft, inlet manifold and carburetor the design pattern has followed very closely the design pattern of straight engines with a single row of cylinders. Notwithstanding the fact that such V-type engines have had the advantage of being shorter and involving less weight than straight engines with the same number of cylinders there are a great many ways in which it is concluded that such engines may be improved.

In the first place V-type engines constructed in the foregoing manner are much wider than straight engines and they require many more parts and machining and other finishing operations than straight engines of equivalent power.

To reduce the length of the cylinders and'consequently the width of the engine and to reduce the unbalanced forces resulting from operation of the crankshaft, connecting rods and pistons of the engine it is proposed to employ a large cylinder bore in relation to the reciprocating motion of the pistons of the engine. Reducing the stroke of the engine in this manner makes possible the use of shorter connecting rods and tends to decrease the width of the engine by moving the outer ends of the cylinders farther inwardly. ing rods bring the lower ends of the pistons closer to the crankshaft and consequently reduces the room available from employing counterweights upon the crankshaft. It is proposed to construct the crankshaft and the counterweighting therefor in such manner as to obtain a relatively large radius of gyration for the center of mass of the counterweights. It is also proposed to construct the crankshaft and the counterweighting therefor in such manner as to obtain a relatively shorter crankshaft and consequently a shorter engine. Having materially decreased the possible width of the engine by decreasing the length of the cylinders and moving the cylinders inwardly toward the axis of rotation of the crankshaft it is now proposed to construct the remaining parts'of the engine to extend upwardly in parallel relation to an intermediate plane through the axis of rotation of the crankshaft forming the axis of the engine rather than obliquely and outwardly in parallel relation to the axes of the cylinders. By so extending the remaining parts of the engine in planes generally parallel to the intermediate plane of the engine it is possible to decrease the number of finished surfaces on various parts of the engine and to formsuchsurfaces in the same plane on both banks of cylinders of the engine or in planes parallel to the intermediate plane of the engine. By so constructing the engine heads, the inlet and exhaust manifolds and various parts of the engine associated therewith it is possible to decrease the width of the engine and the weight, size However, shorter connect- (iii 2,856,909 Patented Oct. 21, 1958 and number of parts and the number of different planes involved in the finished surfaces of the parts.

It is also proposed to so construct the block of the engine as to decrease the water jacketed space surrounding the cylinders and to eliminate excess metal in the web members supporting the bearings and in the gallery.

space between the two banks of cylinders of the engine.

It is further proposed to so construct the lubricating system of the engine as to decrease the number of drilled.

passages required and to decrease the weight of the metal ordinarily required to provide the passages re--" quired in the lubricating system of an engine. It is further proposed to improve the combustion process em f ployed in the engine by providing a new and improved design for the combustion chamber employed. In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a longitudinal sectional'view through the Figure 3 is a fragmentary view of one of the cylinder heads of the engine and looking at the outer surfaces 9 thereof in the plane of the axes of the cylinders ofthe engine.

Figure 4 is a cross-sectional view of the engine headshown by Figure 3 and taken substantially in the plane of lines 4-4 on Figure 3 looking in the direction of the arrows thereon.

Figures 5, 6 and 7 are diagrammatical illustrations showing the relation between a piston and a rotating counterweight on the crankshaft at different positions in" the rotation of the crankshaft and the movement of the piston.

The engine 10 comprises generally an engine block 11,

a crankshaft 12, a camshaft 13, 'heads 14- and 16, an inlet manifold 17 and a carburetor 18. The block 11 is formed to provide rows or banks 19 and 21 of cylinders 22 in which pistons 23 are reciprocated by connecting rods 24 secured between piston pins 26 and crank arms 27 formed on the crankshaft 12. The pistons 23 are of greater diameter than the distances traveled by the axes of the crank arms 27 along the axes of the cylinders 22.

The rows 19 and 21 of the cylinders 22 have axes disposed in planes that intersect one another substantially at the axis of rotation of the crankshaft 12. The engine may be constructed so that these rows of cylinders intersect one another at any desired angle although in the present instance they intersect at an angle of and at 45 with respect to an intermediate vertical plane extending through the axis of the camshaft 13 and the crankshaft 12. The block 11 is constructed so that each of the banks or rows 19 and 21 of cylinders 22 are partly enclosed by longitudinally disposed inner walls 27 and outer walls 28 and by common transversely disposed front and rear end walls 29 and 31 respectively. The front and rear walls 29 and 31 also extend entirely across the front and rear ends of the block 11.

The walls 27,28, 29 and 31 are closed around the cylinders 22 and may be formed integrally therewith if this is desired, at the upper ends of the cylinders 22 and in spaced relation to the lower ends of the cylinders 22. The spaces betweenthe cylinders 22 and the walls 27, 28, 29 and 31 form cooling fluid jackets 32 in which water or other cooling fluid may be circulated for cooling the engine. The block 11 also isformed below the rows of cylinders- 19 and 21 to provide side walls 33 which 3 join the walls 29 and 31 at the front and rear ends of the engine, respectively, to provide the upperpart of a crankcase indicated generally at 3.4. The lower part of the crankcase 34 may be closed in any suitable manner as by the employmentofa sheet metal oil pan indicated at 36 and secured to the. lower flanged edges of the walls of the block 11 byscrews 37. The space between the banks of. cylinders 19 and 21 and within the end walls 29 and Slis formedto providea crankcase gallery indicated at 38 and in the lower part ofv which the camshaft 13 is located. The block 11 also is formed to provide a plurality of spaced and transversely disposed webs or supports 39, 41 and 42, which extend across the upper part of the crankcase and the lower. part of the camshaft gallery 38 for the purpose of providing intermediate bearings 43 for the camshaft 13 and intermediate bearings 44 for the crankshaft 12. Thefronttand rear bearings 46 and 47 of the camshaft 13.and the front and rear bearings 48 and 49 of the crankshaft 12 are formedin the front and rear walls 29 and 31, respectively, of the block 11. The webs 39, 41 and 42 are cutout at 51 between the lowerextremities of the cylinders 22 and below the water jacket space indicated at 32 to make the block 11 easier to cast, to prevent distortion at the lower ends-of the cylinders 22 and to provide windows between the different sections of the crankcase34which are formed by the webs or supports 39, 41 and-.42. The walls 27, 28 and 33 which form the longitudinally disposed side walls of the block 11 are thick enough and strong enough so that the usual longitudinally disposed supports are not required between the camshaft bearings 43 and 46 and at the lower and adjacent extremities of the cylinder banks 19 and21. However, the walls 27 are reinforced adjacent the lower extremities thereof by longitudinally extending struts or columns 52 which project inwardly and are formed integrally with the walls,27.and 28 which extend between the front and rear walls 29 and 31 and the transversely disposed webs or supports 39, 41 and 42. However, there is considerable space between the struts or ridges 52 so as to provide space therebetween for the upward flow of air and crankcase vapors, from the crankcase 34 to the camshaft gal lery 38.

In order to provide the greatest possible radius of gyration for the center of mass of counterweights 53 which are employed in counterbalancing the crankshaft 12 and to thereby decrease the amount of counterweighting required, it is proposed to construct the counterweights 53 with peripheral edges that will not only clear the lower ends of the cylinders 22 but will clear by a constant amount the lower ends of the pistons 23 when the pistons move below the lower extremities of the cylinders 22. Figures 5, 6 and 7 illustrate the contouring of thecounterweights 53 to accomplish such purposes. Figure illustrates the rotation of the crankshaft 12 in the movement of .the piston 23 below the cylinder 22 and as the crankshaft approaches inner dead center. Figure 6 illustrates the position of these parts at inner dead center and Figure 7 illustrates the position of the same parts as the shaft moves beyond inner dead center. The circular arcs 59, shown. in dot and dash lines in Figures 5, 6 and 7, illustrate what might be the contour of the outer edges 57 of thecounterweights 53 were it not for the movement of the pistons 23 below. the lower extremities of the cylinders 22 totheextent shown in Figures 5, 6 and 7. The lower extremities of the cylinders 22 at the front and rear sides ofv each of the cylinders 22 havearcuate cutaway or relief counte rweights 53;;were constructed in such a way as,

to follow the'contourofthe arcs 59. However, it will be apparent frominspecting Figures.5, 6 and 7 that pistons .549. or elow hs ovsr x r e c h y rs 22. Therefore, the outer peripheral edges of the counterweights 53. cannot be constructed to. follow. the circular arcs 59. The circular arcs 61 on Figures 5, 6 and '1 illustrate what the contour of the outer peripheral edge of the counterweights would be if the counterweights 53: were constructed according to present practices and of a sufficiently small radius so that the. peripheral edges of the counterweights would miss the lower edges of the pistons 22 when the pistons were at the. inner extremity of the movement thereof. metal outside of the circular arcs 61 could not be utilized in making the counterweights 53 so that the counterweights would have to be made much wider and the engine crankshaft correspondingly longer in order to incorporate in the counterweights a sufficient amount of metal to counterbalance the crankshaft 12. Since the metal in the counterweights 53, which is disposed externally with respect to the circular arcs 61, has a center of mass which is much farther from the axis of rotation of the crankshaft than the center of mass of the connterweights 53, it will be apparent that the inertia effect of the rotation of the metal outside of the circular are 61 is much greater than the inertia effect resulting from the rotation of any other part of the counterweight 53 of similar weight. In order to gain this advantage from the metal in the counterweights 53 which appears in Figures 5, 6 and 7 as being outside the circular arcs indicated at 61, it is proposed to construct the peripheral edge 57 of the counterweights 53 on a line which includes the locus of all points equal in distance from the lower edges of the pistons 23 when the pistons 23 move below the lower extremities of the cylinders 22. Under such circumstancesas will be seen from observing Figures 5, 6 and 7 that the peripheral edges 57 of the counterweights will not only miss the lower endsof the cylinders 22 by a distance equal to the distance between the circular arcs 56 and 59 but between the opposite ends of the counterweights will miss the pistons when the pistons move below the lower extremities of the cylinders by an amount equalto the distance between the the axis of rotation of the crankshaft 12, and at the same time will clear the lower extremity of the pistons by a uniform and sufficient distance.

While it is necessary in order to construct. a, V-typeengine to have the planes of the axes-of the cylinders 22 extend obliquely outwardly from the intermediate plane of thecngine, it isnot necessary to construct theengine heads and other parts of the engine above the cylinders in this manner. The heads and other parts of the engine, therefore, are constructed in such a way as to extend upwardly from the ends of the cylinders 22 in planes that are generally parallel to the intermediate plane; of the The heads 14- and 16 are, therefore, constructed in such manner as to.

engine or that extend normally thereto.

haveouter and generally plane and parallel side walls. 66

and generally plane upper wa1ls67. The walls 67 of eachof the heads when installed on the engine 10 lie substantially in the same plane and ina plane normally intersecting the intermediate plane of the engine. The inner or lower wall 68 of each of the heads 16 is disposed nor-. mally to the axes of the cylinders 22 and generally inter-. sects the planes of the side walls 66 and the upper walls 67 at acute angles. The heads 14 and 16 are adapted to.

be secured upon the walls 68 and to the upper ends of the banks of cylinders 19 and 21 by bolts indicated at 69. The outer walls 66 and 67 and the inner wall 68 ofeach of the heads 14 and 1 6 are joinedat opposite ends by It will be apparent that all of the transversely disposed outer end walls indicated at 71 in Figure 3. The interiors of the heads 14 and 16 are formed to provide cooling fluid passages indicated at 72 which are adapted to communicate with the cooling fluid passages 32 surrounding the cylinders 22. Water or other cooling fluid is adapted to be circulated through the passages 72 for the purpose of cooling the valves, spark plugs, combustion chambers and the inlet and exhaust passages which are located within or partly within the heads 16. Although the combustion chambers of the engine may be formed in any suitable manner, in the present instance the combustion chambers 73 are formed between the heads 14 and 16 and the pistons 23 by depressions formed in the inner walls 68. These depressions are of right triangular formation transversely of the engine and with the walls thereof being generally parallel to the outer walls 66 and 67 of the heads 14 and 16. The depressions forming the combustion chambers 73 are generally elongated longitudinally of the engine to provide room for the inlet and exhaust valves of the engine. The head ends of the pistons 23 project outwardly as is indicated at 74 for partly filling the depressions forming the combustion chambers 73 so that a high compression engine may be provided. The compression ratio may be altered in the engine as desired merely by varying the extent to which the projections 74 formed on the end walls of the pistons may project into the depressions within the walls 68. The spark plugs 76 are positioned in the heads 14 and 16 substantially in the plane of the axes of the cylinders 22 and with the spark gap terminals thereof extending into the combustion chambers 73 at substantially the middle of each combustion chamber both longitudinally and transversely of the engine. In order to provide room for locating the spark plugs, the outer walls 66 of the heads 14 and 16 are provided with elongated depressions adjacent the upper extremities of the heads where the outer ends of the spark plugs may be located and the terminals of the ignition conductors connected. The depressions referred to are adapted to be closed by covers indicated M77 and which are secured to the side walls 66 by screws indicated at 78.

The interior of the heads 14 and 16 are also formed in such manner as to provide inwardly disposed and upwardly extending inlet passages indicated at 79. The outer ends of the inlet passages 79 terminate in the plane of the outer surfaces of the walls 67 and are adapted to be connected to the outlet ends of branch passages 81 formed in the inlet manifold 17 employed with the banks of cylinders indicated at 19 and 21. The outlet ends of the branches 81 of the inlet manifold 17 are also formed in a single plane, this being the plane of the outer surfaces of the walls 67 when the manifold 17 is in operative position. The manifold 17 may be removed from or secured to the inlet passages within the heads 14 and 16 by operation of screws indicated at 82. The heads 14 and 16 are also formed internally thereof so as to provide exhaust passages indicated at 83. The outer ends of the exhaust passages 83 terminate substantially in the planes of the outer walls 66 of the heads 14 and 16. There is preferably one inlet passage 79 and one exhaust passage 83 for each cylinder 22 of the engine 10. The interior of the heads 14 and 16 are also formed in a way to provide cross over exhaust passages 84 which lead from the inner ends of the two intermediate exhaust passages in each bank of four cylinders. The intermediate exhaust passages 84 also have outlet ends which terminate in alignment with the outlet ends of the inlet passages 79 and in the plane of the outer end of the inlet passages 79. The 1 cross over passages 84 are adapted to supply exhaust gas for heating the terminals between the main distribution passages and the branch passages at each end of the inlet manifold 17.

The interiors of the heads 14 and 16 are also formed in such manner as to provide inlet and exhaust valve stem guide supports indicated at 86. There may be a pair of the supports 86 for each cylinder of the engine so as to provide one inlet and one exhaust valve for each cylinder. The supports are arranged in the heads 14 and 16 to support valve stem guides or sleeves 87 which are adapted to be pressed or otherwise secured in the guide supports indicated .at 86. Inlet and exhaust valves 88 and 89 respectively are slidably mounted in the valve stem guides 87 of each cylinder and in such manner that the valve stems 91 of the valves will be aligned from front to rear of the engine with the axes thereof in planes parallel to the intermediate plane of the engine. The valves 88 and 89 close ports at the inner extremities of the passages 79 and 83 which are located in an upper wall on one side of each of the combustion chambers 73. The side wall of the combustion chambers 73 in which the valves 88 and 89 are located is in the same plane on each side of the engine and intersects the intermediate plane of the engine substantially at The valves 88 and 89 are adapted tobe closed by springs 92 which are positioned on the outer end of the valve stems 91 in depressions formed in the outer surfaces of the walls 67. The springs are held in position upon the valve stems 91 by valve stem washers 90 which are secured to the outer ends of the valve stems 91. The outer ends of the valve stems 91 are adapted to be engaged for operating the valves by rocker arms indicated at 93 and which are mounted for rotation upon rocker shafts indicated at 94. The rocker shafts 94 are positioned outwardly with respect to the valve stems 91 and are secured on rocker arm supports 96 which are mounted upon the outer surface of the Walls 67 of the heads 14 and 16. The supports 96 are secured in position upon the walls 67 by screws indicated at 97. The opposite ends of the rocker arms 93 are offset upon the rocker shafts 94in such manner that the actuated ends of the arms may be engaged at one side of the valve stems 91 by push rods indicated at 98. The push rods 98 extend through openings 99 which are formed obliquely within the heads 14 and 16 and in such manner as to intersect the planes of the stems 91 of the inlet and exhaust valves between the valves and the outer ends of the valve stems. The inner extremities of the push rod 98 engage valve lifters 101 which are mounted in transversely and obliquely disposed openings formed in bosses 102 which project inwardly and upwardly from the reenforcing struts indicated at 52. The inner ends of the valve lifters 101 are engaged by cams on the camshaft 13 which operate the inlet and exhaust valves in properly timed relation. The valve actuating mechanisms for the heads 14 and 16 are enclosed within covers 107 each of which is secured to the upper wall 67 of one of the heads by bolts indicated at 118.

The lubricating-system for the engine employs a pump 103 which is located in the enlarged rear end of the oil pan 36. The pump 103 is removably secured to a. lower portion of the rear end of the block 11 by screws indicated at 104. The pump 103 delivers oil for lubricating the engine through a conduit 106 which communicates with a drilled passage formed at one side of the rear main bearing 49. This passage in turn communicates with a horizontally disposed passage formed in the end wall of the block and the opposite end of which is connected to an oil filter. From the oil filter the oil returns through another horizontally disposed passage also formed in the end of the block 11. The other end of this passage communicates with a single transversely disposed passage 107 formed within the rear wall of the block 11. The passage 107 is adapted to be closed at the outer end thereof by plug indicated at 108. Beyond the opening 107 the front and rear walls of the block 11 and the supports or webs 39, 41 and 42 are formed to provide aligned openings in which a conduit 109 is press fitted, cast or otherwise secured. The interior of the conduit 109 forms a single high pressure gallery which receives oil from the pump 103 and supplies the oil to the crank shaft bearings and the connecting rod bearings through at ra ly spos d.- p a s an sp ly, formed inthe conduit 109, and in the webs 39, 41 and 42 and in the front and rear walls 29 and 31 of the hlock 1.1, The-crankshaft may be internally drilled as is indicated at 113 for the purpose of supplying oil to the connecting rod bearings from eachof the passages Oil for lubricating. the pistons, rings and piston pins is thrown. out ofthe connecting rod bearings upon the lower parts, of, the-pistons and the lower ends of the cylinder walls. The frontcamshaft hearing has an annular groove formed therein which communicates with laterally disposed grooves formed inthe front wall 29 of the block 11. Theoppositeendsof these-laterally extending openings communicate with the front ends of a pair of longitudinally disposed passages indicated at 114. The passages. 114 are formed in the reenforcing struts 52 on the outside of the openingswhich receive the valve lifters 101 and in such Way as to intersect the openings in which the valve lifters 101 are located. The annular grooves formed in the front bearing of the camshaft meters the oil supplied to the passages 114 by the main gallery-and within the conduit 109 to supply oil of any desired reduced: pressure to the passages 114. The valve tappets will receive oil forlubricating the tappets for supplying oil to the tappets in the event hydraulically actuated tappets; are employed. There are also passages formed inthe front wall 29 of each bank of cylinders which communicate at one end with the passages 14 and with; enlarged bolt holes that extend through the heads 14 and 16. Oil is then supplied from these bolt hole passages through other passages formed in the heads and which terminate beneath the front supports for; each rocker shaft. The supports are in turn drilled to provide passages communicating with passages 116 within the rocker shafts 94. The rocker arms are supplied withioil through passages communicating with the passages 116 in the interior of rocker shafts 94. The valve springs and stems are lubricated by oil spray within the rocker arm covers.

I claim:

1. An engine head comprising an elongated body having an inner Wall formed to provide a plane surface adapted, to engage the plane end surface of a block having a row of. cylinders formed therein, means for securing said body to said block with said plane surface: of said inner wall in contact with said plane surface of said block, a pair of side walls having the oppositeedges thereof joining the opposite edges of said inner wall and. having the adjacent edges thereof joining; one another and positioning said side walls in substantially normal relation to one another and in acute angular relation to said inner wall, said inner wall being formed to provide combustion chamber cavities extending inwardly of said body in opposed relation to said cylinders in said row, said cavities being elongated in formation for each of said cylinders and being aligned 8 with respect to the length of said cavities to provide a row of said cavities in opposed relation tov the outer ends of said cylinders, said inner; Wall. being formed adjacent said cavities to provide normally disposed cavity side walls joining one another opposite said cylinders and extending lengthwise of said body substantially inparallel relation to said side walls of said body.

2. An engine head as defined by claim 1 and in which valves open into said combustion chamber cavities through said cavity side Walls and in which said body is formed to provide passages controlled by said valves and extending from said. cavities and terminating in said body side walls adjacent the edges of said body side walls which join said inner Wall.

3. An engine head as defined by claim 1 and in which inlet and exhaust valves open into each of said combus tion chamber cavities through one of said cavity side Walls and in which said body is formed to provide inlet and exhaust passages each controlled by one of said valves and extending from said cavities and terminating in said body side walls adjacent the edges of said body side walls which join said inner wall, said inlet passages UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,250,426 Brush Dec. 18, 1917 1,291,839 Gorham Jan. 21, 1919 1,293,712 Church Feb. 11, 1919 1,303,622 Williams n M ay 13, 1919 1,332,964 Vincent Mar. 9, 1920 1,353,959 Holst Sept. 28, 1920 1,403,350 Short Jan. 10, 1922, 1,444,279 Short Feb. 6, 1923 1,475,965 Pence Dec. 4, 1923 1,488,285 Rhoads Mar. 25, 1924 1,524,150 Rhoads Jan. 27, 1925 1,552,215 Chase Sept. 1, 1925 1,625,597 Fornaca Apr. 19, 1927 1,636,213 Cappa July 19, 1927 1,806,138 Wyclcoff May 19, 1931 2,022,556 Brown Nov. 26, 1935 2,126,609 Brill Aug. 9, 1938 2,523,611 Clayton Sept. 26, 1950 2,577,308 Carson Dec. 4, 1951 2,669,227 Drinkard Feb. 16, 1954 FOREIGN PATENTS 2,588 Great Britain Feb. 18, 1915 112,461 Great Britain May 16, 1918 189,151 Great Britain Jan. 3, 1924 456,688 Great Britain Nov. 13, 1926 17,488 Australia May 8, 1934

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US57473356 US2838941A (en) 1952-11-12 1956-03-29 Internal combustion engine counterweight and cylinder construction
US57608956 US3011591A (en) 1952-11-12 1956-04-04 Engine lubricating system

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Cited By (8)

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US2927565A (en) * 1958-12-08 1960-03-08 E T Dev Ltd Valve operated mechanism for internal combustion engines
US3023844A (en) * 1959-10-01 1962-03-06 Gen Motors Corp Internal combustion engine lubricating system
US4058092A (en) * 1974-11-27 1977-11-15 Isuzu Motors Limited V-Type engines
DE3601274A1 (en) * 1985-01-18 1986-07-24 Honda Motor Co Ltd INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE
JPS61167146A (en) * 1985-01-18 1986-07-28 Honda Motor Co Ltd Internal-combustion engine
DE3636180A1 (en) * 1986-10-24 1988-04-28 Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz Ag Cylinder head for internal combustion engines, especially air-cooled diesel engines
WO2011084640A2 (en) 2009-12-16 2011-07-14 Red Leaf Resources, Inc. Method for the removal and condensation of vapors
US8919311B2 (en) 2013-03-06 2014-12-30 General Electric Company Method and systems for variable valve timing for a V-engine with a single central camshaft

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