US2851094A - Means for hypergolic flame combat - Google Patents

Means for hypergolic flame combat Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2851094A
US2851094A US292708A US29270852A US2851094A US 2851094 A US2851094 A US 2851094A US 292708 A US292708 A US 292708A US 29270852 A US29270852 A US 29270852A US 2851094 A US2851094 A US 2851094A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
hypergolic
flame
fuel
valves
oxidizer
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US292708A
Inventor
Donald N Griffin
Original Assignee
Donald N Griffin
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Donald N Griffin filed Critical Donald N Griffin
Priority to US292708A priority Critical patent/US2851094A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2851094A publication Critical patent/US2851094A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41HARMOUR; ARMOURED TURRETS; ARMOURED OR ARMED VEHICLES; MEANS OF ATTACK OR DEFENCE, e.g. CAMOUFLAGE, IN GENERAL
    • F41H13/00Means of attack or defence not otherwise provided for
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41HARMOUR; ARMOURED TURRETS; ARMOURED OR ARMED VEHICLES; MEANS OF ATTACK OR DEFENCE, e.g. CAMOUFLAGE, IN GENERAL
    • F41H9/00Equipment for attack or defence by spreading flame, gas or smoke or leurres; Chemical warfare equipment
    • F41H9/02Flame-throwing apparatus

Description

Sept. 9; 1958 D. N. GRIFFIN 2,851,094
MEANS FOR HYPERGOLIC FLAME COMBAT Filed June 10, 1952 30 4 4 62 Go 3 Q i2 INVE NT R'. I Ilunuld N. Bmffn'L ATTORNEYS 2,851,094 Patented Sept.- 9, 1958 "This invention relates to a projector for ejecting hypergo lic liquids and it is ,a primary object of the invention to utilize hypergolic bipropellant combinations ejected in either parallel or slightly converging streams .sothat ignition occurs when the propellants mix, without other igniting means.
An ancillary object of this invention is to simplify I the design of a projector for ejecting hypergolic liquids to such an extent that the same is expendible, or at least some portions of the weapon would regularly be thrown away after use.
' 'Another object of the invention is to provide for flame temperatures approximating 3000 K., which is considerably in excess of the gasoline-air flame temperature.
Still another object is to provide a projector for ejecting hypergolic liquids which is extremely versatile in use. The operating valves can be simultaneously opened to produce ignition and stoichiometric flame. If flame persistence is desired ejection of fuel only can follow the original ignition, in which case the fuel would air-burn at a reduced rate. Finally, when the target is of combustible material, initial bipropellant flame can be followed with ejection of oxidizer alone to accelerate the rate of combustion of the target.
A last object to be mentioned specifically is to provide' a projector forejecting hypergolic liquids which is simple and economical to manufacture, light in weight and easily manipulable, and which is generally eflicient in service.
The invention is illustrated in the drawing, in which:
Figure 1 is a somewhat schematic isometric view, designed to show the general arrangement of the essential elements of the invention;
Figure 2 is a top plan view of a simple form of apparatus used in reducing this invention to practice;
Figure 3 is a vertical longitudinal sectional view taken substantially on the line 33 in Figure 2;
Figure 4 is a transverse sectional view taken on line 4.4 in Figure 3.
Similar characters of reference indicate similar or identical elements and portions throughout the specification and drawing.
Referring now to the drawing in detail, the apparatus includes a tank 10 comprising a reservoir for a fluid fuel, a tank 12 serving as a reservoir for a fluid oxidizer for said fuel, and a pressure tank 14 connected to tanks 10 and 12 by a bifurcated manifold having legs 16 and 18 and used to pressurize said fuel and oxidizer according to the adjustment of the pressure controlling valves 26 and 22. Blow-off valves 24 and 26 may be provided.
One fuel used with success is aniline-furfuryl alcohol which was employed with red fuming nitric acid as oxidizer, although other bipropellant or multipropellant mixtures can be used. The prime essential in any propellant mixture used according to this invention is the hypergolic nature thereof. In this regard it isnoteworthy that, for purposes of economy and efliciency, the mixture and protect the operating valves 36 and 38.
as actually ejected should be stoichiometric producing the highest flame temperature, andhence the maximum heat with a minimum of fuel. The above named bi- ,propellants produce a flame temperature of approximately relationship is provided in the form of a plate-like bracket 40 having edge portions '42turned onto intermediateportions of said pipes. This bracket carries a handle 44. The pipes 28 and 30 terminate adjacent the lower ends of the tanks 10 and l2.
The operating valves -3 6-and 38 are individually manually operable by means of triggers 46 and 48 comprising depending portions of bell cranks operably connected to valve levers 5t and 52 by inflexible links 54 and 56. The triggers are pivotedon a transverse axis member 58, which is convenientlysupported on the rear handle 60 mounted on the bottom of a casing 62 provided to cover Helical springs 64 and 66 are co-axially arranged on the links 54 and 56 and compressed between the bottom of the casing 62 and the levers and 52 to bias the valves 36 and 38 into closedposition and shut-off valves 68 and 70 are provided in the pipes 28 and 30 for further individual control and'metering of the fuel and oxidizer as required. 1
The operation of the device is readily understood from the foregoing but it may be added that when the triggers are manually shifted to easily determined positions, fully retracted against the handle for example, the streams of fuel and oxidizer will result in a stoichiometric mixture at some distance from the nozzles 32 and 34. The actual ignition may occur either at the time of contact with the target or before the two streams strike the target, depending on whether the pipes 28 and 30 are parallel or slightly converging. A single trigger control may be provided in lieu of the two triggers 36 and 48 and'the valves 36 and 38 operated thereby in unison but greater versatility is achieved by the illustrated trigger assembly or its equivalent since individual operation of the valves 36 and 38 allows initial ignition to be followed by a continued feeding of stoichiometric mixture, air burning of the fuel, or feeding additional oxygen for increasing the rate of burning of targets which include quantities of combustible material.
It will be clear that all the objects listed in the preamble to this specification are amply achieved by this invention and further description would appear to be unnecessary.
In the claims, the term hypergolic liquids means two liquids capable of igniting spontaneously upon contact or intermingling at ambient atmospheric temperatures.
What I claim is: 1
1. A body-supported mechanism for projecting two discrete streams of hypergolic liquids at a small angle of convergence to intermingle adjacent a remote target, comprising, first and second tanks each adapted to contain a respective one of the hypergolic liquids and mounted in side-by-side relation for support on the back of an operator, first and second conduits, each extending in laterally-spaced parallel relation from a respective tank, upwardly, forwardly over the respective shoulders of the operator, then downwardly and terminating in a second forwardly extending section, a pair of nozzles each fixed over the terminus of a respective one of said second-forwardly extending sections, a bracket rigidly connecting said second forwardly extending conduit sections at a small angle'of convergence in the forward direction, a
first grip for one hand of the operator secured to said bracket, first and second valves each in a respective one of said second forwardly extending conduit portions rearwardly of said bracket, a casing enclosing both said valves, a second grip for the other hand of an operator secured to said casing, a pair of triggers mounted in side-by-side contiguous relation on said casing for simultaneous operation by the finger of the hand of an operator holding said second grip and operating connections between each said trigger and a respective one of said valves.
2. A mechanism as recited in claim 1, a third pressure fluid tank fixed with respect to said first and second tanks rearwardly thereof, and pressure conduits from said third tank to each of said first'and second tanks.
3. A body-supported mechanism for projecting two discrete streams of hypergolic liquids at a small anglev of convergence to initially intermingle at a remote target comprising, first and second tanks each adapted to contain a respective one of the liquids and fixed in side by side relation for support upon the back of the operator, first and second conduits each extending in laterallyspaced parallel relation from a respective one of said tanks, forwardly over the respective shoulders of the operator, downwardly and terminating in forwardly-extending sections, a pair' of nozzles each secured over the forward terminus of a respective conduit, a bracket rigidly connecting said conduits rearwardly of said nozzles for directing discrete streams of liquid from said nozzles at a small angle of convergence in the forward direction, 'a first grip for one hand of the operator secured to said bracket, first and second valves in each respective conduit rearwardly of said bracket, a casing enclosing said valves, a second grip for the other hand of the operator and secured to said casing, first and second triggers mounted to said casing in side by side relation for pivotal movement about a-common transverse axis for simultaneous actuation by a finger of the hand of the oper ator holding said second grip, and means operable to open each said valve in response to pull on a respective trigger.
4. A mechanism as recited in'claim 3, a third pressure tank fixed with and rearwardly of said first and second tanks and conduits connecting said third tank with said first and second tanks.
5. In a flame projector of the portable type, a container of pressurized liquid hypergolic fuel, a container of pressurizedliquid hypergolic oxidizer,.a flow conduit extend- A ing exteriorly of each container providing communication between said containers and free atmosphere, said flow conduits each including a' unidirectional stream-producing nozzle at the terminus thereof to direct into the free atmosphere exterior of said flame projector discrete unidirectional streams of liquid fuel and oxidizer, meansfixing said nozzles with respect to each other in substantially parallel alignment and spaced in close proximity, normally closed valving means in each of said flow conduits, and triggering means connected to said valving means for opening said flow conduits, said streams of hypergolic fuel and oxidizer following substantially parallel trajectories and intermixing for ignition upon splash contact with a target. i
6. In a flame projector of the portable type, a container of pressurized liquid hypergolic fuel, a container of pressurized liquid hypergolic oxidizer, a flow conduit extending exteriorly of each container providing com munication between said containers and free atmosphere, said flow conduits each including a unidirectional streamproducing nozzle at the terminus thereof to direct into the free atmosphere exterior'of said flame projector discrete unidirectional streams of liquid fuel and oxidizer, means fixing said nozzles with respect to each other at a small angle of convergence ,and spaced in close proximity, normally closed valving means in each of said flow conduits,
and triggering means connected to said valving means for opening said flow conduits, said streams of hypergolic fuel and oxidizer following trajectories having a small angle of convergence and intermixing for ignition proximate to a target.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,340,012 Cave et a1. May 11, 1920 2,489,051 Sayward et al Nov. 22, 1949 2,497,939 Garraway et al Feb. 21, 1950 2,563,532 Kistiakowsky Aug. 7, 1951 2,573,471 Malina et al Oct. 30, 1951 2,610,464 Knoll Sept. 16, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 17,696 Great Britain Dec. 17, 191 405,645 Great Britain Jan. 29, 1934 583,023 Great Britain Dec. 5, 1946
US292708A 1952-06-10 1952-06-10 Means for hypergolic flame combat Expired - Lifetime US2851094A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US292708A US2851094A (en) 1952-06-10 1952-06-10 Means for hypergolic flame combat

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US292708A US2851094A (en) 1952-06-10 1952-06-10 Means for hypergolic flame combat

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2851094A true US2851094A (en) 1958-09-09

Family

ID=23125848

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US292708A Expired - Lifetime US2851094A (en) 1952-06-10 1952-06-10 Means for hypergolic flame combat

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2851094A (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2971573A (en) * 1958-01-16 1961-02-14 Olin Mathieson Flame thrower
US3394982A (en) * 1966-06-23 1968-07-30 North American Rockwell Torch
US3472165A (en) * 1963-03-28 1969-10-14 Us Air Force Warhead
US3880569A (en) * 1970-09-18 1975-04-29 William W Bannister Method for thickening, igniting and projecting hydrocarbon fuels
US5225623A (en) * 1990-01-12 1993-07-06 Philip Self-defense device
US5429494A (en) * 1993-10-01 1995-07-04 Plum Creek Timber Co., L.P. Low pressure transportable igniting device using volatile liquid fuel
US5756920A (en) * 1996-05-09 1998-05-26 Sigma Services, Inc. Special effect flame cannon
US10488147B2 (en) 2016-02-24 2019-11-26 Simon TREMBLAY Electric projection weapon system

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB191517696A (en) * 1915-12-17 1919-03-27 Percy Harold Lawrence Improvements relating to Means for Ejecting Burning Liquid, Discharging Gases and Producing Flame.
US1340012A (en) * 1918-04-27 1920-05-11 Davis Bournonville Co Flame-projector apparatus
GB405645A (en) * 1932-07-29 1934-01-29 David Hodge Improvements in and relating to cartridges for blasting, also applicable to the discharge of projectiles from guns
GB583023A (en) * 1940-09-30 1946-12-05 Reginald Percy Fraser Improvements relating to the projection of inflammable material
US2489051A (en) * 1943-08-16 1949-11-22 American Cyanamid Co Rocket propulsion utilizing hydrocarbon, sulfate turpentine, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid or oleum
US2497939A (en) * 1945-07-14 1950-02-21 Standard Oil Dev Co Oil projecting device
US2563532A (en) * 1951-08-07 Spontaneous ignition of gasoline
US2573471A (en) * 1943-05-08 1951-10-30 Aerojet Engineering Corp Reaction motor operable by liquid propellants and method of operating it
US2610464A (en) * 1946-02-01 1952-09-16 William A Knoll Jet engine having fuel pumps driven by air turbine in thrust augmenting air duct

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2563532A (en) * 1951-08-07 Spontaneous ignition of gasoline
GB191517696A (en) * 1915-12-17 1919-03-27 Percy Harold Lawrence Improvements relating to Means for Ejecting Burning Liquid, Discharging Gases and Producing Flame.
US1340012A (en) * 1918-04-27 1920-05-11 Davis Bournonville Co Flame-projector apparatus
GB405645A (en) * 1932-07-29 1934-01-29 David Hodge Improvements in and relating to cartridges for blasting, also applicable to the discharge of projectiles from guns
GB583023A (en) * 1940-09-30 1946-12-05 Reginald Percy Fraser Improvements relating to the projection of inflammable material
US2573471A (en) * 1943-05-08 1951-10-30 Aerojet Engineering Corp Reaction motor operable by liquid propellants and method of operating it
US2489051A (en) * 1943-08-16 1949-11-22 American Cyanamid Co Rocket propulsion utilizing hydrocarbon, sulfate turpentine, nitric acid, and sulfuric acid or oleum
US2497939A (en) * 1945-07-14 1950-02-21 Standard Oil Dev Co Oil projecting device
US2610464A (en) * 1946-02-01 1952-09-16 William A Knoll Jet engine having fuel pumps driven by air turbine in thrust augmenting air duct

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2971573A (en) * 1958-01-16 1961-02-14 Olin Mathieson Flame thrower
US3472165A (en) * 1963-03-28 1969-10-14 Us Air Force Warhead
US3394982A (en) * 1966-06-23 1968-07-30 North American Rockwell Torch
US3880569A (en) * 1970-09-18 1975-04-29 William W Bannister Method for thickening, igniting and projecting hydrocarbon fuels
US5225623A (en) * 1990-01-12 1993-07-06 Philip Self-defense device
US5429494A (en) * 1993-10-01 1995-07-04 Plum Creek Timber Co., L.P. Low pressure transportable igniting device using volatile liquid fuel
US5756920A (en) * 1996-05-09 1998-05-26 Sigma Services, Inc. Special effect flame cannon
US10488147B2 (en) 2016-02-24 2019-11-26 Simon TREMBLAY Electric projection weapon system

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2851094A (en) Means for hypergolic flame combat
US2402826A (en) Control means for jet propulsion apparatus
US2217649A (en) Combustion chamber for rocket apparatus
US2406926A (en) System of jet propulsion
US2666480A (en) Hand torch and igniter for use with low boiling point fuel
US1879186A (en) Apparatus for igniting liquid fuel
US2094854A (en) Gun
US2417981A (en) Portable flame thrower
US3410559A (en) Airborne target with infrared source
US3575349A (en) Spraying apparatus
US3220459A (en) Electrically ignited gas torch
US1340012A (en) Flame-projector apparatus
US2694899A (en) Liquid fuel vaporizing apparatus
US3106238A (en) Pyrophoric slug flame thrower
US3724217A (en) Rocket system
US2766581A (en) Ram jet engine
GB702779A (en) Means for supplying propellents to a rocket motor
US3759245A (en) Heating torch
US1709886A (en) Cutting torch
US3354650A (en) Pulse-jet engines of the valveless type
US2331388A (en) Flame throwing equipment
GB553099A (en) Improvements in processes and apparatus for spraying fusible and thermoplastic material
US2402803A (en) Steam generator
US2095747A (en) Blowpipe and method of forming combustible mixtures
US3137997A (en) Hydrojet propulsion apparatus