US2849030A - Pile fabric - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2849030A
US2849030A US651287A US65128757A US2849030A US 2849030 A US2849030 A US 2849030A US 651287 A US651287 A US 651287A US 65128757 A US65128757 A US 65128757A US 2849030 A US2849030 A US 2849030A
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pile
fabric
shots
yarn
shot
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US651287A
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Raymond B Patterson
Harry J Smiley
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James Lees and Sons Co
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Lees & Sons Co James
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D39/00Pile-fabric looms

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  • the present invention therefore, has for its object the provision in a two-shot Wilton weave of a construction in which the pile yarn is intermittently carried through to the back and then brought up to the face.
  • a further object of the invention is to provide an improved Wiltontype fabric in which each pile yarn is carried through to the back and tied under one bottom shot, whereupon it is brought up to work in the face between the succeeding top and bottom shots.
  • a further object of the invention is to provide a Wiltontype fabric in which there are not more than three pile projections in the same warp yarn carried upwardly between successive top shots followed by a semi-void in which the yarn is carried through to the back and tied in around only one bottom shot.
  • a further object of the invention is to provide a Wiltontype fabric of the type described in which there are two face yarns in each dent and one of the yarns is carried through to the back on every other bottom shot.
  • FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a fabric woven in accordance with the present invention
  • Fig. 2 is a section as seen at 2-2 of Fig. 1,
  • Fig. 3 is a section as seen at 33 of Fig. l.
  • Fig. 4 is a section as seen at 44 of Fig. l.
  • the preferred form of the present invention utilizes a conventional two-shot Wilton-type fabric construction having stufier warps 10, chain warps 11 and 12, a series of co-planar top shots 13, 13 and a series of co planar bottom shots 14, 14.
  • the weaving of such a two-shot type ground fabric is conventional and well known in the art.
  • the face or pile of the fabric is formed of two warp yarns 15 and 16 in every dent, as shown in Fig. 1.
  • Warp yarn 15 is tied down under three succeeding top shots 13a, 13b, and 130, and is carried up between these 2,849,030 Patented Aug. 26, 1958 upwardly'above bottom shot 14c and under top shot 13a,
  • Yarn 15 then continues to weave loops or tufts for a plurality of transverse rows, preferably no more than three.
  • the other warp yarn 16 in the same dent as yarn 15 is carried down through to the back under bottom shot 14b and then up to the face between top shot 13c and bottom shot 14c, thus providing a semi-void at 18.
  • Yarn 16 then works to form three pile loops or tufts in succeeding rows before it is again brought through to the back to be bound under bottom shot 14 thus providing a void at 19.
  • a void indicates an area in the fabric Where there is no pile projection between adjacent filling shots and chain warps, so that the areas or gaps 17 and 18 are, strictly speaking, semi-voids rather than full voids.
  • the term is used to include any area where either pile yarn is not brought up to the face to form face pile projections.
  • the present fabric employs three double pile projections for each adjacent pair of weftwise rows, and the void or semi-void is offset weftwise back and forth across the dent.
  • the through-to-the-back construction on every other bottom shot and every fourth shot for each warp pile provides excellent tuft bind and prevents unsightly pulling through of a warp if a loop is snagged.
  • a further advantage of my improved construction in this regard resides in the staggered or offset weave to provide a through-to-the-back bind in every dent under every other bottom shot. Even if snagging should occur, it would be unlikely, if not impossible, to snag one of the two loops projecting between adjacent top shots. Therefore, if a pair of loops should be snagged, there is always a through-to-the-back bind on one of them adjacent the point of snagging.
  • a Wilton-type pile fabric having a plurality of coplanar top shots, a plurality of co-planar bottom shots, stulfer warps separating said top and bottom shots, chain warps for binding said top and bottom shots together, and at least two pile warps in warpwise parallel relationship, one of said pile warps being tied down under three successive top shots, carried through to the back under a fourth top andbottom shots and carried back to the facebetweenthe fifth top and bottom shots.
  • A- Wilton-type fabric having aplurality of top filling shots, a plurality of bottomfilling shots, stulierwarps separating saidtop and bottom fillingshots, chain warps, a pair of pile warps running in each dent between adjacent chain warps, each pile warpbeing bound under no more than three succeeding top filling shots and carried through to the back under a fourth bottom shot to'provide' a semi-void between the fourth and fifth top filling shots.

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  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Textile Engineering (AREA)
  • Woven Fabrics (AREA)

Description

g- 26, 1958 R. 'B. PATTERSON Em 2,849,030
PILE FABRIC Filed April 8, 1957 FIG I. 4. M a
' INVENTORS M HARRY J. SMILEY RAYMOND B.-PATTERSON ATTY.
United States Patent PILE FABRIC Raymond B. Patterson and Harry J. Smiley, Glasgow, Va., assignors to James Lees and Sons Company, Bridgeport, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Application April 8, 1957, Serial No. 651,287 4 Claims. (Cl. 139-403) This invention relates to an improved pile fabric and more particularly to a Wilton-type carpet having superior wear and strength features.
In order to achieve better stability in the ground fabric of a fioor covering and at the same time to conserve the amount of face yarn used, it is desirable to weave some of the face yarn through to the back in a multi-shot Wiltontype fabric. Where a conventional two-shot construction is used having upper and lower planes of filling shots bound together by chain warps and a plurality of stutter warps carried between the shots, it is well known to weave the face yarn under some or all of the upper shots. This construction does have, however, some disadvantage from a quality standpoint in that the pile material is not bound as firmly as in other constructions and, also, the weight and stiffness of the ground fabric is not all that might be desired. However, in carrying all or substantially all of the face yarn through to the back or running dead along with the stulfer, there is a very substantial increase in cost because of the amount of relatively expensive yarn that is used.
The present invention, therefore, has for its object the provision in a two-shot Wilton weave of a construction in which the pile yarn is intermittently carried through to the back and then brought up to the face. A further object of the invention is to provide an improved Wiltontype fabric in which each pile yarn is carried through to the back and tied under one bottom shot, whereupon it is brought up to work in the face between the succeeding top and bottom shots.
A further object of the invention is to provide a Wiltontype fabric in which there are not more than three pile projections in the same warp yarn carried upwardly between successive top shots followed by a semi-void in which the yarn is carried through to the back and tied in around only one bottom shot.
A further object of the invention is to provide a Wiltontype fabric of the type described in which there are two face yarns in each dent and one of the yarns is carried through to the back on every other bottom shot.
Further objects will be apparent from the drawings and specification in which Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view of a fabric woven in accordance with the present invention,
Fig. 2 is a section as seen at 2-2 of Fig. 1,
Fig. 3 is a section as seen at 33 of Fig. l, and
Fig. 4 is a section as seen at 44 of Fig. l.
The preferred form of the present invention utilizes a conventional two-shot Wilton-type fabric construction having stufier warps 10, chain warps 11 and 12, a series of co-planar top shots 13, 13 and a series of co planar bottom shots 14, 14. The weaving of such a two-shot type ground fabric is conventional and well known in the art. The face or pile of the fabric is formed of two warp yarns 15 and 16 in every dent, as shown in Fig. 1. Warp yarn 15 is tied down under three succeeding top shots 13a, 13b, and 130, and is carried up between these 2,849,030 Patented Aug. 26, 1958 upwardly'above bottom shot 14c and under top shot 13a,
so that a semi-void at 17 is formed. Yarn 15 then continues to weave loops or tufts for a plurality of transverse rows, preferably no more than three.
The other warp yarn 16 in the same dent as yarn 15 is carried down through to the back under bottom shot 14b and then up to the face between top shot 13c and bottom shot 14c, thus providing a semi-void at 18. Yarn 16 then works to form three pile loops or tufts in succeeding rows before it is again brought through to the back to be bound under bottom shot 14 thus providing a void at 19.
This offset arrangement of the voids conserves face yarn and at the same time provides a very satisfactory binding and strengthening of the ground fabric. It will be noticed by referring to Fig. 1 that every other transverse row in each dent has two pile loops or four projections, whereas the intermediate row carries two projections (one loop), first the yarn 15 and then the yarn 16. Furthermore, if the yarns are staggered weftwise from dent to dent, it will be noticed that the yarns in the adjoining dent, as seen in Fig. 3, complement those in the dent shown in Fig. 2, so that weftwise there are two pile loops in dent A and one loop in dent B in the first transverse row reading from left to right in Fig. 1. In the second row there are two loops in dent B and one in dent A and so on across the fabric. However, it will be noted that there is a repeat every fifth row because the yarns in each dent are carried through to the back alternately. Weftwise of the fabric the repeat occurs also on every fifth dent for the same reason.
To be strictly accurate, a void indicates an area in the fabric Where there is no pile projection between adjacent filling shots and chain warps, so that the areas or gaps 17 and 18 are, strictly speaking, semi-voids rather than full voids. For the purpose of this description, however, the term is used to include any area where either pile yarn is not brought up to the face to form face pile projections. The present fabric employs three double pile projections for each adjacent pair of weftwise rows, and the void or semi-void is offset weftwise back and forth across the dent. The through-to-the-back construction on every other bottom shot and every fourth shot for each warp pile provides excellent tuft bind and prevents unsightly pulling through of a warp if a loop is snagged. This accomplishes a completely satisfactory through-tothe-back bind with a substantial saving in the amount of pile yarn used. A further advantage of my improved construction in this regard resides in the staggered or offset weave to provide a through-to-the-back bind in every dent under every other bottom shot. Even if snagging should occur, it would be unlikely, if not impossible, to snag one of the two loops projecting between adjacent top shots. Therefore, if a pair of loops should be snagged, there is always a through-to-the-back bind on one of them adjacent the point of snagging.
Having thus described our invention, we claim:
1. A Wilton-type pile fabric having a plurality of coplanar top shots, a plurality of co-planar bottom shots, stulfer warps separating said top and bottom shots, chain warps for binding said top and bottom shots together, and at least two pile warps in warpwise parallel relationship, one of said pile warps being tied down under three successive top shots, carried through to the back under a fourth top andbottom shots and carried back to the facebetweenthe fifth top and bottom shots.
2. A fabric in accordance with claim 1 in which the second pile warp is staggered weftwise sothat it is carriedthrough to the back and under every other alternate bottom shot than those bottom shots which bind the first pile warp.
3. A- Wilton-type fabric having aplurality of top filling shots, a plurality of bottomfilling shots, stulierwarps separating saidtop and bottom fillingshots, chain warps, a pair of pile warps running in each dent between adjacent chain warps, each pile warpbeing bound under no more than three succeeding top filling shots and carried through to the back under a fourth bottom shot to'provide' a semi-void between the fourth and fifth top filling shots.
4. A fabric in accordance with claim 3 in which the other pile yarn in the dent is offset warpwise to provide a through-to-the-back binding under every other bottom filling shot.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,325,520 Krijger July 27, 1943 2,685,894 Parlin Aug. 10, 1954 2,708,458 Gebert May 17, 1955 2,758,613 Schmitz Aug. 14, 1956
US651287A 1957-04-08 1957-04-08 Pile fabric Expired - Lifetime US2849030A (en)

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Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2325520A (en) * 1939-07-28 1943-07-27 Krijger Willem Jacobus Pile fabric
US2685894A (en) * 1952-11-28 1954-08-10 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Manufacture of single and multiframe jacquard woven carpets
US2708458A (en) * 1952-03-14 1955-05-17 Lees & Sons Co James Pile fabric
US2758613A (en) * 1952-05-29 1956-08-14 Paul J Schmitz Wire loom manufacture of pattern pile fabrics

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2325520A (en) * 1939-07-28 1943-07-27 Krijger Willem Jacobus Pile fabric
US2708458A (en) * 1952-03-14 1955-05-17 Lees & Sons Co James Pile fabric
US2758613A (en) * 1952-05-29 1956-08-14 Paul J Schmitz Wire loom manufacture of pattern pile fabrics
US2685894A (en) * 1952-11-28 1954-08-10 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Manufacture of single and multiframe jacquard woven carpets

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