US2847150A - Collar holder - Google Patents

Collar holder Download PDF

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Publication number
US2847150A
US2847150A US595662A US59566256A US2847150A US 2847150 A US2847150 A US 2847150A US 595662 A US595662 A US 595662A US 59566256 A US59566256 A US 59566256A US 2847150 A US2847150 A US 2847150A
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Prior art keywords
collar
shirt
folding
operating
holding
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US595662A
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Edmund N Neckel
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American Laundry Machinery Co
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American Laundry Machinery Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F89/00Apparatus for folding textile articles with or without stapling
    • D06F89/02Apparatus for folding textile articles with or without stapling of textile articles to be worn, e.g. shirts
    • D06F89/023Apparatus for folding textile articles with or without stapling of textile articles to be worn, e.g. shirts of shirts
    • D06F89/026Details, e.g. collar holders
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D85/00Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials
    • B65D85/18Containers, packaging elements or packages, specially adapted for particular articles or materials for wearing apparel, headwear or footwear
    • B65D85/182Shirt packaging and display supports

Description

I Allg- 12, 1958 E. N. NECKEL 2,847,150

COLLAR HOLDER Filed July 3. 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 E. N. NEcKEL y COLLAR HOLDER Aug. 12, 1958 Filed July 3, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 JNVENTOR. fana/va /k v/Ye'cma-z.

/j @L-.9 a?. @zum @fran/Veys E.N.NECKELI COLLAR HOLDER Aug. 12, 1958 3 Sheets-Shea?l 3 Filed July 3, 1956 INVENToR. Fond/vo /V. /VEc x54 United States atent iiice 2,847,150 Patented Aug. 12, 1958 COLLAR HOLDER Edmund N. Neckel, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to The American Laundry Machinery Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Application July 3, 19'56, Serial N o. 595,662

9 Claims. ('Cl. 22S-52.1)

This invention relates to collar holding and shaping devices which, among other adaptations, are used in connection with means for folding or finishing laundered articles such as shirts. While not necessarily restricted thereto, the invention will be described as used in the operation of folding a finished shirt. Obviously the invention can also be adapted for holding and maintaining the shape of a shirt collar during other operations involving other parts of the shirt body.

Collar holding devices of the general nature of those to Ibe herein described have previously been known and used. While quite useful, they have been characterized by certain attendant disadvantages. The commonly used type of holder has been of the stand-up form wherein the collar is positioned with its sides and back substantially upright relative to the folded body of the shirt. In this type of holder the finished collar is roughly circular or tends towards a heart shape, and the pressed finish shows no creases, this being especially desirable when the collar finish is stiff.

To preserve the stiff collar appearance during packaging and further handling and transportation of wrapped shirts, laundries have provided stiffening and protecting cardboard forms, some of which have one portion designed to underlie the shirt being folded, and an extended portion to be turned inwardly over the collar at the end of the folding operation and preliminary to wrapping. During said folding operation the extended cardboard portion normally projects rearwardly and tends to overhang downwardly. In previously used types of adjustable-size collar holders, the operating mechanism `had portions extending rearwardly beneath the end of the folding table which tended to interfere with the temporary disposal of the extra cardboard portion.

An object of the present invention is to provide operating means for the movable elements of a collar holder, which operating means is disposed in a novel and improved arrangement, so that itlies compactly beneath the collar holder, and so that its operating parts and the means for moving said parts do not extend rearwardly to an extent which might be interfered with by any overhanging portion of the cardboard stiffener means.

Another object of the invention is to provide operating means of the character defined in the last preceding paragraph, which means is compact enough to =be out of the path of operating movement of any movable shirt folding elements.

Another object of the invention is to provide collar holding means havingadjustably movable parts accommodatable to the use therewith of shaping and holding elements suited either for a stiff stand-up type collar, or a partially collapsed collar having several creases therein along which the collar may naturally yield when subjected to packing or wrapping pressures.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent from a study of the following description in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a bottom plan view showing the operating mechanism for a collar holder exemplifying the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1, from which position the operating elements and collar holding devices are shown mainly in side elevation.

Fig. 3 is a top plan view, as normally viewed by the operator, the movable parts being in an intermediate position. In the views of Figs. 1 and 2 the elements are shown in the position they occupy when the collar holding devices are in contracted position.

Fig. 4 is a top plan View of a partially collapsed shirt collar.

Fig. 5 is a side elevational view of the configuration of the collar of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a folded shirt with a cardboard stiifener and special collar protecting means such as discussed hereinabove.

Fig. 7 is a side elevational view of a somewhat modified embodiment of the invention adapted for use with the collar protecting means shown in Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a top plan view of the embodiment shown in Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a bottom plan view showing the operating mechanism for the embodiment of Figs. 7 and 8.

Glancing briefly at Figs. 4 and 5, there is illustrated a fragmentary portion of a folded shirt 10 showing a collar 11 of the partially collapsed type. This is the collar type associated with the holding means best seen in Figs. 2 and 3. Said holding means includes a front block or element 12, the collar-contacting surface 12a, of which is shaped to generally conform to the inner surface of the neckband part of the collar in the neighborhood of the button. The holding means also includes a pair of additional elements here shown as knurled fingers 13 and 14 mounted independently of each other and of element 12, and spaced rearwardly from element 12 and laterally from each other. As will appear, all three elements are disposed to be convergently or divergently movable. In practice a laundered shirt is turned button strip downwardly on table 15 (Fig. 2). The collar holder elements are contracted in a manner to be described below, and the buttened shirt collar is lowered so as to surround them. The elements are then permitted to expand and engage the neckband tightly enough, under spring bias in the present instance, so that the ngers 13 and 14 crease the collar at the points 11a (Fig. 4). A folding plate 16 (Fig. 2) may be hinged to the folding table at 16a, or some other suitable device, attached or otherwise, may be used around which the shirt is folded. The collar holder elements are again contracted or caused to converge so that the collar may be released, and the shirt then withdrawn from the folding plate or other attached folding device if one was used.

As best seen in Fig. 2, the collar holder is supported in a cut-out or well in the folding table. A dished base plate or floor member 19 has at its forward end an upturned wall 19a, and this in turn is provided with a connecting flange 19b by which it is attached to the underside of the folding table 15 at the forward edge of the well. All operating mechanism is supported above and below the base plate-19, the dimensions being such that the top surface of the collar holder elements are approximately at the level of folding table 15, and no moving part extends to any marked extent rearwardly of the base plate.

The means whereby the elements 12, 13 and 14 are mounted and operated will now be described. Their operating mechanisms are mutually so linked. that suitable movement of all elements takes place simultaneously.

The formed front element 12 is carried on a slide bar 22 movable forwardly and rearwardly in a slot 23 in base plate. Screw 24 extends upwardly through block 26, through slide bar 22, and seats in a guide member 27. Screw 25 and another screw '28 extend up through spacers in slot 23, and thereby fasten element 12 to slide bar 22. The rear end of bar 22 (right end in- Figs. 1 and 2) slides between adjacent ends of a' pair of iitjted guides 29 and 30, secured beneath base 19 by 'studs 31, and is retained and guided by a recess in the bottom face of bracket 42 soon to be described. These guides have an additional function as will appear.

Depending from the rear end of slide bar 22 is a clevis 34 having legs 34a and 34b between which the end of a piston rod 35 is secured. This rod responds to movement of a piston 36 in a fluid power motor cylinder 37 which receives its power uid, usually air, through a pipe 38. Valve means and other control elements are not shown but may be conventional. The valve may be operated by foot pedal or otherwise, or even automatically in a sequence of events in a cycle. It will be noted that admission of air to cylinder 37 moves piston 36 and rod 35 from idle position to the right, carrying slide bar 22 and collar holding element 12 therewith. The slide bar and associated elements are in approximately the extreme right position in Fig. 2. When uid power is cut off and exhausted, the piston, piston rod, and slide bar are returned to idle position, at the left, by a compression spring 39 which surrounds the mid portion of connecting rod 35, and is compressed between piston 36 and a washer 40 backed by the leg 41 of a bracket 42 on plate 19.

Fingers 13 and 14 are attached to respective carriers 44 and 45 which in turn are attached by studs 46 and 46a to slide blocks or at bars 47 and 48. These blocks are laterally movable in guides 29 and 30. Movement of blocks 47 and 48 is effected through swinging movement of a pair of respective bell crank levers 51 and 52 which are pivotally mounted on the base plate 19. Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, lever 52 has a boss portion 52a perforated to receive a pivot bolt 53, the assembly being retained by nut 54. Both bell crank levers 51 and 5 2 are constructed and mounted similarly, and are simultaneously operated, though their operating output is directed in opposite directions.

A transversely disposed actuator member 57 has oppositely extending arms 57a and 57b. Near their inner ends they have upturned portions which are secured to block 26 which, it will be recalled, travels with slide bar 22, so that actuator 57 moves along with the slide bar 22. Referring to actuator arm 57a, it will be noted that it is provided at its outer end with an upstanding operating pin 58 which enters a slot in the arm 52b of lever 52. Similarly, a pin 59 on the outer end of arm 57h enters a slot in the arm 51b of bell crank 51. Movement of actuator 57, for example to the left, Figs. l and 2, will rock cranks 51 and 52 in opposite directions, counterclockwise for crank 52 and clockwise for crank 51.

Arms 51h and 52b may herein be termed the operated ends of the bell crank levers, and arms 51e and 52C the operating ends. These operating ends are linked to slide blocks 47 and 48 as follows, reference being made only to the linkage to block 48. Stud bolt 46a has a downwardly extending shank passing through a slot in the tip of lever arm 52e, and since stud 46a is fixed in block 48, counterclockwise movement of bell crank 52 will move block 48 outwardly in slot 50.

The operation of the embodiment just described will now be quite clear. In idle position air has already been admitted to cylinder 37 driving piston 36 to the right, and by means of piston rod 35 and clevis bracket 34 moving slide bar 22 and actuator 57 to the right, thereby also moving holder element 12 to the right. Simultaneously the bell crank levers 51 and 52 rotate, moving `slide blocks 47 and 48 towards each other. The collar holder elements therefore are in converged or contracted relationship.

The operator then lays a shirt on the table 15, button strip downwardly, and dresses the collar around elements 12, 13 and 14. Air is thereupon exhausted from cylinder 37 and spring 39 returns the piston and associated members to the left, expanding the collar holder to tight engagement with the collar. The operator then folds the shirt, again admits air to piston 38, removes the folded shirt from table 15, and again exhausts cylinder 37.

Collar holders have heretofore been known and used in which toggle or bell crank leverages were used to operate collar holder elements. In such prior devices the bell crank pivots were disposed outwardly and rearwardly of the collar holder, and the operating means for the bell cranks extended a material distance rearwardly from the operating ends of the cranks. Further the elbows of the bell cranks were disposed outwardly so that the crank sectors opened or diverged inwardly, and the operated ends of the crank arms were connected directly to an equivalent of the present slide bar.

In my present invention this prior arrangement has been completely revised. The bell crank pivots are disposed beneath the collar holder and are much closer together. The bell crank sectors now diverge outwardly, and the operating connection to the slide blocks is at the inner ends of the respective crank arms instead of at the outer ends as previously. Further the operated connection to the other arms of the bell cranks is not made with the slide bar, as previously, but to a separate actuator permitting an outer end or laterally spread operated connection.

All of this construction, with consequent direction reversals of significant movements, permits the operating parts to be rearranged in a most compact group, thereby preventing any interference between the collar holding means, the wrapping accessories, and the folding devices.

So far I have described the present invention as directed to the holding of a collar in a partially collapsed configuration. I will now describe the embodiment illus- `trated in Figs. 6, 7, 8 and 9 which show means for holding the stiif or stand-up type of collar in cooperation with the use of a cardboard stiffener and collar guard of a type recently introduced.

The older types of collar holders hereinabove generally characterized proved satisfactory when a shirt was merely intended to be folded around a rectangle of cardboard. New packaging arrangements are beginning to come on the market, and their main purpose is to provide support for the finished shirt collar, such support being developed most conveniently from a unitary piece of cardboard,

As shown in Fig. 6, the packaged shirt 62 has been folded about a rectangular central section of cardboard (63, Fig. 7), and back extension 63a, 63b has been folded up and over the stand-up collar. Portion 63b has a cut-out and pieces 63e which fold down inside the collar band. All of these sections are originally (Fig. 7) in straight, flat condition. A separate piece 65 has one part inserted under the folded collar at the front and another portion (not shown) folded over in back of the band through the cut-out in 63b. In some types of packaging the under-collar strip is attached to the other parts of the cardboard. In many folding tables, particularly the automatic types, there is a central forming plate 66 pivotally supported in back of the collar holder, and various other folding wings, tail holders, and associated mechanism form obstructions to the extending cardboard when in its at state. The cardboard could be folded down in back of the collar, but in the case of certain prior art devices herein-above characterized, the base extends back, as noted, beyond the back of the collar line, preventing such folding down ofthe cardboard.

Accordingly, as previously indicated, the mechanism has been redesigned so that the parts are situated forward o'f the back collar line, allowing the ycardboard to be bent down out of the way -of the folder mechanism. This is `indicated in Figs. 7, 8 and 9. The standup collar form is the regular type used in this unit, comprising thin metal bands 67a, 67b, 67e, 67d, 67e. Front piece 67a has hinged to it parts 67b and 67e and is supported on carrier 68. Parts 67d and 67e are secured to carriers 69, 70 respectively and their back portions are slidable on a fixed supporting piece 71 having an overlying lip 71a. The bottom edges of sections 67b and 67e are guided in a curved slot or track in carriers 69 and 70.

The operating mechanism for carriers 68, 69 and 70 is substantially identical with that heretofore described in connection with the operative movements of the collar holding parts 12, 13 and 14 (Fig. 3). Carriers 68, 69, and 70 are secured, through respective slots 73, 74 and 75 in the base plate, to sliding members 76, 77 and 78. Again it may be here emphasized that the bell cranks 79 'and 80 are pivoted forwardly of sliding members 77 and 78 and instead of being simply reversed from back to front, they are also reversed laterally.

The operation of folding the shirt will be apparent from what has 'already been said. A shirt to be folded is placed front down on the table, and the collar is dressed around the contracted bands 67a, 67b, 67e, 67d, 67e, which are then allowed to expand within the collar. The cardboard 63 is placed on top of the shirt, with the parts 63a and 6311 overhanging, as shown in Fig. 7, and the plate 66 is swung downwardly. A shield 81 separates the depending part of the cardboard from the operating mechanism for the collar holder. After the shirt has been folded around the cardboard part 63, the collar form is contracted and the mechanism 66 is swung up to the position shown in broken line in Fig. 7. The folded shirt is then slipped off the swinging means 66 'and the cardboard parts 63a and 63b are swung upwardly and forwardly to achieve the configuration shown in Fig. 6. Other cardboard arrangements can of course be utilized.

What I claim is:

l. In shirt folding means of the type wherein a laundered shirt is laid upon a folding surface with its collar downwardly disposed, collar holding means and operating means therefor comprising a pair of internal side collar supports movable in a path transversely with respect to the folding surface and convergently and divergently with respect to each other, a front collar support movable longitudinally towards and away from said path, and means for operatively moving said side collar supports comprising a pair of bell crank levers disposed immediately beneath said supports, each crank lever having a pair of arms extending away from a pivot point beneath said supports and in an outwardly divergent sector, the two said pivot points being disposed one each side of and adjacent to a longitudinal central vertical plane through the collar form, the driving arm of each crank lever extending generally along and adjacent to said vertical plane and having an operating end connected to a respective side collar support, the driven arm of each crank lever extending generally outwardly away from said vertical plane, actuating means operatively connecting thevtwo outer ends of the two driven arms whereby to be adapted to produce simultaneous operative movement of both crank levers, and consequently simultaneous movement of said side collar supports.

2. Collar holding means as dened in claim 1 wherein said pivot points lie in a vertical plane on the shirt-body side of the side collar supports.

3. Collar holding means 'as defined in claim l wherein said actuating means is also operatively connected to the front collar support whereby to produce simultaneous operative movement of said side collar supports and said front collar support.

4. Collar holding means as defined in claim l wherein said actuating means consists of an elongated member extending laterally beneath said collar holding means.

5. Collar holding means as defined in claim 4 wherein said front collar support is operatively connected to a midportion of said actuating means.

6. Collar holding means as defined in claim 4 wherein said two outer ends of said driven means are connected to laterally widely spaced points on said actuating means.

7. In shirt folding means of the type whereinv a laundered shirt is laid upon a folding surface with its collar downwardly disposed, collar holding means and operating means therefor comprising a pair of internal side collar supports simultaneously movable in a plane transversely with respect to said folding surface, and laterally convergently and divergently movable with respect' to each other, said operating means including a pair of levers each one effective on a respective side collar` support and disposed beneath its respective side collar support to produce the aforesaid convergent and divergent movement, and manipulating means having a respective operating connection to each said lever, said levers and said manipulating means being confined to a space on the shirt body side of a transverse vertical plane through said side collar supports.

8. Collar holding means as dened in claim 7 including a front internal collar support, and wherein said manipulating means also has an operating connection to said front internal collar support whereby to produce simultaneous movement of all said supports.

9. In shirt folding means of the type wherein a laundered shirt is laid upon a folding surface with its collar downwardly disposed, collar holding means therefor comprising a plurality of internal collar supports, said collar supports being movable towards and from contact with the inner surface of the collar, the collar-contacting surfaces of said collar supports being inclined at such angle to said folding surface that a collar dressed thereon will be held in partially collapsed relationship to the shirt front, said collar supports consisting of a front support and two rear side supports spaced laterally from each other and longitudinally away from said front support, said rear side supports being disposed slightly divergently laterally with respect to each other in a. direction away from said folding surface, and being likewise inclined towards said front support in the same said direction, said rear side supports having roughened surface portions adapted to frictionally retain the collar in dressed position on the supports.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,192,786 Campbell Mar. 5, 1940 2,504,934 Luke Apr. 18, 1950 2,768,774 Rieck Oct. 30, 1956

US595662A 1956-07-03 1956-07-03 Collar holder Expired - Lifetime US2847150A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2948441A (en) * 1956-10-02 1960-08-09 David A Freeman Collar molding means
US2972437A (en) * 1957-05-31 1961-02-21 Ward Ind Corp Collar former device
US3227333A (en) * 1964-02-14 1966-01-04 Spartans Ind Inc Collar shaper device
US3901420A (en) * 1973-01-23 1975-08-26 Antonio Lozano Revuelta Machine for ironing shirt collars

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2192786A (en) * 1938-02-14 1940-03-05 Key Tag Checking System Compan Collar ironing device
US2504934A (en) * 1948-03-25 1950-04-18 Kokchong Lew Apparatus for and method of folding collars
US2768774A (en) * 1954-03-01 1956-10-30 G H Bishop Company Collar former

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2192786A (en) * 1938-02-14 1940-03-05 Key Tag Checking System Compan Collar ironing device
US2504934A (en) * 1948-03-25 1950-04-18 Kokchong Lew Apparatus for and method of folding collars
US2768774A (en) * 1954-03-01 1956-10-30 G H Bishop Company Collar former

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2948441A (en) * 1956-10-02 1960-08-09 David A Freeman Collar molding means
US2972437A (en) * 1957-05-31 1961-02-21 Ward Ind Corp Collar former device
US3227333A (en) * 1964-02-14 1966-01-04 Spartans Ind Inc Collar shaper device
US3901420A (en) * 1973-01-23 1975-08-26 Antonio Lozano Revuelta Machine for ironing shirt collars

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