US2841863A - Rubber lined bottle caps - Google Patents

Rubber lined bottle caps Download PDF

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US2841863A
US2841863A US43682254A US2841863A US 2841863 A US2841863 A US 2841863A US 43682254 A US43682254 A US 43682254A US 2841863 A US2841863 A US 2841863A
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Prior art keywords
bottle
rubber
cap
stopper
metal
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Geisler William
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Wilbro Corp
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Wilbro Corp
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B21MECHANICAL METAL-WORKING WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21DWORKING OR PROCESSING OF SHEET METAL OR METAL TUBES, RODS OR PROFILES WITHOUT ESSENTIALLY REMOVING MATERIAL; PUNCHING METAL
    • B21D51/00Making hollow objects
    • B21D51/16Making hollow objects characterised by the use of the objects
    • B21D51/38Making inlet or outlet arrangements of cans, tins, baths, bottles, or other vessels; Making can ends; Making closures
    • B21D51/44Making closures, e.g. caps
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C45/00Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C45/14Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor incorporating preformed parts or layers, e.g. injection moulding around inserts or for coating articles
    • B29C45/1418Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor incorporating preformed parts or layers, e.g. injection moulding around inserts or for coating articles the inserts being deformed or preformed, e.g. by the injection pressure
    • B29C45/14262Clamping or tensioning means for the insert
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C45/00Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor
    • B29C45/14Injection moulding, i.e. forcing the required volume of moulding material through a nozzle into a closed mould; Apparatus therefor incorporating preformed parts or layers, e.g. injection moulding around inserts or for coating articles
    • B29C45/14336Coating a portion of the article, e.g. the edge of the article
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D51/00Closures not otherwise provided for
    • B65D51/002Closures to be pierced by an extracting-device for the contents and fixed on the container by separate retaining means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS
    • B29K2021/00Use of unspecified rubbers as moulding material
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29KINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASSES B29B, B29C OR B29D, RELATING TO MOULDING MATERIALS
    • B29K2705/00Use of metals, their alloys or their compounds, for preformed parts, e.g. for inserts
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29LINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBCLASS B29C, RELATING TO PARTICULAR ARTICLES
    • B29L2031/00Other particular articles
    • B29L2031/56Stoppers or lids for bottles, jars, or the like, e.g. closures
    • B29L2031/565Stoppers or lids for bottles, jars, or the like, e.g. closures for containers
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S215/00Bottles and jars
    • Y10S215/03Medical
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S425/00Plastic article or earthenware shaping or treating: apparatus
    • Y10S425/809Seal, bottle caps only
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49789Obtaining plural product pieces from unitary workpiece
    • Y10T29/4979Breaking through weakened portion
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/4998Combined manufacture including applying or shaping of fluent material

Description

July 8, 1958 w, GElsLER 2,841,863

RUBBER LINED BOTTLE CAPS med June 15, 1954 1 s sheets-sheet 1 NVENToR. 42 F/G. 2/ W/y//bm @afs/ef BY Em@ 2m11.mm 1,1%/

A//Urneys `W. GEISLER RUBBER LINED BOTTLE CAPS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 www? INVENTOR. W/'l//am Ge/'s/er HY n @@M, wail/)mrs f77/J Afforneys July 8, 1958 Filed June 15, 1954 VII July 8, 1958 w. GElsLl-:R 2,841,853

RUBBER LINED BOTTLE CAPS Filed June l5, 1954 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 v INVENTOR. 32 M//Y//am Geisler BY @W41 LLM Mg/Rmvlya/ A f/orneys United States Patent() RUBBER LINED BOTTLE CAPS William Geisler, Tenaiiy, N. J., assignor to Wilbro Corporation, Maywood, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application June 15, 1954, Serial No. 436,822 4 Claims. (Cl. 29-413) This invention relates to a method for making bottle caps, and more particularly to improvements in the method described in my co-pending application Ser. No. 410,584, iiled February 16, 1954, now Patent No. 2,777,411.

In the above mentioned application I have disclosed a method and apparatus for making the conventional crown caps which are used extensively for closures for bottles containing beer and other carbonated beverages.

The invention of the present application relates to the rubber stopper is separate from the metal cap and has to be applied by hand to the bottles to maintain complete sterility, and after being so stoppered by hand the bottles must then be sealed with the metal cap, which may be done by bottle capping machines. The procedure thus involves four steps: the making of the bottle cap, the making of the rubber stopper, the application of the rubber stopper by hand under sterile conditions, and finally the bottle capping operation. By the improved procedure constituting the invention of this application the combined rubber and metal closure is made at one operation by fully automatic machines, the combined stopper being of such character that its application to the bottle may be carried out by conventional automatic bottle capping machinery.

My improved procedure makes a much tighter and safer seal for the bottle for the reason that the rubber stopper is securely vulcanized to the inner face of the metal cap and is applied to the bottle under the pressure ofthe capping machine instead of by hand.

My invention also involves a modified form of closure for bottles for iluids for hypodermic administration which is both cheaper and better than the conventional closure.

My invention also embodies a modification of my prior process wherein the metal portion of the cap is so constructed that the cap, although applied in such manner as to provide a tight seal for carbonated beverages, may be readily removed by hand without the conventional bottle opener. This modified form of closure is'also made by completely automatic machinery and is of a character to be applied by conventional bottle capping machines.

In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated the successive steps performed in carrying out each of the threermoditied procedures, and in the said drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a portion of the metal sheet ICC from which the metal caps for the conventional stopper for bottles for iiuids for hypodermic administration are made.

Fig. 2 is a section of a `portion of the extrusion press with the parts assembled Iready for the extrusion operation;

Figs. 3, 4 and 5 are similar views showing the successive steps of the extrusion operation;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of a section of the metal sheet with the Stoppers vulcanized thereto;

Figs. 7 and 8 are diagrammatic views in section showing the shaping of the metal cap;

Fig. 9 is a perspective'view partlybroken away showing the finished cap; t

Fig. 10 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 but showing the mold for making Ia modified form of the closure of Fig. 9;

Fig. 1l is a perspective view partially broken away of the modiiied form of closure;

Fig. 12 is a plan view of the sheet used for making a tear-strip closure for carbonated beverages;

Fig. 13 is `a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 showing the shape of the mold for the tear-strip closure;

Figs. l4and l5 are diagrammatic views in section Y showing the cutting, scoring and shaping operations;

Fig. 16 is a plan view of the closure after the cutting and scoring operations but before the shaping operation;

Fig. 17 is a section on line 17-17 of Fig. 15;

Fig. 18 is an elevational view partly in section showing the closure applied to the bottle; and

Figs. 19, 20 and 21 are detail views showing a moditied form of tear-strip closure. i

Referring to the drawings, particularly to Figs. l to 5, 1 indicates the bottom plate of the molding press which is similar to the press described in my abo'vementioned co-pending application except in minor particulars which will be later described. 2 represents the upper plate of the press wherein cavities 3 are formed of the shape desired for the molded rubber stopper and entrance ports 4 for the rubber to the molds, said ports being of the same tapered conguration as the ports in my previously filed application with the smallest diameter of the taper at the top wall of the cavity 3, whereby, when the stripper plate 5 which overlies theY die-forming plate 2 is elevated, the rubber compound will break away from the rubber in the mold at the junction of the mold and the entrance port.

The stripper plate 5 forms the bottom plate of the extruson press, which plate is formed with ports 6 registering with the ports 4 in the upper mold plate. The upper face of the stripper plate 5 is provided around its perimeter with upstanding flanges 7 to confine the sheet of rubber or other -rnolding compound which is forced by the press member 8 through the registering ports 4 and 6 into the molds.

The molded stopper here shown is of the same shape as the conventional separate rubber stopper used for closures of this kind, that is to say, it has a portion '10 which projects into the neck of the bottle when the stopper is applied and a head 11 which covers the neck of the bottle and fills the metal cap 1-2 when the latter is applied. The neck portion of the stopper is recessed on the under -side to reduce the thickness of the middle portion of the stopper through which lthe physician thrusts his needle. The cap 12 is the conventional cap of sheet aluminum which is in th-e present day procedure applied to the stoppered bottles in a sealing machine, which spins the downwardly projecting margin of the stopper under the ange at the top of neck of `the 'bottle inthe usual manner.

To facilitate the use of thebottle by the physician the 3 middle portion of the capis cut and scored in the manner shown so -that the physician may without tools bend up an edge of the cut and scored central part and detach it from the bottle, leaving a small portion of the rubber stopper exposed sothatthe hypodermic needle may be thrust through the rubber stopper without removing the rest of the closure from the bottle.

iIn adaptingfthe method ot manufacture described in my prior app-lication to the manufacture of this type of bottle closure, the bottom plate 1 of the mold is provided with spaced circular recesses 13 of a size to receive the central cut and vscored portion of the cap so that the scored vportion will `not be flattened down bythe pressure of the rub'ber against the area surrounding the central portion. VBy providing these recesses 13 in the bottom plate of the mold the flat metal of the plate surrounding the central scored'portion lies flat against lthe metal of the mold and consequently prevents any extrusion of rulbber through the slits in the scored portion and between the metal of the cap and the yface of the mold. As stated in my above-mentioned application, the rubber forming the 'bottle closure is vulcanized firmly to the face of the metal plate at 'the same time that the rubber compound itself is vulcanized. This may vbe done by placing the sheets, after they are removed from the press in the usual mann-er in an oven or tunnel at vuln canizing temperatures for the required period of time.

The usual procedure as shown in Figs. 7 and 8 is followed in making the bottle caps from the sheets to which th-e Stoppers are applied as above described. The shaping plunger 15 is `shaped at its end to fit the upper face of the lbottle stopper and its extending flange. The pressure required for shaping the aluminum disk is such that the rubber stopper will transmit the force of the plunger necessary to shape the cap Without significant compression.

The plunger 15 is surrounded by a cylindrical knife 16` which cuts out the `disks of aluminum in advance of the shaping operation so that when the plunger thrusts a c ap and attached m-etal disk into the die 17 a bottle closure will be formed of the conventional shape now employed but with rubber portion held in place by the adhesion of the kmolded rubber to the metal.

It will vbe understood that in practice the presses used are gang presses which at one operation shape as many caps as can 'be made of a single sheet.

The *bottle closures so made may be applied to the bottles by the same machine as now used for placing the aluminum caps over the previously stoppered bottles and spinning the ange beneath the llange of the neck of the bottle. The exterior dimensions of the caps with the rubber Stoppers inside are the same as the caps without such Stoppers and as the caps are placed over -the Stoppers by a downward movement of the cap, the same movement will, in placing the Stoppers over the bottle necks, cause the middle stopper portion of the rubber to enter the neck of the bottle into which it is forced by the plunger which holds the cap on `the bottle during the spinning operation.

In Figs. 10 and 1v1 I have shown a modied form of clos-ure for bottles containing uids for hypodermic administration wherein the metal ca-p, `instead of having a middle lportion cut and scored for easy removal, is formed with a central hole of approximately the same diameter as the removable piece. IThese holes 2% are punched in the aluminum sheet before the rubber cap is applied so that when the rubber portion is molded onto the face of the sheet the rubber will extend into the hole as shown more particularly in Fig. 10. The rubber portion may on its exposed side *be of the same yshape as in the previously described structure wherein a stopper to project the neck of the lbottle is provided. Instead, an entirely satisfactory seal is obtained with less rubber by providing the rubber closure with a marginal flange 21 which is pressed against the neck of the bottle by the bottle cap machine and there held `when the llower edge ofthe cap is spun beneath the tlange on the bottle neck.

As the top surface of the bottle cap when so made is flat with the exposed rubber flush with the surrounding metal it can be rendered sterile by wiping off with alcohol or otherwise when used by the physician more readily than the conventionall closure where the surrounding metal overlies the exposed face of the rubber but is not attached to it 4so that there are unsterile surfaces of the metal and rubber surrounding the exposed portion of the rubber, which surfaces are diflcu'lt to sterilize.

In Figs. 1248, inclusive, I have shown a modification of the process as adapted to the manufacture of caps for 'beverage bottles and cans of the so-called tear-strip type. For making s-uch closures a sheet of aluminum 2li is employed of the same character as used in making the previously described closure. The portions of the sheet Whichform the .tops of the bottle closures may be previously embossed or otherwise marked with the name of the beverage or other desired legend. The extrusion press used for molding the rubber disks onto the face of the plate is of the same structure as that shown in Fig. l0, but with the individual molds somewhat more widely spaced to provide a flange of metal of greater ldiameter around the rubber disks as necessary to t over the flanges ofthe conventional beverage bottles and cans. The molds are also spaced to provide for the projecting end 25 of the tear-strip tobe cut from the metal 'between the closures.

After the rubber disks are molded onto the face of the aluminum sheet the sheet'is placed in a gang punch for simultaneously cutting out the metal for the caps and shaping them around the rubber disk for application to the Ybottle neck. One of the punches used for this purpose is diagrammatically shown in Figs. 14 and 15 and comprises in addition to the shaping plunger 26, a cutting knife 27 and intermediate scoring knife 28 which operates simultaneously with the cutting knife 27 to score a ring almost completely around the rubber disk, as indicated at 29,l Fig. 16, and also a short connecting score line 30 between the annular score line 29 and one edge of the tear stripextension 25. After the disks are cut and scored as indicated, the lforming plunger 31 whose end is shaped to conform with the rubber disk forces the metal disk with the attached rubber disk into the die 32 to shape the cap in the manner shown.

In Fig. 18 the tear strip cap is shown as applied to the conventional beverage bottle. The lower edge of the metal flange surrounding the rubber gasket is spun under the flange on the bottle neck with the extension 25 of the tear strip extending downwardly along the neck of the bottle where it may be readily grasped with the fingers and pulled away from the bottle neck, which movement causes the cap to tear along the score line 29, thereby detaching the closure from the bottle neck. As shown, the score line 251 does not extend quite all the way around the cap, but a short portion is lleft Unscored as indicated at 33 adjacent the juncture of the score lines 29 and 30. Whenthe score line 29 is torn throughout more than three-quarters the circumference of the bottle the cap as a whole may be readily dislodged, whereas if the score line is torn throughout the entire circumference, as it might be with a quick jerk on the tear strip extension, the middle part of the cap will be blown off the bottle by the force of the carbonated beverage.

In Figs. 19, 20 and 21 I have illustrated a somewhat modified form of closure wherein the rubber stopper feature of the closure shown in Figs. l to 9, inclusive, is combined with the tear strip feature of the stopper shown in Figs. l2 to 18, inclusive, to provide a replaceable stopper for use as a closure for the bottle or can should the contents be not consumed at one time. As shown here, the rubber stopper 40 which is extrusion molded and vulcanized to the base sheet 42 is generally ofthe shape shown in Fig. 9, the stopper portion being somewhat extended to fully close the neck of the bottle and lit tightly enough to serve as a leak-proof stopper for the bottle after the removable portion 43 of the cap is detached. The metal portion of the cap is of the same shape as that `shown in Fig. 4 except that the score line 29 extends throughout the entire circumference of the cap so that when the bottle is opened by pulling on the tear strip the lower portion of the metal cap will be entirely removed, leaving the rubber stopper in place with its upper portion covered by a tightly tting metal cap firmly vulcanized thereto.

The stopper of this construction may be used for all manner of liquids. It provides a tight seal which cannot be opened in the rst instance without destroying the seal but at the same time provides after the seal is broken a neat, tightly tting, easily removable stopper for retaining the contents of the bottle until consumed.

A stopper of this form is particularly useful in connection with cans of the type which are now sealed with the conventional Crown cap. The internal pressure of the contents tends to expand the depending flange of the stopper outwardly beneath the bottom edge of the neck in such manner as to increase the resistance of the stopper to withdrawal so that the re-stoppered can will remain tight even though the contained liquid has a substantial degree of remaining effervescence.

In the foregoing specification I have described several modifications of my method of making bottle caps and the resulting caps, but it is to be understood that my invention is not limited to the procedures and structures disclosed except insofar as recited in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The method of making a bottle closure which consists in scoring a thin metal sheet with a series of scored areas spaced from each other to provide a surrounding metal area greater than the overall area of the bottle closure, placing said sheet in a mold member, placing over said mold member a second mold member having recesses registering with said scored areas and shaped to form a bottle closure having an annular outer portion of a diameter to tit against the neck of the bottle, said mold member having a passage extending from the mold cavity to the upper surface of the mold member for the passage of molding compound to be molded therein, placing a third member over said second-mentioned member, said third member having passages registering with the first-mentioned passages, forcing the molding composition through said passage while retaining said three mold members against relative movement, elevating said third mold member to separate the molding composition in said passage from the molded bottle closure, and thereafter cutting from `said sheet disks of metal with the molded bottle closure attached thereto and] shaping said disks to provide metal flanges of a width to be spun under the flange on the neck of the bottle to be closed.

2. The method of claim l wherein the first-mentioned mold member has recesses positioned to underlie the scored areas of said sheet.

3. The method of claim l wherein the cavities in the second mold member are shaped to provide a stopper portion to tit within the neck of the bottle.

4. The method of claim 1 wherein the scoring consists of a circular line and a radial line extending from the circular line and the subsequently cut disk is concentric with said circular line with a radial tab having one edge aligned with said radial line.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 436,638 Taylor Sept. 16, 1890 1,832,321 Owens Nov. 17, 1931 1,989,739 Meyer Feb. 21, 1933 1,995,256 Raworth Mar. 19, 1935 2,184,281 Clark Dec. 26, 1939 2,322,885 Rogers June 29, 1943 2,492,144 Goro Dec. 27, 1949 2,516,647 Rogers et al July 25, 1950 2,520,259 Pummill Aug. 29, 1950 2,543,775 Goro Mar. 6, 1951 2,743,506 Solow May l, 1956

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Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3112561A (en) * 1955-05-17 1963-12-03 Solow Benjamin Method and apparatus for making pencil marking points
US3159318A (en) * 1962-03-20 1964-12-01 Edward H Green Aerosol valve housing construction and method of making same
US3167856A (en) * 1961-11-13 1965-02-02 Standard Products Co Methods of making strip structures
US3195227A (en) * 1963-02-20 1965-07-20 J & S Engineers Ltd Methods of inserting inserts through solid bodies
US3332136A (en) * 1965-07-09 1967-07-25 L Mcbrine Co Ltd Method of manufacturing luggage
US3336427A (en) * 1965-10-07 1967-08-15 Stuart & Co Inc C H Method for making an earring
US3526694A (en) * 1968-02-06 1970-09-01 Jerome H Lemelson Molding techniques
US3619458A (en) * 1969-03-26 1971-11-09 Cefilac Method of making a gasket
US4292735A (en) * 1978-06-16 1981-10-06 U.S. Philips Corporation Method of manufacturing a coplanar photocoupler
US4489018A (en) * 1980-03-25 1984-12-18 Metal Box Limited Method and apparatus for sealing a plastics material to a metal substrate
US4530437A (en) * 1982-05-03 1985-07-23 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Tamperproof package
US4578857A (en) * 1984-05-04 1986-04-01 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Tamperproof package
US6322739B1 (en) * 1997-02-20 2001-11-27 Fresemus Kabi Ab Method of manufacturing pharmaceutical articles
US6607685B2 (en) * 1998-11-04 2003-08-19 Taisei Plas Co., Ltd. Method of producing pierceable stopper

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US436638A (en) * 1890-09-16 Lace or embroidery holder
US1832321A (en) * 1929-01-23 1931-11-17 Owens Robert Stuart Method of making bottle closures
US1989739A (en) * 1932-06-22 1935-02-05 Int Communications Lab Inc Remote control device
US1995256A (en) * 1931-11-18 1935-03-19 Singer Mfg Co Can
US2184281A (en) * 1935-07-26 1939-12-26 Armstrong Cork Co Method of making closures
US2322885A (en) * 1939-05-03 1943-06-29 Bond Mfg Corp Inc Method of making closures for collapsible tubes and the like
US2492144A (en) * 1944-12-30 1949-12-27 Gora Lee Corp Cap for containers
US2516647A (en) * 1946-05-13 1950-07-25 Continental Can Co Method of making closure elements
US2520259A (en) * 1943-12-11 1950-08-29 Edwin W Pummill Self-locking nut and washer
US2543775A (en) * 1949-04-01 1951-03-06 Gora Lee Corp Container closure
US2743506A (en) * 1952-02-23 1956-05-01 Int Resistance Co Method of manufacturing rectifier cells

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US436638A (en) * 1890-09-16 Lace or embroidery holder
US1832321A (en) * 1929-01-23 1931-11-17 Owens Robert Stuart Method of making bottle closures
US1995256A (en) * 1931-11-18 1935-03-19 Singer Mfg Co Can
US1989739A (en) * 1932-06-22 1935-02-05 Int Communications Lab Inc Remote control device
US2184281A (en) * 1935-07-26 1939-12-26 Armstrong Cork Co Method of making closures
US2322885A (en) * 1939-05-03 1943-06-29 Bond Mfg Corp Inc Method of making closures for collapsible tubes and the like
US2520259A (en) * 1943-12-11 1950-08-29 Edwin W Pummill Self-locking nut and washer
US2492144A (en) * 1944-12-30 1949-12-27 Gora Lee Corp Cap for containers
US2516647A (en) * 1946-05-13 1950-07-25 Continental Can Co Method of making closure elements
US2543775A (en) * 1949-04-01 1951-03-06 Gora Lee Corp Container closure
US2743506A (en) * 1952-02-23 1956-05-01 Int Resistance Co Method of manufacturing rectifier cells

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3112561A (en) * 1955-05-17 1963-12-03 Solow Benjamin Method and apparatus for making pencil marking points
US3167856A (en) * 1961-11-13 1965-02-02 Standard Products Co Methods of making strip structures
US3159318A (en) * 1962-03-20 1964-12-01 Edward H Green Aerosol valve housing construction and method of making same
US3195227A (en) * 1963-02-20 1965-07-20 J & S Engineers Ltd Methods of inserting inserts through solid bodies
US3332136A (en) * 1965-07-09 1967-07-25 L Mcbrine Co Ltd Method of manufacturing luggage
US3336427A (en) * 1965-10-07 1967-08-15 Stuart & Co Inc C H Method for making an earring
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