Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Nonwoven fabric and absorbent products

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2833283A
US2833283A US47798254A US2833283A US 2833283 A US2833283 A US 2833283A US 47798254 A US47798254 A US 47798254A US 2833283 A US2833283 A US 2833283A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
binder
web
fabric
acetate
alkyl
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Raymond J Spahr
John K Sumner
Elmer J Yedlick
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
CHICOPEE Manufacturing CORP
Original Assignee
CHICOPEE Manufacturing CORP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/15Absorbent pads, e.g. sanitary towels, swabs or tampons for external or internal application to the body; Supporting or fastening means therefor; Tampon applicators
    • A61F13/51Absorbent pads, e.g. sanitary towels, swabs or tampons for external or internal application to the body; Supporting or fastening means therefor; Tampon applicators characterised by the outer layers
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61FFILTERS IMPLANTABLE INTO BLOOD VESSELS; PROSTHESES; DEVICES PROVIDING PATENCY TO, OR PREVENTING COLLAPSING OF, TUBULAR STRUCTURES OF THE BODY, E.G. STENTS; ORTHOPAEDIC, NURSING OR CONTRACEPTIVE DEVICES; FOMENTATION; TREATMENT OR PROTECTION OF EYES OR EARS; BANDAGES, DRESSINGS OR ABSORBENT PADS; FIRST-AID KITS
    • A61F13/00Bandages or dressings; Absorbent pads
    • A61F13/15Absorbent pads, e.g. sanitary towels, swabs or tampons for external or internal application to the body; Supporting or fastening means therefor; Tampon applicators
    • A61F13/51Absorbent pads, e.g. sanitary towels, swabs or tampons for external or internal application to the body; Supporting or fastening means therefor; Tampon applicators characterised by the outer layers
    • A61F13/511Topsheet, i.e. the permeable cover or layer facing the skin
    • A61F13/51121Topsheet, i.e. the permeable cover or layer facing the skin characterised by the material
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61LMETHODS OR APPARATUS FOR STERILISING MATERIALS OR OBJECTS IN GENERAL; DISINFECTION, STERILISATION, OR DEODORISATION OF AIR; CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES; MATERIALS FOR BANDAGES, DRESSINGS, ABSORBENT PADS, OR SURGICAL ARTICLES
    • A61L15/00Chemical aspects of, or use of materials for, bandages, dressings or absorbent pads
    • A61L15/16Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons
    • A61L15/22Bandages, dressings or absorbent pads for physiological fluids such as urine or blood, e.g. sanitary towels, tampons containing macromolecular materials
    • A61L15/24Macromolecular compounds obtained by reactions only involving carbon-to-carbon unsaturated bonds; Derivatives thereof
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/58Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives
    • D04H1/64Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives the bonding agent being applied in wet state, e.g. chemical agents in dispersions or solutions
    • D04H1/66Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties by applying, incorporating or activating chemical or thermoplastic bonding agents, e.g. adhesives the bonding agent being applied in wet state, e.g. chemical agents in dispersions or solutions at spaced points or locations
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/20Coated or impregnated woven, knit, or nonwoven fabric which is not [a] associated with another preformed layer or fiber layer or, [b] with respect to woven and knit, characterized, respectively, by a particular or differential weave or knit, wherein the coating or impregnation is neither a foamed material nor a free metal or alloy layer
    • Y10T442/2738Coating or impregnation intended to function as an adhesive to solid surfaces subsequently associated therewith

Description

May 6, 1958 R. J. sPAHR ErAL NoNwovEN FABRIC AND ABsoRBENT lPRODUCTS Filed nec. 28, 1954 i Il n.:

ATTORNEY ilnited States Patent O NONWOVEN FABRIC AND ABSORBENT PRODUCTS Raymond J. Spain', Granbury, .lohn K. Sumner, Plainfield, and Elmer l. Yetllick, Westfield, N. J., assignors to Chicopee Manufacturing Corporation, a corporation of Massachusetts Application December 28, i954, Serial No. 477,982 7 Claims. (Cl. 12S- 290) The present invention relates to nonwoven fabrics, i. e., fabrics produced directly from fibers without the use of conventional spinning, weaving, or knitting operations, more particularly to such fabrics formed by bonding together the fibers of a loosely assembled web or webs of overlapping, intersecting fibers, and absorbent products covered therewith.

Bonded nonwoven fabrics have been formed by printing, impregnating, or otherwise depositing an adhesive bonding material uniformly throughout a base web of the type which may be formed by carding, garnetting, air laying, etc. of relatively long fibers including those of textile length. Generally speaking, it has been an aim to retain the fibrous nature of the web as much `as possible in order that the fabric will be soft and textile like in nature. For this reason, the bonding material employed should be capable of forming strong bonds with the fibers in the web to assure a maximum of strength with a minimum of binder. This is also important from a cost standpoint. Binders based upon polyvinyl acetate resins are known to be capable of forming strong bonds with textile fibers, particularly with cellulosic fibers, as well as to have good mechanical 'and chemical stability. Unfortunately, polyvinyl acetate tends to be quite brittle, which means it must be softened or plasticized in some way if it is to be used in the formation of textile-like fabrics wherein drape, flexibility, and softness are important qualities. In lthe past polyvinyl acetate resins have been softened for this purpose by the addition of external plasticizers such `as dibutyl phthalate to the resin emulsion before application to lthe web. These plasticizers, while improving the softness or hand of the fabric, tend to detract seriously from strength, particularly wet strength, to the extent that the resulting fabrics have either been lacking in strength, on the one extreme,

or softness on the other.

The present invention contemplates a fabric bonded with `an internally plasticized polyvinyl acetate, wherein the internal plasticization softens the acetate and yet does not detract seriously from its strength and bonding ability. This internal plasticization is in the nature of a modification by polymerization with another resin. The preferred resin modifier may be chosen from alkyl ,acrylates or alkyl methacrylates with the resulting internally plasticized polyvinyl acetate resin in the form of a copolymer of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate, a copolymer of vinyl acetate and an alkyl methacrylate, or a tripolymer of vinyl acetate, an alkyl acrylate and an alkyl methacrylate. However, other modifiers such as copolymers of vinyl acetate and vinyl stearate may be used. Alkyl acrylates and methacrylates comprising lower alkyl radicals containing less than nine carbon atoms Iare preferred. The preferred acrylates may be defined by the following general formula:

ICC

where Ris an alkyl radical containing less than nine carbon atoms. The preferred methacrylates likewise may be defined by the following general formula:

where R is as defined above. Generally speaking, the copolymer or tripolymer should comprise predominantly or moreV than 50 percent vinyl acetate, based upon the weight of the total monomers. It is preferred that the copolymer or tripolymer comprise at least about percent vinyl acetate, on the same basis, and excellent results have been obtained with copolymers of vinyl acetate and alkyl acrylates comprising less than 15 percent acrylate based upon the weight of the total monomers.

Nonwoven fabrics bonded with Ithe above-described resins, not only are strong and soft, but `also possess unexpectedly high wet strength yand wet abrasion resistance. They also are capable of resisting heat and can be sterilized without becoming tacky or weakening thebonds between fibers during the sterilization process. The resulting liber-binder combination also is substantially nonionic and in this sense creates a favorable environment for use with anionic or cationic bactericides, odor preventatives, etc., which will not detract seriously from the effectiveness of even small quantities of these agents deposited in the fabric.

Due to the above and other qualities, the fabric of this invention is particularly adaptable for use in covers for sanitary napkins and dressings, disposable diapers, -bed pads, wiping cloths, towelling, filter materials, and many other applications.

Webs suitable for conversion into fabrics of this invention may be formed by cal-ding, garnetting, by air deposition using techniques such as described in U. S. Patent Nos. 2,676,363 and 2,676,364, and other methods. The bers it contains may be oriented predominantly in one direction as in a card web Aor a card web laminate, or the web may be substantially isotropic where equivalent strength in all directions is desired. For napkin covering and related uses the web may be fairly thin land weigh between 15() and 400 grains per square yard. Uniformity of fiber ldistribution is an important characteristic, particularly in thin fabrics which must nevertheless possess a substantial :amount of strength and be free of Weak spots due to lack of uniformity. Uniform webs may be produced by carding, in which case it is advantageous to use fibers which have good carding characteristics and can -be blended into a uniform carded web with facility. Fibers of viscose rayon and cotton are both satisfactory in this respect. An advantageous liber blend may comprise approximately 75 percent of substantially 1.5 denier viscose rayon ibers and the remainder substantially 1.5 denier bleached cotton fibers, both of textile length. However, it should be understood that almost any kind of a textile fiber may be employed in forming a fabric of this invention depending upon the intended end use. -For instance, the base web may comprise natural fibers, such as cotton, jute, ramie, or wool; artificial fibers of vis-cose rayon, cuprammoniurn, cellulose acetate, etc.; or synthetic fibers of materials, such as nylon, Saran, polyethylene, and others; alone or in combination with one another.

The binder may be deposited in the web by printing, spraying, impregnating, or by other techniques wherein i the amount of binder may be metered and the binder satisfactory for use in covers for sanitary napkins, may

ferred tothe web by contact therewith to` distribute Ithe binder in the web in spaced areas thereof. The` bonding material in the binder areas mayform'bon'ds ywiththose` portions of the fibers passing through the areas and the spaces between binder areas may be limited to assure that substantially -all of the fibers in the web are adequately bound. Since there is a corresponding pattern of unboundiber areas, extending between the arcas of binder deposition, a soft and flexible fabric niayresult wherein the binder which is deposited in the web is subje'cnt maximum utilization. In a pattern ,bonded fabric offthi'sV type, it is particularly important that the binder foi'n strong bonds with those portions of the bers passing through the binder areas.

`Examples of pattern bonded nonwoven fabrics and products illustrating certain Vuses of fabrics of this inve'ntion are shown in the attached drawings wherein: v

Fig. 1 is a plan view of one embodiment of a fabric according to this invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan View of another embodiment;

Fig. 3 is an isometric view of a sanitary napkin covered with a fabric of this invention;

Fig. V4 is an enlarged sectional view along the o'f Fig. 3";

Fig. 5 is an isometric `view of a diaper or absorbent pad covered with afabrie of this invention; Y

Fig. 6 is Aan 'enlarged fragmental sectional view along the line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

line 4 4 As shown in Fig. l, an adhesive bonding material may` binder. 1 referably, the binder areas are located close.

enough together to intersect and Vbind most Vof the fibers in the web even thoughsubstantial portions of the lengths of these fibers ',areifree of binder. The pattern of Fig. '1 is 'illustrative of fone Vtypeo'f an open pattern which may be used. Fig. 2 illustrateslanothertypeof pattern. In this figurethe binder is distributed Ain intersecting courses of spaced lines or strips 15 defining square or diagonal web areas 16` relatively freeA of binder between them. It will beobvious to one skilled jin the art thatY there are many variations of patternsfwhich may be used to deposit ftlie binder 1in spaced 'areas `in the web to provide a lfabric comprising an intermittent 'arrangement of soft `"areas relatively "free of binder fand areas lwhere the binder is deposited as if by impregnation to bind the'tbers together.

Figs. 3 fand vl 4illustrate a sanitary 'napkin A17 covered with a soft Vnonwoven'fabric '1.8 taccording'to this invention wherein the binder isdepdsitedfin apatternof spaced rings or atolls `19 such as isshown in" Fig. l. 'lfhe fabric is'wrapped` around an absonbentinner body 21 which may bedesigned to distributevuids as uniformly as possible throughout its length. VIt is extremely importantthatthe nonwoven napkin coverjremain vquitesoft while at the Sametime retaining its web-like integrity to` prevent-roping and chang during use. Thus, the binder must be relatively softxand flexible, wet and dry, and possessfrelatively highlwet and dry strengths to asurethat theliberswill remain bonded in use and'that'the'fabric will'vbe abrasionand 2 tend to be highly permeabledue'to the "high per-` basiswith the range of to 25 percent preferred for napkin cover use. Y

Figs. 5 and 6 illustrate a diaper or Iabsorbent pad 22 covered with a nonwoven fabric 23 according to this invention wherein the binder is deposited in a diagonal pattern of spaced strips 24 such as is shown in Fig. 2. The nonwoven facing fabric 23 covers an absorbent inner layer 25 which in turn may comprise `a number of sheets eoveragebe no greater than about 35 percent onian area 75 vthat will be readily apparent to the skilled artisan.

Ofcreped cellulose or an absorbent material such as fluled woodpulp. The pad may include a relatively waterproof or water-impermeable backing sheet 2.6 on one face of the diaper. The nonwoven -facing sheet 23 will be in contact with the wearer in the case of a diaper, for instance, and therefore must be quite soft and durable. As in the case of the sanitary napkin cover, described hereinbefore, the `diaper facing must retain its softness, permeability and strength, wet and dry, and rmust be capable of considerable resistance to abrasion when wet. yIn fact, ability to resist wet abrasion may be one of the most important requirements for a diaper cover of this type.

An illustrative fabric of this invention may be formed by printing a laminate of ve or six card webs with an aqueous dispersion of an adhesive binder comprising a copolymer of vinyl acetate and approximately l5 percent ethyl acrylate based upon the weight of rthe total monomers. The web may weigh approximately 170 grains per square yard and comprise approximately percent of substantially 1.5 denier viscose rayon staple fibers averaging about 2 inches in length and 25 percent of substantially 1.5 denier bleached absorbent cotton bers of textile length. The binder may be deposited in a pattern similar to that of Fig. l with the result that the binder deposited in the fabric weighs about 35 grains per square yard on a dry basis. The resulting fabric will be soft and strong, wet and dry. lt also will be flexible and highly extensible. The copolymer of vinyl acetate and ethyl acrylate, described, will form particularly good bonds with the rayon and cotton bers in the web with the result that the fabric .will be capable of resisting a good deal of abrasion and stretching when wet without serious loss of bond integrity. This fabric also will be capable of resisting quantities of heat, such as maybe necessary for sterilization, without deterioration or appreciable loss of bond integrity.

The binder dispersion may be applied to the fabric by bringing 'the card web laminate into contact with an engraved roll'carrying the binder, such as is generally described in U. S. Patent No. 2,545,952 to YE. R. Goldman. In the above example, the binder dispersion may comprise approximately 50 percent resins solids, a small amount o f a dispersing agent such as carboxymethylcellulose, a small amount of an anti-foaming agent such as the product soldas Anti-Foam A by the Dow Corning Corportion, and other conventional agents to assistin processing. The resulting fabric is substantially nouionic and therefore will provide afavorable environment for anionic and cationicagents. For instance, the fabric may be impregnated with a relativelysmall amount of a cationic bactericide or odor preventative such as a quaternary ammonium compound, and the compound will remain effective for this purpose for a relatively long period of time despite the small quantity employed.

Having now described the invention in specific detail and indicated the manner' in which it may be 'carried in to practice, it will be readily apparent to those skilled p in the art that innumerable variations, applications, modifications and extensions of the basic principles involved may be made without Vdeparting from its spirit orscope. Thus, thefabrics of the present invention may be laminated with other fabrics or employed in a host ofways lt should also be apparent that for uses wherein extreme softness is desired the binder employed may be softened further by the addition of a conventional external plasticizer for the binder in an amount calculated to effect the desired result. We therefore intend to be limited only in accordance with the appended patent claims.

The invention claimed is:

1. A relatively soft, strong and sterilizable nonwoven fabric comprising a loosely assembled web of overlapping, intersecting fibers, and a binder material distributed intermittently throughout the web in adhesive contact with the fibers therein and forming longitudinally and transversely spaced heat resistant bonds between the individual fibers, the distribution of the binder material being such as to retain the iibrous textile-like qualities of the original web to a large extent, said binder comprising a material selected from the group consisting of copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate, copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl methacrylate and tripolymers of vinyl acetate, an alkyl acrylate, and an alkyl methacrylate and said bonds being strong and capable of resisting abrasion when wet, said acrylates having the following structural formula: l

\G=JJC o 0 R H and said methacrylates having the following structural' formula:

' H on,

C=o o 0 Ry and wherein R is an alkyl radical containing less than nine carbon atoms, said 'binder material comprising at least about 70 percent of vinyl acetate based upon the weight of the total monomers.

2. A relatively soft, strong and sterilizable nonwoven fabric according to claim l wherein said binder material is a copolymer of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate comprising less than l5 percent acrylate based upon the weight of the total monomers. v

3. A relatively soft, strong and .sterilizable nonwoven fabric according to claim 2 wherein said acrylate is ethyl acrylate. v

4. A relatively soft, strong and sterilizable nonwoven fabric comprising a loosely assembled web of overlapping, intersectingbers and a binder material distributed in a pattern defining alternate binder-free and binder-containing areas in the web, said binder being in adhesive contact with the bers in said binder containing areas and forming heat resistant bonds between .individual fibers therein, said binder containing areas comprising less than about 35 percent of the total fabric area, said binder comprising a material selected from the group consisting of copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate, copolymersA of vinyl acetate and an alkyl methacrylate and tripolymers of vinyl acetate, an alkyl acrylate, and an alkyl methacrylate and said bonds being strong and capable of resisting abrasion when wet, said binder material comprising at least about 70 percent of vinyl acetate based upon the weight of the total monomers.

5. A relatively soft, strong and sterilizable nonwoven fabric comprising a loosely assembled web of overlapping, intersecting fibers, said web weighing between about 150 and 400 grains per square yard, and a binder material distributed in a pattern deiining `alternate binderfree and binder-containing areas in the web, said binder being in adhesive contact with the fibers in said binder containing areas and forming heat resistant bonds between individual iibers therein, said binder containing areas comprising less than about 35 percent of the total fabric area, rsaid binder comprising a material sellected from the group consisting of copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate, copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl methacrylate and tripolymers of vinyl acetate, an alkyl acrylate, and an alkyl methacrylate and said bonds being strong and capable of resisting abrasion when wet, said binder material comprising at least about percent of vinyl acetate based upon the weight of the total monomers.

6. A sterilizable absorbent pad comprising an inner absorbent layer and a relatively soft and Istrong nonwoven fabric covering at least the inner face thereof, and said nonwoven fabric comprising a loosely assembled web of overlapping, intersecting bers and a binder material distributed in a pattern defining alternate binder-free and binder-containing areas in the web, said binder being in adhesive contact with the fibers in said binder containing areas and forming heat resistant bonds between individual iibers therein, said binder containing areas comprising less than about 35 percent of the total fabric area, said binder comprising a material selected from the -group consisting of copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate, copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl methacrylate and tripolymers of vinyl acetate, an alkyl acrylate, and an alkyl methacrylate and said bonds being strong and capable of resisting abrasion when wet, said binder material lcomprising at least about 70 percent of vinyl acetate based upon the weight of the total monomers.

7. A sterilizable sanitary napkin comprising an inner absorbent layer and a relatively soft and strong nonwoven fabric covering at least the inner face thereof, comprising a loosely assembled web of overlapping, intersecting fibers, and a binder material distributed intermittently throughout the web in adhesive contact with the fibers therein and forming longitudinally and transversely spaced heat resistant bonds between the individual Vfibers, the distribution of the binder material being such as to retain the fibrous textile-like qualities of the original web to a large extent, said binder comprising a material selected from the group consisting of copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl acrylate, copolymers of vinyl acetate and an alkyl methacrylate and tripolymers of vinyl acetate, an alkyl acrylate, and an alkyl methacrylate and said bonds being strong Iand capable of resisting abrasion when wet, -said acrylates having the following structural formula:

and said methacrylates having the following structur formula:

H CHa \C=ccoo1z and wherein R is an alkyl radical containing less than nine carbon atoms, said binder material comprising at least about 70 percent of vinyl acetate based upon the weight of the total monomers.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,067,706 Fikentscher Jan. 12, 1937 2,431,745 Flanagan Dec. 2, 1947 2,705,497 Johnson et al. Apr. 5, 1955 2,705,686 Ness et al. Apr. 5, 1955

Claims (1)

1. A RELATIVELY SOFT, STRONG AND STERILIZABLE NONWOVEN FABRIC COMPRISING A LOOSELY ASSEMBLED WEB OF OVERLAPPING, INTERSECTING FIBER, AND A BINDER MATERIAL DISTRIBUTED INTERMITTENTLY THROUGHOUT THE WEB IN ADHESIVE CONTACT WITH THE FIBERS THEREIN AND FORMING LONGITUDINALLY AND TRANSVERSELY SPACED HEAT RESISTANT BONDS BETWEEN THE INVIDIDUAL FIBERS, THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE BINDER MATERIAL BEING SUCH AS TO RETAIN THE FIBROUS TEXTILE-LIKE QUALITIES OF THE ORIGINAL WEB TO A LARGE EXTENT, SAID BINDER COMPRISING A MA-
US2833283A 1954-12-28 1954-12-28 Nonwoven fabric and absorbent products Expired - Lifetime US2833283A (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US818416X true 1954-12-28 1954-12-28
US2833283A US2833283A (en) 1954-12-28 1954-12-28 Nonwoven fabric and absorbent products

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2833283A US2833283A (en) 1954-12-28 1954-12-28 Nonwoven fabric and absorbent products
GB3716955A GB818416A (en) 1954-12-28 1955-12-28 Absorbent non-woven, bonded-fibre fabric

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2833283A true US2833283A (en) 1958-05-06

Family

ID=26766030

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2833283A Expired - Lifetime US2833283A (en) 1954-12-28 1954-12-28 Nonwoven fabric and absorbent products

Country Status (2)

Country Link
US (1) US2833283A (en)
GB (1) GB818416A (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3036573A (en) * 1957-04-10 1962-05-29 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic product
US3047445A (en) * 1958-06-02 1962-07-31 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic wiping material
US3063454A (en) * 1959-02-26 1962-11-13 Cleanese Corp Of America Non-woven products
US3067747A (en) * 1959-09-04 1962-12-11 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic product
US3088464A (en) * 1960-06-03 1963-05-07 Johnson & Johnson Sanitary napkins
US3093546A (en) * 1958-12-18 1963-06-11 Johnson & Johnson Absorbent product
US3122447A (en) * 1962-11-21 1964-02-25 Johnson & Johnson Bonded nonwoven fabrics and methods of making the same
US3135258A (en) * 1961-12-08 1964-06-02 Johnson & Johnson Bandage
US3289254A (en) * 1961-02-02 1966-12-06 Curt G Joa Machine for manufacturing sanitary napkins and the like
US3316117A (en) * 1963-07-15 1967-04-25 Riegel Textile Corp Ravel resistant textile products
US3345207A (en) * 1963-06-20 1967-10-03 Staley Mfg Co A E Non-woven fabric prepared with methylol amides of an adduct formed between a maleyl compound and an ethylenically unsaturated aliphatic compound
US3580253A (en) * 1968-12-09 1971-05-25 Kimberly Clark Co Sanitary napkin and flushable wrapper therefor
US3683921A (en) * 1970-08-17 1972-08-15 Berry A Brooks Absorbent sponges
US3727615A (en) * 1971-11-26 1973-04-17 Kimberly Clark Co Soft, drapable nonwoven material
US3828783A (en) * 1973-05-24 1974-08-13 Johnson & Johnson Absorbent facing material
US4137357A (en) * 1977-10-25 1979-01-30 Uop Inc. Plastic thermoset laminates
US5675079A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-10-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for measuring the crush recovery of an absorbent article
US5803920A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-09-08 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Thin absorbent article
US5810798A (en) * 1995-06-30 1998-09-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a thin, efficient absorbent core
US6206865B1 (en) 1995-11-13 2001-03-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a cellulosic transfer layer
US20040122394A1 (en) * 2002-12-23 2004-06-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High capacity absorbent structure and method for producing same
US20040127870A1 (en) * 2002-12-27 2004-07-01 Dipalma Joseph Thin curved elasticized absorbent article with absorbent concentration profile
US8138106B2 (en) 2005-09-30 2012-03-20 Rayonier Trs Holdings Inc. Cellulosic fibers with odor control characteristics

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2067706A (en) * 1932-12-10 1937-01-12 Ig Farbenindustrie Ag Artificial compositions
US2431745A (en) * 1945-04-05 1947-12-02 Goodrich Co B F Coating fabrics
US2705686A (en) * 1952-04-07 1955-04-05 Chicopee Mfg Corp Laterally extensible non-woven fabric
US2705497A (en) * 1952-04-07 1955-04-05 Chicopee Mfg Corp Absorbent dressing and method of making same

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2067706A (en) * 1932-12-10 1937-01-12 Ig Farbenindustrie Ag Artificial compositions
US2431745A (en) * 1945-04-05 1947-12-02 Goodrich Co B F Coating fabrics
US2705686A (en) * 1952-04-07 1955-04-05 Chicopee Mfg Corp Laterally extensible non-woven fabric
US2705497A (en) * 1952-04-07 1955-04-05 Chicopee Mfg Corp Absorbent dressing and method of making same

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3036573A (en) * 1957-04-10 1962-05-29 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic product
US3047445A (en) * 1958-06-02 1962-07-31 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic wiping material
US3093546A (en) * 1958-12-18 1963-06-11 Johnson & Johnson Absorbent product
US3063454A (en) * 1959-02-26 1962-11-13 Cleanese Corp Of America Non-woven products
US3067747A (en) * 1959-09-04 1962-12-11 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic product
US3088464A (en) * 1960-06-03 1963-05-07 Johnson & Johnson Sanitary napkins
US3289254A (en) * 1961-02-02 1966-12-06 Curt G Joa Machine for manufacturing sanitary napkins and the like
US3135258A (en) * 1961-12-08 1964-06-02 Johnson & Johnson Bandage
US3122447A (en) * 1962-11-21 1964-02-25 Johnson & Johnson Bonded nonwoven fabrics and methods of making the same
US3345207A (en) * 1963-06-20 1967-10-03 Staley Mfg Co A E Non-woven fabric prepared with methylol amides of an adduct formed between a maleyl compound and an ethylenically unsaturated aliphatic compound
US3316117A (en) * 1963-07-15 1967-04-25 Riegel Textile Corp Ravel resistant textile products
US3580253A (en) * 1968-12-09 1971-05-25 Kimberly Clark Co Sanitary napkin and flushable wrapper therefor
US3683921A (en) * 1970-08-17 1972-08-15 Berry A Brooks Absorbent sponges
US3727615A (en) * 1971-11-26 1973-04-17 Kimberly Clark Co Soft, drapable nonwoven material
US3828783A (en) * 1973-05-24 1974-08-13 Johnson & Johnson Absorbent facing material
US4137357A (en) * 1977-10-25 1979-01-30 Uop Inc. Plastic thermoset laminates
US5675079A (en) * 1995-06-07 1997-10-07 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for measuring the crush recovery of an absorbent article
US5803920A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-09-08 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Thin absorbent article
US5810798A (en) * 1995-06-30 1998-09-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a thin, efficient absorbent core
US6206865B1 (en) 1995-11-13 2001-03-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Absorbent article having a cellulosic transfer layer
US20040122394A1 (en) * 2002-12-23 2004-06-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High capacity absorbent structure and method for producing same
US6888044B2 (en) 2002-12-23 2005-05-03 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High capacity absorbent structure and method for producing same
US20040127870A1 (en) * 2002-12-27 2004-07-01 Dipalma Joseph Thin curved elasticized absorbent article with absorbent concentration profile
US8138106B2 (en) 2005-09-30 2012-03-20 Rayonier Trs Holdings Inc. Cellulosic fibers with odor control characteristics
US8574683B2 (en) 2005-09-30 2013-11-05 Rayonier Trs Holdings, Inc. Method of making a pulp sheet of odor-inhibiting absorbent fibers

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
GB818416A (en) 1959-08-19 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3485705A (en) Nonwoven fabric and method of manufacturing the same
US3371668A (en) Sanitary napkin
US3521624A (en) Microorganism growth inhibiting fiber products
US3481337A (en) Corrugated diaper
US3327708A (en) Laminated non-woven fabric
US3395201A (en) Method and apparatus for producing an absorbent product
US3087833A (en) Fibrous structures and methods of making the same
US4018646A (en) Nonwoven fabric
US4514455A (en) Nonwoven fabric for apparel insulating interliner
US5693707A (en) Liquid absorbent composition for nonwoven binder applications
US4333979A (en) Soft, bulky, lightweight nonwoven web and method of producing; the web has both fused spot bonds and patterned embossments
US3059313A (en) Textile fabrics and methods of making the same
US6022818A (en) Hydroentangled nonwoven composites
US5589258A (en) Non-woven fabric comprising at least one spunbonded layer
US5128082A (en) Method of making an absorbant structure
US4627847A (en) Hot melt adhesive waste barrier
US5685756A (en) Nonwoven materials comprising biodegradable copolymers
US6403857B1 (en) Absorbent structures with integral layer of superabsorbent polymer particles
US5496603A (en) Nonwoven sheet materials, tapes and methods
US3561447A (en) Flushable sanitary napkin
US5151320A (en) Hydroentangled spunbonded composite fabric and process
US4377615A (en) Nonwoven fabrics and method of producing the same
US4753840A (en) Coated fabric
US4430372A (en) Non-woven fabric with improved hot-press properties and method for manufacturing same
US20040121683A1 (en) Composite elastic material