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US2829035A - Buffing compositions - Google Patents

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US2829035A
US2829035A US46720554A US2829035A US 2829035 A US2829035 A US 2829035A US 46720554 A US46720554 A US 46720554A US 2829035 A US2829035 A US 2829035A
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fatty
acids
composition
grease
weight
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Doughty Samuel Lewis
Ellsworth T Candee
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Lea Manuf Co
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Lea Manuf Co
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    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C09DYES; PAINTS; POLISHES; NATURAL RESINS; ADHESIVES; MISCELLANEOUS COMPOSITIONS; MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS OF MATERIALS
    • C09KMATERIALS FOR MISCELLANEOUS APPLICATIONS, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE
    • C09K3/00Materials not provided for elsewhere
    • C09K3/14Anti-slip materials; Abrasives
    • C09K3/1454Abrasive powders, suspensions and pastes for polishing
    • C09K3/1463Aqueous liquid suspensions

Description

United States Patent O BUFFINGCOMPOSITIONS Samuel Lewis Doughty, Southington, and Ellsworth T. Candee, .Watertown, Conn., assignors to The Lea Manufacturing Company, a'corporation of Connecticut No Drawing. Application November 5, H54 Serial No. 467,205

7 11 Claims. (Cl. 51-404) This invention relates to bufling compositions and is directed particularly to the provision of an improved buffing composition which is used in the form of a water-base liquid. The new bufling composition consists essentially of a grease in which a non-ionic, surface-active emulsify-' mg agent and particles of a finely divided abrasive are 1 intimately dispersed. The new composition may be prepared and shipped in liquid form. Also, the new composition may be advantageously prepared and shipped in anhydrous form. It is then made ready for use in liquid form by stirring with warm water, in which it emulsifies readily. In the resultant emulsion, the water forms the continuous phase, and dispersed therein are emulsified particles of the grease in which the particles of abrasive are substantially completely enveloped.

It has been customary heretofore to prepare. buffing compounds by intimately mixing abrasive particles with a grease vehicle (grease-type bufiing compositions) or with a glue-base vehicle (greaseless compositions). Both types of bufling compositions are plastic solids at normal temperatures and are used by pressing the solid against a rotating bufling wheel, whereby the wheel is charged with the composition. Such compositions are inherently dirty and somewhat inconvenient to use, although they have been the standard bufling compositionscommercially employed for polishing and like operations.

Liquid bufling compositions, composed essentially of a liquid vehicle (e. g. kerosene or water) in which a grease is dissolved or dispersed and in which the abrasive particles are suspended, have been proposed. Such liquid compositions are somewhat more convenient to use than I adherence of the abrasive particles to a rapidly rotating bufi'ing wheel has been poor, with consequent diminished effectiveness of the composition for bufling and polishing purposes. I I

We have discovered that if a grease-base buffing composition comprising a grease and particles of a finely divided abrasive is prepared in substantially anhydrous form, and if an efiective amount of non-ionic, surfaceactive emulsifying agent is incorporated therein, the resulting composition disperses readily in water to form a stable emulsion'in which the abrasive particles are substantially completely enveloped in the emulsified grease particles. I I

Based on the discovery, the invention provides an improved'buffing composition consisting essentially of toi60%, and preferably from to by weight of a grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 2,829,035 Patented Apr. 1, 1958 15% by weightof a non-ionic, surface-active emulsifying agent and from 30% to 80%, and preferably from to 75%, by weight of a finely divided abrasive. (All percentages given herein, unless otherwise indicated, are on the basis of the anhydrous composition.) Such composition is characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

I In the emulsified form, the new bufiing composition is a liquid emulsion consisting essentially of an aqueous con tinuous phase having dispersed therein emulsified particles I of grease in which particles'of finely divided abrasive are substantially completely enveloped.

13y the term grease we mean to include any fat or organic wax which may be solid or liquid at room temperature, insoluble in water and greasy or waxy in texture. The chemical composition or nature of the fat or wax is of no importance to the present invention. By way of example (but not by way of limitation, for any fat or wax having the above stated physical properties may be used) we mention the following commonly available I greases that may be applied in accordance with the 'in vention: Fatty acids such as stearic acid, palmitic acid, myristic acid, lauric acid, and oleic acid; glycerides of the fatty acids such as mono, di-, and tri-glycerides of lauric, palmitic, stearic and oleic acids; such commercial fats and fatty acids as hydrogenated fish oil, hydrogenated tall oil, tallow, and Wool fat; and such natural waxes as beeswax, carnauba wax and Chinese insect wax. Of these we prefer to use, and 'have had most satisfactory results using, a fatty acid grease, by which term we mean a product of the Atlas Powder Company, which is poly- 'a mixture of two or more such compounds.

by weight (on the dry basis) of the'composition, we have in general found it desirable to use the grease in the narrower range of 20% to 40% by weight (on the dry basis) of the composition.

Any non-ionic, surface-activeemulsifying agent may be employed in preparing the new-composition. By way of example, we have employed successfully various nonionic condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty acids containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylen'e' oxides and fatty alcohols containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and rosin acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and amide derivatives of hydrogenated tallow fatty acids, glycol esters of fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms,

partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, glycol esters of rosin acids, partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and rosin acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and alkyl phenols,vcondensation products of alkylolamines and fatty acids containing 12 to 18v carbon atoms, and condensation products of polyoxypropylene and ethylene oxide. Mixtures of these emulsifying agents are employed as well as the emulsifying agents singly. All of these surface-active emulsifying agents are of the non-gelling type.

As examples'of the above-described classes of emulsifying agents, we have employed Emulphor O, a product of I. G. Farben Industries, which is a condensation prodnot of oleyl alcohol with ethylene oxide; Tween 60, a

product of the Atlas Powder Company, which is polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate; Tween 40, a

oxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate; Tween 20, a product of the Atlas Powder Company, which is polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate; Ethomid PIT/60, a product of Armour Company, which is a condensation product of ethylene oxide and an amide derived from hydrogenated tallow fatty acids; Polyethylene Glycol 600 Distearate, a product, of Glyco Products Company; Span 40, a product of Atlas Powder Company, which is sorbitan monopalmitate: Span 20, a product of Atlas Powderv Company, which is sorbitan monolaurate; Triton X-lOO, a product of Rohm & Haas, which is a condensation product of an alkyl phenol with ethylene oxide; Neutronyx 600, a product of Onyx Oil & Chemical Company, which is an alkyl phenol polyglycol ether; Alrosol, a product of Alrose Chemical Company, which is a condensation productof fatty acids and diethanolamine; and Pluronic L62}? a product of Wyandotte Chemical Corporation, which is a condensation product of ethylene oxide and polyoxypropylene. two emulsifying agents from this list have been used as set forth in the examples below. While it is possible to select one emulsifying agent to produce a suitable buffing composition, often it is advisable to use two emulsifiers from the same class or to use two emulsifiers, each selected from a different class. Commercially these emulsifiers are often made to be predominately water soluble or predominately oil soluble. In order to satisfactorily emulsify our grease materials, we find it advisable to get a balance between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties of an emulsifying agent. While numerous of these materials have the proper balance in themselves, it is often simpler to obtain the balance by the. proper proportioning of two emulsifiers giving a much wider selection which is advantageous both economically and from the standpoint of producing the most satisfactory liquid buffing compounds.

Within the range previously stated, we find it advantageous to use the emulsifying agent in an amount from 2 /2 to 8% by weight of the composition (on the dry basis). While any non-gelling. non-ionic surface-active emulsifying agent may be employed successfully in making the new composition, we have obtained particularly satisfactory results using together (one) a non-ionic hexitol ester of a fatty acid containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms,.e. g. sorbitan monopalmitate, in an amount rang ing from 0.5% to. by Weight of the composition and advantageously in an amount from 1% to 3% by weight thereof, and (two) a non-ionic polyoxyethylene hexitol ester of :a fatty acid containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms, e. g., polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate, in an amount ranging from 0.5% to and most advantageously from 2% to 5%, by weight of the composinon.

Any finely, divided abrasive may be used in preparing the bufiing composition, including all of the abrasives heretofore used in .buffing and like compounds such, for example, as rouge (ferric oxide), tripoli, emery, garnet, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, chromic oxide, silica, etc.

The grease, the emulsifying agent, and the abrasive constitute the essential ingredients ofthe new composition. It is often advantageous, however, to incorporate various other materials in it, such as one or more modifying agents for the grease. By way of example, any of the animal, vegetable or mineral oils or pitches may be used as modifying agents for the fatty acid grease, includingfish oils (e. g. menhaden oil), cottonseed oil, soy bean oil, oleic acidytall oil, petrolatum, petroleum oils, soy bean pitch, stearin pitch, etc. The purpose of suchrnodifying agents is to produce a grease-base vehicle having optimum hardness, stickiness, and other physical properties for the particular use to which the composition is to be put.

In addition, it is advantageous to incorporate a. bactericidal or fungicidal agent and an anti-foaming agent in Mixtures of the composition. The bactericidal or fungicidal agent is especially important in compositions in which a fatty acid grease is employed. Sometimes, too, it is of advantage to incorporate from 0.1% to 6% by weight of entonite clay in the grease composition to facilitate dispersion of the abrasive.

The composition is prepared by heating the fatty acid grease to a temperature at which it is molten, and then stirring into it the emulsifying agent and the abrasive so that the latter two ingredients are thoroughly and intimately distributed throughout the grease. At the same time, such other ingredients as the grease modifying agent, the bactericide, the anti-foaming agent, the bentonite if such be used, etc., are also stirred into the molten liquid and thereby are intimately distributed throughout its mass. Water may then be added, with strong agitation. On subsequent cooling a smooth, stable, free-flowing emulsion is formed with the abrasive permanently suspended. This emulsion may be sold and shipped in this form. Alternatively, the mixture of ingredients, prior to addition of water, while still liquid, may be cast into bars or other suitable shapes and allowed to cool to room temperature, whereupon it becomes solid. It may be distributed in bar or slab form, or may be granulated or formed into pellets prior to distribution or use. the point of use the bar is mixed with an appropriate quantity of water (preferably warmed to 180 F.) and stirring to achieve a liquid emulsion having an aqueous continuous phase and in which the grease and abrasive together form the dispersed phase. In lieu of preparing the compositionin the molten state, it is sometimes possible to obtain satisfactory results by intimately mixing the solid ingredients in comminuted form and then, if desired, compressing into pellets. The following are examples of the prepartion of buffing compositions according to the invention:

Example 1 Percent Hydrogenated fish fatty acid 7.6 Tall oil 3.4 Petrolatum 4.7

Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate (Atlas G9096H) 3.2 Once ground rose tripoli 32.0 Water 52.0 Preservative 0.1

The fatty acid, tall oil, petrolaturn and preservative were melted together with the emulsifying agent and the tripoli was mixed in while the temperature of the mass was raised to F. and maintained there. The re quired water was heated to F. and added slowly to the mass while mixing with a high speed agitator. After the water addition, the mixture was cooled to 70 F. while being continually agitated. The resulting composition was a homogeneous material which flowed and was readily sprayable onto a butting wheel. The tripoli was in a condition in which it was impregnated with the grease which, in turn, was emulsified in the water. The whole mass was a stable. suspension. The viscosity at 70 F. as determined with a Gardner mobilometer was 30 seconds with an additional 200 gram weight.

In case it is desired to ship or store the compound in ingot or bar form for subsequent conversion to a liquid, the above materials minus the water may be mixed at a temperature of 160 F. as indicated above and then poured into molds and allowed to solidify. .In such form, it can be stored for an indefinite period. Upon subsequent reheating to 160 F., the addition of water at 180 F. as indicated above will form the liquid emulsion.

I Condensation product of ethylene oxide andv hydrogenated tallow amide (Armour IEthomid HT/60) 3.0 Once ground rose tripoli 33.0 Water y p 52.0 Preservative 0.1

Example 3 L Percent Hydrogenated tallow fatty acid titre, 54 C 5.0 Hydrogenated fish oil glyceride titre, 42 C 3.1 Dark green petrolatum, M. P. 120/ 130 F. 3.9

Polyethylene glycol 600 distearate (Glyco Products Co.) 1 3.4 #240 and finer fused aluminum oxide 51.0 Water 33.4 Preservative 0.2

The bufi'lng emulsion was prepared as in Example 1 and gave a fiowable material having a viscosity of secends with an additional 400 gram weight. This viscosity is in the range preferred for spraying compounds having a fused aluminum oxide type of abrasive.

Example 4 Percent Double pressed stearic acid 6.4 Tallow 4.4

Triton X 100, a condensation product of an alkyl The bufiing compositionwas prepared as in Example 1. The emulsion has a viscosity of seconds with an additional 20 gram weight.

Example 5 I Percent 7 Single pressed stearic acid 4.5 Oleic acid 3.5 Amber petrolatum Alrosol a condensation product of fatty acids and diethanolamine 2.8 Double ground rose tripoli 28.0 Preservative 0.1 Water 58.0

The acids, petrolatum, preservative and. emulsifying agent were heated and melted together and the tempera-.

ture was raised to 160 F. Maintainingthe temperature, the tripoli was added and mixed to uniform consistency. Water was added, at a temperature of 180 F. while the mixture was strongly agitated. A stiff paste was formed on addition of the water. On cooling, the paste persisted until the temperature reached F; At this point the mixture began to thin. On continued cooling, the mixture became a smooth, stable, free-flowing emulsion with the abrasive permanently suspended. The viscosity at 70 F. was 10 seconds with an added 200 gram weight. This product was found to be an excellent material for cutting down non-ferrous metals, such as brass, etc.

Example 6 Percent Hydrogenated fish fatty acid 8.2 Tall oil 0.4 Petrolatum 5.1

Pluronic L62, the condensation product of poly- Trisodium phosphate 0.05

6 The fatty acid, tall oil, petrolatum, preservative and emulsifying agent were heated together to F. Maintaining the 140 F. temperature, the abrasive was added and thoroughly blended. 90% of the water was then heated to F. and added to the mixture with vigorous agitation. At this temperature the water was only mechanically mixed with'therest of the composition. This condition continued as the temperature was reduced until a temperature of 100 F. was reached at which point the mass emulsified forming a very heavy viscous mixture. At this temperature the trisodium phosphate dissolved in the balance of water was added, thinning the emulsion to proper viscosity to flow. After cooling this emulsion was sprayable-and had a viscosity of 15 seconds with an added 200 gram weight.

Example 7 Percent Hydrogenated fishfatty acid 5.3 Tall oil Petrolatum 2.2 Pluronic L62, the condensation product of ethylene oxide and polyoxypropylene I 0.8 Tween 60,", polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate 1.6 Amorphous silica, 240 mesh and finer 39.8 Preservative 0.2

Water H 47.8

The bufiing composition was prepared as in Example 1. This bufling composition illustrates the use of two emulsifiers of different classes to form a suitable buffing composition.

' Example 8 I Percent Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate 1.7 Sorbitan monopalmitate 0.9 Hydrogenated fish fatty acid 6.8 Oleic acid e 6.8 Double ground rose tripoli 45.6 Preservative 0.2 Water 38.0

, pared according to' Example 1 except that they were poured into molds, prior to the water addition, and, allowed to solidify. Before use they are melted again and.

heated to F. and water is then added as in Example 1.

' Example 9 Percent Polyoxy ethylene sorbitan monopalmitate 4.52 I Sorbitan monopalmitate 2.26 Hydrogenated fish oil fatty acids 33.88 Par'achlorornetacresol (bactericide) 0.61 Anti-foaming agent 0.03 Tripoli 58.70

The buffing composition was prepared as in Example 1.

Example '10 i i Percent Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate 3.82 vSorbitan monopalmitate 1.91 Hydrogenated fishoil fatty acids 20.49 Talloil 10.45 Parachlorometacresol.(bacteric'ide) 0.47 Anti-foaming agent 0.02 Chromic oxide 6.24 Levigated alumina 56.80

The butting, composition was prepared as in Example ,1.

Example 11 Percent Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate 4.32 Sorbitan monopalmitate 2.16 Hydrogenated fish oil fatty acids 24.24 Soya bean pitch 12.11 Parachlorornetacresol (bactericide) 0.59 Anti-foaming agent 0.02

Tripoli 56.56 The butting composition was prepared as in Example 1.

Example 12 Percent Polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalrnitate' 2.7 Sorbitan monopalmitate 1.35 Hydrogenated fish oil fatty acids 12.13 Microcrystalline wax 12.13 lolychlorometacresol (bactericide) 0.47 Anti-foaming agent..--.. 0.02 Quartz -2 70.82 Bentonite 0.38

The butting composition was prepared as in Example 1. In the butting emulsions prepared according to the above examples, either prepared directly as the aqueous emulsion, or formed as a solid bar and later mixed with water to form an emulsion, the abrasive particles, are grease-coated or substantially completely enveloped in the dispersed particles of the grease base, and do not tend to settle out separately. The emulsion therefore is highly stable over prolonged periods of time, both in respect to the grease and in respect to the abrasive.

The amount of water used in making the emulsion depends on how viscous an emulsion is desired; in general an amount of water'(by weight) ranging from one-halfto twice the weight of the anhydrous buffing composition gives a most satisfactory liquid product.

As stated previously, bentonite clay may be incorporated directly in the grease-base composition to aid in dispersing the abrasive particles, but often thebentonite functions most effectivelyas a dispersing agent if it is incorporated directly in the aqueous phase of the emulsion, separately from the grease-base composition. This may be accomplished by starting the emulsion with about 10% of the total amount of water to be, used, and then adding 0.1% to 6% (and most advantageously from 0.25% to 0.75%), by weight of the dry solids, of bentonite clay. Thereafter, with further stirring, the balance of the water is added. With the bentonite then incorporated in the aqueous phase of the emulsion, it thickens it and helps to disperse the grease-coated abrasive par ticles. l i

The emulsion is used by dripping, spraying, painting or swabbing it onto a rotating bufiing wheel, or by applying it (similarly or otherwise) directly to the workpiece to be buffed or polished. Because each of the abrasive particles is substantially enveloped in or coated with the grease component of the composition, the amount'of abbrasive that is thrown clear of the wheelor workpiece before it has performed the buffing or polishing function is small. In this respect, the new butting composition is very much superior to compositions in which the grease component and the abrasive are separately dispersed in a liquid vehicle. The use of, the new composition does not entail the fire hazard that accompanies the use of a liquid composition having an inflammable vehicle such as kerosene. It has the further advantage that if it splashes on the work. it is easily washed off with soft or hard water much more easily, of course, than conventional grease-base buffing compounds, and is even more easily washed off than compositions having a saponified fatty acid base.

The new bufling composition may be made with greases having both substantially higher and substantially lower melting or softening temperatures than have here- 'ing temperatures which is possible in making the new buffing compositions is one of the outstanding advantages of the invention. Since the new composition maybe prepared initially in substantially anhydrous form, its

storage and transportation then entails less expense than in the case of compositions prepared initially as liquids. it is stable indefinitely in the solid substantially anhydrous forrn, and is very easily converted to a liquid emulsion by the user, who requires no special apparatus for such purpose. In the liquid emulsion, either prepared directly, or formed later from solid bars, it is stable over long periods of time. The new bufiing composition thus displays the versatility of being commercially suitable to preparation directly in the liquid emulsion form or in a solid type bar form for later conversion to emulsion form at the time of use.

This application is a continuation-in-part of our application Serial No. 152,754, filed March 29, 1950, and now abandoned.

We claim:

1. A buffing composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, and from 30% to 80% by weight of a finelydivided abrasive, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 15% by weight of a non-ionic surface-active emulsifying agent selected from the group consisting of condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty alcohols containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and rosin acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and amides derivatives of hydrogenated tallow fatty acids, condensation products of alkyleneoxides and alkyl phenols, condensation prodnets of alkylolamines and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of polyoxypropylene and ethylene oxide, glycol esters of fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, glycol esters of rosin acids, and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and rosin acids, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

2. A liquid buffing composition comprising an aqueous emulsion of a mixture consisting essentially of from 30% to 80% by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 15% by weight of a non-ionic surfaceactive emulsifying agent selected from the group consisting of condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty alcohols containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and rosin acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and amide derivatives of hydrogenated tallow fatty acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and alkyl phenols. condcnsa tion products of alkylolamines and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of polyoxypropylene and ethylene oxide, glycol esters of fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, glycol esters of rosin acids, and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and rosin acids, said liquid composition having an aqueous continuous-phase in which emulsified particles of the grease having the abrasive particles substantially completely enveloped therein are dispersed.

3. A liquid buffing composition comprising an aqueous emulsion of a mixture consisting essentially of 20% to 45% by weight of a fatty acid grease having intimately dispersed therein from 50% to 75% by weight of a finelydivided abrasive and from 2 /z% to 8% by weight of a non-ionic surface-active emulsifying agent selected from the group consisting of condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and fatty alcohols containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and rosin acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of alkylene oxides and amide derivatives of hydrogenated tallow fatty acids, condensation products of alkylene oxides and alkyl phenols, condensation products, of alkylolamines and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, condensation products of polyoxypropylene and ethylene oxide,

glycol esters of fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and fatty acids containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, glycol esters of rosin acids, and partial esters of hexitol anhydrides and rosin acids, there being from 0.2% to 0.75% of bentonite clay by weight of said mixture dispersed in said emulsion, said liquid composition having an aqueous continuous phase in which particles of bentonite and emulsified particles of grease having the abrasive particles substantially completely enveloped therein are separately dispersed.

4. A bufling composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed thereester of a fatty acid containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms, from 0.5% to 10% of a non-ionic polyoxyethylene hexitol ester of a fatty acid containing from 12 to 18 carbon atoms and from 30% to 80% by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

5. A bufling composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 0.5 to of sorbitan monopalmitate, from 0.5% to of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monopalmitate, and from 30% to 80% by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive par ticles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

6. A bufl'lng composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and

their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 0.5 to 5% of sorbitan monolaurate, from 0.5 to 10% of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate, and from 30% to 80% by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized byemulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

A bufling composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their A to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, saidv grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 15% by weight of a condensation product of an alkylene oxide and a partial ester of a hexitol anhydride and a fatty acid containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, and from 30% to 80% by weight of a in from 0.5% to 5% by weight of a non-ionic hexitol finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

9. A bufiing composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 15% of polyoxyethylene sorbitan monostearate and from 30% to by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

10. A bufling composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 15% of a partial ester of a hexitol anhydride and a fatty acid containing 12 to 18 carbon atoms, and from 30% to 80% by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

11. A bufiing composition consisting essentially of 10% to 60% by weight of a grease selected from the group consisting of higher fatty acids, their glycerides, and their ester waxes, said grease having intimately dispersed therein from 1% to 15% by weight of sorbitan monopalmitate and from 30% to 80% by weight of a finely-divided abrasive, said composition being characterized by emulsifying readily in water to form an emulsion in which the abrasive particles are grease-coated and stably dispersed in the aqueous phase.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Atlas, Surface Active Agents, published by Atlas Powder Company (1948), pages 9, 20 to 22 and 40 to 41.

Claims (1)

  1. 3. A LIQUID BUFFING COMPOSITION COMPRISING AN AQUEOUS EMULSION OF A MIXTURE CONSISTING ESSENTIALLY OF 20% TO 45% BY WEIGHT OF A FATTY ACID GREASE HAVING INTIMATELY DISPERSED THEREIN FROM 50% TO 75% BY WEIGHT OF A FINELYDIVIDED ABRASIVE AND FROM 21/2% TO 8% BY WEIGHT OF A NON-IONIC SURFACE-ACTIVE EMULSIFYING AGENT SELECTED FROM THE GROUP CONSISTING OF CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES AND FATTY ACIDS CONTAINING 12 TO 18 CARBON ATOMS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES AND FATTY ALCOHOLS CONTAINING 1I TO 18 CARBON ATOMS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES AND ROSIN ACIDS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES AND PARTIAL ESTERS OF HEXITOL ANHYDRIDES AND FATTY ACIDS CONTAINING 12 TO 18 CARBON ATOMS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES AND AMIDE DERIVATIVES OF HYDROGENATED TALLOW FATTY ACIDS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF ALKYLENE OXIDES AND ALKYL PHENOLS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS, OF ALKYLOLAMINES AND FATTY ACIDS CONTAINING 12 TO 18 CARBON ATOMS, CONDENSATION PRODUCTS OF POLYOXYPROPYLENE AND ETHYLENE OXIDE, GLYCOL ESTERS OF FATTY ACIDS CONTAINING 12 TO 18 CARBON ATOMS, PARTIAL ESTERS OF HEXITOL ANHYDRIDEWS AND FATTY ACIDS CONTAINING 12 TO 18 CARBON ATOMS, GLYCOL ESTERS OF ROSIN ACIDS, AND PARTIAL ESTERS OF HEXITOL ANHYDRIDES AND ROSIN ACIDS, THERE BEING FROM 0.2% TO 0.75% OF BENTONITE CLAY BY WEIGHT OF SAID MIXTURE DISPERSED IN SAID EMULSION, SAID LIQUID COMPOSITION HAVING AN AQUEOUS CONTINUOUS PHASE IN WHICH PARTICLES OF BENTONITE AND EMULSIFIED PARTICLES OF GREASE HAVING THE ABRASIVE PARTICLES SUBSTANTIALLY COMPLETELY ENVELOPED THEREIN ARE SEPARATELY DISPERSED.
US2829035A 1954-11-05 1954-11-05 Buffing compositions Expired - Lifetime US2829035A (en)

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Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3042509A (en) * 1959-11-27 1962-07-03 Bruce Products Corp Abrasive and polish compound
US3089233A (en) * 1959-12-28 1963-05-14 Signode Steel Strapping Co Ligature joining
US3265475A (en) * 1962-12-04 1966-08-09 Hanson Van Winkle Munning Co Buffing compositions
US3458300A (en) * 1966-07-05 1969-07-29 Wyandotte Chemicals Corp Abrasive cleaning compositions
US3929499A (en) * 1972-09-08 1975-12-30 Frederick L Thomas High water-content water in oil emulsion
US4060943A (en) * 1976-03-23 1977-12-06 Albert Olsin Metal working compound
US4071333A (en) * 1976-10-18 1978-01-31 American Cyanamid Company Abrasive scouring block (and support therefor)
USRE29634E (en) * 1968-08-05 1978-05-16 Colgate Palmolive Company Dentifrice containing visible agglomerated particles of polishing agents
US4089943A (en) * 1974-02-08 1978-05-16 Colgate-Palmolive Company Toothpaste formulations
US4098878A (en) * 1974-10-29 1978-07-04 Colgate-Palmolive Company Toothpaste containing milled alpha-alumina trihydrate
US4182686A (en) * 1978-05-17 1980-01-08 Sid Laks Plastic wax cleaning and polishing composition and method of making same
US4190986A (en) * 1977-05-14 1980-03-04 Daichiku Co., Ltd. Wax treated grindstone
FR2636326A1 (en) * 1988-09-15 1990-03-16 Rhone Poulenc Sa
US5094687A (en) * 1989-02-15 1992-03-10 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Buffing composition
US5141555A (en) * 1989-02-15 1992-08-25 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Buffing composition
US6086648A (en) * 1998-04-07 2000-07-11 Norton Company Bonded abrasive articles filled with oil/wax mixture
US20120256945A1 (en) * 2008-06-17 2012-10-11 Digigage Ltd. System for altering virtual views

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1442752A (en) * 1922-11-18 1923-01-16 Heinrich H Warmund Composition for coating, sealing, and the like
US2078876A (en) * 1936-10-30 1937-04-27 Puritan Mfg Company Presaponified buffing compound
US2129377A (en) * 1935-06-18 1938-09-06 Allegro Company Polishing compound
US2390212A (en) * 1942-09-22 1945-12-04 Nat Oil Prod Co Antifoaming agents
US2540376A (en) * 1947-01-23 1951-02-06 Theodore F Onkey Buffing or polishing composition
US2548582A (en) * 1947-09-26 1951-04-10 American Steel & Wire Co Abrasive suspensions

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1442752A (en) * 1922-11-18 1923-01-16 Heinrich H Warmund Composition for coating, sealing, and the like
US2129377A (en) * 1935-06-18 1938-09-06 Allegro Company Polishing compound
US2078876A (en) * 1936-10-30 1937-04-27 Puritan Mfg Company Presaponified buffing compound
US2390212A (en) * 1942-09-22 1945-12-04 Nat Oil Prod Co Antifoaming agents
US2540376A (en) * 1947-01-23 1951-02-06 Theodore F Onkey Buffing or polishing composition
US2548582A (en) * 1947-09-26 1951-04-10 American Steel & Wire Co Abrasive suspensions

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3042509A (en) * 1959-11-27 1962-07-03 Bruce Products Corp Abrasive and polish compound
US3089233A (en) * 1959-12-28 1963-05-14 Signode Steel Strapping Co Ligature joining
US3265475A (en) * 1962-12-04 1966-08-09 Hanson Van Winkle Munning Co Buffing compositions
US3458300A (en) * 1966-07-05 1969-07-29 Wyandotte Chemicals Corp Abrasive cleaning compositions
USRE29634E (en) * 1968-08-05 1978-05-16 Colgate Palmolive Company Dentifrice containing visible agglomerated particles of polishing agents
US3929499A (en) * 1972-09-08 1975-12-30 Frederick L Thomas High water-content water in oil emulsion
US4089943A (en) * 1974-02-08 1978-05-16 Colgate-Palmolive Company Toothpaste formulations
US4098878A (en) * 1974-10-29 1978-07-04 Colgate-Palmolive Company Toothpaste containing milled alpha-alumina trihydrate
US4060943A (en) * 1976-03-23 1977-12-06 Albert Olsin Metal working compound
US4071333A (en) * 1976-10-18 1978-01-31 American Cyanamid Company Abrasive scouring block (and support therefor)
US4190986A (en) * 1977-05-14 1980-03-04 Daichiku Co., Ltd. Wax treated grindstone
US4182686A (en) * 1978-05-17 1980-01-08 Sid Laks Plastic wax cleaning and polishing composition and method of making same
FR2636326A1 (en) * 1988-09-15 1990-03-16 Rhone Poulenc Sa
EP0362084A1 (en) * 1988-09-15 1990-04-04 Rhone-Poulenc Chimie Process for waterproofing quarry products by using a silicone emulsion
US5021262A (en) * 1988-09-15 1991-06-04 Rhone-Poulenc Chimie Waterproofing/shaping of quarried building materials
US5094687A (en) * 1989-02-15 1992-03-10 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Buffing composition
US5141555A (en) * 1989-02-15 1992-08-25 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Buffing composition
US6086648A (en) * 1998-04-07 2000-07-11 Norton Company Bonded abrasive articles filled with oil/wax mixture
US20120256945A1 (en) * 2008-06-17 2012-10-11 Digigage Ltd. System for altering virtual views

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