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US2807503A - Garment spotting apparatus - Google Patents

Garment spotting apparatus Download PDF

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US2807503A
US2807503A US33686053A US2807503A US 2807503 A US2807503 A US 2807503A US 33686053 A US33686053 A US 33686053A US 2807503 A US2807503 A US 2807503A
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valve
spotting
liquid
steam
air
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Albert M Buterbaugh
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Albert M Buterbaugh
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F43/00Dry-cleaning apparatus or methods using volatile solvents
    • D06F43/002Spotting apparatus

Description

Sept. 24,. 195 7 A. M. BUTERBAUGH- 2,807,503

GARMENT SPOTTING APPARATUS Filed Feb. 15, 1953 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Zhwentor.

Alba/"f M. Buferbauy/z Gtfornegs.

2,807,503 GARMENT SPOTTIN G APPARATUS Albert M. Buterbaugh, Kansas City, Mo. Application February 13, 1953, Serial No. 336,860

I 2 Claims. (Cl. 299-87) 1 This invention relates to garment spotting apparatus and more particularly to apparatus that combines a liquid receptacle and air connections for supplying air and/or air and liquid to the nozzle or brush of a spotting tool separately or together with wet or dry steam.

' It is common dry cleaning practice to first dry clean a'garment and then, if spots are found thereon, pass the garment to a spotter who treats the spots which are not removed by the dry cleaning process with various chemicals in an attempt to remove them. In the dry cleaning process the garment is subjected to a dry cleaning solvent such as carbon tetrachlorideand the like, which will dissolve most oily or greasy stains, however, such organic solvents do not remove water-soluble stains and certain spots which are neither oil-soluble or watersoluble, such as iodine stains, rust spots, ink spots, et cetera. The spotter usually steams the garment over a steaming board before spotting and then attempts to remove water-soluble spots with wet steam applied with a steam gun or nozzle. For the removal of spots or'stains that are not soluble in Water or wet steam, chemicals are applied and'the spots brushed or otherwise worked to soften and dissolve the spotting matter. Then the chemical and dissolved matter are flushed out with wet steam from the steam gun or nozzle. The spotter usually has available dry steam with provisions of providing moisture in varying quantities thereto according to the particular spotting operation to be performed. Frequently the spotting matter in a garment is hardened or set by the dry cleaning solvent or heat and then is very diflicult and sometimesimpossible of removal.

It is desirable to remove the spotting matter from the garment prior to subjecting same to dry cleaning solvents. However, I have found that either before or after the garment is subjected to dry cleaning solvents many of the spots can be removed by working and softening the spotting matter while applying relatively cold water and/or water and airthereto while brushing or otherwise working-the sptted'areas,- and the spotting matter that is not dissolved by water'is not further hardened or set by such treatment. Therefore, it is preferable when attempting to remove any spots, the cause of which is not known, to first use water and/ or water and air for the attempted removal. If the spot does not respond' to the Water treatment, air and wet steam are applied. Dry steam and wet steam may also be used to 'providea desiredmoisture content of the media applied to the garment and if the spot is still not removed 7 it may be treated with suitable chemicals commonly used in the industry for spot removal and the chemicals then flushed from the garment with water or water and air or steam of desired moisture content.

The objects of thepresent invention are to provide a garment spotting apparatus wherein all the spotting operations may be carried out with a single piece of equipment having controls for varying the spot removingmedia applied to the stained or spotted area; to

provide a liquid container with air connections whereby water or water and air or air alone may be selectively applied to the garment separately or together with wet or dry steam whereby the moisture content of the media applied to the garment is best suited to the work at hand; and to provide a garment spotting apparatus that is easily controlled and eflicient in operation for rapidly spotting garments with reduced danger of injury to the fabrics of the garments.

In accomplishing these and other objects of the present invention, I have provided improved details of structure, the preferred form of which is illustrated in they accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a garment spotting apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is an elevational view of the liquid and air system of the spotting apparatus.

Fig.3 is a side elevation of the liquid and air system 'as viewed from the left of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the liquid and air system.

- Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view through the liquid and air system illustrating the arrangement of the controls therefor.

. Referring more in detail to the drawings:

1 designates a garment spotting apparatus generally consisting of a spotting table 2 and a liquid and air supply system 3. The spotting table has a base 4 provided with an upright support 5, which carries a combination spotting and steaming board 6 having one portion 7 with a slab-like top and another portion 8 having a woven wire or perforated metal top 9. The board 6 is supported on a hollow arm 10, the interior of which communicates with a hollow interior of the board portion 8, and also through a hollow portion of the support 5 to a valvell adapted to be connected to a source of suction whereby when the valve 11 is opened air will be drawn through the woven wire top 9. A basket 12 is carried on the support 5 below the board 6 to aid in supporting garments while beingprocessed on the board.

The spotting table has a steam inlet 13 adapted to be connected to a suitable source of steam for supplying steam to a tubular separator 14. Arranged in the steam system are valves 15 and 16 operated by foot pedals 17 and 18 respectively. The foot pedals 17 and 18 have links '17 and 18 respectively connected with the valve 11 whereby when either foot pedal is depressedthe valve 11-is opened toapply a suction to the spotting table. The'discharge of each of the valves 15 and 16 is connected to a pipe 19 which has a valve 20 controlling flow therethrough and to a flexible hose-like conduit 21. The spotting table and steam system therefor, as above described, are exemplary of spotting tables that have heretofore been used. The'valve 20 is an auxiliary valve to positively shut off flow of wet or dry steam to the conduit 21 when neither is desired for use in the spotting op- 5 erations. When either wet or dry steam is desired valve 20 is opened and the supply of wet steam controlled by valve 15 and the-supply of dry steam controlled by valve 16. The conduit 21 is connected to a steam discharge nozzle or spotting tool for discharge of steam onto the spotted area of a garment and a particular structure of the stance, the tank is mounted on a support 23 and said tank has a vertical, cylindrical wall 24 and upper and lower outwardly dished heads 25 and 26 respectively to form a pressure-tight chamber 27. The lower head 26 is preferably spaced above the bottom edge 28 of the cylindrical, wall and has an ,0utlet29 connected to a drain pipe.

having ;a valve 31 whereby on opening of the valve 31 sediment and liquid may be withdrawn from the bottom of the chamber 27. Air under pressure is supplied to the chamber 27 nearthe upper portion thereof through a port 32 in a boss 33, saidboss being internally'threaded to connect a compressed air supply pipe 34 which is connected to a source of compressed air. (not shown). Water or other suitable liquid is introduced into the tank chamber 27 to a predetermined level provided by a valved controlled overflow port 35 in the side wall of the tank and at a lower level than the port 32, whereby the compressed air enters the chamber 27 above the liquid level.

While the liquid may be introduced from a suitable source through a valved connection with the tank, in the illustrated structure an open top vessel 36. is adapted to have liquid poured therein and the bottom of'rthe vessel is connected by a duct 37 to the pipe 34, wherebythe liquid from the vessel 36 fiowsthrouglr the duct 37, pipe 34 and port 32 into thechamber 27. A valve 38 is arranged in the duct 37 forclosing same during use of the apparatus, the valve 38 being open only when additional liquid is to be supplied to the chamber 27. When liquid is introduced to the chamber 27 the air supply is cut off and the overflow port 35 opened. While the duct 37 is connected to the pipe 34, separate connection with the chamber 27 may be utilized for the compressed air and liquid supply.

The tank 22 is provided with valve controlled connections communicating with a pipe 39 for selective flow therethrough of air or liquid alone, or both air and liquid, The pipe 39 is connected through a solenoid operated valve 40 to a pipe 41 to which is also connected a discharge end of the flexible conduit 21. In the structure illustrated the pipe 41 and conduit 21 are connected to branches of a T fitting 42, the other branch of which is connected to a spotting tool 43 by a flexible hose-like conduit 44. The spotting tool has a handle 45 through which extends a tube 46, one end of which is connected as at 47 to the conduit 44 and the other end of which has a brush 48 mounted thereon, whereby the tube discharges adjacent the center of the brush. An electrical plug connector 49 adapted to be connected to a suitable source of electric current is connected to the solenoid to supply current thereto. A switch 50 arranged in the handle 45 of the spotting tool is electrically connected in the circuit for controlling the current to the solenoid, pressing of the switch 50 to close same energizing the solenoid to open the valve ,40 for flow of media therethrough and releasing of the switch 50, breaking the circuit to the solenoid whereby the valve 40 is then closed and remains closed until the solenoid is again energized.

In the valve connections from the tank 22 to the pipe 39 for flow of air or water or both to said pipe, separate connections with the tank may be arranged. In the illustrated instance, and for convenience of assembly, the upper head 25 has a boss 51 provided with an internally threadedbcre 52 into which is threaded the lower end of a nipple 53. The upper end of the nipple 53 is threaded into one of the aligned branches of a T fitting 54. A reducer bushing 55 is threaded into the upper in line branch of the T fitting 54. A tube 56, smaller in diameter thanthe bore in the nipple 53, has its upper end threaded or otherwise secured in the reducer bushing 55, said tube extending downwardly from the reducer through the bore of the nipple 53 and into the chamber 27 and terminates as at 57 adjacent the bottom of the chamber 27 The upper end of the tube 56 projects from the reducer bushing 55 and is connected to a needle valve assembly 58, the discharge of the needle valve assembly being connected by a tube 59 to a nozzle member 60, which preferably extends through a T fitting 61 and terminates in the pipe 39, whereby when air pressure is applied on the upper surface of the liquid in the chamber 27. and the valve 58 is opened, liquid is forced through the tube 56,. valve 58, tube 59 and nozzle 60 and discharged in a jet intothe pipe 39, adjustment of the needle valve 58 varying the flow of liquid and quantity discharged from the nozzle. The other branch of the T fitting 54 has a reducer bushing 62 therein to which is connected a needle valve assembly 63, the discharge of said needle valve assembly being connected by a pipe 64 to a branch of the T fitting 61, whereby when the needle valve 63 is opened air in the chamber 27 above the liquid therein will flow through the bore of the nipple 53 around the tube 56, through the T fitting 54, reducer bushing 62, valve assembly 63, pipe 64, and into the T fitting 61 for flow around the nozzle 60 and into the pipe 39.

In operating a garment spotting apparatus constructed and assembled as described and with a steam supply con nected to the connection 13, the valve 38 is opened and a suitable liquid, such as water, poured in the vessel 36 for flow into the chamber 27 until the level of the liquid in said chamber is even with the valve controlled overflow port 35. The valve controlled overflow port is then closed and the val e 38 closed. The pipe 34 is then connected to a compressed air supply to deliver air under pressure into the space in the chamber 27 above the liquid level. A garment to be spotted is placed on the portion 8 of the spotting board 6 and then with the valve assembly 63 in closed condition, the valve 58 is opened and the valve 20 closed. The plug 49 is connected with a suitable source of electric current for energizing the solenoid valve 40. Then the operator steps on one of the foot pedals 1'7 or 18 to open the. valve 11 whereby suction is applied to the spotting board portion 8 and the switch 50 is depressed to energize the solenoid valve 40 to open same, whereby the air pressure on the liquid in the chamber 27 causes same to flow through the tube 56, valve 58, tube 59, nozzle 60, pipe 39, valve 40, pipe 41 and conduit 44 and tube 46 to discharge the liquid into the spotted area of the garment, the operator also working the brush 48 on the. garment to soften the spotting material and facilitate its being dissolved and washed from the garment by the water. Then the valve assembly 63 may be opened whereby air. from the chamber 27 will llow through the nipple 53, the fitting 54, reducer bushing 62, valve 63, pipe 64, T fitting 61 and around the nozzle 60 into the pipe 39, whereby the. air flow serves as an aspirator drawing liquid from the nozzle 60 and breaking same into a fine mist which is discharged through the spotting tool onto the garment. If desired the valve assembly 58 may be closed whereby only air is discharged from the spotting tool. Then the switch 50 is depressed to energize and open the solenoid valve 40. 1 If the spotting matter does not respond to such treatment, the valve 20 is opened and the operator, by depressing pedal 17 or 18, will cause wet or dry steam respectively to flow through the-conduit21, conduit 44 and'spotting tool to the garment. By opening the valve 58 and valve 20 and pressing the switch 50 simultaneously with depressing of thefoot pedal 18, both water and steam will be discharged from the spotting tool onto the garment. Also by opening the valve 63, together with valve 58 and valve 20, a

mixture of air, water and steam will be discharged onto.

the garment. Closing of the valve 58 and opening the valve 63 and valve 20 and depressing of the pedal 18 and switch 50 will cause air and steam to be discharged onto the garment.

Therefore, by manipulation of the valves, air or water alone may be discharged onto the garment, air and water together, air and dry steam, air and wet steam, dry steam alone, or wet steam alone maybe discharged onto the garment, and with this arrangement the operator may selectively flow water onto the garment at desired tem peratures from cold water to water substantially at the boiling point and also may flow steam with various degrees of moisture therein, the character of the spots to be removed determining the media to be used thereon. After treatment with liquid or steam, air alone may be discharged on the garment to facilitate drying of same.

It is believed obvious I have provided a garment spotting apparatus which provides a wide range of spotting media for use in removing spots and also provides for the use of liquid such as water for use in the first endeavor to remove spots the character of which is unknown.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a garment spotting apparatus, a steam separator having a steam inlet and a dry steam outlet and a wet steam outlet, valved means regulating flow through the respective steam outlets, a spotting tool having a passage therethrough, a closed tank adapted to contain a liquid and air under pressure above the liquid level, means connected to the tank for supplying liquid thereto, means connected with the tank for supplying air under pressure to said tank above the liquid level, a tubular member extending downwardly of the tank and having an inlet below the surface of the liquid and an outlet exteriorly of the tank above the surface of the liquid, a discharge line, a flexible conduit connecting one end of the discharge line with the passage in the spotting tool, means in the discharge line for controlling flow therethrough to the spotting tool, flow means connecting the tubular member outlet with the discharge line, means in said flow means for controlling flow therethrough, a second flow means having one end communicating with the tank above the surface of the liquid therein and the other end communicating with the discharge line, means controlling air flow through the second flow means, means for operating the flow control means in the discharge line for discharge of air and liquid from the spotting tool, duct means connecting the wet and dry steam outlets to the discharge line, and a valve means controlling steam flow to the discharge line.

2. In a garment spotting apparatus, a steam separator having a steam inlet and a dry steam outlet and a Wet steam outlet, valved means regulating flow through the respective steam outlets, a spotting tool having 'a passage therethrough, a closed tank adapted to contain a liquid and air under pressure above the liquid level, means connected to the tank for supplying liquid thereto, a valved overflow connection limiting the maximum level of the liquid in the tank, means connected with the tank above the overflow connection for supplying air under pressure to said tank above the liquid level, a tubular member extending downwardly of the tank and having an inlet below the surface of the liquid and an outlet exteriorly of the tank above the surface of the liquid, a discharge line, a flexible conduit connecting one end of the discharge line with the spotting tool, a valve in the discharge line for controlling flow therethrough to the spotting tool, a nozzle discharging in the discharge line adjacent the other end thereof, flow means connecting the tubular member outlet with the nozzle, valve means in the flow means for regulating liquid flow therethrough, a second flow means having one end communicating with the tank above the surface of the liquid therein and the other end communicating with the discharge line adjacent the nozzle and upstream therefrom, valve means in the second flow means for regulating air flow therethrough, means for operating the valve in the discharge line for discharge of air and liquid from the spotting tool in accordance with the relative regulatory adjustment of the valve means in the respective flow means, duct means connecting the dry and wet steam outlets to the discharge line, and valve means in the duct means for regulating steam flow therethrough.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,114,592 De Witt Oct. 20, 1914 1,437,331 Alexander Nov. 28, 1922 1,608,635 Theriot Nov. 30, 1926 1,667,683 Thompson Apr. 24, 1928 2,340,832 Darnrne Feb. 1, 1944 2,346,821 Cissell Apr. 18, 1944 2,350,876 Clarkson June 6, 1944 2,363,956 Glover Nov. 28, 1944 2,392,645 Clobridge Jan. 8, 1946 2,571,575 Holmes Oct. 16, 1951. 2,598,447 Schultz May 27, 1952 2,598,571 Longmuir May 27, 1952 2,670,621 Glover Mar. 2, 1954 2,707,874 Glover May 10, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 672,442 Great Britain May 21, 1951

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2967670A (en) * 1958-10-03 1961-01-10 Mcroberts Roscoe Pre-spotting machine
US3457017A (en) * 1966-03-01 1969-07-22 James W Bastian Painting system
US4926514A (en) * 1988-01-18 1990-05-22 Biac Holding Ag Method of and apparatus for removing stains from soiled areas of a plannar textile article
US20040144140A1 (en) * 2003-01-27 2004-07-29 Benny Lee Steamer attachment
US20070151302A1 (en) * 2000-07-25 2007-07-05 Kendall James W Vertical laundry module
US7562543B2 (en) 2005-12-30 2009-07-21 Whirlpool Corporation Vertical laundry module with backsplash
US7587917B2 (en) 2005-12-30 2009-09-15 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with shelf module
US7617702B2 (en) 2000-07-25 2009-11-17 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with cabinet module
US7624600B2 (en) 2000-07-25 2009-12-01 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with horizontally arranged cabinet module
US7628043B2 (en) 2000-07-25 2009-12-08 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with horizontal modules
US20100086287A1 (en) * 2008-10-03 2010-04-08 Euro-Pro Operating Llc Apparatus and method for a steamer
US7849717B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2010-12-14 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with horizontal module spanning two laundry appliances
US8286452B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2012-10-16 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with segmented work surface
US8479542B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2013-07-09 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with work surface having a functional insert
US9187855B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2015-11-17 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with work surface

Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1114592A (en) * 1914-02-26 1914-10-20 Clinton C De Witt Hydropneumatic window-cleaning apparatus.
US1437331A (en) * 1921-02-21 1922-11-28 Horace G Alexander Process of cleaning paint, grease, dirt, and other matter from vehicles and other articles
US1608635A (en) * 1921-11-18 1926-11-30 Oswald H Theriot Apparatus for removing paint
US1667683A (en) * 1924-12-01 1928-04-24 Alfred H Thompson Apparatus for cleansing and disinfecting
US2340832A (en) * 1940-11-07 1944-02-01 Butler Manufacturing Co Spotting board
US2346821A (en) * 1940-06-28 1944-04-18 William M Cissell Apparatus for spotting fabric materials
US2350876A (en) * 1938-12-17 1944-06-06 Clarkson Alick Cleaning apparatus
US2363956A (en) * 1940-02-24 1944-11-28 Cleaners Specialties Inc Spotting apparatus
US2392645A (en) * 1943-09-27 1946-01-08 Charles D Clobridge Steam gun and brush combination
US2571575A (en) * 1947-07-03 1951-10-16 John C Holmes Steam cleaner
GB672442A (en) * 1950-05-08 1952-05-21 Bill Glover Inc Improvements relating to garment and like textile article spotting machines
US2598447A (en) * 1948-12-31 1952-05-27 David A Freeman Corp Steam hydrator
US2598571A (en) * 1947-06-13 1952-05-27 Longmuir James Dry cleaning apparatus
US2670621A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-03-02 Bill Glover Inc Garment spotting machine
US2707874A (en) * 1950-03-18 1955-05-10 Bill Glover Inc Garment spotting machine

Patent Citations (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1114592A (en) * 1914-02-26 1914-10-20 Clinton C De Witt Hydropneumatic window-cleaning apparatus.
US1437331A (en) * 1921-02-21 1922-11-28 Horace G Alexander Process of cleaning paint, grease, dirt, and other matter from vehicles and other articles
US1608635A (en) * 1921-11-18 1926-11-30 Oswald H Theriot Apparatus for removing paint
US1667683A (en) * 1924-12-01 1928-04-24 Alfred H Thompson Apparatus for cleansing and disinfecting
US2350876A (en) * 1938-12-17 1944-06-06 Clarkson Alick Cleaning apparatus
US2363956A (en) * 1940-02-24 1944-11-28 Cleaners Specialties Inc Spotting apparatus
US2346821A (en) * 1940-06-28 1944-04-18 William M Cissell Apparatus for spotting fabric materials
US2340832A (en) * 1940-11-07 1944-02-01 Butler Manufacturing Co Spotting board
US2392645A (en) * 1943-09-27 1946-01-08 Charles D Clobridge Steam gun and brush combination
US2598571A (en) * 1947-06-13 1952-05-27 Longmuir James Dry cleaning apparatus
US2571575A (en) * 1947-07-03 1951-10-16 John C Holmes Steam cleaner
US2598447A (en) * 1948-12-31 1952-05-27 David A Freeman Corp Steam hydrator
US2670621A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-03-02 Bill Glover Inc Garment spotting machine
US2707874A (en) * 1950-03-18 1955-05-10 Bill Glover Inc Garment spotting machine
GB672442A (en) * 1950-05-08 1952-05-21 Bill Glover Inc Improvements relating to garment and like textile article spotting machines

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2967670A (en) * 1958-10-03 1961-01-10 Mcroberts Roscoe Pre-spotting machine
US3457017A (en) * 1966-03-01 1969-07-22 James W Bastian Painting system
US4926514A (en) * 1988-01-18 1990-05-22 Biac Holding Ag Method of and apparatus for removing stains from soiled areas of a plannar textile article
US20070151302A1 (en) * 2000-07-25 2007-07-05 Kendall James W Vertical laundry module
US20070266740A9 (en) * 2000-07-25 2007-11-22 Kendall James W Vertical laundry module
US7624600B2 (en) 2000-07-25 2009-12-01 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with horizontally arranged cabinet module
US7628043B2 (en) 2000-07-25 2009-12-08 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with horizontal modules
US7617702B2 (en) 2000-07-25 2009-11-17 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with cabinet module
US20040144140A1 (en) * 2003-01-27 2004-07-29 Benny Lee Steamer attachment
US9611578B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2017-04-04 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system
US9187855B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2015-11-17 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with work surface
US9546442B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2017-01-17 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system and laundry module
US7849717B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2010-12-14 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with horizontal module spanning two laundry appliances
US8286452B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2012-10-16 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with segmented work surface
US8322169B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2012-12-04 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8375750B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2013-02-19 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8381552B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2013-02-26 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8413470B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2013-04-09 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8459067B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2013-06-11 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with vertical laundry module
US8479542B2 (en) 2004-10-22 2013-07-09 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with work surface having a functional insert
US7587917B2 (en) 2005-12-30 2009-09-15 Whirlpool Corporation Modular laundry system with shelf module
US7562543B2 (en) 2005-12-30 2009-07-21 Whirlpool Corporation Vertical laundry module with backsplash
US20100086287A1 (en) * 2008-10-03 2010-04-08 Euro-Pro Operating Llc Apparatus and method for a steamer

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