US2799249A - Boom actuating motor and locking means - Google Patents

Boom actuating motor and locking means Download PDF

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US2799249A
US2799249A US39534553A US2799249A US 2799249 A US2799249 A US 2799249A US 39534553 A US39534553 A US 39534553A US 2799249 A US2799249 A US 2799249A
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boom
member
hole
means
end
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Earl B Lear
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Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co LLC
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Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co LLC
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/02Portable drilling rigs, truck-or skid-mounted, with their own drive
    • E21B7/025Rock drills, i.e. jumbo drills
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B7/00Special methods or apparatus for drilling
    • E21B7/02Portable drilling rigs, truck-or skid-mounted, with their own drive
    • E21B7/022Control of the drilling operation; Hydraulic or pneumatic means for activation or operation

Description

July 16, 1957 E. B. LEAR BOOM-ACTUATING MOTOR AND LOCKING MEANS 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Original Filed July 6, 1950 ATTORNEY July 16, 1957 E. B. LEAR 2,799,249

Boom AcTuATING NoToR AND LOCKING MEANS original Filed July e, 195o s sheets-sheet 2 INVENTOR 5f/@.4 f4/Q BY 2 ATTORNEY A llllllllll'llll.

E. B. LEAR 2,799,249

5 Sheets-Sheet 5 NQ m2 m@ s .INVEN-ron vez f4/9 W ATTORNEY BOOM ACTUATING MOTOR AND LOCKING MEANS 4 Q .uLP NQ .M .TLP .n TI NMX nl Qv @Q m.. wwwwmw) sw m h d L l E Al A1 ZV r m@ M// f l Il Q J WNlbWY W l l l wml llllnll M i lll .HHJ; l l Q L ---L ---l N\ l w :t F fr UVW* July 16, 1957 original Filed July 6, 195o July 16, 1957' E', B, LEAR 2,799,249

BOOM ACTUATING MOTOR AND LOCKING MEANS Original Filed July 6, 1950 5 Sheets-SheetA lNvENToR ma .J5/4f? i ATTORNEY July 16, 1957 E. B. I EAR 2,799,249

BOOM ACTUATING MOTOR AND LOCKING MEANS A Original Filed July 6, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 vlNvENToR mez 54,? f

BY .92 ATTORNEY United States Patent Earl B. Lear, Utica, N. Y., assignor to Chicago Pneumatic.v Tool Company, New York, N. Y., a corporation of New Jersey 1950, Serial No.- 172,340, dated August 10, 1954. Di-

Serial No;

Original application July 6,- uow Patent No. 2,686,040, vided and this application December 1, 1953, 395,345

3 Claims. (Cl. 121-39) This invention relates to rock drilling equipment and more particularly to improvements in a portable multiple drill supporting apparatus.

This application is a division of my parent application Serial No. 172,340, led July .6, 1950, which issued as Patent No. 2,686,040 on August 10, 1954.

It is common practice in quarry and mining operations, especially in tunneling operations, to employ a track mounted carrier having adjustable drill supporting means whereby one or more drills may be readily positioned and maintained in operative position with respect to the work surface. Such equipment is generally known in the industry as a jumbo drill mounting, and usually includes one or more power operated booms, each of which supports a drill atlixed thereto by some form of swivel arrangement. The use of the jumbo drill mounting permits the convenient drilling of any work surface, or of any tunnel area as the case may be.

During the actual drilling operations, it is important that the drill be rigidly maintained in operative position. To this end, various means for anchoring the carrier, as well as means for locking the boom and swivel arrangement, have been designed. However, the arrangements of the prior art structures are not always successful in maintaining the drill in fixed position during drilling, due to the great weight of the boom and drill, together with the excessive vibrations which are set upv during drilling. In such cases the drill steel very shortly settles, or rides, on the lower radius of the drill hole, thereby causing increased friction with a reduction in drilling speed. lFur,- thermore, any tendencyof the carriage anchoring means to lose grip, likewise contributes to aV reduction in operat ing efciency. Such conditions are undesirable since frequenty readjustment of the boom and/ or the anchoring means is required to maintain proper alignment of the drill with the hole being drilled. l

It is the object of the present invention to provide a jumbo drill mount with an improved drill supporting means, which maintains proper alignment of the drillV with the hole being drilled. Another object is to provide an improved drill supporting means having a boom which is automatically locked in position after adjustment, to avoid downward movement or sagging thereof. A further object is to provide an improved anchoring means for the carriage which can be quickly and conveniently set up and knocked down, and which is rigid and reliable in use. Another object is to provide means on the car-v riage to counterbalance the weight of the booms and drills when the carriage is being moved from one location to another in the mine. A further object is to provide an improved internal construction of the boom whereby lubricant will not collect therein/and ood the boom actuating motor when the boom is lowered. These and other objects and features of the invention will become more apparent when viewed in the light of the following specication and accompanying drawings wherein:

, motor control valve arrangement taken as 2,799,249 Patented July 1,6, 1957 Fig. 1 is aside view of a rock drill machine embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is an incomplete front View of the machine of Fig. 1 with some parts in section;

Fig. 3a is a fragmentary sectional View of one end of the boom;

Fig. 3b is a fragmentary sectional view of the other end of the boom;

Fig. 4 is a section of the boom as seen from the arrows 4--4 in Fig. 3b;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section view of the boom actuating motor including the boom locking arrangement and a portion of the boom screw;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view of the boom actuating motor as seen from the arrows 6--6 in Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view of the boom locking arrangement as seen from the arrows 7 7 in Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is an exterior view of a portion of the boom in the region of the boom control motor valve;

Fig. 9 isa sectional view as seen from the arrows 9-9 in Fig. 8;

Fig. 10 -is a sectional view of the boom motor control valve arrangement as seen from the arrows 10'-10 in Fig. 8;

Figs. 11, 12 and 13 are sectional views of the boom indicated by the respective arrows in Fig. 9;

Fig. 14 is a plan view of the boom motor control valve;

Fig. l5 isa partial section view of the boom motor control valve viewed as indicated by arrows 15-15 in Fig. 14;

Figs. 16 and 17 are sectional views of the boom motor control valve taken as indicated by the respective arrows in Fig. l5; and

Fig. 18 is an exterior portion of the control valve viewed as indicated by arrows 18--18 in Fig. 17.

The scale used in the drawings is not alike for all gures: Figs. l and 2 are alike in scale; Figs. 3a and 3b are alike in scale but larger than Fig. l; the scale of Fig. 4 is greater than that of Fig. 3a; Figs. 5 to 13 inclusive are alike in scale but larger than Fig. 4;V Figs. 14 to 18 inclusive are alike (and are approximately fullvscale) but larger than Fig. 5.

Referring now to Fig. l a jumbo drillV mounting illustrative of the invention comprises, a carrier 30 arranged ,tol ride upon trackway 31, which is laid in advance of the carrier as the work or tunnelling progresses; one or more swivel heads 32 mounted upon the carrier and arranged for rotation about a vertical post 33;y a boom arrangement 34 pivotally affixed to the swivel head for movement in any vertical plane bisecting the axis of the swivel head; and a ballast box 36 projecting in overhanging manner fromV the rear end of the carrier.

The carrier 30 comprises a platform 37 mounted upon two pairs of wheels 38, which are designed to ride upon trackway 31. Swivel head posts 33 are symmetrically arranged about the longitudinal axis of platform 37, and at a short distance rearward of the front pair of wheels 38. Each swivel head 32 has a clamping means 39, suchV as the well known block and bolt type, by means of which the swivel head can be manually locked in position on the swivel h-eadpost 33.

The boom arrangement 34 basically comprises a boom 41, an arm 42, and a boom actuating means 43. The boom 41 has a yoke member 44 at one end by means of which the boom is pivotally affixed to the upper end of the swivel head 32. Arm 42 is located at the other end ofv boom 41 and is connected thereto, by swivel means 45, for movement of approximately in a plane parallel to the pivot axis of yoke 44. The swivel means 45` consists ofV a taperedy or truste-conical member 46 (Fig. 3b) forming a portion of a casting' 47 secured to the end of the boom 41 as shown, and a cup member 48 which is secured to the arm 42, and which has an internal tapered surface engageable with the member 46. By means of a draw bolt 49, the cup member 48 can be drawn snugly down upon the frusto-conical member 46, to lock arm 42 in position. Arm 42 is made up of an inner shaft (not shown) which is integral with the cup member 48, and a cylindrical outer member 51 which is positioned for rotational movement about the inner shaft. A draw bolt 52 is arranged to provide locking of the outer member 51 against movement relative to the inner shaft. Near the free end of the arm 42 is a clamping head 53 for supporting and clamping a swivel base 54 of a drill 55, the illustrative type shown being known lto the trade as a driften The boom actuating means 43 comprises an actuating motor 56,(Figs. 1 and 5), a screw member 57 having a single right-hand square thread, and a sleeve member 58 which has internal thread means to receive the screw member. One end of the sleeve member is enclosed by a yoke 59 (Figs. 1 and 2), which is pivotally aflixed to a lower portion of the swivel head 32, while the other end encompasses the screw member 57. The actuating motor longitudinal 4 first of which is cast integral with the body of valve 83, the latter of which is maintained in alignment thereon by a Woodrul key 86 or equivalent, and a nut 87. An alignment bushing 88, fitted to the housing 79, projects into hole 77 in the boom outer member 65.

As best seen in Figs. 14 to 17 inclusive, the valve 83 has a circumferential groove 89, which connects with two grooves 91, and 92 running in the direction of the axis, groove 91 extending toward control handle S4, while groove 92 extends in the opposite direction and is displaced approximately 165 from groove 91. A longitudinal passageway 93 formed within the valve 83, has an opening 94 adjacent a ange 95, which is cast 56 is drivingly connected to the screw member at one end and is pivotally connected at the other end to a yoke bracket 61 which is attached to the lower side of the boom 41. Slightly forward of the motor 56 an actuating motor control valve assembly 62 is aixed to the underside of theboom 41 by means of bolts 63 which hang from a saddle clamp 64. It will be seen that the structure of the boom arrangement as described, permits the positioning of the drill at any angle with respect to the work surface. The screw 57 has a relief 57A which in turn has two flats 57b for turning the screw with a wrench, when compressed air is not available for running the motor 56. Turning now to the consideration of certain elements of the boom arrangement 34 in greater detail, the boom 41 comprises in part an outer tubular member 65 (Figs. 1, 3A and 3b), and an inner tubular member 66, for delivery of live air tothe drill and actuating motor, which is maintained in spaced relation to the member 65 by spacer blocks 67 and a distributing block 68, the latter of which are welded in place within member 65. The inner member 66 is slidably fitted to the blocks 67 and 68, and when assembled is maintained in position by a spring 69 which is held in compression between the end of member 66 and a cap 71, threadably affixed to the yoke member 44. g A threaded portion 72, located in the end of member 66, is provided for the convenient removal of the inner member 66 from the outer member 65. The distributing block 68 is bored to receive the front end of the tubular member 66, and has a passageway 73 which leads upwards, connecting with a hole 74 formed in the outer member 65, the hole 74 being surrounded by a boss member 75 tapped to receive a pipe connection. A circumferential groove 76 is formed on the periphery of the block 68, which intersects with the passageway 73, and which is aligned with a hole 77, formed in the lower surface of the member 65. A threaded hole 78 is provided in yoke member 44 to receive a pipe coupling for the flow of live air to the inner member 66. It will be apparent that air ow through the inner member 66 leaves the boom 41 by way of hole 74 and also hole 77. It is further seen that the arrangement of the boom, viz., the smaller ydiameter inner member 66 supported within a relatively large diameter outer member 65, provides a smaller passageway for the conduction of air through the boom, thereby reducing the possibility of lubricant condensation to a degree which could flood the actuator motor when the boom is lowered.

Control valve assembly 62, as shown in Figs. 9 and l0,l comprises a housing 79, formed with lugs 81 tapped to receive bolts 63, and having a transverse bore 82 for reception of a valve 83. The valve 83 has two control handles 84 and 85 on opposite sides of the boom 41, the

v the housing 79,

integral with the valve 83, as best seen in Fig. l5. A radial hole 96 is formed in the valve in a plane coincident with the axis of groove 92, and connects with passageway 93, while another radial hole 97 is formed in the valve in a plane coincident with the axis of groove 91, and also connects with passageway 93. A groove 98, connecting with groove 92, and of somewhat less width, extends a short distance about the periphery of Valve 83, in a direction as shown in Fig. 18. Two radial holes 99 and 101 in the same plane as hole 97, are arranged to connect passageway 93 to the periphery of the valve 83. 'The end of the valve 83 has a threaded portion 103 to receive the nut 87.

A passageway 104, formed in partby the bore of alignment bushing 88, connects groove 76 of the distributing block 68 with groove 89 of the valve 83. Passing through a wall surrounding in part the bore 82 of housing 79, are two holes 105, 106, the first of which is located, as shown in Fig. 13, for possible alignment with groove 91or hole 96, the latter of which is located for alignment, as shown in Fig. 1l, with grooves 92 and 98 or holes 97, 99 and 101, as will be more fully explained. Each hole and 106 is threaded to receive a pipe fitting. Directly below hole 106, i. e., inthe same vertical plane, is a hole 107 which connects with a passageway 108 extending upwardly and opening into the bore 82 of housing 79. Hole 107, which is also threaded to receive a pipe iitting, is located for alignment with grooves 92 and 98, or holes 97, 99 and 101, as will be more fully explained. The handle 85 has a groove 109 formed on an inner corner of its flange portion, which extends for a distance of a little more than 180, and has three equispaced detents 111, 112, and 113, as best seen in Fig. 8. An indexing pin 114, which is slidably mounted within is spring loaded to bear against a side of groove'109 and has a pointed end for engaging any one of the detents 111, 112, and 113 to hold the valve in position. As will be seen, the pin 114 engages detent 112 when the valve 83 is in normal or non-operative position, engages detent 111 when theboom is being lowered, and engages detent 113 when the boom is being raised. In event an auxiliary air outlet is desired for operation of a blow gun, etc., a hole is provided in the housing 79 in alignment with groove 89 of the valve; when not in use the hole 110 is plugged with a pipe plug, as shown.

The exterior structure of the actuating motor 56 comprises a motor housing 115 and `a ratchet housing 116 which are secured in fixed relation by bolt means (not shown). At the exterior end portion of housing 115 is formed a lug 117 which is bored to receive a pin 118 for pivotally ailxing the motor 56 to the yoke bracket 61, as heretofore explained. The pin 118 is grooved about its mid-section to receive a set screw 119, positioned in the lug 117, whereby lateral movement of the pin 118 is prevented. Supported within the motor housing, is a cylindrical linerv121, the ends of which `abut against end plates 122, each of which has a flange 123, on the outer Wall, which surrounds and supports a ball bearing 124. The Iball bearings 124 support front and rear shafts 125 and 126 which project from, and `are integral with, a rotor 127. The'rotor is of cylindrical Vshape -and is arranged coaxially with the shafts 125, 126 and with the motor areas@ and ratchet housings, but is eccentric'with respect to the cylinder liner 121 to provide `a crescent shaped chamber between the rotor and cylinder liner. The rotor is provided with a plurality of radial slots in which blades 128 Iare slidably mounted for movement with their outer edges in scraping contact with the cylinder to divide the crescent shaped chamber into a series of pockets.

Arranged toward the lower portion ofthe cylinder liner 121 and on each side of the center are sets of air intake ports 129 and 130, while near the top portion of the cylinder liner, are a plurality of exhaust slots 131. The exhaust slots 131 are covered by a hood 132, which is formed integral with the motor housing 115, and is arranged to deflect exhaust air downwardly about the motor. Air inlet passages 133 and 134, 4having threaded openings, are provided in the lower portion of the motor housing 115, for the passage of 'air to the exterior of cylinder liner 121 and to intake ports 129 and 130 respectively. A flexible hose 135 connects inlet passage 134 with the hole 106 of control housing 79, while another flexible hose 136 connects inlet passage 133 with hole 105 of the control housing.

It will be seen that when the live air is admitted to the -motor housing 115 by way of passage 133, it will enter ports 129 and, in a well known manner, cause the rotor 127 to turn in a clockwise direction (as viewed in Fig. 6), exhausting by way of exhaust slots 131. Any `air that' is entrapped between the blades 128 after the'exhaust slots 131 are passed, will be forced out of the ports 130. Likewise when live air is admitted to the motor housing 115 by way of passage 134, it will enter ports 130 and will cause the rotor 127 to turn in a counter-clockwise direction (as again viewed in Fig. 6), exhausting Iby way of exhaust slots 131. Any -air that is entrapped between the blades 128 after the exhaust slots 131 are passed, will be forced out of the ports 129.

The end plate 122, which surrounds front shaft 125, abuts a bearing retainer 137 which supports a roller bearing 138. The bearing 13S supports a gear retainer 139, the other end of which is ysupported by'a similar bearing 141, which is maintained in a bearing retainer 142. The gear retainer 139 forms part of a planetary gear system comprising three planetary gears 143 (only one shown), the inner periphery of each thereof being engaged with a geared end portion 144 of shaft 125, while the outer periphery of each is engaged with a ring gear 145, which is maintained in abutment with bearing retainers 137 and 142, as shown.

A pin 146 extends through the cylinder liner 121 and end plate 122, one end of the pin entering the motor housing 115 to maintain the cylinder liner 121 in fixed position within the motor housing. One of the end bearings 124 is maintained within a ange 123 by a bolt 147 which is screwed into rear shaft 126, while the other end bearing 124 is maintained in the other flange 123, by means of a nut 148 which is threadably affixed to the shaft 125.

The gear retainer 139 has a diametrical slot to receive a tongue 149a at one end of a flexible coupling element 149 whose opposite end has a tongue 151 which engages a cross-slot 152 arranged in the end of screw member 57. Near the end of the screw member is formed a ratchet ring 153 which is arranged to cooperate with a pawl 154 in the manner as will be soon explained. The bearing retainer 142 supports a thrust bearing 150 which abuts the Aside of ratchet ring 153 to provide easy rotation of the screw member 57. Ratchet housing 116 surrounds the ratchet ring and pawl, and `also the forward end portion of the screw member 57, being separated from the latter by means of a bushing 155 which engages a smooth portion of the screw member. A spring actuated plunger 156 is slidably arranged in a bore 157 formed in the ratchet housing 116, and constantly bears against the side of the pawl 154 to maintain an end corner of the pawl in full engagement with the teeth ot the ratchet ring 153. A trunnion member 158 is 6 threadably atxedA to the ratchet housing 116 to support the pawl in operative position as shown. It will be seen (Fig. 7) that the pawl, when so engaged, restricts rotation of the screw member 5,7 in clockwise direction but will not restrict rotation of the screw member in counterclockwise direction.

In an enlarged portion of the ratchet housing 116, a bore 159 is formed which slidably maintains a piston means Vcomprising a head portion 161, and a rod 162, the free end of which is in alignment with the `side of the pawl 154 opposite that in contact with plunger 156. Surrounding. the rod 162 is a spring 163 which is under compression to urge the head portion and rod in a direction away from the pawl. A cap 164, affixed to the ratchet housing to cover bore 159, engages the head portion 161 of the piston means to limit maximum movement thereof in one direction in the bore 159. An air passageway 165 formed in the cap 164, is arranged to admit air to bore 159 to move the piston means so that the rod 162 engages the pawl 154, to disengage the pawl from the teeth of ratchet ring 153. A passageway 166 vents the' chamber formed in bore 159 underneath the head`16'1 ofthe piston means. A hose 167 is threadably affixed to thel open end yof passageway 165 to connect same with the holeA 167 in control valve housing 79.

Surrounding the end of sleeve member 53 `and affixed thereto, is a casing 168, which is Kcoupled by bolt means 169 to an internally threaded bushing 171, which engages thethreads of the screw member 57. It will be seenthat asthe screw' member is caused to rotate in counterclockwi'se direction (Fig. 7.), the actuating motor 56 will move away from bushing 171, with the result that the boom 41. will be raised, whereas when the screw member is caused to rotate in clockwise direction, the actuating motor will move toward bushing 171, with the result that the boom will be lowered.

Considering now the over-al1 picture of the boom actuating arrangement, and assuming that the boom is to be raised, the control valve handle (or 84) is rotated counter-clockwise (Fig. 8) thereby causing groove 91, of the valve 83, to line up with hole in housing 79. Live air will then flow through hose 136 to passageway 133, enter ports 129, and turn the rotor 127 in counterclockwise direction (looking toward screw member 57), thereby causing movement of the actuating motor in a direction to raise the boom, as explained above. The valve 83 is maintained in boom raising position by means of pin 114 being in engagement with detent 113. With the valve in this position, it is to be noted that hole 97 thereof is in alignment with hole 106 in housing 79, so that exhaust air entrapped between the blades 128 of the rotor 127, is afforded exit to the atmosphere via ports and passageway 134, through hose 135, and holes 106 and 97, through passageway 93 in the valve, and opening 94. Further, as the screw member 57 is rotating, the pawl 154 successively engages the teeth on the ratchet ring 153 so that when the control valve handle is moved back to normal or non-operative position and the power to the actuating motor 56 is cut-olf, the screw member 57 is automatically locked against rotation so that the boom is rigidly maintained in the new position of adjustment.

When the boom is to be lowered, the valve handle 85 (or 84) is rotated clockwise (Fig. 8). As the valve 83 is being rotated, groove 92 rst uncovers passageway 10S in the housing, thus allowing live air to flow through hole 107 and hose 167, into passageway 165 in cap 164 and move the piston means in bore 159 so that the piston rod 162 contacts and forces pawl 154 out of engagement with the toothed ratchet ring 153. Screw member 57 is thus conditioned for rotation in clockwise direction (Fig. 7). Continued rotation of the valve causes alignment of the groove 92 with the hole 106, whereupon live air will flow through the hose 135, to passageway 134, enter ports 130, and turn the rotor 127 in clockwise direction (looking toward screw member 57) thereby causing movement of the actuating motor in a direction to lower the boom, as heretofore explained. `The va'lve 83 is maintained in boom lowering position by means of pin 114 being in engagement with detent 111. With the valve in this position, it is to be noted that hole 96 thereof is in alignment with hole 105 in housing 79 so that exhaust air entrapped between the blades 128 of the rotor 127, is afforded eXit to the atmosphere via ports 129, and passageway 133, through hose 136 and holes 105 and 96, through passageway 93 in the valve, and opening 94. Further, live air pressure is maintained in hose 167 by virtue of the groove 98, which is connected to groove 92, being in alignment with passageway 108, as heretofore shown. When the valve handle 85 is rotated to normal or non-operative position (pin 114 engaging detent 112) the power to the actuating motor is cut-olf, and air pressure behind the piston head 161 is released to the atmosphere via hose 167, hole 107 and passageway 108, hole 101 in the valve 83, to passageway 93 and opening 94, thereby allowing spring 163 to move the piston means to non-operative position, whereupon the pawl 154 is forced back into engagement with the toothed ratchet ring 153, and the screw member is again locked against clockwise rotation. It will be seen that hole 99 in valve 83 prevents any build-up of air pressure in hose 167, due to valve leakage, during the boom raising operation.

For the purposes of supplying water to the drill 55 for use in wet drilling, a pipe 172 is aiiiXed to the bottom of the boom 41, the front end of which is connected to a hose 173 leading to the drill, the lower end of which connects with a hose 174 leading to a distributing manifold 175 aiiixed to the platform 37, which is connected to a source of water supply, not shown. An air hose 176 connects hole 78 of the boom 41 with a distributing block 177, attached to the platform 37, the distributing block being supplied by an air hose 178. At the forward end of the boom a hose 179 connects with the tapped hole 78 in boss member 75 for delivery of live air to the drill 55.

What is claimed is:

1. In rock drilling equipment, an actuating motor for rotation of a screw member of a boom, said motor comprising a motor housing, a ratchet housing atiixed to the motor housing, a rotor positioned within the motor housing having a plurality of radially disposed sliding varies, air intake and exhaust passageways arranged for. the movement of live air through the motor to provide rotation of the rotor in either of two opposite directions, a pawl pvotally maintained in the ratchet housing for engagement with a ratchet ring atiixed to the screw member of the boom actuating arrangement in the rock drill equipment, compression means for maintaining the pawl in engagement with the ratchet ring, an air operated means operable to move the pawl out of engagement position, and a control Valve assembly which is adapted to allow ow of air to the air operated means and subsequently to the actuating motor.

2. An actuating motor according to claim 1 wherein the means operable to move the pawl out of engagement position comprises a piston and an integral rod, cornpression means to urge said piston toward non-operative position, and a passageway arrangement for the conduction l`of live air to the piston to move the latter into engagement with the pawl.

3. An actuating motor according to claim 2 wherein said passageway arrangement is contained in a cap which is aixed to the exterior of the ratchet housing.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 512,313 McDonald Jan. 9, 1894 2,138,208 Rosen Nov. 29, 1938 2,243,656 Shannon May 27, 1941 2,467,026 Giger Apr. 12, 1949 2,482,568 Werner Sept. 20, 1949 2,552,840 Burke May 15, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS 608,151 France Apr. 17, 1926

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US172340A US2686040A (en) 1950-07-06 1950-07-06 Multiple drill mounting
US39534553 US2799249A (en) 1950-07-06 1953-12-01 Boom actuating motor and locking means

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Cited By (8)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3015936A (en) * 1957-06-03 1962-01-09 Curtiss Wright Corp Thrust reversers
US3237462A (en) * 1964-05-15 1966-03-01 Ingersoll Rand Co Rock drilling rig
US3241457A (en) * 1964-05-06 1966-03-22 Ingersoll Rand Co Reversible motor
US4444542A (en) * 1981-05-22 1984-04-24 Shaw Douglas A Vehicle with double booms
US4595316A (en) * 1984-05-09 1986-06-17 Tinnel Nelson E Automated temporary roof support system for mining equipment
US4993564A (en) * 1989-05-17 1991-02-19 Blatt John A Quick disconnect tooling mount
US20050051364A1 (en) * 2003-09-08 2005-03-10 Bowe James M. Feed table pivot pin constraining device
US20100119310A1 (en) * 2007-10-01 2010-05-13 Zhendong Yan crawler-type and height adjustment drilling machine for setting roof and side wall anchor bolts and anchor cables

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US2243656A (en) * 1937-04-14 1941-05-27 Ellwood M Shannon Power reverse gear
US2467026A (en) * 1944-03-03 1949-04-12 Bbc Brown Boveri & Cie Control system for electric locomotives
US2482568A (en) * 1945-05-26 1949-09-20 Gen Motors Corp Actuator control
US2552840A (en) * 1948-05-07 1951-05-15 Stanley A Burke Automatically reversible air-driven tapping unit

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US512313A (en) * 1894-01-09 Pneumatic jack
FR608151A (en) * 1925-03-26 1926-07-22 Alsacienne Constr Meca remote control for servo motor
US2243656A (en) * 1937-04-14 1941-05-27 Ellwood M Shannon Power reverse gear
US2138208A (en) * 1937-04-21 1938-11-29 Oscar E Rosen Duplicating machine
US2467026A (en) * 1944-03-03 1949-04-12 Bbc Brown Boveri & Cie Control system for electric locomotives
US2482568A (en) * 1945-05-26 1949-09-20 Gen Motors Corp Actuator control
US2552840A (en) * 1948-05-07 1951-05-15 Stanley A Burke Automatically reversible air-driven tapping unit

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3015936A (en) * 1957-06-03 1962-01-09 Curtiss Wright Corp Thrust reversers
US3241457A (en) * 1964-05-06 1966-03-22 Ingersoll Rand Co Reversible motor
US3237462A (en) * 1964-05-15 1966-03-01 Ingersoll Rand Co Rock drilling rig
US4444542A (en) * 1981-05-22 1984-04-24 Shaw Douglas A Vehicle with double booms
US4595316A (en) * 1984-05-09 1986-06-17 Tinnel Nelson E Automated temporary roof support system for mining equipment
US4993564A (en) * 1989-05-17 1991-02-19 Blatt John A Quick disconnect tooling mount
US20050051364A1 (en) * 2003-09-08 2005-03-10 Bowe James M. Feed table pivot pin constraining device
US7100709B2 (en) * 2003-09-08 2006-09-05 Metso Minerals Industries, Inc. Feed table pivot pin constraining device
US20100119310A1 (en) * 2007-10-01 2010-05-13 Zhendong Yan crawler-type and height adjustment drilling machine for setting roof and side wall anchor bolts and anchor cables
US8317430B2 (en) * 2007-10-01 2012-11-27 Zhendong Yan Crawler-type and height adjustment drilling machine for setting roof and side wall anchor bolts and anchor cables

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