US2793448A - Turbulence controlled steam iron - Google Patents

Turbulence controlled steam iron Download PDF

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US2793448A
US2793448A US450875A US45087554A US2793448A US 2793448 A US2793448 A US 2793448A US 450875 A US450875 A US 450875A US 45087554 A US45087554 A US 45087554A US 2793448 A US2793448 A US 2793448A
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steam
boiler
iron
water
soleplate
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US450875A
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Robert H Duncanson
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General Mills Inc
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General Mills Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06FLAUNDERING, DRYING, IRONING, PRESSING OR FOLDING TEXTILE ARTICLES
    • D06F75/00Hand irons
    • D06F75/08Hand irons internally heated by electricity
    • D06F75/10Hand irons internally heated by electricity with means for supplying steam to the article being ironed
    • D06F75/14Hand irons internally heated by electricity with means for supplying steam to the article being ironed the steam being produced from water in a reservoir carried by the iron
    • D06F75/16Hand irons internally heated by electricity with means for supplying steam to the article being ironed the steam being produced from water in a reservoir carried by the iron the reservoir being heated to produce the steam

Description

R. H. DuNcANsoN 2,793,448

May 28, 1957 TURBULENCE coNTRoLLEu STEAM IRON Filed Aug. 19, 1954 2 shets-sneet 1 AJM/W A rroRNgr May 28, 1957 R. H. DuNcANsoN 2,793,448

TuaBuLENcEcoNTRoLLED STEAM IRON.

Filed Aug. 19, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1 l INVENToR.-

Aoberz H Dal/)cansan JM/2mm Arroz/ver TURBULENCE coNTRoLLED STEAM ino Robert H. Duncaxison, Minneapolis, Minn., assigner to General Mills, Inc., a corporation of Delaware Application August 19, 1954, Serial No. 450,875

Claims. (Cl. 158-77) This invention relates generally to steam irons of the domestic variety, and pertains more particularly to a steam iron having improved operating characteristics.

In the designing of steam irons there have been two extremes that have been most widely adopted. Probably the earlier of these `extremes has been the tea kettle type where the entire quantity of water must be raised to boiling temperature before steam is made available for ironing purposes. Not only does the user of such an iron have to wait a relatively long period of time for steam to be generated, but certain safety problems must be overcome to assure that dangerous pressures are never reached.

The other extreme, which has proved to be the more generally employed' type, is the so-called flash variety where the water is permitted to flow drop by drop from a supply reservoir into a region or chamber of concentrated heat, the water so fed being instantly converted into steam. With this style of iron, however, difficulties have been encountered as a result of attempts to steam iron before the proper generating chamber temperature has been reached, and the water introduced flows onto the fabric with attendant spotting thereof in many instances. On the other hand, the steam generating temperature may become too hot with the consequence that the steam becomes superheated to such an extent that the operation is not wholly satisfactory, for experience has demonstrated that the pressing operation is more efficient in many situations where the stream engages the fabric in a relatively moist condition.

Compromising the foregoing extremes is a design involving the utilization of a boiler having a relatively limited capacity, the limited capacity permitting entrance to the boiler of only a small Volume of water. By withdrawing the steam thus produced from the upper region of the relatively small steam generating chamber or boiler, that is above the water level in the boiler, water does not flow directly to the ironing face of the soleplate when the boiler is below boiling temperature. Also, one does not have to wait very long for steam to be generated, inasmuch as the limited volume of water need be the only water to reach such a temperature. Thus, it will be recognized that this intermediate design possesses considerable merit and promise, and it is with this kind of steam iron that the present invention is primarily concerned.`

While the above alluded to intermediate type of iron does actually overcome the enumerated difficulties set forth above, it is not entirely devoid of difficulties, the foremost of which stems from turbulence at times within the limited or predetermined small volumetric capacity of the boiler chamber. As a result of excessive turbulence, it is possible for an objectionable amount of water in particle or globule form to be carried to the pressing face along with the steam. This water is undesirable in a number of instances, for while it is not a direct stream, nonetheless it has the propensity to spot certain vvulnerable fabrics.

The solution of this turbulence problem has not been Patented May 28, 1957 ICC an easy task. If water from the reservoir could be fed into the steam generating chamber or well at a constant temperature and ata regulated ow equal to the rate at which steam is formed and escapes, the turbulence would be constant and could be more readily held in check by transmitting less heat to the chamber where the conversion is taking place. Such an ideal situation does not occur, and instead the operation is of a cyclic nature, there being a build up of turbulence, a period of turbulence, a diminution of turbulence, a period of proper generation followed perhaps by a period of relative quiescence. Probably what happens is that with a wide open valve, which permits entrance of Water to the boiler from the reservoir, the water enters until pressure develops in the boiler area to such an extent that it is greater than the head of water in the reservoir. Obviously, with the iron v being moved back and forth `during a pressing operation even this head, due to the jostling of water, will not be constant. However, now that no Water, or water at a reduced rate, is entering the boiler, the percolation would be expected to increase. Soon the turbulence thus produced will subside owing to the withdrawal of steam, and the boiler pressure ldrops to that of the reservoirs head. Such happenings are aggravated and complicated by the fact the iron itself is undergoing rapid temperature changes by reason of what transpires during the various ironing strokes and the pauses therebetween; if the iron is lifted momentarily from the fabric, heat conduction to the fabric is replaced by radiation to the atmosphere and vice versa.

Accordingly, it is believed manifest that uniform conditions do not prevail when using a steam iron and that operating characteristics could stand to be improved upon in order to obtain a more idealistic steam iron. With this aim in View, it is an object of the instant invention to introduce into the steam irons design what might be termed a self-compensating feature having an over-all effect of minimizing turbulence to such an extent that undesirable quantities of water will not be ejected onto the fabric along with the extravasated steam. More specifically, it is within the purview of the invention to lead a portion of the steam and any entrained water over a course passing in a heat transfer relation with the boiler chamber. If the steam contains an objectionable amount of water it will be cooler than if it carried little or none, and the concomitant cooling action of such a mixed vapor will have the immediate effect of withdrawing heat from the boiler with the consequent result that the percolating severity will be lessened. Actually, relatively speaking, the above described happening is a suppressive one, for the percolation is constantly discouraged from reaching excessive proportions by reason of the fact that once the turbulence begins to build up, the cooling effect progressively increases, too. Hence for all intents and purposes the contemplated construction is truly a selfcompensating one.

Another object of the invention is to devise a particular tank or reservoir structure that coacts in a unique fashion with the preferred construction utilized inthe realization of the above aim. In this connection, it is a desideratum of the invention to provide a composite reservoir formed of a casting and a resilient enveloping shell having its lower edge telescoped thereover, the resilient character of the shell in conjunction with the casting permitting a sealing relationship with only a silicone cement in contradistinction to a brazed Vor welded arrangement. While an economy is effected in assembling labor, it should be pointed out that a further fabrication saving is brought about by virtue of the casting serving as the bottom of the reservoir, it being used anyway in the achievement of the earlier mentioned aim.

A further feature of the invention resides in the ernployment of structure in carrying out the foregoing objectives lending itself readily to the utilization of a breather system permitting the iron to be rested on either of its sides. Y

Other objects will be in part obvious, and in part pointed out more in detail hereinafter.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combination of elements and arrangement of parts which will be exemplified in the construction hereafter set forth an-d the scope of the application which will be indicated in the appended claims.

Figure l is a longitudinal sectional View taken 1n the direction of line 1-1 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the boiler casting; A j h Fig. 3 is a perspective view taken in the general direction of line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary sectional View taken 1n the direction of line 4 4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a plan view of the soleplate; and

Fig. 6 is a sectional view taken in the direction of line 6-6 of Figs. l and 5.

To illustrate the invention, the drawings show a steamdry iron comprising a soleplate 10 having a conventional encased heating element 12 embedded therein. The soleplate is recessed at 14 for the accommodation of a thermostatic switch structure designated generally by the reference numeral 16, the switch structure including a bimetallic element 18 and a pair of cooperable switch arms 20 and 22, each equipped with a contact 24. In order to adjust the setting of the thermostatic switch 16 there is provided an upstanding control shaft 26 having an adjusting knob 28 mounted at its upper end.

Describing the soleplate 10 in greater detail, it will be observed from an inspection of Figs. 5 and 6 that the heating element 12, while actually embedded in the soleplate, is disposed within a pair of ribs 30 and 32 integral with the main portion of this plate. These ribs are instrumental in forming passages or grooves for the flow of steam therethrough. However, more will be said later on concerning the precise construction of these grooves and the particular pattern that they follow in guiding the steam to a plurality of outlet ports 34. Inasmuch as specific reference will be made hereinafter to certain of these ports, each has been rdistinguished one from the other by letter suixes a, b, c, d, e, and f.

Also formed integral with the soleplate 10 is a cavity 36 having a peripheral upstanding wall 38. As will be noted from Fig. 5 this cavity is somewhat triangular in configuration. Rearwardly disposed with reference to the cavity 36 which, as will later become more apparent, forms a part of the steam generating chamber or boiler is a pair of pockets 40 and 42 which form part of the steam passage means leading to the various ports or outlets 34. Forwardly located with respect to the cavity 36 is a pair of outwardly and rearwardly directed baffles 44 and 46 and extending inwardly and forwardly are still further batles 48 and 50.

Overlying the soleplate 10 is a cover plate 52, this cover plate having a plurality of apertures 54, 56, 58 and 60 which will be referred to with greater particularity hereinafter. Superjacent the cover plate 52 is a gasket member 62 provided with a pattern of apertures corresponding to those in the cover plate.

The purpose of the gasket 62 is to minimize the upward flow of heat from the soleplate 10 vi-a the cover plate 52 as well as to form a seal with respect to a boiler casting designated in its entirety by the reference numeral 64. This boiler casting 64 surmounts the soleplate 10 and is equipped with downwardly projecting posts or cleats 66, -any preferred number of which bear against the upper surface of the soleplate. For a purpose soon to be explained, the casting 64 has a downwardly turned peripheral skirt or flange 68. Centrally disposed and integral with the casting member 64 is an upstanding body portion 70 having 4at its lower edge a rather wide laterally extending ange '72 connecting with the downwardly turned flange 68. Just to the front of the upstanding body portion 70 is an aperture 74 through which water is fed gravitationally to the cavity 36 where steam conversion takes place. The upstanding body portion also contains a pair of vertically disposed passages 76 and 78 leading upwardly from the cavity 36 and it will be appreciated that the passages 76 and 78 are in registry with the apertures 56 and 58, respectively, located in the cover plate 52. In this way, unrestricted upward flow of the steam generated in the cavity 36 is permitted. At this time perhaps it would be well to point out specifically that the cavity 36 in conjunction with the cover plate 52 forms a steam generating chamber or boiler having at its bottom a relatively small predetermined constant area which is a part of the top surface of the soleplate 10. 5

Located in the upper region of the body portion '70 is a header chamber 80 into which the vertical passages 76 and 78 lead, the bottom of the chamber 80 being of such contour that it drains in the direction of the passages 76 and 78. Also, it should be pointed out that the chamber 80 is of substantially larger volumetric capacity than that ofthe passages 76 and '78, thereby producing a region of reduced steam velocity so that there is an attendant tendency for large drops of water to settle. Further, the header chamber 80 is formed with arcuate or cycloidal shaped ends 82 and 84, these ends forming rather sharp inwardly extending projections 87 and 88. immediately forwardly and extending substantially therebetween is a transverse bale 86 which is spaced in advance of the projections suiciently so that the flow of steam may progress between said bafe 86 and the projections 87 and 88. The function of the projections 87 and 88 is to provide a relatively sharp vertical edge against which unwantedparticles or globules of water entrained in the steam will tend to cling so that they will not continue to flow along with the steam. Having passed between the baffle 86 and the projections 87 and 88, the steam proceeds to a vertical passage 90 which leads downwardly to a locus intermediate the pockets 4t) and 42. However, to either side of the forward portion of the entrance to the passage 90 are inwardly directed projections 92 and 94, these projections providing additional sharp edges against which the undesired particles of water will tend to cling just as they do with reference to the projections 87 and 88. Aiding in this action are oppositely issuing pockets 96 and 98 formed in part by said projections 92 and 94.

As has already been stated, the passage 90 leads downwardly to a locus intermediate the passages 40 and 42 and due to this intermedi'acy @the flow of steam passing downwardly divides so that substantially haflf of the supply proceeds toward one side of the iron and the other half toward the opposite side of the iron. From the pockets 40 and 42 some of the steam is directed forwardly between the wall 38 surrounding the cavity 36 and the ribs 30 and 32, the steam as well passing over that area of the `top surface of the soleplate 10 lying between said ribs and the wall 38. The significance of having at least a portion of the steam passing forwardly in the manner indicated resides in the fact that the percolation of `the water within the cavity is apt to at times become so vigorous that Ithe resulting turbulence will cause excessively large particles or globules of water to pass upwardly via the passages 76 and 78 andthis water when carried with the steam to the pressing face of the iron in many instances will cause objectionable spotting of fabrics vulnerable to excessive water. Stated otherwise, it is extremely desirable in steam ironing to have any moisture in very fine particulate form rather than in large particles or globules. What happens is that when the steam does contain an objectionable amount of water itt has a more pronounced cooling action against the walls of the passages through which it is flowing. By causing at least a portion ofthe total output of steam from the cavity 36 to pass in heat transfer relationship therewith, then when the boiling action becomes so vigorous that the turbulence produces the aforementioned objectionable action, the action is minimized or suppressed practically instantaneously with its occurrence. This stems from the fact as implied above thait the steam with the objectionable amount of water withdraws heat from the cavity 36 via the wall 38 and those portions of the top surface of the soleplate lying intermediate said wall tand the ribs 30 and 32. The cooling action serves to reduce the turbulence and in this way isv self-compensating in nature.

As stated above, in the exemplified embodiment only a portion of the steam is :directed forwardly in a proximal relation with the cavity 36 so as to influence the operating temperature thereof. This fraction of steam proceeds forwardly about the distal ends of the baffles 44 and 46, traversing a path over each of the ribs 30 and 32, then between the baffles 44, 48 and 46, 50, respectively, and then outwardly through the particular ports or outlets 34h, 34e, 34d, and 34e where it is extravasated onto the fabric being ironed. The remainder of the steam, that is the fraction which is not directly responsible for inuencing the temperature of the cavity 36, is somewhat rearwardly directed over the ribs 30 and 32 to the ports 34a and 34]". Quite obviously any particular number of ports 34 may be decided upon, mainly due to design factors :and to obtain an appropriate division of steam so that the requisite amount of influence is obtained with respect to affecting the temperature of the cavity 36.

In order to provide a reservoir for containing waiter to be fed gravitationally through the aperture 74 it is contemplated that ia resilient concave shell 100 be utilized, the lower edge of this shell being telescope'd over the downwardly projecting flange 68. The particular gauge of the sheet stock from which the shell is stamped and pressed should be adequate to pass a three foot drop test to a wood floor, preferably in the neighborhood of 0.026 inch or possibly somewhat heavier. In this way, the iro-n will meet with both the American Standard Association (A. S. A.) specification :and the National Electrical Manufacturing Association (N. E. M. A.) specification approved October 6, 1953. To provide an effective seal between the flange 68 and the shell 100 it is intended that a suitable silicone cement be employed and portions of this cement may be seen in Fig. 6, the portions there shown bearing the reference numerals` 102 :and 104. In this type of reservoir construction it will be appreciated that fabrication costs are minimized inasmuch as the shell 100 does not have to conform precisely to the more rigid flange 68 of the casting member 64, for the cement itself will till up those small discrepancies in the fit that might remain, although the resiliency of the shell minimizes such discrepancies. However, as observed in Fig. l the forward and rearward ends of the shell 100 have spacing such that these ends will lit snugly over the corresponding en'ds of the flange 68.

One nicety about the tank or reservoir construction described above lies in the fact that it cooperates with the upstanding body portion 70. Focusing attention on Fig. 6 for a moment, it will be seen that the sectional makeup of the body portion as shown illustrates that the top surface thereof may be relatively planar. Because of this planar surface the shell 100 may also be substantially planar in this region and by utilizing a gasket 106 the under side of the top of the shell 100 may be caused to tact in a compressible manner :against the top surface of the body portion 70. Since the casting member 64 is formed in effect with open grooves such as the header chamber 80 and the side pockets 96 land 98 as well as the interconnecting passageways, the top of the shell 160 encloses these various passages so that there will be no avenue of escape for the steam in this particular region other than via its intended course.

In order to either open or close the Iaperture 74, it is planned that a suitable valve mechanism be employed and to achieve this aim the invention has depicted a valve member 108 which seats within the upper end of the aperture 74. The valve member 108 is displaceably mounted with reference to the aperture 74 by reason of a resilient spring element 110 substantially L-haped when viewed from one side as in Fig. l. The L-shaped spring element is ranchored intermediate its ends at 112 by means of a screw 114 extending into the lateral flange 72 of the casting member 64. The upper end 116 of the L-shaped spring serves as a follower for an internally fashioned cam 118 disposed in a downwardly facing recess 120 formed in a filler cap 122. The ller cap 122 is pressfitted within a grornrnet 124 which is anchored to the marginal edge 126 of an aperture provided in the top wall of the shell 100. By so relating the parts, it will be apparent that rotation of the filler cap 122 is instrumental in urging the end 116 of the spring 110 in such a direction that the valve member 108 will be moved into an open position to permit water to ilow gravitationally from the reservoir i-nto the cavity .36 via the aperture 74. Of course, reverse rotation of the cap 122 will release the opening force and by virtue of the inherent resiliency of the spring 110 the valve member 108 will close.

Although not important to :an understanding of the invention it will be sta-ted in passing that in order to fill the reservoir formed by the casting 64 and the shell 100 the f1ller cap 122 is raised somewhat so that a side opening 123 is above the top surface of the shell 100.

Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of a breather system which has unique cooperation with the passages heretofore described as well as the shell 100. For the purpose of understanding the functioning of the breather system now to be explained, particular reference should be had to Figs. 3 and 4. Referring first to Fig. 3, the upper end of the vertical passage adjacent its rear side has direct communication with a relatively short rearwardly extending groove 130. This groove 130, which also appears in plan in Fig. 2, merges into a relatively deep transverse groove 132, the groove 132 extending toward either side of the steam iron. At one Aend 134 ofthe groove 132 there is a reverse bend imparted thereto and the groove continues as indicated by the number 136 toward the opposite side of the iron. Near the opposite side of the iron there is a passage 138 angling downwardly. Communication is therefore established between the groove extension 136 and the reservoir proper which, as hereinbefore stated, is formed by the casting 64 and the shell-100. Specific reference to Fig. 4 should be had in understanding the direction in which the passage 138 extends. The end 140 of the groove 132 lying opposite the end 134 has a reverse bend imparted to it, also there being a short rearwardly extending portion 142 which connects with an extended portion 144 leading toward the opposite side of the iron. The end of the groove extension 144 which provides direct communication with the reservoir proper has been indicated by the reference numeral 146. Inasmuch as the various groove means 132, 136, 142, and 144 are covered by the top portion of the shell 100, it will be appreciated that passages are in fact formed by the shell which serve to provide ingress or egress of air and vaporsbetween-the reservoir and-atmosphere, the path taken being by way of the vertical passage 90 and the various passages over which the steam itself flows. Stated somewhat differently, the breathing action takes place over a rather tortuous route between the reservoir proper and the atmosphere by way of the outlet ports 34. One point to be stressed in connection with the breather system is that this breather system functions irrespective of the particular side upon which the iron is rested for if the iron is placed with the passage 138 lowermost, then communication with the atmosphere Vis rendered possible by way of the end 146, the groove extension 144, the groove portion 142 and the groove 132 which leads to atmosareas/is phere by way of the vertical passage 90 as hereinbefore explained. If the iron is tilted into a side rest position with the end 146 lowermost, then of course communication is provided through the passage 138 which connects with the groove extension 136 and the groove 132 whi-ch has already been fully described as connecting with the vertical passage 90. Thus the aforedescribed breather system has special utility in steam irons which are to be side rested and in this respect it should be pointed out that the side resting of steam irons is usually desirable inasmuch as laboratory-conducted tests have demonstrated that less over-all ironing effort is expended when side resting an iron in eontradistinction to upending an iron.

It is not believed necessary to present a detailed description of the operation, for the operation is readily understandable from a study of the preceding material in conjunction with the drawings associated therewith. All that need be emphasized at this time is the fact that the steam generated within the cavity 36, the wall 38 surrounding such cavity in cooperation with the cover plate 52 as earlier explained forming a boiler chamber, courses over a path that will permit at least a portion of the total quantity of steam to flow in heat transfer relationship with the cavity 36. By so doing, with undesired turbulent conditions arising within the cavity 36, concomitantly produced excessively moisture laden steam will extract heat from this region and the heat withdrawn will have a cooling effect upon the boiler, which cooling effect will cause the turbulent action to subside to the extent necessary to reduce the emission of water globules with the steam.

The breather system per se is disclosed and claimed in application No. 451,008, filed August 19, 1954, by Robert H. Duncanson and William G. Roll.

As many changes could be made in the above construction and many apparently widely different embodiments of this invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

It is also to be understood that the language used in the following claims is intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention herein described and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.

I claim:

1. A steam iron comprising a soleplate having top and bottom surfaces, the top surface having a recess formed therein of a relatively small predetermined constant area, casting means surmounting the soleplate forming a steam generating boiler chamber with said recess, said casting means including a first substantially vertical passage leading upwardly from said boiler chamber, a second substantially vertical passage leading downwardly to a locus on the top vsurface of said soleplate spaced laterally from said recess and groove means in the upper surface of said casting means communicating with said first and second passages, passage means leading from said locus having a portion thereof in heat transfer relationship with said boiler, and a relatively thin concave shell member enveloping the upper portion of said casting means having its lower edge telescoped over the lower portion of said casting means to form a reservoir.

2. A steam iron comprising a soleplate having top and bottom surfaces, the top surface having a recess formed therein of a relatively small predetermined constant area providing a steam generating boiler chamber, casting means surmounting the soleplate including a body portion and a peripheral flange portion extending laterally from the base of said body portion, said body portion having a first substantially vertical passage leading upwardly from said recess, a second substantially vertical passage leading downwardly to a locus on the top surface of said soleplate spaced laterally from said recess and groove means in the upper surface of said vbody portion communicating with said rst and second passages, passage means leading from said locus to the bottom surface of said soleplate having a portion thereof in heat transfer relationship with said boiler, and a relatively thin concave shell member engaging and covering the upper part of said body portion having its lower edge telescoped over said peripheral flange portion to form a reservoir defined by said body portion, flange portion and shell member, said body portion further including a passage communicating between said reservoir and said boiler chamber to permit flow of liquid to said boiler.

3. A steam iron comprising a soleplate having top and bottom surfaces, the top surface having a recess formed therein of a relatively small predetermined constant area providing a steam generating boiler chamber, casting means surmounting the soleplate including a body portion and a peripheral fiange portion extending laterally from the base of said body portion, said body portion having a first substantially vertical passage leading upwardly from said recess, a second substantially vertical passage leading downwardly to a locus on the top surface of said soleplate spaced laterally from said recess and groove means in the upper surface of said body portion communicating with said first and second passages, passage means leading from said locus to the bottom surface of said soleplate having a portion thereof in heat transfer relationship with said boiler, a relatively thin concave shell member engaging and covering the upper part of said body portion having its lower edge telescoped over said peripheral flange portion to form a reservoir defined by said body portion, ange portion and shell member, said body portion further including a passage communicating between said reservoir and said boiler chamber to permit fiow of liquid to said boiler, and additional groove means in the upper surface of said body portion connecting with the first mentioned groove means, said additional groove means having individual sections thereof extending first to opposite sides of said body portion and then reversely to different opposite sides, said shell member also covering said additional groove means.

4. A steam iron comprising a soleplate having top and bottom surfaces, a boiler of limited volume having its lower end associated with said soleplate, means for heating said boiler chamber, substantially vertical passage means leading upwardly from said boiler, second substantially vertical passage means displaced laterally from said boiler, third passage means providing communication between the upper ends of said first and second passage means including a header chamber substantially larger in volumetric capacity than that of said first passage means, and fourth passage means leading from the lower end of said second passage means having a portion thereof in heat transfer relationship with said boiler.

5. A steam iron in accordance with claim 4 in which said header chamber contains a transverse bafiie and a bottom contoured so that drainage may occur in the direction of said first passage means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,078,061 Cooper Apr. 20, 1937 2,316,907 Wallace Apr. 20, 1943 2,483,580 Green et al. Oct. 4, 1949 2,499,184 Finlayson Feb. 28, 1950 2,506,941 Scott May 9, 1950 2,557,732 Finlayson June 19, 1951 2,690,623 Jepson Oct. 5, 1954

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2963803A (en) * 1958-04-21 1960-12-13 Mc Graw Edison Co Steam iron
DE1206842B (en) * 1960-08-15 1965-12-16 Licentia Gmbh Steam iron
US3368294A (en) * 1965-08-20 1968-02-13 Westinghouse Electric Corp Steam iron
DE1289510B (en) * 1962-06-19 1969-02-20 Sunbeam Corp Steam iron
US4285145A (en) * 1979-06-25 1981-08-25 General Electric Company Thermostat and iron assembly
US4990745A (en) * 1988-06-15 1991-02-05 Black & Decker Inc. Steam generators
US20170226687A1 (en) * 2014-09-11 2017-08-10 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Steam iron
CN107148499A (en) * 2014-10-31 2017-09-08 皇家飞利浦有限公司 Clothing decatize utensil

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2078061A (en) * 1935-10-14 1937-04-20 Harry P Cooper Pressing iron
US2316907A (en) * 1939-07-11 1943-04-20 Wallace Stanley Electric pressing iron
US2483580A (en) * 1945-06-14 1949-10-04 Engineering Lab Inc Steaming and pressing iron
US2499184A (en) * 1946-09-11 1950-02-28 Gen Electric Steam generating electric pressing iron
US2506941A (en) * 1949-07-07 1950-05-09 John C Hockery Steam iron
US2557732A (en) * 1946-09-11 1951-06-19 Gen Electric Water supply means for steam iron steam generators
US2690623A (en) * 1948-05-27 1954-10-05 Sunbeam Corp Steam iron

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2078061A (en) * 1935-10-14 1937-04-20 Harry P Cooper Pressing iron
US2316907A (en) * 1939-07-11 1943-04-20 Wallace Stanley Electric pressing iron
US2483580A (en) * 1945-06-14 1949-10-04 Engineering Lab Inc Steaming and pressing iron
US2499184A (en) * 1946-09-11 1950-02-28 Gen Electric Steam generating electric pressing iron
US2557732A (en) * 1946-09-11 1951-06-19 Gen Electric Water supply means for steam iron steam generators
US2690623A (en) * 1948-05-27 1954-10-05 Sunbeam Corp Steam iron
US2506941A (en) * 1949-07-07 1950-05-09 John C Hockery Steam iron

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2963803A (en) * 1958-04-21 1960-12-13 Mc Graw Edison Co Steam iron
DE1206842B (en) * 1960-08-15 1965-12-16 Licentia Gmbh Steam iron
DE1289510B (en) * 1962-06-19 1969-02-20 Sunbeam Corp Steam iron
US3368294A (en) * 1965-08-20 1968-02-13 Westinghouse Electric Corp Steam iron
US4285145A (en) * 1979-06-25 1981-08-25 General Electric Company Thermostat and iron assembly
US4990745A (en) * 1988-06-15 1991-02-05 Black & Decker Inc. Steam generators
US20170226687A1 (en) * 2014-09-11 2017-08-10 Panasonic Intellectual Property Management Co., Ltd. Steam iron
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