US2792000A - Face mask for use in dust-laden or other contaminated conditions - Google Patents

Face mask for use in dust-laden or other contaminated conditions Download PDF

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US2792000A
US2792000A US404538A US40453854A US2792000A US 2792000 A US2792000 A US 2792000A US 404538 A US404538 A US 404538A US 40453854 A US40453854 A US 40453854A US 2792000 A US2792000 A US 2792000A
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nose
air
nose piece
tube
mouth
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US404538A
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Richardson Richard John
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B S F A Holdings Ltd
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A62LIFE-SAVING; FIRE-FIGHTING
    • A62BDEVICES, APPARATUS OR METHODS FOR LIFE-SAVING
    • A62B18/00Breathing masks or helmets, e.g. affording protection against chemical agents or for use at high altitudes or incorporating a pump or compressor for reducing the inhalation effort
    • A62B18/02Masks

Description

R. J. RICHARDSON FACE MASK FOR USE IN DUST-LADEN OR OTHER CONTAMINATED CONDITIONS May 14, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet Filed Jan. 18, 1954 v [710811 0! BIOHARD'J. mcumos ou B WW Attorney RICHARDSON FACE MASK FOR USE IN DUST-LADEN OR OTHER CONTAMINATED CONDITIONS May 14, 1957 2 Sheets-Sheet Filed Jan. 18, 1954 InUerl 0r RIGHARDSQN RICHARD J orneys FAQE MASK FOR 'USE'IN DUST LADEN"OR OTHER '(IDNTAMINATED (ZONDHTEDNS Richard John Richardson, Pontypridd,England, assignor toBISPF. A. Holdings'Limited,'Shethe-ld, England .Applicafion JannarylS, 1954,'Serial No. 4614538 Claims priority, application Great Britain January 20, 1953 '7 Claims. (Cl. 128-445) This invention relates to-face 'masks'foruse in atmosp'hericconditions that may be injurious 'to health or are "unpleasant, particularly atmospheres-that are-dust, fumeor vapour-laden.

his a serious disadvantage oftherespirator type of face'niask operating by filtration of contaminants from theair inhaled by the wearer thatbot'n the nose and mouth are enclosed, this resulting insuch real or fancied "discomfort that-an operative willeither refuse to wear ita, all or will. discard it at the;earliest opportunity. This means that protection is not obtained against-the effects of harmful or unpleasant atmospheres in many industries where the 'nature'of' the workmakes it inconvenient or undesirable for the operator'to wear 'the moreelaborate helmet equipment using a separate supply of uncontaminated air.

An important instance of this arises in the fertile-gshops of steel and'other fouridrieawhere; inspire of precautions to remove as much sand as possible irrknocking-outthe castings from their moulds, sand still 'a'dheringto -the "castings is pulverisedand becomes airborneduring'fettling "and cannot, depending'upon "the particular operation T being .perforrnei'be wholly rcmovedfrom the vicinity of .the operative'by exhausting equipment.

:Itis the object of the 'inventionto provide a mask giving 1a :high degree of, protection against the breathing 'of dust, ifurne,'or.otheriobjectionable atmospheric condition and yetrbeing comfortable to wear and convenient in use.

FACCOICllIlg tothe present inventioma face mask com- "prisesxacnose .piece'adaptedi..to:enclose'the nose and to extend aslarhood in frontof the upper lip, anda tube .passinginto. the space thus enclosed to serve for the intro- .duction .of uncontaminated Fall; into the breathing 'zone lyingbelow the space irr'which: contaminated atmospheric air. is excludedifrorn.Etheinostrils by the nose piece.

The nose piece may extend in front of the upper lip by curving in a single piece in conformity to the profile of the noseyor-iitmay'becprovidedwith:separate short hood to form the extension. In the 'former case, the tube preferably enters the enclosed space ata level above the nostrilsjin the latter case, the tube may enter the, part of i the space in front of'the upper lip.

Because of the barrier formed bythe noselplece, uncontaminatedlair introduced through the tubemust dispersemainly in adownward direction to' form a curtain in front of and below the mouth .and nostrils of the wearer so. that dust-laden oriotherwise. contaminated air is urged away from the wearer and breathing is'from the supply of uncontaminated air admitted through the tube. The sides of the hood may fit closely to the face at the sides of the nose and upper lip, to assist in the maintenance of the zone of uncontaminated air round the mouth.

The mouth itself is unencumbered, so that the operative does not feel restricted. There is no limitation on speech, and, if the hood does not fall below the level of the upper lip, smoking is not prevented. The enclosure r 2,792,000 "Patented May 14, 1957 ofthe nose does not prove objectionable, and the mask is free from the disincentives that make other forms of mask unacceptable.

ln order to increase'thecomfortable use of the mask, the'incorning air should not discharge in'theform of a jet. Preferably, therefore, the tube outlets-are covered by diffusing material. The 'quantityof air necessary to maintain the curtain may then escape into the hood substantiallyimperceptibly. Conveniently, a length of-the tube within the enclosed spa e has a closed end and has its 'wall generously perforated or slotted, avoiding discharge in the form of a jet but forming aprotectionfor an internal dispersingsleeve GP'Wad of suitable fabric or other. porous material.

The accompanying drawings show two forms of mask according tothe'inventionyboth including an eye shield through which some ofthc uncontaminated air is allowed ,to flow.

lnthe drawings:

"Figure 'l -is a front elevation of one form of mask, shown in the-position of use;

Figure 2 is a side elevation ,of the mask of Figure T;

Figure '3 is .asectionpn -the-line3-3 of Figure 1;

Figure 4 is afragmentary section onthe line 44 of Figure .3; and

Figures -5, 6 and '7 'areviews similarv toFigures 1, 2, and 3, but showing another form of mask,'Figure Tbeing .a sectiontaken on1.the line 7-7;of'Figure 5.

In Figures 1 to 3, a 'one piece'cye shield i ofplastic sheetgmaterial 'withpacurled rim-'11 carrying anedging 12 of 'sponge rubber 0r;the like to farm face closely, continues downwardly into "an integral nose piece 13, which follows: the; profile of-the wearers nose,,its lower end;14 extendingbelow'the IlQSB'IO leavea'fairly small gap MAY-in frontofthe upper lip above the level of the mouth. *The nose piece 13 and its extension '14 fit the face atthe sides of the nose and upper lip; the soft edging the-nose piece 13, an'internalbridge or support 15 with soft edging l6 is provided to bear on the nose, thus maintaining the'widthcf thespace l7, enclosedby the nose piecel3. Inst below the-bridge 15', transverse tube 18 is fitted (seeparticularly'Figure 4),",this entering at 9 one side of the nose 'piece 13,-where it is cemented into thewall and thickeningpieceltl. The other end 21 of "the tube'l 'is blanked ed, and cemented with a thickeningipiece'22 to the wall -of the nose piece. The protrudin-gendZS 'ofthe tube'18 receives afiexible air supply 'tube'24.

A wad 25 of porous material fills the tube 118 to produce a diifused fiow-of air'from the-outlet perforations 26: "Someoffthe-airpasses through'perforations 2'7 in -the'-b'ridge 1 5, toprevent ingress of dust Ol"0ll1,$1 contaminant to the neighbourhoodof the eyes and to prevent condensation on the inside of the shield. This air finally escapes through perforations 2S.

*Thegreaten part of the air, however passes over and round'nthe -n-ose an-d'through the gap MA to form a *curtain of air in frontofthe mouth. Assuming a breathing ra te of up --t-o 1 cubic foot -per-rninute (which is the=maximum li-k'e1y'to*bereached by an active :manual worker), a supply of air through the tube 18 at a rate of 3 cubic feet per minute produces such concentration of uncontaminated air about the nostrils of the wearer that the mask approximates to efiiciency if breathing is purely nasal. If the wearer uses mouth breathing alone, the curtain of uncontaminated air in front of the mouth makes the mask 70%80% efiicient, which means that the contaminated ambient air is largely prevented from coming into proximity to the mouth, in spite of the mouth itself not being covered by the mask.

The air supply tube 24 is secured to the mask by a clip 29 and is connected to an air supply system. The supply of uncontaminated air is adjusted to exceed continuously by a safe margin whatever maximum breathing rate is likely to be reached by the wearer, and may be taken from a low-pressure supply or a high-pressure supply. It the latter, the tube 24 is connected to a suitable reducing valve, and a filter should be interposed to preclude oil mist or other objectionable contaminants in the air-supply.

The mask as shown provides both breathing protection and eye protection. The one-piece eye shield serves for many operations, but separate windows or a single window, e. g. of reinforced or toughened glass, in an opaque shield body may be used if required. The mask is secured by tapes 30.

In Figures to 7, an eye shield 31 with a nose piece 32 much as in Figures 1 to 3 has the nose piece end just below the level of the nose. A hood extension 33 is cemented to the nose piece and continues to just above the level of the upper lip. A tube 34 enters one side of the extension 32 and continues to the other side underneath the nose. This is supplied by the flaxible tube 35 clipped at 36 to the eye shield. The tube 34 is filled with porous material 37 to act as a diffuser for the outlets 38.

Air emerging below the nostrils forms a curtain over the mouth as it escapes below the edge 39 of the hood extension 33. Some air passes upwardly over the nose into the eye space, finally escaping by perforations 40.

What I claim is:

1. A face mask comprising a nose piece adapted to surround the nose and to enclose the upper part and sides of the nose, with the lower part of the nose piece extending downwardly as a hood in front of and clear of the upper lip, where it ends short of the mouth to leave a clear and direct passage to the atmosphere, and a tube passing into the nose piece to serve for the introduction of uncontaminated air into the breathing zone of the nostrils, with the clear passage providing for the escape of the air as a curtain in front of and below the mouth of the wearer.

2. A face mask comprising a nose piece adapted to surround the nose and to enclose the upper part and sides of the nose, with the lower part of the nose piece extending downwardly as a hood in front of and clear of the upper lip, where it ends short of the mouth to leave a clear and direct passage to the atmosphere, and a tube passing into the nose piece, the tube within the nose piece being perforated and filled with porous material, whereby uncontaminated air may be introduced in diffused manner into the breathing zone of the nostrils, with the clear passage providing for the escape of the air as a curtain in front of and below the mouth of the wearer.

3. A face mask comprising a nose piece adapted to surround the nose and to enclose the upper part and sides of the nose, with the lower part of the nose piece extending downwardly as a hood in front of and clear of the upper lip, Where it ends short of the mouth to leave a clear and direct passage to the atmosphere, together with an eye shield connected internally with the nose piece, and a tube passing into the nose piece to serve for the introduction of uncontaminated air into both the nose piece and the eyeshield, escape openings in the upper part of the eye shield permitting some flow of the air through the eyeshield, but the clear passage in front of the upper lip providing for free escape of air as a curtain in front of and below the mouth of. the wearer.

4. A face mask comprising a nose piece adapted to surround the nose and to enclose the upper part and sides of the nose, with the lower part of the nose piece extending downwardly as a hood in front of and clear of the upper lip, where it ends short of the mouth to leave a clear and direct passage to the atmosphere, together with an eye shield connected internally with the nose piece, and a tube passing into the mask between the nose piece and the eyeshield to serve for the introduction of uncontaminated air into both the nose piece and the eyeshield, escape openings in the upper part of the eyeshield permitting some flow of the air through the eyeshield, but the clear passage in front of the upper lip providing for free escape of air as a curtain in front of and below the mouth of the wearer.

5. A face mask as in claim 4, comprising an internal bridge to bear on the nose, the air tube being disposed below the bridge, and perforations being provided in the bridge to admit air to the eyeshield.

6. A face mask comprising a nose piece adapted to surround the nose and to enclose the upper part and sides of the nose, with the lower part of the nose piece extending downwardly as a hood in front of and clear of the upper lip, where it ends short of the mouth to leave a clear and direct passage to the atmosphere, together with an eyeshield connected internally with the nose piece, and a tube passing into the nose piece in front of the upper lip to serve for the introduction of uncontaminated air into the nose piece and the eyeshield, escape openings in the upper part of the eyeshield permitting some flow of the air through the eyeshield, but the clear passage in front of the upper lip providing for free escape of air as a curtain in front of and below the mouth of the wearer.

7. A face mask comprising a nose piece adapted to surround the nose and to enclose the upper part and sides of the nose, with the lower part of the nose piece extending downwardly as a hood in front of and clear of the upper lip, where it ends short of the mouth to leave a clear and direct passage to the atmosphere, together with an eyeshield connected internally with the nose piece, and a tube passing into the nose piece in front of the upper lip, the tube within the nose piece being perforated and filled with porous material, whereby uncontaminated air may be introduced in diffused manner into the breathing zone of the nostrils and to the eyeshield, escape openings in the upper part of the eyeshield permitting some flow of the air through the eyeshield, but the clear passage in front of the upper lip providing for free escape of air as a curtain in front of and below the mouth of the wearer.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 428,592 Chapman May 27, 1890 771,801 Andrew Oct. 11, 1904 1,191,274 Brayton July 18, 1916 2,468,383 Tifiany Apr. 26, 1949 2,764,152 Osterberg Sept. 25, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 492,723 Great Britain Sept. 26, 1938

US404538A 1953-01-20 1954-01-18 Face mask for use in dust-laden or other contaminated conditions Expired - Lifetime US2792000A (en)

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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO1982001823A1 (en) * 1980-11-24 1982-06-10 Dow Corning Nose mask gas delivery device
US4377162A (en) * 1980-11-26 1983-03-22 Staver Peter J Facial protective device, and methods of constructing and utilizing same
US4402316A (en) * 1981-04-27 1983-09-06 U.S.D. Corp. Breathing gas mask
US4784131A (en) * 1986-03-17 1988-11-15 Michael Schroeder Pollen protection device
US4915105A (en) * 1988-10-28 1990-04-10 Lee Tien Chu Miniature respiratory apparatus
US5261398A (en) * 1992-03-26 1993-11-16 Sobolik Barbara L Dental eye shield with link mounting feet for attaching to mask
US5479917A (en) * 1995-02-28 1996-01-02 Hsieh; Hsing-Chi Structure of diving mask
US5595174A (en) * 1994-02-28 1997-01-21 Gwaltney; Max R. Nasal adaptor, mask, and method
US6619288B2 (en) * 2000-11-15 2003-09-16 Deka Products Limited Partnership Breathing mask with incomplete headband
US20040069306A1 (en) * 2002-08-26 2004-04-15 John Moenning Dental anesthesia administration mask and eye shield
US20090156953A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2009-06-18 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and providing ventilation therapy
US20100071693A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-03-25 Breathe Technologies Methods and devices for providing mechanical ventilation with an open airway interface
US20110209705A1 (en) * 2003-08-11 2011-09-01 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Tracheal catheter and prosthesis and method of respiratory support of a patient
US8136527B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2012-03-20 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US8381729B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2013-02-26 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for minimally invasive respiratory support
US8418694B2 (en) 2003-08-11 2013-04-16 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for respiratory support of a patient
US8567399B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2013-10-29 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for providing inspiratory and expiratory flow relief during ventilation therapy
US8770193B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-08 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
US8776793B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
US8893720B2 (en) 2011-02-15 2014-11-25 Binyomin A. Cohen Inhalation apparatus
US8925545B2 (en) 2004-02-04 2015-01-06 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for treating sleep apnea
US8939152B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2015-01-27 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for humidifying a respiratory tract
US8955518B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2015-02-17 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for improving ventilation in a lung area
US8985099B2 (en) 2006-05-18 2015-03-24 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Tracheostoma spacer, tracheotomy method, and device for inserting a tracheostoma spacer
US9132250B2 (en) 2009-09-03 2015-09-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with an entrainment port and/or pressure feature
US9180270B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2015-11-10 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation with gas delivery nozzles within an outer tube
US9962512B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2018-05-08 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with a free space nozzle feature
US10099028B2 (en) 2010-08-16 2018-10-16 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices using LOX to provide ventilatory support
US10252020B2 (en) 2008-10-01 2019-04-09 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Ventilator with biofeedback monitoring and control for improving patient activity and health
US10265486B2 (en) 2015-07-09 2019-04-23 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with an entrainment port and/or pressure feature

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US428592A (en) * 1890-05-27 Inspirator
US771801A (en) * 1903-03-25 1904-10-11 william e Andrew Smoke-protector.
US1191274A (en) * 1914-04-25 1916-07-18 James T Brayton Protective mask for workmen.
GB492723A (en) * 1937-03-25 1938-09-26 Victor Leopold Lambert Hall Improvements in or relating to facial masks for use in the administration of anaesthetics or other gases
US2468383A (en) * 1948-02-13 1949-04-26 William E Tiffany Nasal and sinus protector and warmer
US2764152A (en) * 1953-05-12 1956-09-25 Joel Clark Mask for applying gases

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US428592A (en) * 1890-05-27 Inspirator
US771801A (en) * 1903-03-25 1904-10-11 william e Andrew Smoke-protector.
US1191274A (en) * 1914-04-25 1916-07-18 James T Brayton Protective mask for workmen.
GB492723A (en) * 1937-03-25 1938-09-26 Victor Leopold Lambert Hall Improvements in or relating to facial masks for use in the administration of anaesthetics or other gases
US2468383A (en) * 1948-02-13 1949-04-26 William E Tiffany Nasal and sinus protector and warmer
US2764152A (en) * 1953-05-12 1956-09-25 Joel Clark Mask for applying gases

Cited By (41)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JPS57501765A (en) * 1980-11-24 1982-10-07
US4354488A (en) * 1980-11-24 1982-10-19 Dow Corning Corporation Nose mask gas delivery device
WO1982001823A1 (en) * 1980-11-24 1982-06-10 Dow Corning Nose mask gas delivery device
US4377162A (en) * 1980-11-26 1983-03-22 Staver Peter J Facial protective device, and methods of constructing and utilizing same
US4402316A (en) * 1981-04-27 1983-09-06 U.S.D. Corp. Breathing gas mask
US4784131A (en) * 1986-03-17 1988-11-15 Michael Schroeder Pollen protection device
US4915105A (en) * 1988-10-28 1990-04-10 Lee Tien Chu Miniature respiratory apparatus
US5261398A (en) * 1992-03-26 1993-11-16 Sobolik Barbara L Dental eye shield with link mounting feet for attaching to mask
US5595174A (en) * 1994-02-28 1997-01-21 Gwaltney; Max R. Nasal adaptor, mask, and method
US5479917A (en) * 1995-02-28 1996-01-02 Hsieh; Hsing-Chi Structure of diving mask
US6619288B2 (en) * 2000-11-15 2003-09-16 Deka Products Limited Partnership Breathing mask with incomplete headband
US20040069306A1 (en) * 2002-08-26 2004-04-15 John Moenning Dental anesthesia administration mask and eye shield
US7243649B2 (en) 2002-08-26 2007-07-17 King Systems Corporation Anesthesia administration mask and eye shield
US8381729B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2013-02-26 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for minimally invasive respiratory support
US8955518B2 (en) 2003-06-18 2015-02-17 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for improving ventilation in a lung area
US20110209705A1 (en) * 2003-08-11 2011-09-01 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Tracheal catheter and prosthesis and method of respiratory support of a patient
US8418694B2 (en) 2003-08-11 2013-04-16 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Systems, methods and apparatus for respiratory support of a patient
US8136527B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2012-03-20 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US8573219B2 (en) 2003-08-18 2013-11-05 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Method and device for non-invasive ventilation with nasal interface
US8925545B2 (en) 2004-02-04 2015-01-06 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for treating sleep apnea
US8985099B2 (en) 2006-05-18 2015-03-24 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Tracheostoma spacer, tracheotomy method, and device for inserting a tracheostoma spacer
US20090156953A1 (en) * 2007-05-18 2009-06-18 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and providing ventilation therapy
US10058668B2 (en) 2007-05-18 2018-08-28 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and providing ventilation therapy
US8567399B2 (en) 2007-09-26 2013-10-29 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for providing inspiratory and expiratory flow relief during ventilation therapy
US8776793B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
US8770193B2 (en) 2008-04-18 2014-07-08 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for sensing respiration and controlling ventilator functions
US20100071693A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-03-25 Breathe Technologies Methods and devices for providing mechanical ventilation with an open airway interface
US8677999B2 (en) 2008-08-22 2014-03-25 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods and devices for providing mechanical ventilation with an open airway interface
US10252020B2 (en) 2008-10-01 2019-04-09 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Ventilator with biofeedback monitoring and control for improving patient activity and health
US9962512B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2018-05-08 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with a free space nozzle feature
US10232136B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2019-03-19 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation for treating airway obstructions
US9227034B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2016-01-05 Beathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation for treating airway obstructions
US10046133B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2018-08-14 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation for providing ventilation support
US9675774B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2017-06-13 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation with gas delivery nozzles in free space
US9180270B2 (en) 2009-04-02 2015-11-10 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive open ventilation with gas delivery nozzles within an outer tube
US9132250B2 (en) 2009-09-03 2015-09-15 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with an entrainment port and/or pressure feature
US10099028B2 (en) 2010-08-16 2018-10-16 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices using LOX to provide ventilatory support
US9358358B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2016-06-07 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for humidifying a respiratory tract
US8939152B2 (en) 2010-09-30 2015-01-27 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for humidifying a respiratory tract
US8893720B2 (en) 2011-02-15 2014-11-25 Binyomin A. Cohen Inhalation apparatus
US10265486B2 (en) 2015-07-09 2019-04-23 Breathe Technologies, Inc. Methods, systems and devices for non-invasive ventilation including a non-sealing ventilation interface with an entrainment port and/or pressure feature

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