US2786787A - Textile fabric rendered soil resistant with aluminum phosphate and method of producing same - Google Patents

Textile fabric rendered soil resistant with aluminum phosphate and method of producing same Download PDF

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Publication number
US2786787A
US2786787A US42298754A US2786787A US 2786787 A US2786787 A US 2786787A US 42298754 A US42298754 A US 42298754A US 2786787 A US2786787 A US 2786787A
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Prior art keywords
aluminum phosphate
dispersion
pile
coating
textile fabric
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Patrick A Florio
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Mohasco Industries Inc
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Mohasco Industries Inc
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M11/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with inorganic substances or complexes thereof; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment, e.g. mercerising
    • D06M11/68Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with inorganic substances or complexes thereof; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment, e.g. mercerising with phosphorus or compounds thereof, e.g. with chlorophosphonic acid or salts thereof
    • D06M11/70Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with inorganic substances or complexes thereof; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment, e.g. mercerising with phosphorus or compounds thereof, e.g. with chlorophosphonic acid or salts thereof with oxides of phosphorus; with hypophosphorous, phosphorous or phosphoric acids or their salts
    • D06M11/71Salts of phosphoric acids
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H25/00After-treatment of paper not provided for in groups D21H17/00 - D21H23/00
    • D21H25/02Chemical or biochemical treatment
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H23/00Processes or apparatus for adding material to the pulp or to the paper
    • D21H23/02Processes or apparatus for adding material to the pulp or to the paper characterised by the manner in which substances are added
    • D21H23/22Addition to the formed paper
    • D21H23/50Spraying or projecting
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D21PAPER-MAKING; PRODUCTION OF CELLULOSE
    • D21HPULP COMPOSITIONS; PREPARATION THEREOF NOT COVERED BY SUBCLASSES D21C OR D21D; IMPREGNATING OR COATING OF PAPER; TREATMENT OF FINISHED PAPER NOT COVERED BY CLASS B31 OR SUBCLASS D21G; PAPER NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D21H23/00Processes or apparatus for adding material to the pulp or to the paper
    • D21H23/02Processes or apparatus for adding material to the pulp or to the paper characterised by the manner in which substances are added
    • D21H23/22Addition to the formed paper
    • D21H23/52Addition to the formed paper by contacting paper with a device carrying the material
    • D21H23/54Rubbing devices, e.g. brush, pad, felt
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23921With particles
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/23907Pile or nap type surface or component
    • Y10T428/23986With coating, impregnation, or bond
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/25Web or sheet containing structurally defined element or component and including a second component containing structurally defined particles

Description

TEXTILE FABRIC RENDERED SOIL RESISTANT WITH ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME Patrick A. Florio, Elmhurst, N. Y., assignor to Mohasco Industries, Inc., a corporation of New York No Drawing. Application April 13, 1954, Serial No. 422,987

12 Claims. (Cl. 117-169) This invention relates to the treatment of surfaces to reduce the adherence or attraction of particles thereto ahd more particularly to the treatment of fabrics, paper and paper-like materials, paint films and other materials to reduce their color change due to pick-up and retention of particles on their exposed surfaces.

A more specific object is to reduce color change or greying of fabrics (flat or pile), covering or wrapping material, such as paper, and films, such as paint or varnish, due to the pick-up and retention of particles during use.

Another object is to reduce the particle adherence of surfaces without introducing an undesirable discoloration or whitening or otherwise harmfully altering the appearance or feel of the treated material.

Another object is to reduce the adherence of soil particles to surfaces.

Other objects and advantages will be apparent as the nature of the invention is more fully disclosed.

The treatment in accordance with this invention comprises depositing on the surface to be protected a composition containing aluminum phosphate and having characteristics which make it effective for the purpose as illustrated by the specific examples.

The composition may be applied to the surface from a dispersion under conditions to leave a coating of the desired weight and composition after the vehicle has been removed.

The surface can be treated in various ways depending upon its type and the results desired. In the case of pile fabrics, such as rugs or carpets, a water dispersion of the compositon may be sprayed over the pile surface in an amount to produce the desired. particle pick-up, or the dispersion may be applied by means of a carpet cleaning brush and then dried, or the fabric may be inverted and the pile only dipped into the dispersion. When used as a part of a standard rug-making process the dispersion may be sprayed onto the pile (face up) or the pile dipped (face down) after sizing and the treated rug then passed through a standard drier'for removing the vehicle. If the treatment is applied to a carpet on the floor it may be dried. at room temperature'by, allowing it to stand for 'a sufficient period'of time;

After drying the coating has' the property of adhering strongly to the surface. sult of repeated cleaning or use it can be easily renewed.

The treatment is eifective on various textiles such as- Cotton pile rugs may be immersed in the dispersion until the desired pick-up has taken place on the fibers. The fabric is then passed between squeeze rollers and dried to leave the desired coating on the pile.

nited States Patent If eventually removed as a re 2,786,787 Patented Mar. 26, 19 57 The dispersion may be applied to wall paper or to a surface by spraying or painting technique and allowed to dry at room temperature to form a coating having the characteristics above described.

5 The treatment is suited in general for any surface which is subject to particle adherence.

In accordance with this invention a dispersion of aluminum phosphate (A1PO4), a water insoluble phosphate of extremely small particle size, in salt free water.

' Example 1 A dispersion made by mixing 1 part of aluminum-phos phate (AlPO4) of extremely small average particle size (70 millimicrons and below) in 99 parts of salt free water, was stirred vigorously for a period of 10 minutesv A pile fabric having 22 ounces per square yard of pile fiber was treated by immersion face down in this dispersion at room temperature to produce a solids pick-up of 1% on a dry basis on the pile Weight. This corresponds to a pick-up of 0.011 ounce per square yard of exposed fiber surface area.

' Example 2 A dispersion made by mixing 1 part of aluminum phosphate (AlPO4) of extremely small average particle size (70 millimicrons and below) and 0.25 part of trisodium phosphate (NasPO4-l2H2O) and 98.75 parts of salt free water was sprayed at room temperature as a line mist on to the pile surface of an Axminster pile carpet having a 40 backing composed of cotton chain and filler yarns, jute stuffer yarns and one-half inch pile having a weight of.

. 23.2 ounces per square yard composed of a blend of 50% wool and 50% rayon. The pH of the pile may be 4 to 6.5. The spray may be controlled so that the weight of the dispersion taken up by the pile is about 100% of the pile weight and is concentrated on the pile with the backing remaining substantially dry. The carpet is then passed through a drier at a temperature of about 175 F. to remove the water and leave a coating of aluminum phosphate on the pile of about 1% by weight of the pile,

corresponding to about .011 ounce per square yard of exposed fiber surface area. The coating is most concentrated at the free ends of the pile although some of the coating may extend down to the portion of the pile anchored in the backing. 6

Example 3 A dispersion made by mixing 1 part of aluminum phosphat (AlPO4) of extremely small average particle size (70 millimicrons and below), 0.25 part of trisodium '60 phosphate, N213PO4-12H2O), 0.25 part of Carbowax (a polyethylene glycol high molecular weight wax made by Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corporation), and

98.75 parts .of salt free water, was applied to the exposed fiber surface of a pile fabric containing a blend of carpet wool and viscose rayon by spraying at room temperature. After drying, a pick-up of 1% aluminum phosphate on the pile or .011 ounce per square yard of exposed fiber surface was obtained.

Example 4 dispersion was made by mixing 0.5 part of aluminum phosphate, 0.25 part of trisodium phosphate, and 0.25

arrears? part of Oarbowax into 5916 parts of salt freewater. 'E'hg mixture was stirred vigorously for 10 minutes. This dispersion was used to treat carpet as above.

Example Other materials may beadded to the dispersion states; to improve the soil fepeuencyqimntiee lior exainplg a dispersion was made by mixing 0l5 par t of aluminum phosphate, 0.25 part of Ludo)? snicdfipnde' s old by Du Pont), 0.25 art or tris'odiu'rii pses iate, 0 25 ar: of CarboWax; and 98175 parts of salt nee water. mixture was stirred vigorously fora period or o, rninntes, The dispersion was used to treat carpet as in Examples 1 to 3. n

Other metal oxi es may be used" in precep Ludox, us such as Alon, an aluminum oxide soldb'y Go'dfrey Cabot, Inc'., aluminum aerog'el, titaniili'iioxide, etc. Representative Water dispersions of these materials are set forth in the following table:

ALULIINUM PHOSPHATE AND METAL OXIDES 2o [Oxides'iri water dispersion 'for use in-t'ne treatment' of pil ca'iis't'as'sa" forth-inExample 1.]

Parts Parts Metal Oxides Parts Parts AIPO; TSP ;Carbowax 0. 25 0.25 Alon (A1100 0,-25; Ogle.

0. 50 0.25 T10: (Titano'xL. 0. 25 0. 2a.

0. 50 0.25 hydrous alumina. O. 25 0:25

Example 7 A combination of oxides'm-ay'be' usedto aidi'th f aluminum phosphate in giving 'soil resistance; Fonex -fl. ample, a dispersion was made by mixing0.5 'parto'f' aluminum phosphate, 0.25ipart of Alon, 0.25 part'of; Ludox, 0.25 part of trisodium'phosphate, 0. 25pa'rt of" Carbowax, and 98.5 parts of salt free'water. Thiskiis persion was used to treat carpet as in'Examples 1 to 3.

Example 8 Other water insoluble inorganic materials having par ticle sizes of a colloidal nature such as silicates and clays; may also be used as an addition to the aluminum, phos' phate to improve its soil resistance properties. For ex- ,ln" ample, adispersion may-he made by mixing 0.5 part of aluminum phosphate, 0.25 part of Veegum '(an aluminum magnesium silicate made by the Vanderbilt'CoJ, 0.125 part of trisodium phosphate, 0.125;p'art of Carbowax, and 99 parts of salt free water. This mixture was stirred l vigorously and used to treat carpetas in Example I.

Example'9 A dispersion prepared as set" forthin the answer amples and containing 5% solids maybeappliewb' a brush to a standard wall paperwhile on the wall Landloa 4 painted surface in a quantity to produce a 'so'l ids' coating of .01 ounce per squareyar'd."

Example 10 Ailat non-pile fabric (fla'g --bunting,"weight4.75 ouncesper square yard) may be passed through a dispersion pre pared as set forth in the aboveexamples and between squee ze rollers to leave a solids pick-up of"from=i1% to 1.5% by weight when dryycorresponding to about .0091" g ounce tg olfi ounce per square yard of exposed fiber surface area.

Exarnple 11 Additions may be made to the AlPOi dispersion to satisfy the need for other properties such as (1) lowering whitening effect by the addition of metal, oxides; (2) improvement of hand b 'the' addition of known softening agent-s; ("3) improv ent of change by the addition of dy' jser oth'e e 10 matter. 7v

g In any of the above examples her kriowiii wetting and dispersing agents ma paused n .pla'ce.i ,0f thetrisodium phosphate, or, if desired, the w'e ttirig or dispersing agent Also othe'r'waxesmaiybe in p laice' of the Carbowax for improving the handiand decreasing theQli'arshn ess of thetreat'e'dsurface or the" warm-84y" be omitted if not required for aparticular purpose. t I g p V y p The spraying or dipping may hecontrolled so that the desired Weight ofc'oating' is formed; v v A coating of 5% ro1 115% dry solids based on the weight of the pile has been fdundrnost effective for many types of pile materials although the coating maybe varied from 25% to 5% for some purposes. Ari excess of the composition maybe used'biut usually does not further decreasetlreadlieren ce er soil particles and may increase the whitening effect: In addition it rnay result in excess dusting' and' maybec'om noticeable in the feel of the materia'L' p v; The surface area'or fiber co'iite'ama' be calculated by the following equation:

Where W equals the total weightiof "fiber persquarc yard; As equals the elfe'ctive'exposecl iib erl surface area (in square yards) er; square yard of'fabric'; 'D' equals average density of the fibe r in pounds per" cubic'yard calculated by- (specific gravity) X1685; 'df'equals'aver'ag diameter of thefiber in ya rds'calculated by (fiberdiameter in' microns) 1.0 9 5 :10 and'E equal'sfaTfactor showing the averagef degree ofjpen'et'ra'ti on of the. treating dispersion expresse d as a"fraction"of"th'e total'fiber area i assey be fused; coating" technique,

like these same limits in ounces of coating'pi' square yard apply. If pile surfac the coinpositionf rnafrni the pile and totlre'backing. f

Standard detergents,'iwett n g an 'dispe be used withtheabove"dispersions*if'desii These are particularly useful to effect a combination of cleaning and treating.

Obviously the above treatment can be applied to fibers prior to spinning, to yarn prior to weaving or to fabrics after weaving.

What is claimed is:

l. A textile fabric having a surface coating of discrete, pre-formed aluminum phosphate, the average particle size of said aluminum phosphate being not greater than about 70 millimicrons, the coating being present on the material in an amount of from about 0.25% to about of the weight of the fabric, said coating having the property of reducing the tendency of the surface to pick up and retain soil particles.

2. A textile fabric as set forth in claim 1 having a backing and pile elements anchored therein, the pile elements forming the exposed surface and having the coating of the particles of aluminum phosphate.

3. A textile fabric as set forth in claim 1 in which the surface coating includes a softening agent.

4. A textile fabric as set forth in claim 1 in which the coating also includes a finely-divided metal oxide.

5. A textile fabric as set forth in claim 1 in which the metal oxide is aluminum oxide.

6. A textile fabric as set forth in claim 1 in which the metal oxide is silicon oxide.

7. The method of reducing the particle adherence characteristics of a textile fabric without producing an undesirable color change therein, which comprises applying to a surface of said fabric a dilute liquid dispersion containing pre-formed particles of aluminum phosphate having an average particle size not greater than about 70 millimicrons, and removing the dispersion vehicle from the fabric, the amount of dispersion applied to the surface being such as to leave thereOn an amount of the aluminum phosphate equal to about 0.25% to about 5% of the Weight of the fabric.

8. The method of claim 7 in which the dispersion of the aluminum phosphate includes a wetting and dispersion agent.

9. The method of claim 7 in which the dispersion of aluminum phosphate includes a softening agent.

10. The method of claim 7 in which the dispersion of aluminum phosphate also includes a finely-divided metal oxide.

11. The method of claim 10 in which the metal oxide is aluminum oxide.

12. The method of claim 10 in which the metal oxide is silicon oxide.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,434,549 Lewis et al. Nov. 7, 1922 1,983,349 Dreyfus Dec. 4, 1934 2,033,977 Dreyfus Mar. 17, 1936 2,230,656 Scholler Feb. 4, 1941 2,570,750 Bauer Oct. 9, 1951 2,587,505 Moody Feb. 26, 1952 2,622,307 Cogovan et al. Dec. 23, 1952 OTHER REFERENCES Synthetic Organic Chemicals, 12th edition, July 1, 1946, pages 22 and 23, Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corp.

Claims (1)

1. A TEXTILE FABRIC HAVING A SURFACE COATING OF DISCRETE, PRE-FORMED ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE, THE AVERAGE PARTICLE SIZE OF SAID ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE BEING NOT GREATER THAN ABOUT 70 MILLIMICRONS, THE COATING BEING PRESENT ON THE MATERIAL IN AN AMOUNT OF FROM ABOUT 0.25% TO ABOUT 5% OF THE WEIGHT OF THE FABRIC, SAID COATING HAVING THE PROPERTY OF REDUCING THE TENDENCY OF THE SURFACE TO PICK UP AND RETAIN SOIL PARTICLES.
US2786787A 1954-04-13 1954-04-13 Textile fabric rendered soil resistant with aluminum phosphate and method of producing same Expired - Lifetime US2786787A (en)

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US2786787A US2786787A (en) 1954-04-13 1954-04-13 Textile fabric rendered soil resistant with aluminum phosphate and method of producing same
GB903555A GB787476A (en) 1954-04-13 1955-03-28 Method of improving soil resistance of textile fabrics
FR1124633A FR1124633A (en) 1954-04-13 1955-04-12 Improvements relating to the treatment of surfaces to reduce the adhesion of the particles thereon

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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2891874A (en) * 1957-03-07 1959-06-23 Du Pont Process for increasing soil-resistance of fibers, a composition therefor and process for producing it
US2909451A (en) * 1956-04-27 1959-10-20 American Cyanamid Co Process for preparing aluminum phosphate dispersion and process of treating pile fabric with the resulting dispersion
US2922393A (en) * 1957-01-31 1960-01-26 Otto J Munz Sea farming
US3030235A (en) * 1958-03-13 1962-04-17 American Viscose Corp Discoloration-resistant regenerated cellulose articles
US3645780A (en) * 1966-08-08 1972-02-29 Monsanto Co Improving soil resistance through the use of rare earth metal containing compounds
US3853588A (en) * 1972-07-19 1974-12-10 Du Pont Vinylidene chloride-topcoated, orthophosphate-coated polymeric objects
US3853587A (en) * 1972-07-19 1974-12-10 Du Pont Ferric phosphate coated polymeric shaped objects
US3853591A (en) * 1972-07-19 1974-12-10 Du Pont Phosphate coated polymeric shaped objects
US3885079A (en) * 1972-07-19 1975-05-20 Du Pont Phosphate coated polymeric shaped objects
US3895164A (en) * 1971-11-24 1975-07-15 Key Chemicals Inc Process for imparting friction properties to a base material and the resultant product
US3955017A (en) * 1971-11-26 1976-05-04 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Method of coating metal phosphates on organic polymeric substrates
US4015050A (en) * 1970-12-11 1977-03-29 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Plastics film with an aluminium phosphate coating
US5908663A (en) * 1996-02-01 1999-06-01 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Topical carpet treatment
US6874834B2 (en) 1996-10-07 2005-04-05 Phd, Inc. Linear slide gripper
US20050095933A1 (en) * 2003-11-03 2005-05-05 Kimbrell William C. Textile substrates, compositions useful for treating textile substrates, and related methods
US20070010150A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Xinggao Fang Textile materials exbiting enhanced soil-release properties and process for producing the same
US20070130695A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Eduardo Torres Soil release agent
US20070130694A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Michaels Emily W Textile surface modification composition
US20070131892A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Valenti Dominick J Stain repellant and release fabric conditioner
US20070199157A1 (en) * 2006-02-28 2007-08-30 Eduardo Torres Fabric conditioner enhancing agent and emulsion and dispersant stabilizer

Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1434549A (en) * 1919-10-16 1922-11-07 Lewis Green Mcadam & Knowland Process of flash-proofing fabrics
US1983349A (en) * 1930-09-29 1934-12-04 Dreyfus Camille Textile material and method of making the same
US2033977A (en) * 1931-09-14 1936-03-17 Dreyfus Henry Treatment of filaments, fabrics, and the like
US2230656A (en) * 1936-08-29 1941-02-04 Scholler Brothers Inc Stable waterproofing composition
US2570750A (en) * 1948-10-21 1951-10-09 Whitaker Co Fred Brashening of wool
US2587505A (en) * 1945-10-25 1952-02-26 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Pile fabric floor covering and pile yarn therefor made from cleaned and degreased wool sliver
US2622307A (en) * 1951-03-08 1952-12-23 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Soil-resistant pile fabric

Patent Citations (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1434549A (en) * 1919-10-16 1922-11-07 Lewis Green Mcadam & Knowland Process of flash-proofing fabrics
US1983349A (en) * 1930-09-29 1934-12-04 Dreyfus Camille Textile material and method of making the same
US2033977A (en) * 1931-09-14 1936-03-17 Dreyfus Henry Treatment of filaments, fabrics, and the like
US2230656A (en) * 1936-08-29 1941-02-04 Scholler Brothers Inc Stable waterproofing composition
US2587505A (en) * 1945-10-25 1952-02-26 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Pile fabric floor covering and pile yarn therefor made from cleaned and degreased wool sliver
US2570750A (en) * 1948-10-21 1951-10-09 Whitaker Co Fred Brashening of wool
US2622307A (en) * 1951-03-08 1952-12-23 Mohawk Carpet Mills Inc Soil-resistant pile fabric

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2909451A (en) * 1956-04-27 1959-10-20 American Cyanamid Co Process for preparing aluminum phosphate dispersion and process of treating pile fabric with the resulting dispersion
US2922393A (en) * 1957-01-31 1960-01-26 Otto J Munz Sea farming
US2891874A (en) * 1957-03-07 1959-06-23 Du Pont Process for increasing soil-resistance of fibers, a composition therefor and process for producing it
US3030235A (en) * 1958-03-13 1962-04-17 American Viscose Corp Discoloration-resistant regenerated cellulose articles
US3645780A (en) * 1966-08-08 1972-02-29 Monsanto Co Improving soil resistance through the use of rare earth metal containing compounds
US4015050A (en) * 1970-12-11 1977-03-29 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Plastics film with an aluminium phosphate coating
US3895164A (en) * 1971-11-24 1975-07-15 Key Chemicals Inc Process for imparting friction properties to a base material and the resultant product
US3955017A (en) * 1971-11-26 1976-05-04 Imperial Chemical Industries Limited Method of coating metal phosphates on organic polymeric substrates
US3885079A (en) * 1972-07-19 1975-05-20 Du Pont Phosphate coated polymeric shaped objects
US3853591A (en) * 1972-07-19 1974-12-10 Du Pont Phosphate coated polymeric shaped objects
US3853587A (en) * 1972-07-19 1974-12-10 Du Pont Ferric phosphate coated polymeric shaped objects
US3853588A (en) * 1972-07-19 1974-12-10 Du Pont Vinylidene chloride-topcoated, orthophosphate-coated polymeric objects
US5908663A (en) * 1996-02-01 1999-06-01 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Topical carpet treatment
US6874834B2 (en) 1996-10-07 2005-04-05 Phd, Inc. Linear slide gripper
US20050095933A1 (en) * 2003-11-03 2005-05-05 Kimbrell William C. Textile substrates, compositions useful for treating textile substrates, and related methods
US20070010150A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Xinggao Fang Textile materials exbiting enhanced soil-release properties and process for producing the same
US20070130695A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Eduardo Torres Soil release agent
US20070130694A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Michaels Emily W Textile surface modification composition
US20070131892A1 (en) * 2005-12-12 2007-06-14 Valenti Dominick J Stain repellant and release fabric conditioner
US7655609B2 (en) 2005-12-12 2010-02-02 Milliken & Company Soil release agent
US20070199157A1 (en) * 2006-02-28 2007-08-30 Eduardo Torres Fabric conditioner enhancing agent and emulsion and dispersant stabilizer

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Publication number Publication date Type
GB787476A (en) 1957-12-11 application
FR1124633A (en) 1956-10-15 grant
BE537252A (en) grant

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