US2762176A - Wrapping machine - Google Patents

Wrapping machine Download PDF

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US2762176A
US2762176A US48366A US4836648A US2762176A US 2762176 A US2762176 A US 2762176A US 48366 A US48366 A US 48366A US 4836648 A US4836648 A US 4836648A US 2762176 A US2762176 A US 2762176A
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Prior art keywords
package
wrapping
crank
shaft
wrapper
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US48366A
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Kenneth D Knapp
Joseph T Schooler
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ELGIN Manufacturing Co
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ELGIN Manufacturing Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B11/00Wrapping, e.g. partially or wholly enclosing, articles or quantities of material, in strips, sheets or blanks, of flexible material
    • B65B11/06Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths
    • B65B11/08Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in a single straight path
    • B65B11/10Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in a single straight path to fold the wrappers in tubular form about contents
    • B65B11/12Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in a single straight path to fold the wrappers in tubular form about contents and then to form closing folds of similar form at opposite ends of the tube

Description

l Sept 11, 1956 K. D, KNAPP ETAL 2,762,176

WRAPPING MACHINE Filed Sept. 9, 1948 8 Sheets-Sheet l Sept. 11, 1956 K, D, KNAPPk TAL 2,762,176

WRAPPING MACHINE Filed sept. 9, 194s. e shee'rs-shee: 2

TTOP/VEV Sept. 11, 1956 K. D. KNAPP ErAL YWRAPPINC- MACHINE 8 Sheets-Shea*l 3 Filed Sept. 9, 1948 P X e www 0K0 ,mm r .H 0x n f,

Sept. l1, 1956 K. D. KNAPP ETAL WRAPPING MACHINE 8 Sheets-Sheet Filed Sept. 9, 1948 Idl 9a ww p) P A, K wmmw @.wf/f@ ZW .MHC ,r Vrd 4 M ff .MNH my 3 HW. 6

Sept. 11, 1956 K, D KNAPP ETAL 2,762,176

WRAPPING MACHINE Filed sept. 9, 194s 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 @Trae/vin Sept. 11, 1956 K. D. KNAPP ETAL 2,762,176

WRAPPING MACHINE Filed sept. e, 1948 8 sneaks-sheet e /Qf /l/ rrOR/vfn Sept. 11, 1956 K, D, KNAPP HAL 2,762,176

WRAPPING MACHINE Filed Sept. 9, 1948 8 Sheets-Sheetl 7 l f #fro/@vin Sept. 11, 1956 K. D. KNAPP ErAL 2,762,176

WRAPPING MACHINE Filed Sept. 9, 1948 8 Sheets-SheetI 8 WRAPPING MACHINE Kenneth D. Knapp, Los Angeles, and Joseph T. Schooler, Glendale, Calif., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Elgin Manufacturing Company, Elgin, lll., a corporation of Illinois Application September 9, 1948, Serial No. 48,366 4 Claims. (Cl. 53-66) This invention relates to machines for wrapping articles or packages in wrappers of paper, cellophane, or other suitable wrapping material, and has as an object the provision of a machine unitA in which not only the actual wrapping of the article, but the cutting of a Wrapper of selected size and the sealing of the wrapper upon the article may be quickly and efficiently carried Olli.

A further object of the invention is to provide a wrapping machine capable of rapid mass production of Wrapped articles by a simplified wrapping system acting in synchronized coordination with a conveyor system and a paper supply system in accordance with mass production principles.

Another object of the invention is to provide a wrapping machine having simplied means for drawing a wrapper tightly about an article in preparation for subsequent tucking and folding operations, these means also serving temporarily to support and to govern the movement of the article.

Stil-l another object of the invention is to provide a wrapping machine having time-saving mechanical actions shortening the periods devoted to recovery strokes of the mechanism without, however, relinquishing the advantages of smooth action obtainable from cyclic rotary movement.

A further object of the invention is to provide 'in a wrapping machine means for accurately cutting a wrapper to a predetermined length but actuable only if an article is available to be wrapped by the particular cut wrapper.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide in a wrapping machine simple'and effective means for cooling a heated sealing compound so that a wrapper may be sealed upon a package in a short interval of time and travel.

The invention possesses other objects and features of advantage, some of which, with the foregoing, will be set forth in the following description of the preferred form of our invention which is illustrated in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the specification. It is to be understood that we do not limit ourselves to the showing made by the said drawings and description, as we may adopt variations of the preferred form within the scope'of our invention as set forth in the claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a top plan view of a wrapping machine embodying the principles of this invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevational view of the machine shown in Figure l, the direction of view being indicated by the arrow 2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side elevational View taken from the opposite side of the machine, as indicated by the arrow 3 of Figure 1. g i p Figure 4 is a vertical transverse sectional view on an enlarged scale, the plane of section being indicated by the line 4-4 of Figure 2, with the Idirection of view as indicated, and illustrates the Wrapper paper feed mechanism and controls.

2,762,176 Patented Sept. 11, 1956 Fig. 4a is a diagrammatic view of electrical means controlling the paper feed. Figure 5 is a fragmentary detail of the paper feed mechanism shown in Figure 4, illustrating the released position of the blacklash brake on the paper feed spool. Figure 6 is another vertical transverse sectional view of the paper feed and cutting mechanism, the plane of section being indicated by the line 6-6 of Figure 2, with the direction of View as indicated.

Figure 7 is an enlarged vertical longitudinal sectional view taken on the plane of section indicated by the line 7-7 of'Figure 1, with the ydirection of view as indicated, and showing generally the paper folding mechanism and the package conveying mechanism associated therewith.

-Figure 8 is a fragmentary top plan View of the mechanism shown in Figure 7, being more illustrative of the package conveying mechanism. v

Figure 9 is a further enlarged vertical sectional view of elements of the paper folding mechanism, taken on the line 9 9 of Figure 8, with the direction of view as indi# cated and showing particularly the means for making the first end tuck and the tirst bottom fold on the paper wrapper.

Figure l0 is a View similar to Figure 9, but with the mechanism at the more advanced stage of making the second bottom fold.

Figure 11 is a perspective view showing the package at a further advanced stage of wrapping in which the bottom folds and the lirst end tuck are completed.

Figure l2 is another perspective View of a still more advanced stage of wrapping in which the second end tuck has been completed.

Figure 13 is a detailed side elevational view from the aspect of Figure 3, illustrative of driving mechanism for elevating and forwardly moving the package and for actuating the wrapping mechanism, the parts being shown in a stage in which the elevator is descending to receive another package.

Figure 14 is a view similar to Figure 13, with the elevator at the top of its ascending stroke in which it delivers a package to the wrapping mechanism. i

Figure 15 is a detail of the elevator lift mechanism shown in Figure 13. Y

Figure 16 isfa horizontal sectional view taken on the plane of section indicated by the line 16-16 of Figure 2, with the direction of View as indicated and on an enlarged scale, illustrating the primary driving mechanism of the` machine and the chain of actuation sequential thereto.

1 Figure 17 is a fragmentary View of a further enlarged scale'of the clutch indicated by the arrow 17 of Figure 16.

Figure 18 is a vertical transverse sectional view on an enlarged scale, taken on the plane of section indicated by the line 18-18 of Figure 2, with the direction of view as indicated, and illustrating the cooling system by which Wax seals on the wrappers are cooled and hardened.

Referring to the details of the drawings, and more specifically to the general views as shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3, the general schematic plan of our improved wrapping machine comprises an intake conveyor system 21, an outlet conveyor system 22 at a higher level than the system 21, an elevator system 23 for transferring material to be wrapped from the level of one conveyor system to the level of the other, a paper supply system 24 feeding wrapping paper at the locus of the elevator, and a wrapping system 25 which folds the paper around the material during the progress of material between the conveyor systems and at the same time controls and actuates the movement of the material from the elevator to the outlet conveyor system.

The machine also comprises a heating system 26 and a cooling system 27 operating in connection with the outlet conveyor system 22, for softening and rehardening the coordination of the'r Asealing compounds on the paper wrappers'. be understood that Athe above-enumerated systems are not ver-say fof the frame as.

V68 on anf idler Vshaft 6,9V

' ably It should independent,` but rather are 'convenient functional desig- 'hation's 'of cooperating groups of partsntof a unit All of the above systems are mou ted ipitly a Y '.2'8', and the moving elements receive then-actuafibsrffe annesse-:29- ,c As shown most clearlyin Figures 16 and 17, the motor 29 is connected to a reduction gear '31 by means oa i belt 32 and clutch 33; Th'epcliitch disc 34 is movable in out 'of operating' posi'tipii by yoke 35 mounted on a verticalY shaft 36 to which aY linkage bar 37 is cnamericani/anemie the aachi'ae'epefstrwaefe it is 'h'lcid by an 39 t'O 'a vertic'lshaft 40 and handle 41a Y Thereduen'a gear 31 is essai-acted by a chais '44 art-'61 sprockets '45 and 46 to a inai''shaftAfl mounteiifti'ans- 'mainsnaftli'l drives the ntake conveyor system 21 andthe 'outlet 'conveyor system 22 yby means fV afchanS which 'engages ad'riving sprocket 49 'on the shaft 47 and driven sprockets 50 and '1; Vrespectively mounted onfend shafts of lthe intake and outlet 'conveyor systems, and an adjustable' take-up sprocket 52., The main shaft 47 'also drives 'th'eelevator system 23 through a crank 53, and drives units of the wrapping system 25 through a 'crank V5'4. A second shaft Y 55, parallel to the main shaft 47, is drivn therefrom by gears 56l and 57, and in turn drives `other units of the wrapping system 25 through a crank 58, an'd also drives the.pap'er supply system 24., g

YThe intake Vconveyor sy`steni21 niay` comprise twin side chains 61, provided with suitable fittings '62 (Figure Y tem 22..

To receive a package 63 from the intake conveyor system 21 and to hold it poi-sed above die ascending elevatorpltfini, a linger 95 (see Figure 7) extends fror rife fraaie 2S Vinto' tnespae in the elevator operates aid 'from the 'side thereof opposite to 'the` h't'ak' conveyor and is backed byV a stop 96. The .elevator platform 84 iS formed with agV-noth .97 it@ 'Permit its ,Passage past the, linger 95.Y packageV is moved by the chains 61,V

until its forward edge rests upon'th'e iinger 95 and against the stop 96, and its rearward edgeV rests upon the forward'marginof the plate 67, its center then being inthe j path of the elevator platform 84.'

vIt will be noted from Figures 13, 14, and 15, and par-` ticularly from Figure 1'5, that. theV fulcrum shaft 8SY is much closer to the main shaft 47 thanit is to` theelevat'or rod 83. Consequently, the position of the block 91 in the slot 90 has at all times .ri'nnhy greater iniluence ontthe rate of vertical speed, eitherup or down, oftheelevator rod 83 than has the lposition of the block V8 6 in the forkl89. When the block 91 is atrthe inner yend of the slot 90 (at the left end, as viewed in Figure '15,),

t its acts upon `the lever 87Aat arelatively 'short radius 7)l engaging ann article or package 63'. YThe ochains 61 are Y driven by sprockets 64 mounted on a 'shaft 65 'carrying the sprockeLSG and vdriven by the chain 48, and preferably have their upper, orcarrying, Courses sunk in guide slots 66 in a plate 67, TheV chain 61;, extend around sprockets Y. which is supported bya bracket 7,0 upheld byV support bars 71 viriiextelisiori of the frame 28V and protected by an aprony 72.V The s haft -65 is disposedin coordinatihglprximity to theI elevator system 23 so that `apaek'age 63 may be broughtlby'rthe cha-ins 61 rto l"the -path of the supporting surface of an ascending elYazm- .Y f. VThe intake conveyor system 21 is alsocoordinated Y With, therapsriipply Serali A .contest arm .74

is pivotally supported as atV75 above `thepath ydi the package V63 so as to ybe raised bycontactfwithjapassing pac afge into V'coift`ac`t with@ micro-switch (see AFigure 4) supported n abi'a'cket 77. AThe,nuoro-switch 7(6 ac- Y tii'ijat'es' a solenoid 7S which is connfeit'ed to the paper suprply system 24s() a's to piventjfee'digff apaper 'wrapper in tojv A machine when ho package ifs 4in transit toreceive he wasser', ia a manner hereinafter' to be described. Anoia-'deman 7s any :be nciud'a inthe intake conveyr "syste'r'n to hold light 'packages in Ifirm contact Awith the chains 61, vto insure their ,correct placement as they approach ftheelevator systerh 23. l Y

k elevator lguide 8'1, having 'u'p'pe'r 'and lw'g'gide 82, is rsecured to the frae 28 'substantallybe i'w sie ineke enrayer shaft r6s, and 'suspens siids'bly anelevator rod '83V which has la platform 84 'at its upper end. t Secured to -one side of 'the elevator rd S3 is fa 85 which 'tatabiyfarcries 'a block j86. A Iever'sl, fnlcrurhed on ja transverse shaft '88, has vaff'c'irk -r89 'at one end which slidably engages `the block -At'fts other end the levier '8 7 hasta slot or "giiideway 90 slifdgages a 'blockf rotatably nion'nt'fed"onV crank pin blcki`9'1 t oscilla@ Jle'ctiliitiearly iuthe slot 970 vl/bile oscillating rotatively on the crank'pin l92,"a`nd so danses vertifrom the fulcrum shaft 88, andV therefore moves the lever'and the elevator `rod rapidly and converselywhen 'Y the block 91 is at the outer end of the slot 91g), it actsY t upon thelleyer 87 Vat a relatively longradius from the fulcrurnshaft 88 andtherefore moves the lever and the elatQrLshaft less rapidlyt. Y :It Will be further 'Hated that th'rmain Shaft@ and the fulcrum ,shaft 88 are substantially in the's'amehorizortal Y plane, with the result that the block 91 ilsat one 'nd o r the other, of the slot `9,0 when the'lcver 87 is horizontal "and the elevatorrod at the mid-pointuof 4 its vxupward or downwardstroke. Rotation of the crank pin 92 is at these instants iiindirecltions at right anglelsto the axis of the lever 87 `andthereforethe elevator rod $3 moves fastest at the middle of its stroke. However, theend points of the stroke of the elevator roddo no t coincidewith vcrlever )87 is trangentjiallftothe aro of rotation of the crank pin 92.Y ligre 15 illustrates the substantialV attainment tical .positions of the crank arm 93, but occur when the` Y of one of'thesejend points, the other occurring whenlth'e crank arml is at the same angle fromccthevertlical but directed downwardlyand inwardly toward the fulcruin shaft( 88. The are of rotationrofthe crankv arm 9`3-i s Vtherefore shorter for one stroke ofthe elevator rod t$3 than for the reciprocal st rloke, andtas thewcrank 4a1'ru93 rotates at constant speedthe tworstrokes of the elevator rod are ait-different speeds. As shown by the airowswinV Figure A'1'5 indicating the direction of rotation ofthe crank 93, 'the shorter fare andcthcreforepthe higher stroke v speed relates to the downward stroke of theA elevator rod,

illustrated as just completed with the'slower 11p-stroke about to begin. rlhe relative speeds of the two 'strokes may lbe 4varied'by changing -vtheratio of the` eifective length of the crank arm 93 to the distance between the nain shaft 47V and the fulcrum shaft`8n8, a greaterrv I' V ing a greater dfferencein speed. ,Y c v The above-described rectilinear movement of; a

actuated by a crank with relation to the axis ofca leverl has v'ery considerable advantage over a system of rearns orY simple cranks for actuating the elevator rod 83. A muchhigher rate of operation kwithout vibration yca'n'be Y b't'ainedfthan is possible from the use of cams, and-ille speedingup of the Yrecoveryor idle -downwardrstr'okeot the elevator rodsavesconsiderable time not possible toV save with ordinarycranks.

To V'supply a paper wrapper for a .package63 which'has 'been conveyed to Jlthe elevator platform j'S-l-byY the A intA-ake Y conveyor system 21 and which is in process jof being Y 'tiorprovid- Y Y raised by the .elevator` system 23 to the level of the outlet conveyorsystem 22,.a ,1'eel-101 is placed on a shaftV 102 rotatably held in -brackets 103 at one side of the wrapping machine (sec Figures 4, 5, and 6). The paper sheet 104 is led from the reel downwardly around a roller 105 and then upwardly to its point of introduction into the machine. The roller 105 is mounted between like arms 106 of a pair of crank levers 107 mounted on trunnions 108 journalle'cl in the brackets 103. When the paper sheet 104 is pulled upwardly, as indicated in Figure 5, the levers 107 are rotated about the trunnions 108 and a brake shoe 109 mounted on one of the levers 107 is swung out of contact with a brake drum 110 mounted on the shaft 102, to permit rotation of the shaft and of the reel 101. When the paper sheet ceases to move toward the machine, the reel 101 will unroll enough aditional paper to permit the lever arms 106 and the roller 105 to fall by gravity, thereby bringing the brake shoe 109 again in Contact with the brake drum 110 and so preventing backlash of the reel 101.

The paper sheet 104 is pulled from the reel 101 into the machine -by the action of cooperating pressure rollers 113 and 114 which are driven from the shaft 55. The shaft 55 carries at one end a meter gear 115 which meshes with a meter gear 116 carried on a shaft 117 suitably journalled on the frame 28 below the reel 101. The shaft 117 has a sprocket 118 secured thereto, from which a chain 119 drives a sprocket 120 mounted on the shaft 121 of the lower roller 113. The shaft 121 is journalled in plates 122 secured to the frame 28 and carries a gear 123 which meshes with a gear 124 carried by the shaft 125 of the upper roller 114. The shaft 125 is also journalled in the plates 122, but in vertically slidable journal boxes 126 which may move upward to so raise the shaft 125 to permit Separation of the rollers 113 and 114, but only to an extent maintaining the gears 123 and 124 in mesh. Springs 127 urge the journalV boxes 126 downwardly to compress the sheet 104 between the upper roller 114 and the lower roller 113.

When the rollers are closed upon a sheet of paper 104 led between them and are rotated by the above-described gears and chain, the paper will be pulled from the reel 101 and fed into the machine. A scraper plate 131 is mounted between the plates 122 for lifting the sheet 104 from the lower roller 113 and directing the sheet between a pair of knife blades 132 and 133. The upper knife blade 132 is held secured to a bar 134 in turn secured to the frame 28; the lower knife blade 133 is mounted on a bar 135 arcuately movable on pivot arms 136 journalled at 137 in the plates 122. To permit the lower blade 133 to slide 4upon the bevel of the upper blade 132, the blade 133 is yieldably secured to the bar 135 by studs 138 and springs 139.

The bar 135 is connected to a lever 141 by a pivot link 142 and a turnbuckle 143 which permits adjustment of the amountof overlapping bite of the knife blades 132 and 133. The lever 141 is fulcrumed as at 144 on a bracket 145 secured to the frame 28 and is urged by a spring 146 acting against an arm 147 of the bracket to raise the lower knife blade 133 to its raised position. However, the spring 146 is, for the greater part of a cycle of operation of the machine, held compressed by the action of a cam 148, so that the knife blades are separated during this greater part of the cycle to permit the sheet 104 to pass freely between them. The cam 148 is mounted on the shaft 117, which it will be recalled is in the mechanical actuating sequence of positively acting gears vand chains driving the rollers 113 and 114, and therefore the cam acts in positively coordinated synchronization with the aforesaid paper feed rollers. A cam follower 149 on the lever 141 rides the high portion of the cam 148 for the greater part of the cam cycle, dipping into the cam valley 150 to permit the spring 146 to raise the knife blade 133 to cut the paper.

.Reverting for the moment to Figure 16, illustrative of the main drivinsmehanism of the machine, it mavnow be explained that by a cycle of operation of the machine is meant the cycle in which n package 63 is received o n the elevator platform 84, raised to the level of the wrapping system 25V, wrapped in a piece of paper cut from the sheet 104, and pushed onward as hereinaftery eX- plained towards the outlet conveyer system 22. During this cycle of operation, the main shaft 47 revolves once, completing an up-and-down cycle of the elevator rod 83 by means of the crank arm 93. The gears 56 and 57 are of equal size, so that the secondary shaft 55 also revolves once in the cycle, and as the miter gears and 116 are also ofequal size, the cam 148 revolves once in the cycle and causes the knife blades 132 and 133 to per-i form one cutting operation upon the sheet of paper- It is, of course, necessary to vary the length of the cut piece of wrapping paper according to the size of the package to be wrapped. It is also desirable to prevent the feeding and cutting of wrapping paper if no package 1s present to be wrapped. The Ycontrols for regulating the length 0f paper fed and cut. at each cycle of 'operation and for preventing the feeding of any paper when'no package is present, will now be described, reference again being made to Figures 4 and 6, and to Figure 2. Y i

Levers 153 are pivoted, as at 154, on the journal platesl 122, and have their one ends in contactvwith the lower faces of the movable journal boxes 126, so as to be able to raise the upper roller 114. Saddles 155 in the other ends of the levers support a rod 156 Vto which is secured, by suitable connections 1757., a snubber barl 158 having a rubber friction` face 159. When the levers are pivoted to raise the upper roller 114 from the lower roller 113,'and thereby to release the sheet of paper 104 from tension, the snubber bar 158 is, by the same motion, pressed down upon the sheet of paper to hold it in place, both to prevent it from being carried into the machine by the continuing rotation of the lower roller and to prevent it fromv falling out of the machine by its own weight. :y Y i To actuate the levers 153, a crank arm 161 is secured to an end of a shaft 162 journalled in the journal plates 1,22, and is connected by a link 163 to the plunger ofthe solenoid 78. Short crank arms 164 are also secured adja? cent the ends of the shaft 162 and are connected by links 1,65 to the ends of the rod 156. The solenoid, in its mag.-V

. netized condition, operates to pull on the crank 161 and thereby to lift the upper roller 114 andV to press the Vsnub-l ber bar 158 downwardly, to hold the sheet of paper 104 stationary. Y

To permit feeding the forward edge of a sheet of paper to the rollers 113 and 114Y when the machine is not running, a manually operated auxiliary to thesolenoid 78 is provided. A hand lever 167 is securedl to a rod 168 journalled in the journal plates 122. The rod 168 carries cams 169, normally inactive, but which may be turned by the hand lever 167 to bear downwardly on the long ends of the levers 153 and upwardly on the short crank arms 164. So turning the cams 1.69 raisesthe'movable journal boxes 126 to separate the roller 114 from the roller 113 and also lifts the rod 156 partly out of the saddles'155 an-d so raises the snubber bar 158.

The solenoid 78 is activated by parallel electriccircuits, both of which must be broken in order to demagnetize the solenoid and permit the paper 104 to be released for entry to the knives 132 and 133. One of these circuits, already described in connection with the intake conveyor system 21, is controlled by the micro-switch 76, which is normally closed to magnetize the solenoid. Passage of a package 63 in contact with the contact arm 74 opens the micro-switch 76 for the length of time that it takes the package to move past the contact arm. If no package is present at the position of the contact arm in the intake conveyor system 21-and therefore in position to be immediately delivered to the elevator system 23 in the forthcoming cycle of operation-the solenoid 78 will con- Y hitting teS'peetivly,

s etizin he peset wil'lhe fed inte the "A 'lille 'ndfcirciit activating the solenoid 78 is coli-V tlrlld by micro-,switch 1 71responsive to movement of a` lfolldvilt'r 172l rolling in contact with a cam 173 mou 'dieron tliejlaft '117, VPassage of thecamufollower 17 overftlerhigh shoulder ofthe cam 173 opens the Y hiiete-switeh'i'lll. cath 173 isrpsvided with an ediiisthre lebe 174, hy `vvhieh the high shouidetef the eem elitendd from a'riied minimum to a suitable l "um,

. paper will be pulled by :the'roll'ers `1'13.and 114 into the machine Vand be veen the knives Y132 'ndr133, thereto bmcutot the nexta'sce llon ofthe lower knife 133. 'ffl'lej'setting` 0f` ihe cani 14S, actuating the knife 133 is, of course, suchfthat the actuationvof the knife occurs jn'st'dafter the paper has been fed between the knives Vand Yhas Vbeen stopped by the re-magnetization of the solenoid 78 'and the consegui/nt clamping of the snubber bar 158 upon :the paper. Y The actuation'of'the knifealso occurs asfthe elevator platform 8 4 begins 'to ascend, so that a cut sheet o'f paper is onhndto envelop a package ascendingfon Y'heelevatodr-. ,The cut sheet, or wrapper 177 6, Vrests uponV barsr177 (Figure 7 )Y disposedtransversely ofv the rchi'rie the forward and rearward sides of Vthe p'th rofthe ascending package, substantiallyltunder the center of the wrapper and lifts Vthewrapperfrom the bar'sr177 asit-ascends. s

s e Vlivrappi'ng'systerirZ now to be described, may be Saitlte Begin with a series' et plates 'island V132 de; the forward and rearward wallsY of VWh'ch theelevator Vpl'atfo'rri'l 84 moves, and

the well in .secured tothe frameZiS so as to be movable optionally to-,closer ormone widely separated relationship.

The plates ld l1.82 are slightly inclined towards one another in' ascending ord r so as'to narrow the elevator well at itsupper end'tosubstantially the length of the packa`ge763, and have the function of engaging the for- Ward-'and rearward'margins of the wrapper 176 as the package ascends between them and of draping these: margnsldownwardly the forward and rearward YsidesV of the' package,` as shown` lnjFigure 7. TheV rearward Y drapingp1a tes 1 82 'entend upwardly to just belowthe up-V perY of travel of heelevator platform V84,..V For an upper plate in the series'Y of forwaidrd'raping plates 181', an oscillatingroller V183,V hereinafter more fully described, issllbSiitllteS To fold the rearwardmargin of the wrapper"`176 n'de'r the packageV 63, `a reciprocating plate4 135is; provided, which slides 'pil jtli'esframe 28 and has a plurality of ridges 1'8"6, w1iicl i may be wire r'o'ds, bn its upper surface t' reduce the are'a in frictio'rlal contact with the wrapper. llTh'e plate l185,fcalled the rear folder plate, is

et the erteilt `ssi Eighties 3.13. ein av 'thehhuekie .the

on Ithe' secondary drive shaft l55 (see '14). The 'crank 58 has secured te it 188 whichV through a crank arm 189 mises' ieseillatioh ef arshaft 1'90 .jeurjhalled in brackets 'the frame 28. The 'cori-V 1191 iupstalnding above and from ne'ctioniof'the tunrbuckle rod 188 to the crank 58, as Well fas the `length -of Ythe god, vis vadjustable to vary the throw ofthe erank 189 of ftheshaft 19,0. Crank arms 1,92 secured to the shaft 190 are pivotally connected to turnbuckle pushrods 193,

so .that the package is pn 'ed and pulled reciprocatingly 'in response Vto rotation Y andthe angle of oscillation actually demagneti'zes the hihihi Seetir'ed hivhtall-y "to ihrs 194 tithe feit' tenet plate 185.1 Adjustment of' thejmeelianel linkageoe# limits of motion of the plate 185 without altering the vdis-'- tahee between thein. Y

The above-described operating mechanism `for the rear .Y Y Y folder plate 185 is timed to cause the plate to `inovejunder the rearward lower edge of theY package 63, vvl'lichV over# hangs the edge of 'the elevator vp'latfo'rt'li `:54.jt1st VVas'tlie elevator vstarts dovvrnvard.V The' forwardrlow'er edge of the package is't this i nt supported by the oscillating tenerlas which isY mem the package rests upon it along aline about'forty' live degrees from the .highest point ofthe roller.` The par';k`a geV therefore does not cause the roller to rotate, but-the roller both supports the packagefarld resists thereof, sueh as might otherwise `result lfrom the forward pushing movement wrapper 176 under' the package. Figurev 9 Vis illustrative of the relative position of the parts :in instant later in the `cycle vwhen the elevator Ypflatforri 84 has descended `a Y little further and the plate 1 85 has Vmoved into theV space vacated ybythe elevator platform, and clearly shows how the packageris momentarily slipported by the vplate and by the roller 183.

To feld the' forward margih ofthe wrapper V176 einer 1 the k'package 63Y and at the same timeV to' canse the por- 'tions ofthe wrapper extending at the forward andrarward sides of the package beyond 'the 'ends thereof to'be tucked across the ends, the package is pushedrfrorrl the plate 185 over the oscillating rollerals to a platform.

196 disposed beyond the roller 183 and `at,snbstantiallyl the samel level as the .ppe'r 4su'rfa'ceof therplate 185` `andjof the supporting surface of ther'elevatorplatfrom 8 4 when the latter is Vat the Vsummit of Y the plate 18.5to causethe package to slideeasily thereon;

The package 63 is pushed onto the Yplatfornl 19'6byV aVv Y oscillatingV Yroller 183 is swung pushV bar '201,V and the A s n Y s from the path ofthe package of a: rod .202,'botli arranged to act in synchronization in a mechanical sequence driven by the main shaft s j i i V vtheforward end of Va slide'bar 203' whichis slidably held by VguideV 'rails '204x511 the 'plate 18S?Y The slide bar 21713 4is reciprocatinglylmoved by Y s which connects Vit to acr'ankona shaft "217WlieldY rotatably in the brackets l191; The oscillating roller 183 is mounted in crank 209 suitably journalled in the frame 28 to brin'gthe roller into 'extension Y plates 181. One of the cranksarms (Figures 9 and 1 0) extends rupwardly beyond the roller 183 and 'ispivot ally connected toga block 210 lslidably mounted 'o'n` the r'od 20,2. v The `red 202 is` eonneete at its other end toY a crank 211 on the shaft 207, so thatrotati'on o'f the shaft 207 simultaneously actuates the roller 183 and the push bar 261 to move in the same general direction. Springs 212 and 213 acting on yoppc'l'site sides of the 'sliding .block 211) and respectively against 'the resistance of a rod head that, while the roller 'may be arcuately -rioved about the 2'9rby the rod 292, it nevertheless is urged to resist t such arcuatemovement and to l'maintain pressure upon! the package V63, althoughat times-from -a 'different angle 216,.'Which engage stops 217. Further movement 'of "the rod 202 is, however, permitted 'by the spring The shaft 257 is connected ft'o main .shaft '47.s'by rectilinear Vlinkage'ino'vel'rl'ent "to thaf'heretoore ent'rily in'- such a positionlthat Y forward movement 'Y Y 'of the plate its hstheplate folds "theV Y y 'its pahhe platform m6 my also be provided 'with Wife' rod ridges 197,111@` 47. s The' push 201 is mounted on la connectingl rofd 20S arms 20B secured to a Vshaft Y of the plan'eof the 'forwards draping described in connection with the elevator system 23. A bell crank lever 221 has its fulcrum shaft 222 journalled in brackets 223 on the frame E8, and has a guide slot 224 in one of its arms in which a block 225 is slidably held for rectilinear movement relative to that arm. The block 225 is pivotally mounted on a pin 226 on the crank 54 which, it will be recalled, is mounted on and rotates with the main shaft 47. The other arm of the bell crank lever 221 is connected by a turnbuckle rod 227 to a crank 228 on the shaft 207. The rod 227 is adjustably connected to the crank 228 by means of a tting 229 adjustably secured in a slot 230, so as to vary the effective length of the crank 228 and so to vary the angle of oscillation of the shaft 207 and the resultant movement of the push bar 201 in accordance with the size of the package 63 which is to be moved. The turnbuckle rod is, of course, adjustable in length to provide suitable angularity between the bell crank lever 221 and the crank 228.

It will be observed that the speed of reciprocation of the turnbuckle rod 188 will follow the ordinary sine curve of crank action, because of the xed, although adjustable, pivot between the rod 188 and the crank 58. The speed of reciprocation of the folder plate 185 does not, however, necessarily follow the same curve, the actual curve being a matter of the angular relationships of the cranks 189 and 192 to one another and to the tangential path of the rod 188. The combination of these angular relationships, as shown in Figures 13 and 14, with the action of the crank 58, is designed and set to produce reciprocation of the folder plate 185 in which the plate makes a relatively fast reversal of direction at the rearward end of its stroke, slows as it reaches the forward end of its stroke and there makes a relatively slow reversal of direction, and then gathers speed as it moves rearwardly again. The total time periods of the advancing and retractive strokes of the plate 185 are, however, equal. This action is desirable in that it causes the plate 185 to fold the draped wrapper 176 under the package 63 with a gentle force and to support the package for a longer interval, while also saving time at the other end of its traverse. The rectilinear movement provided by the block 225 sliding in the slot 224 results, on the other hand, in a speed of oscillation of the shaft 207 differing materially rom the sine curve of the usual crank action. During the major portion of the cycle of the crank 54, the bell crank lever 221, the turnbuckle rod 227 and the crank 228 move in a direction to turn the shaft 207 in a direction advancing the pusher bar 201, providing a relatively short interval of time for the retraction of the pusher bar. As with ordinary crank action, the pusher bar moves most slowly at the ends of its strokes and most rapidly at the mid points of the strokes, but it moves with particular gentleness as it pushes the package 63 towards the platform 196 and, as will be seen, causes further folding and tucking of the wrapper 176 around the package.

The timing of the folder plate 185 relatively to the elevator 83 has already been described. The timing of the pusher bar 201 and of the oscillating roller 183 relatively to the folder plate 185 is such that the folder plate reaches its farthest point of advance, in which it has folded the wrapper 176 under the rearward portion of the package and is partly supporting the package, as or just after the pusher bar comes into contact with the package (Figure 9). As the pusher bar starts to push the package onto the platform 196, the folder plate 185 gently reverses its direction of movement and starts its retractive stroke (Figure l). The rod 202, connected to the roller 133, advances simultaneously with the rod 205 which is moving the pusher bar 201, but'due to different angular disposition of the cranks 211 and 206 on the shaft 207, the rod 202 does not attain its maximum speed or sufficient distance of travel to compress the spring 213 and rotate the crank arms 208 until the pusher bar starts 10 to press against the package. At that moment, any com? pression on the spring 212 is released, the shoulders 216 on the crank arms 2'08VareY free to'disengage from Vthe stops 217, and the rod 202moves the roller 183 arcuately sullciently to allow the forward edge of the package to pass over the roller. v

To prevent the package from bouncing or jolting out of contact with the roller 183, overhead` guide bars 234 may be provided, suitablyv secured to convenient frame members. f v

The pusher bar 201` carries adjacent to each of its ends a wire loop 236. Each of the loops 236 extends forwardly from the pusher bar, and then outwardly and downwardly and then inwardly and downwardly and then rearwardly again to thepusher bar, to form a laterally4 pointing V projected forwardly of the pusher bar. Frame members 237 at the sides of the'platform196 support lateral folding guides 238, best illustrated in Figure 7. The folding guides 238 are spaced from the frame members 237 by spacers 239 on bolts 240, which may 'be changed in length to Vvary thesetting of the folding guides for packages of various sizes.v Each of the folding guides 238 has an upper arm 241 which extends across the well of the elevator 83 and serves'in conjunction with the overhead guide bars 234 to hold the package in its proper course and to hold the wrapper 176 on the top of the package. A central segment 242 of each folding guide cooperates with-the respective upper arm` 241 to define a gradually downward sloping channel 243 between them. A lower segment 244 of each folding guide cooperates with the respective central segment to define a gradually upward sloping channel 245 joining the channel 243 at the forward end of the central segment, and then defines a continuation 246.0f the channel 243 in conjunction with the upper arm 241.V The rearward end of each central segment 242 is formed `as an outwardly curved, horizontally pointed V 247, adapted and aligned to pass through the notch of the laterally pointed V of the wire loop 236 on the same side of the machine.

When the pusher bar 201 approaches the package 63, the wire loops 236 extending ahead of the pusher bar push against the portions 250 of the wrapper draped at the rearward side of the package and extending beyond the ends thereof. As the folder plate has already folded the lower portion 251 of this part of the wrapper under the parcel and is holding it there, there is tension on the wrapper to hold it in place while the wire loops tuck the lateral extensions 250 around the ends of the package, as is indicated lbythe position of the wire loop shown in dotted lines in Figures 9 and 10 and as more clearly shown, but at later stages in Figures l1 and l2. When, an instant later, the pusher bar 201 actually makes contact with the package and pushes it over the now-nclined roller 183, the roller places the forward draped portion 252 of the wrapper under tension and folds the lower portion 253 thereof under the package, as shown in Figure 10.

Further movement of the package brings the lateral extensions 254 of the forward side of the wrapper intoz contact with the V-points 247 of the folding guides 238, causing the extensions 253 to be tucked rearwardly across. the ends of the package, the V-points 247 passing through, the V-notches of the wire loops 236. This .-tucking action leaves the wrapper 176 foldedV and tucked around the package except for upper. and lower end aps 255 and 256 at each end of the package.

The package 63 will now lbe supported vby the platform 196 and will be advancedto a position where it may no longer be propelled by the pusher bar 201 which will return to its retracted position. Further advancement of the package will be accomplished by its being propelled by subsequent packages and, of course, as at the close of a run of packages, by` manual propulsion. After resting momentarily on the platform `196, the package will advance to the heating system 26. During this movement,

'Y as to temperature Vheated by conyenti'onal electric heating coils', 'the 'conduits for which are' indicated at 262Fgure 7,.and controlled 'by' therr'nostati'ejmeans (not shown). They mayY also have.'sl'ida'blel or swinging Vmountings' caencadre operationwill suffice toV aord a general understanding of the over-all'methodof operation. f Y Y If the cycle be deemed as .beginning 'at'rthe instant 'that a' package 63 travelling on' the intake conveyor belt makes V contactwith the arm 74, the parts 'ofthe machine will b'e' approkirnately in the positions shown in Figuresrl to 3. That is to say, the elevator S3 will beat or near the bottom of its stroke; the' solenoidr7 will b'e active to keep the roller 114 'spread from the roller 123 and the snubber' pabl'e of moving thepals' towardsone another to Ypress against the Aends of the package, but such' rnoun'tingsV form no partY of' 'this inyer'itionf andV are' vshown herein only di'agrammatically at`263'. is to warm wax or other viscous coatings on he aps 255 Y and 256 to a condition' of ,stickin'ess The coolingA system' 2T acts' in conjunction with the outlet conveyor system 22which` begins' adjacent to the platform 260. vA conveyor belt 265 extends between a rollerk 267' mounted in bearin'g's' E268 on'the trarne 28, and

The' function of the panels 261 bar l58 pressed against the sheet of paper; follower 145? will be riding the high shoulder of the'jcaai 148 to keep the knives 132 and 133 open.' The'foldr beretreating from its advanced position; the pusher bar' 201 will be nearing the end of its adv fc4 ing stroke; and the roller 183 will be swung to'a position plate E85 will permitting a package to pass over it.

Upon contact of the package-witl11thearm 74,'orle' circuit to the solenoid is broken. immediately' thereafter 1 the other circuit is broken by the caml73 and then'V closed a roller 269 mounted in bearings '270'on brackets'Z'IllV supported in 'extension' of f hei frame 28' by support rods' Y 272.` The shaft 273'Y ofthe roller 26.7 has' mounted on it the sprocket 5I by the chain 431 which is Vdrivenfrom the'main shaft 47 At the sides of the conveyor belt 266,

andlsecu'red" to the frame ZSiso as to Contact' the sides of a package transported by the' conveyor belt, are parallel' banks of' coolingbars'2`74gl shown in side elevation in Figures 2 and 31and in vertical section' in Figure 18. Each of the cooling bars 274' is of substantial length, so that it may maintain 'contact'with ,each successive package for l an interval of time Vextending,'over several-cycles of operation of the machine, as may be judged by comparison ofthe sizes of' the roller ,267"and the 'sprocket 57 in f' Figure l', the sprocketS'being sorelated tothe. sprocket j49 on the main shaft47 Vas V'to"revolve approximately one revolution in each cycle f operation;V The coclingibars 27.4have the form of'a'ngle irons andfhave'znarrow anges' 275 inthe vertical plane', in Contact.' with the wrapper 176' Y att-.hel ends Yof the' package, and relativelyrwide flanges Y' 276 inthe horizontal plane.` Atwidfely' spaced' intervals the cooling bars 2774"are supported on'po'st's 277,.'oeing' held apart thereon,` byspacers 27$. The' posts 277 are upheld' by braeketarms 279secured to' the' frame 28"'by bolts 28e. Y Y Y Itl will be seen'vthatthe` coolingbars 27'4 haveflittl'e metallic contact with the` framev 28", and'that the heat Yabsorbed by the narrowianges' 275 from contact with the heated Vend aps 255- and 256 must be' dispersed largely by radiation-and 4cc'invecvtion tov the" atmosphere Y rather than by conduction throughV metal.V Yprevention of conduction of heat, the` bars 274 are preferably made of stainless steelwhichhas low conductivity In' further as compared with metals usually utilized inV heat-dispersing systems." The stainless steel'ibars 274 have also Ythe qualities of ornamental appearance, resembling ornamental grills, vand of beingY easily maintained in sanitary condition, but the principal objectv and advantage of their use is to cause the heat to disperse, to the atmosphere in close Yproximity tov thespoitlat which itis absorbed and so to obtain a. considerable temperature drop along. the bars 274. in thedirection;inwhichthepackages'S move.

YBetter. cooling. and sealing of the wrappers 176 is thus.

secured.y Y -v Y As theindividualroperatonand,Av thev cooperative functions ofv the enumerated partsof thewrapping machine- Y. have been. explained' detaili ini thev foregoing descrip- Y Y tion, itL is believed; that; a brie review 'of asinglel cycle of- Yment, following thefolder lplate 135.

again, and the rollers 113 and' llrfeed through the' knives 1732 and 33` a length ofpa'per proportionate to the length of time the second circuit is broken. The cam 43' then causes'the knife 133' to rise and cut the paper wrapper 176, which is supported by the bars 17710 extend acr'pss' the elevator well.

lnl Vthe meantime, the elevator S3 willl have started upward, and theVpus-her barZlll will have 'njishe'd delivering a previous package (if any) tothe f platform 196 and'will have started its retractive move-` The' roller'lSS will resume its upward position. Y

The package 63'no'wis moved' by the intake' conveyor chains" 61 out of Contact with the arm 74, re-est'ablishi'ng' the rst circuit'to'the solenoid '78 for the duration of the cycle, and the' package is delivered to the elevator well' "to rest upon-the supportnger'QS aboveV the Vasc'enling-g" elevator 83 a'nd'belowthe cut wrapper 76. The elevatory now picks up th'e package and carries it to the top ofthe" elevator well-that is, toV substantially the level of the' v platform 19d-causing'the package in turnfto pick uprthe wrapper'176, and the' forward andrearward portions of the wrapper to be' draped on the forward` and rearward sides of the package' by the vdrapingplates 181' and' 182'.

` Both the'pu'sher bar2lll` and thefolder plate 55 will have completed Vtheir refractive strokes and will he advancing,

with the .folder plate in' advance of the' pusher bar.

'As the folder plate' 185"reaches the "rearward bottom edge of the package, the'elevat'o'r S3 starts downward Yleaving thejpackage supported by the folder plate and by the' roller 18T'. Theifolde'rfplate noa/"folds the rearward y lower portion 251' of the' wrapper' under the package.

While the' folder'plate momentarily provides full'support' forthep'ackage, the pusher` b'ar' 201 advances so that the' wire4 loops 2,36` tuck in the outstanding end portions' 25) of the wrapper. The pusher 'b'ar'fitselfthen pushes the package overV the rollerf'lSSj: while the folder plate 1&5"

beginsl to withdraw rearwardly. The roller 183 will be swung' byv the rod 202vsui'ciently'out of the way of the' package' tolet the packageV pass to the platform19'6, but

will maintain tension" on thefo'rward draped portion' 252 of they wrapper to fold the lower portions 253 tn'ereo- Y. under the'pa'ckage'.

One cycle ofoperation of Vth'egrnachine will' nowV have been completed', but there will remain the work of comr' pletingV the Wrapping of; 'die package and of sealing the wrapper, tobe accomplished during subsequent cycles.

Ati the startof the next cycle, the still-advancing push bar 201 causes'the-Vends- 2470i Vthe lateral folding guidesV 2381 to tuckthe'y laterally extending portions 254 of theV wrapper' across the ends'of the package. At the endj of the;v same` cycle, the1 package is pushedv by the following packagev VVtol the rforward endl of theV platform 195, with' V` the endrflaps 255- anaf 256 being-folded by the guide channels 243, 245, andY 246.Y VIn the next cycle, theV packageis pushed bythe toll"owing'package to therheater platform260,1wl1ere the flaps-2'55Qand256are pr/'e'zpared` and the Can for sealing. The following cycle causes the package to be pushed onto the outlet conveyor belt 266 which conveys it past the cooling bars 274 to the discharge end of the machine.

It will be understood that the above-described timing of a cycle of operation is exemplary and not absolute. Adjustment of the lengths of the various turnbuckle rods and of the effective radius of the crank connections to the rods, and also adjustment of the various cams and contact arms, makes possible the accommodation of various sizes of package and the cutting and wrapping of various sizes of Wrapper, which will require variations in the relative timing of the systems of parts and of the individual parts of a system, while still conforming to the general pattern as described.

While an individual package requires several cycles of operation to be received, wrapped, and delivered, it will be seen that, once in full operation, the machine will deliver a wrapped package at each cycle. Due in part to the synchronization of its function-al movements, in part to the simplicity of its wrapping system and paper feed system, and in part to the time saving eifected by utilization of rectilinear crank movement to give unbalanced cycles of reciprocation, the machine is capable of operating at seventy five or more cycles of operation per minute. This speed, moreover, is accomplished without jolting, jarring, or twisting the packages. An accurately measured wrapper is wrapped with neatness and tension about each package, and is sealed thereon in an interval of but a few seconds after being wrapped.

We claim:

1. Wrapping web supplying means for a wrapping machine having means to advance articles to be Wrapped to a wrapping station and drive means to actuate said advancing means, said web-supplying means comprising means to support Ia continuous Web of Wrapping material, means to feed said 4web -from said supporting means to said wrapping station, an electro-magnetic solenoid operatively connected to said feeding means to maintain said feeding means inoperative when said solenoid is energized, two parallel energizing circuits each operatively connected in series -with said solenoid, a normallyclosed switch included in each of said circuits, means operably associated with one of said switches and lying in the path of said articles being moved by said advancing means and actuated ,by said articles to open the associated switch and its circuit only when an article is approaching said Wrapping means, and means mechanically connected to said drive means to operate synchronously with said article-advancing means to open the other of said switches and its circuit.

2. Wrapping web supply means for a wrapping machine having means to advance articles to be wrapped to a wrapping station and drive means to actuate said advancing means, said web-supplying means comprising means to support a continuous web of wrapping material, means to feed said web `from said supporting means to said wrapping station, 1an electro-magnetic solenoid operatively connected to said feeding means to maintain said feeding means inoperative when said solenoid is energized, two parallel energizing circuits each operatively connected in series with said solenoid, a normallyclosed switch included in each of said circuits, means operably associated with one of said switches, and lying in the path of said articles -being moved by said advancing means and actuated =by said articles to open the associated switch and its circuit only when an article is approaching said wrapping means, and means mechanically connected to said drive means to operate synchronously with said article-advancing means to open the other of said switches and its circuit for a period of time of predetermined duration shorter than and in- 14 eluded within the period of time that a single one of said articles is in engagement ywith said first-mentioned switchopening means.

3. Wrapping web supplying means for a wrapping machine having means to advance articles to be wrapped to a wrapping station and drive means to actuate said advancing means, said Web-supplying means comprising means to support a continuons web of wrapping material, means to feed said web from said supporting means to said wrapping station, an electro-magnetic solenoid operatively connected to said feeding meansto maintain said feeding means inoperative when said solenoid is energized, two parallel energizing circuits each operatively connected in series with said solenoid, a normally-closed switch included in each of said circuits, means operably associated with one of said switches and lying in the path of said articles being moved by said advancing means and actuated by said articles to open the associated switch and its circuit only when an article is approaching said wrapping means, means mechanica-ily connected to said drive means to operate synchronously with said article-advancing means to open the other of said switches, and adjustable means associated with said second-mentioned switch-opening means to vary the `operative extent and the duration of the period of operation of said second-mentioned `switclr-opening means.

4. Wrapping web supply means for la Wrapping machine having means to advance articles yto be Wrapped to a Wrapping station and drive means to actuate said advancing means, said web-supplying means comprising means to support a continuous web of wrapping material, means to feed said web from said supporting means to said wrapping station, an electro-magnetic solenoid operatively connected to said feeding means to maintain said feeding means inoperative when said solenoid is energized, two parallel energizing circuits each operatively connected in series with said solenoid, a normally-closed switch included in each of said circuits, means operably associated with one of said switches and lying in the path of said `articles being moved by said advancing means and actuated by said articles to open the associated switch and its circui-t only when an article is approaching said Wrapping means, means mechanically connected to said drive means to -operate synchronously With said article-advancing meansto open the other of said switches for a period of time of predetermined duration shorter than and included within the period of time that a single one of said articles is in engagement with `said rstmentioned switch-opening means, vand adjustable means comprising part of said second-mentioned switch-opening means to -vary the operative extent and the duration of the period of operation of said second-mentioned switch-opening means.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 734,215 Bilgram July 21, 1903 1,066,193 Ferguson Iuly 1, 1913 1,085,260 Holden et al. lan. 27, 1914 1,158,186 Dearborne Oct. 26, 1915 1,254,895 Ferguson Jan. 29, 1918 1,599,993 Dupray sept. 14, 1926 1,603,879 Smith et al. Oct. 19, 1926 1,664,048 Schmitt Mar. 27, 1928 1,829,515 Hegg Oct. 27, 1931 1,892,275 Jensen Dec. 27, 1932 1,924,964 Smith Aug. 29, 1933 2,110,815 Parsons Mar. 8, 1938 2,127,028 Hayssen Apr. 16, 1938 2,146,997 Smith et al. Feb. 14, 1939 2,273,961 Hoppe Feb. 24, 1942

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US3092019A (en) * 1956-11-23 1963-06-04 Buskirk & Co Inc Van Article marking
DE1174247B (en) * 1960-01-13 1964-07-16 Gen Foods Corp Method and machine for producing a wrapped package of compressible packet
US3143947A (en) * 1960-11-18 1964-08-11 Lumoprint Zindler Kg Accessory apparatus for copying devices and a copying device therefor
US3343334A (en) * 1963-02-28 1967-09-26 Journal Company Method and apparatus fof bundling stacked material
US4813211A (en) * 1987-09-15 1989-03-21 Hobart Corporation Package wrapping method and machine
WO1997024262A2 (en) * 1995-12-28 1997-07-10 Wrap-It-Up, Inc. Automatic package wrapping machine
US5655356A (en) * 1995-12-28 1997-08-12 Wrap-It-Up, Inc. Automatic package wrapping machine
US5657608A (en) * 1994-10-20 1997-08-19 Innocomp Automaatio Oy Method and an apparatus for wrapping of an article
US5671593A (en) * 1995-12-28 1997-09-30 Wrap-It-Up, Inc. Semiautomatic package wrapping machine

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US3092019A (en) * 1956-11-23 1963-06-04 Buskirk & Co Inc Van Article marking
DE1146801B (en) * 1958-08-29 1963-04-04 Package Machinery Co Method and device for producing a sealed Einwickelpackung
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