US2746046A - Heel attaching machines - Google Patents

Heel attaching machines Download PDF

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US2746046A
US2746046A US513436A US51343655A US2746046A US 2746046 A US2746046 A US 2746046A US 513436 A US513436 A US 513436A US 51343655 A US51343655 A US 51343655A US 2746046 A US2746046 A US 2746046A
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Prior art keywords
heel
shoe
pressure
line
jack
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US513436A
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Ferman N Lee
William F Mackenzie
Arcey Alfred C D
Alfred G Cicchetti
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D79/00Combined heel-pressing and nailing machines

Description

May 22, 1956 F. N. LEE ET AL 2,746,046
HEEL ATTACHING MACHINES Filed June 6, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 316 3 5 209 3 183020326 lm/enfors Erma/7 /1. [ee
y 1956 F. N. LEE ET AL ,046
HEEL ATTACHING MACHINES Filed June 6, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 In uen fora Fer/nan /l( lee VVz'l/iom F/l lacfienzl'e Alfred C DArCey Alfred G. C/(C/Ielli May 22, 1956 F. N. LEE ET AL 2,746,046
HEEL ATTACHING MACHINES Filed June 6, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 [17 van fors Fer/nan N Z ee \X/z/Imm FMacAenz/ Alfred C Dllrcey Alfred G. C/bCAef/f y 2, 1956 F. N. LEE ET AL 2,746,046
HEEL ATTACHING MACHINES Filed June 6, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 1 29. 6 l/fi i -A l T lnl/enfors Fer/nan IV lee VVzY/zam F Mackenzie A/freo C D lrcey A/frco G Czcc/zezli y 1956 F. N. LEE ET AL 2,746,046
HEEL. ATTACHING MACHINES Filed June 6, 1955 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 [m/en fors Fer/nan A! lee VVf/X/am F Mackenzie A/freo C Di l/Cay United States Patent HEEL ATTACHING MACHINES- Ferman N. Lee, Danvers, William F. MacKenzie; Hamilton, Alfred C. DArcey, Danvers, and Alfred G. Cicchetti, Beverly, Mass., assignors to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Flemington, N. J., a corporation of New Jersey Application June 6, 1955, Serial No. 513,436 49 Claims. (Cl. 1-141) This invention relates to machines for attaching leather and rubber heels to shoes mounted on lasts, it being'an object of the invention to provide an improved machine in which the heel seat of the shoe and the heel are automatically clamped together during the driving of nails into the heel and heel seat by a force which is a constant amount greater than and acts in a direction opposed to the force required to drive the nails into the work.
With the above object in view, and in accordance with various novel features of the present invention, applicants have provided, in a heel attaching machine, a movable jack for receiving a shoe mounted on a last, a fixed sup port, for example, a nailing die for receiving a heel, a first actuator operatively connected to the jack, fluid pressure means for applying a sustained force against the first actuator for causing the heel seat of the shoe to be clamped with primary pressure against the heel supported by the nailing die, nail drivers, a second actuator operatively connected to the nail drivers, fluid pressure means for moving the second actuator with a force slightly greater than that required to drive in one direction nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and to clench them against a heel plate of the last, and fluid pressure means responsive to said second-named fluid pressure means for applying against the first actuator an augmented force which is substantially equal to the force applied against said second actuator whereby to apply to the jack in a direction opposite to said one direction an additional force which is substantially equal to the force required to drive the nails into the work. As will be hereinafter explained, the sustained force'which is-exerted against the work and squeezes the work in the-machine during the attachment of the heel to the shoe is equal to a constant holddown force, for example, a thousand pounds plus the variable effort required to drive the nails into the work, said sustained force acting in a direction opposed to said driving effort.
The present invention consists in the aboveandother novel improvements hereinafter described and directed in part to the spanking of top lifts onto the leather heels, reference being had to the accompanying drawings which disclose one embodiment of the invention selected for purposes of illustration, the invention being fully disclosed in the following description and claims.
In the drawings,
Fig. l is a view showing the left side of the illustrative machine;
Fig. 2 shows in perspective a portion of themachine as viewed from the front and the left of the machine;
Fig. 3 is a view, partly broken away and partly in section, on the line III-III of Fig. 1;
Fig. 4 is a view, partly broken away, on the line 'IVIV of Fig. 3;
Fig. 5 is a schematic diagram of fluid-pressure means for operating the illustrative machine;
Fig. 6 is a wiring diagram for use in describing the operation of the machine;
Fig. 7 is a vertical longitudinal'section through a the top, lift spanking on after explained, the top lift 32, during Patented May 22, 1956 treadle box which is illustrated in Fig. 1 and is used to control the operation of the illustrative machine;
Fig. 8 is a plan view of mechanism used in the machine equipped to attach rubber heels and their spotted base lifts to shoes;
Fig. 9 is an exploded view, partly broken away and partly in section, showing in perspective the rear end of a shoe to which the heel has been attached by the use of the illustrative machine and showing a top lift which is to be spanked onto the heel; and
Fig. 10is a perspective view, partly broken away and partly in section, of a rear endportion of a shoe to'which a rubber heel and its base lift have been attached by the use of the machine.
The illustrative machine is described with reference to the attachment of a leather heel30' (Figs. 2, 3 and 9) and its top lift 32 to the'heelseat of a shoe '34 (Figs. 9 and 10), which is mountedon a last- 36, by the'use'of cut nails 38 and also with reference to the attachment of a rubber heel= 40 (Figs. 8 and 10) and a base lift 42, which is spotted thereto, to the heel seat ofthe shoe by the use of headed nails 44.
The machine comprises a jack or support 46 (Figs. 1 and 5)- upon which the shoe'34onthe last 36 is mounted, a nailing die or support 48, a carriage 50 for positioning and clamping the leather heel 30 and its top lift 32 over thenailing die, ora modified carriageSOa (Fig. 8) for positioning. and holding. the rubber heel 40' and an associated base lift 42 over said die, a driver head 54 to which are secured nail drivers 56, fluid-pressure means 58 for causing the heel seat of the shoe 34; which is positioned on the jack 46 by a back gage 60, to be depressed against the leather heel 30 in the carriage 50 or against the base lift 42, which is spotted to the rubber heel 40 and may be regarded as partof the rubber heel,-in the carriage 50a, and fluid-pressure means 62 for raising the drivers 56 to cause the nails 38 or-44-then in passages 64 of the nailingdie 48 to be driven intothe heel, or into the rubber heel 40 and its base lift 42, and the heel seat of the shoe 34 which pointed'ends ofthe nails clenched against aheelplate 66 of the last 36. I
In the attachment of the leather heel 30 to the shoe 34 the nails 38 are left projecting beyond a top lift receivingface 68 (Fig. 9): of the heel. As will be hereina succeeding stage of the cycle of the machine,- is attached to the heel 30 by spanking? it onto the heel by the application of downward pressure of the'heel, which then'forms part of the shoe 34, against the'top lift mounted in the carriage-50 and supported by the nailing die 48. The carriage 50 is movable over a flat upper face 70 of the nailing die 48 and preparatory to carrying out the heel attaching and operations is arranged to dwell on said die in active positions in which the heel-30and the top lift 32 positioned and clamped in-the carriage 50 are centralized respectively over the upper ends of the driver passages 64 of the nailing die.
The jack 46 is journaled upon a bearing pin 72 carried by. a guidebar 74 which is mounted for movement along a vertical guideway 76 formed in a main frame 78 ofthe machine. Slldingly adjustable upon the lower end of the jack 46 is a spindle plate 80 (Fig. 5) provided with a last pin 82 adaptedto be interengaged by a thimble 84 of the last 36 upon which the shoe 34 is mounted. The shoe 34 on the last: 36 is manually presented, bottom down and rear end away from the operator, to the jack 46 with the thirnble 84'of the last in interen'gagementwith the last pin 82 of the jack, said jack having operatively connected to it by a chain'86 a slidabl'emount 88for an arcuate crease band 90, the shoe being "swung rearward together with the jack until a rand crease 91"(F igs. 9 and 10) of the shoe engages a lower edg'e' of said band which which has nail passages 94 and is automatically swung,
by mechanism hereinafter described, between a rest or nail receiving position beneath a foot plate 96 which forms part of a replaceable "beer mug or tube holder 98, and a nail discharging position over the nailing die 48. The nails 38, 44 are delivered to the loader block 92 in its rest position beneath the foot plate 96 through upper and lower tubes 100, 102 respectively which receive the nails from a nail distributor 104 generally similar to the nail distributor disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 1,381,240, granted June 14, 1921, on anapplication filed in the name of Joseph H. Pope and improved as disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,319,797, granted May 2-5, 1943, on an application filed in the name of Wallace M. Cutler.
The illustrative machine, which is of the general type disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 1,157,688, granted October 26, 1915, on an application tiled in the name of Lester L. Glidden, has substantially all its operating parts supported by the main frame 78 into which are threaded a pair of rods 106 upon shoulders 108 of which rests a bracket 110 secured to the rods by nuts 112. The bracket 110 has formed in it a cavity 114 for receiving the nailing die 48 which is held in its operative position in the bracket by a removable retaining plate 116 normally secured to the bracket. Positioned beneath the bracket 110 and having sleeve portions which are slidingly mounted upon the rods 106 is a crosshead 118 comprising an adjustable slide 120 provided with a pair of undercut guideways 122 for receiving the driver head 54 to which the lower ends of the drivers 56 are secured. Formed on the main frame 78 adjacent to the lower end portions of the rods are shoulders 124 adapted to be engaged by the sleeve portions of the crosshead 118 to limit downward movement of said crosshead which has :1 depending shank 126 movable along a vertical guideway 128 formed in the main frame and connected by a pin 130 to the upper end of a piston or driver actuator 132 movable along a bore 134 of a cylinder 136 having a depending boss 138 which fits in a bore 140 of the main frame and is secured to said frame by screws 142 (only one shown).
Any one of a plurality of nailing dies 48, together with an associated driver head 54 having drivers 56 which extend into the passages 64 of the die and are of the same design as said die, may be initially slid as a unit into the cavity 114 of the bracket 110 and into the guideways 122 of the adjustable slide 120 of the crosshead 118, said nailing die being held in its operative position in the cavity by the retaining plate 116. The driver head 54 and the drivers 56 are normally hidden from view by a cover 144 (Figs. 1 and 2) which is journaled on trunnions 146 carried by a bifurcated lug 148 secured to and forming part of the main frame 78 and which may be swung forward and downward to a lowered position preparatory to removing the nailing die 48 and its associated driver head 54 and drivers 56 from the machine. As will be explained later, the cover 144 has associated with it safety mechanism which, when the cover is lowered, prevents the machine from being operated.
Secured to the bracket 110 is a transversely extending rod 150 which fits in a bore 152 (Fig. 3) of a depending boss 154 of the carriage 50 and serves to guide the carriage, as will be hereinafter explained, over the upper face 70 of the nailing die 48 and over an alined upper face of the bracket 110. The carriage 50 is moved on the rod 150 to the left, as viewed in Figs. 2 and 3, against the action of a spring 157 in order temporarily to clear the upper end of the nailing die 48 so that the nails 38 may be dumped from the passages 94 of the loader block 4 92 into the passages 64 of the die, upon engagement of an arm 156, which carries the loader block, with an upstanding flange 158 (Figs. 2 and 3) secured to the upper face of the carriage. The carriage 50 may bev described as comprising a heel receiving unit 160 and a top lift receiving unit 160a, the rear ends of the heel 30 and the top lift 32 positioned in the carriage being in engagement respectively with rear gages 162, 162a which may be initially adjusted into different positions forward and rearward of said carriage to accommodate heels of different sizes. The heel 30 and the top lift 32 are held against the rear gages 162, 162a respectively by L-shaped breast gages 164, 164a which are slidably mounted in guideways 166, 166a. The operator moves the breast gages 164, 164a forward by forcing the breasts of the heel 30 and the top lift 32 respectively against said breast gages in order to allow the heel and the top lift to be placed in the carriage 50 and releases them, springs 168, 168a forcing the breast gages rearward until the heel and the top lift have been forced respectively against the rear gages 162, 162a.
The arm 156, which carries the loader block 92 and may be referred to as a loader block arm, is pivotally mounted upon a post 170 secured to the main frame 78. The loader block 92 is rendered active in response to the engagement of a one-revolution clutch 172 of the nail distributor 104. The clutch 172 is tripped by manually striking a knob 174 mounted on the lower end of a depending rod 176 secured to a sleeve 178 which is journaled on.a bearing 180 mounted on the main frame 78 and has extending from it a lug pivotally connected to a bar 182 slidable in a slot 183 of the main frame. When the depending rod 176 is swung counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 2, the bar 182 moves away from a shoulder 184 of the clutch 172 thereby causing said clutch to be engaged and a drum 186 operatively connected to the clutch to be rotated through one revolution. The drum 186 has adjustably secured to it a pin 188 pivotally connected to a rod 190 which slides in a bore of a rod 192 universally connected to an arm 194 secured to the upper end of a vertical shaft 196 which is journaled in brackets 198 secured to the post 170. Secured to the rods 190, 192, which may be collectively described as a telescopic rod, are opposite ends of a coil spring 200 the purpose of which will be explained later. Secured to the lower end of the vertical shaft 196 is an arm 202 pivotally connected to one end of a toggle 204 the other end of which is screwed to a bearing block 206 secured to the loader block arm 156 which, as above explained, is journaled for rotation upon the vertical post 170.
Pivotally mounted on a pin 208 carried by the bearing block 206 is shutter control mechanism disclosed in detail in United States Letters Patent 2,274,777, granted March 3, 1942, on an application filed in the name of William S. Dallas. When the loader block 92 is in its rest or nail receiving position shown in Fig. 2 the shutter control mechanism holds a shutter 210, which is movable in a slot 212 of said block, in a nail retaining position in the loader block. Movement of the loader block 92 to its nail delivering position over the nailing die 48 is arrested by the engagement of a stop screw 211 carried by the bearing block 206 with the main frame 78. Just before the loader block 92 reaches its nail delivering position a screw 213 carried by means described in said Patent 2,274,777 engages the main frame 78 and releases the shutter 210 which, under the biasing action of a spring (not shown) moves away from the loader block to allow the nails to drop into the nailing die 48.
The loader block operating mechanism is so constructed and arranged that immediately after the clutch 172 is tripped the loader block 92 delivers a load of nails to the passages 64 of the nailing die 48, and after returning to its rest position beneath the foot plate 96 of the tube holder 98, nails 38 or 44, then on a nail roll (not shown) of the nail distributor 104, are dumped into the tubes 100, 102 which deliver the nails to the foot plate and accordingly to the passages 94 of the loader block. It occasionally happens that a bent nail in the process of being transferred from the passages 94 of the loader block 92 to the passages 64 of the nailing die 48 prevents said block from being moved away from said die in which event the spring 200 yields and the drum 186 driven by the one-revolution clutch 172 will return to its rest or starting position, the spring during this time being expanded. After the operator has manually dislodged the nail 38 or 44, which has prevented the loader block 92 from returning to its rest position, the loader block arm 156 is released and the spring 200 operating through the above described mechanism biases the loader block to its rest position.
The machine is operated by the use of a foot treadle 214 (Figs. 1 and 7) which is secured to a bearing shaft 216 journaled in a control box 218. Secured to the control box 218 are normally closed and open switches 220, 222 respectively comprising plungers 201, 203 and secured to the shaft 216 is a block 205 having riveted to it an arm 207 front and rear portions of which are at all times engaged respectively by said plungers. The treadle 214 is constantly urged counterclockwise, as viewed in Fig. 7, by a weak coil spring 209 mounted on an upstanding boss at the base of the control box 218, said counterclockwise movement of the treadle being limited by a stop face 211 of the box. Housed in a recess of the boss is a relatively strong coil spring 213a on which is mounted a stud 215, said stud being vertically slidable in said recess and, when the treadle is raised, being in engagement with an inturned flange of the boss. When the operator has depressed the treadle 214 sufliciently to engage the stud 215, the arm 207 has been moved to a position recognized by the operator by reason of resistance encountered by the treadle, in which the plunger 201 of the switch 220 acted on by a spring 217 is allowed to bridge contacts 219 of the switch 220 and thus close said switch. As will be explained later, the closing of the switch 220 causes a solenoid S1 to be energized. As the operator further depresses the treadle 214 the plunger 203 of the switch 222 is moved by the arm 207 across terminals 221 of the switch thereby causing, by means hereinafter described, the solenoid S2 to be energized. The successive energizing of the solenoids S1 aand S2 renders said fluid-pressure means 58, 62 active to cause through mechanism hereinafter described said leather heel or the rubber heel 40 and its base lift 42 to be attached to the shoe.
Power for operating the fluid-pressure means 58, 62 of the machine is supplied by a motor 224 (Figs. 1, 5 and 6) which drives a rotary pump 226 having an intake line 228 extending into a sump 230 containing oil, for example. Extending between the pump 226 and a port 232 of a 4-way valve 234 having a bore 236 is a pressure line 238 including a relief valve 240 which is normally set to spill oil through an exhaust or sump line 242 back into the sump 230 when the oil in the pressure line reaches 1000 lbs. per square inch. The valve 234 includes a spool 244 slidable in the bore 236 and operatively connected to the solenoid S1 which, as above explained, is energized when the switch 220 is closed. When the machine is powered and the treadle 214 is in its raised position the spool 244 of the valve 234 is held in its full-line position shown in Fig. 5 by a compression spring 246, oil from the pressure line 238 flowing through the port 232, through a circular channel 248 of the spool 244 and through a port 249 in said valve into a line 250 leading to the upper end of a chamber 252 formed by a cylinder 254 which is secured by screws 256 to the main frame 78, and a clamp or holddown piston or actuator 258 which is slidable in a bore 260 of the cylinder. The piston 258 is pivotally connected to a rod 262 an upper end of which is pivotally connected to a rear arm of a rocking beam 264 having trunnions 266 'journaled in bearings of the main frame 78. The forward arm of therocking beam nions 266 and pivotal connections of the rocking beam 264 on the one hand and the rod 262 and the guide bar 74 on the other hand being approximately equal. Extending from the lower end of the chamber 252 (the machine at this time being at rest) to the upper end of a chamber 268 formed by the piston 132 and the bore 134 of the cylinder 136, is a line 270 and extending from the central portion of the line 270 to thelower end of a reservoir 272 is a line 274 having interposed in it a relief valve 276 which is commonly set to open at a pressure of approximately 50lbs. per square inch. A line 278 connects the upper portion of the reservoir 272 to the sump or exhaust line 242.
Extending between a port280 in the 4-way valve 234 and a primary chamber 282, which is formed by a bore 284 of the clamp or holddown piston 258 and a vertical cylindrical projection 286 of the cylinder 254, is a branch or holddown line 288 which, when the machine is idle and the solenoid S1 is deenergized'as shown in Fig. 5, is open to a port 285 connected to an exhaust or sump line 287 and which, when the solenoid S1 is energized and has moved the spool 244 of the valve 234 to its dash-dot position, is open to the high pressure line 238. When the spool 244 of the valve 234 is in its dash-dot position the line 250 is open to a port 289 which is connected to an exhaust or sump line 291.
It will be noted that the line 288 includes a passage which extends without restriction to oil through a passage of a sequence valve 290. The sequence valve 290, which is of a well-known commercial type, comprises a spool 292 which is slidingly mounted in a bore 294 of the housing of this valve and is constantly urged toward a stop face 296 by a spring 298 the effective strength of which may be varied in accordance with the pressure at which it is desired to have the sequence valve open, such pressure, for example, being in the vicinity of 1000 lbs. per square inch. When the pressure of oil in the line 288 is raised to a predetermined amount (approximately 1000 lbs. per square inch), oil, which is in a passage 300 of the sequence valve 290 and operates against the lower end of the spool 292, as viewed in Fig. 5, slides the spool 292 in the bore 294against the action of the spring 298 to its dash-dot position thus rendering oil in the line 288 aavilable for the equalizing or transfer lines 302, 302a. A passage 299 formed in the sequence valve 290 extends between the lines 288 and 302 and has extending into it a check valve 301 which prevents oil from flowing from the line 288 to the line 302 but which yields against spring action to allow oil forced out of a secondary chamber 306, which is formed by the piston 258 and the cylinder 254 to be readily exhausted through the sump line 287 at the end of the heel attaching or top lift spanking on operation. In view of the foregoing it will be clear that, when the spool 244 of the 4-wayvalve 234 has been moved to its dash-dot position, oil from the pressure line 288 is available for the chamber 282 thereby causing pressure acting against a primary face 304 of the piston 258 to raise said piston and accordingly to lower the shoe 34 positioned upon the jack 36 and thus to force the heel seat of the shoe with primary, preliminary or holddown pressure against the heel 30 mounted in the carriage 50. As the piston 258 is raised. oil enters the chamber 306 through a passage 308 which is open to the reservoir 272 and has interposed in it a one-way check valve 312.
While the normally open switch 222, which as above explained may be closed in response to movement of the treadle 214 to its fully depressed position, remains open, the solenoid S2, as will be hereinafter explained, remains deenergized and a spool 314 of a 4-way valve 316 acted upon by a spring 318 is in its full-line position shown in Fig. 5. When the spool 244 of the valve 234 has been moved to its dash-dot position in response to partial depression of the treadle 214, oil under pressure in the line 302, after the sequence valve 290 has been loaded, flows through a port 320 of the valve 316, through a circular channel 322 of the spool 314, through a port 324 of the valve 316 and into a line 326 leading to a relief valve 328, The relief valve 328 has a port 330 open to the line 326 and a port 332 which is open to the port 330 and to a line 334 leading to a valve 336 which has a bore 338 and a spool 340 slidable in said bore. Except when the machine has been set for spanking on of the top lift 32, as will be explained later, the spool 340 of the valve 336 is held in its full-line position shown in Fig. against a stop face 342 by a spring 344, the line 334 being open through a port 346 of the valve, a circular channel 348 of the spool 340 and a port 350 of this valve to a sump line 352.
When the spool 314 of the valve 316 is in its fullline or rest position, the solenoid S2 being deenergized, a port 353 which is connected to an exhaust or sump line 355 is out off from the line 326 by the spool 314 and a port 357 connected to an exhaust or sump line 359 is open to a port 363 connected to a line 365 extending into a chamber 367 formed by the driver piston or actuator 132 and the cylinder 136. The piston 132 has formed on it a face 369 which has substantially the same area as a secondary face 371 formed on the piston 258. The clamp piston 132 may be described as having small and large faces 304, 371 respectively.
When the heel seat of the shoe 34 has been forced against the heel with primary, preliminary or holddown pressure as above described in response to the energizing of the solenoid S1, oil in the pressure line 238 at this time being open to the face 304 of the piston 258, the
operator, if satisfied with the position of the work, fully depresses the treadle 214 causing, by means hereinafter described, the solenoid S2 to be energized and the spool 314 of the valve 316 to be moved to its dash-dot position (Fig. 5). When this occurs high pressure oil is available for the chambers 306 and 367, which are then cut off from exhaust, with the result that the piston 132 is immediately raised causing the drivers 56 to force the nails 38 or 44 into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, said nails being clenched against the heel plate 66 of the last 36 upon which the shoe is mounted. As the drivers 56 meet resistance pressure builds up in the chamber 367 and accordingly in the chamber 306 and this results in substantial pressure being applied against the large or secondary face 371 of the clamp piston 258 and accordingly causes the shoe 34 to be forced with additional or augmented pressure against the leather heel 30 or against the base lift 42 which together with the rubber heel 40 may be collectively considered as constituting a heel. It will be apparent that the piston 258 is operatively connected to the jack 46 for freely reversible and positive movement of the same degree and that the piston 132 is operatively connected to the drivers 56 for freely reversible and positive movement of the same degree. Accordingly, since the area of the face 369 of the piston 132 is substantially equal to the area of the face 371 of the piston 258 and the pressures in the chambers 367 and 306, which pressures may vary in accordance with resistance met in the driving of the nails, are equal, it will be clear that the secondary pressure, or pressure in addition to the constant holddown pressure exerted downward by the shoe against the heel supported by the nailing die 48, will be substantially equal and opposite to the pressure exerted by the drivers 56 in driving the nails into the work.
When the nails 38 or 44 have been fully driven into the work a frusto-conical face 373 of a striker 375, which is threaded for initial adjustment in a lug 377 secured to the piston 132, forces a plunger 379 of a normally open switch 381 across the' contacts 383 of said switch and thus causes, through means hereinafter described, the
solenoids S1 and S2 to be deenergized. The spools 244, 314 of the valves 234, 316 respectively are then biased by the springs 246, 318 to their full-line positions with the result that oil, which is under pressure determined by the setting of the relief valve 276 and is available for the chambers 252 and 268, acts against shoulders 387, 389 of the pistons 258, 132 respectively to move said pistons to their starting positions shown in Fig. 5 and accordingly to move the jack 46 and the nail drivers 56 to their starting positions. The spools 244, 314 may be referred to as control members of the valves 234, 316.
In order to set the machine for the spanking on of the top lift 32, a plunger 354 of a switch 356 is moved from a bridging position across contacts 358 of said switch to a bridging position across contacts 358a of the switch thereby causing, after the switch 220 has been closed, the spool 340, which is operatively connected to a solenoid S3 and forms part of the valve 336, to move to a dash-dot position (Fig. 5) and thus to shut olf the line 334 from the exhaust line 352. When this occurs oil pressure is built up in the relief valve 328 and when such pressure attains a predetermined amount oil is dumped through a port 360 leading to an exhaust or sump line 361. The pressure at which the oil in the relief valve 328 is dumped may be varied by the use of a hand screw 362 which is threaded into a housing of this valve.
The relief valve 328 is of the general type disclosed in United States Letters Patent No. 2,043,453, granted June 9, 1936, on an application filed in the name of Harry F. Vickers and in United States Letters Patent No. 2,198,049, granted April 23, 1940, on an application filed in the name of Richard W. Dinzl and also in United States Letters Patent Reissue No. 22,099, granted May 19, 1942, on an application filed in the name of Ferris T. Harrington, et al. Since the construction and operation of the relief valve 328 is substantially the same as that disclosed in the above patents no further description herein of this valve is deemed to be necessary. It will be understood that any one of various other commercial relief valves may be used in place of the valve 328.
The various exhaust lines 287, 291, 352, 355, 359 and 361 are preferably led back to the sump 230 by a common line not shown. In order to insure against the piston 258 and accordingly the jack 46 moving back too fast to their starting positions shown in Fig. 5 after the attachment of the heel 30 to the shoe 34 and also to insure that oil displaced from the chamber 306 at the end of the heel attaching stage of the cycle of the machine shall not have a tendency to back up through the exhaust line 359 and cause overdriving of the actuator 132 and accordingly the drivers 56 there is interposed in the line 302 a combined check and throttle valve 364 which comprises a sleeve 366 reciprocabie in a bore 368 of a housing of said valve and constantly urged toward a face 370 of said housing by a weak spring 372. The housing of the valve 364 has formed in its passages 374, 376 which are continuous with adjacent portions of the line 302, oil in the line after forcing the sleeve 366 away from the face 370 being free to flow toward the chamber 306 without any substantial restriction through the passage 376, a port 378 in the sleeve and the passage 374. Oil flowing in the line 302 away from the chamber 306 forces the sleeve 366 against the face 370 of the valve housing and has to travel through an L-shaped passage 380 which connects the port 378 to the passage 376 and has extending into it a throttle screw 382 for variably restricting the flow of oil through said L-shaped passage and accordingly through the line 302.
As above explained, in the attachment of leather heels 30 to shoes 34 the treadle 214 is fully depressed causing the spools 244, 314 of the valves 234, 316 respectively to be moved successively from their full-time to their dash-dot positions shown in Fig. 5 with the result that the heel seat of the shoe is forced with primary pressure against the heel 30 positioned by the carriage 50 on the same nailing die 48 and is thereafter forced with augmented pressure against the heel as upward movement of the driver head 54 -is initiated and continued until the nails 38 are driven into the heel and the heel seat-of the shoe with their head ends projecting (as shown in Fig. 9) beyond the top liftreceiving face 68 of the heel. In the succeeding stage of the cycle of'the machineset for operating upon leather work the shoe34, which is mounted on the jack 46 and to which the heel 30 has been attached, is forced downward onto the top-lift 32, the carriage 50 having been moved by the spring 157 into a position in Which the depending boss 154 of the carriage is in engagement with a stop collar 385 secured to the rod 150 and in which the top lift is centralized over the nailing die 48 and is arranged vertically. beneath the attached heel of the shoe mounted on the jack. It will be apparent that since no nails are driven into the work during the spanking on operation it is not necessary to operate the drivers during this operation. It is, however,.desirable that during the spanking on operation the attached heel 30 of the shoe 34 shall be forced downward against the top lift 32 with a force which is-considerably greater than that employed in forcing the shoe 34 with primary pressure against the heel 30and which may. be varied in-accordance with the thickness-and the consistency of the top lift.
With the foregoing considerations in view applicants have provided the above-mentioned switch 356 having the plunger 354 which may be moved-away from the contacts .358 and across the contacts 358:: of said switch to insure against energizing the solenoid S2 when the treadle 214 is depressed and thus insuring that the .drivers 56 shall not be operated during the spanking.onoperation, as well as insuring that the solenoid S3 shall be energized upon depression of the treadle 214 so asto cause the line 334 connected to the relief valve 328 to-be cut off from the sump line 352, the hand screw 362 of the relief valve 316 being'suitably adjusted to createin the line 302 and accordingly in the chamber 306' the proper pressure to insure that the top lift 32 shall be effectively pressed onto the portions of the nails 38-left projecting beyond the top lift receiving face 68of the attached heel 30 of the shoe. Furthermore, it is desirable that the plunger 354 of the switch 356 shall be-automatically moved to its dash-line position'shown' in Fig. 6- across the contacts 358a just before starting-"the second-stage of-the cycle of the machine set for leather work and also that after the spanking on operation the plunger shall move back to its full-line positionshown in Fig. 6 across the contacts 358 of the switch 356' to set the machine for attaching, during the first stage of thenext cycle of 'the machine, the heel 30 to the next shoe being operated upon. Accordingly, the machine is provided withtrrechanism (best shown in Figs. 3 and 4) which is operatively connected to the jack" operating rod 262-and to the carriage 50 and which will now be described;
At the time the nails 38 are driven into the heel 30 and the heel seat of the shoe 34, the carriage 50'is in its position shown in Figs. 2 and 3, a hook portion" of a latch or latch lever 384 pivoted upon abearing stud 386 secured to the bracket 110 being inengagementwith a roll 388 mounted on a bearing screw 390 secured to the carriage and thus preventing said-carriage, until it is released by mechanism hereinafter described, fron'rmoving to the right (Fig. 3) under the-action of the spring 157 to a position in which the ''top lift receiving unit 160a and accordingly the top lift 32 mounted therein-is positioned above the nailing die 48:
Clamped by bolts 392 to the jack operating rod 262 is a collar 394 in a housing 394a of which-acatch 396 is slidable. The catch 396 is circular in cross section and has a slot 395 in which fits a spring-pressed plunger 397 which is slidingly mounted in the housing 394a and re tains the catch against rotation in said housing. The catch 396 is constantly urged forward (to the left in Fig.
-the plungers 244 4') with abeveled'end thereof'projecting beyond the housing 394, by a spring. 398, forward movement of the catch being limited byengagement of a nut 400secured to a shank portion'of the catch with said housing. Secured by screws 401 to the main frame 78 is a bracket 402 in which is journale'd a vertical shaft 404 having secured to it a multiarm lever 406 one arm of which is universally connected by a coupling 408 to the rear end of a rod 410 pivotally connected to one arm of the latch lever 384. The shaft 404 is constantly biased clockwise, as viewed from above, bya torsion spring. 412 having its lower end attached to a collar secured to the shaft and its upper end attached to the bracket 402. A second arm of the lever 406 has a depending cylindrical housing provided with a bore 414 in whichis vertically slidable a latch 416provided with a bottom flange portion above which the forward beveled portion of the catch 396 lies when the rod 262 is in its raised position at the time the heel 30 is being attached to the shoe 34, a spring 418 serving constantly to urge the latch upward until its flange portion engages thelower endof the depending housing of this lever. Secured to and .forming, in effect, part of the bracket 402 is a stop lug 420 which normally lies in front of a backwardly beveled upper end portion of the latch 416 and serves to hold this lever 406 and accordingly the rod 410 and the latch lever 384 in their full-line positions shown in Fig. 3.
When the jack operating rod262 is lowered after the attachment of the heel 30 to the shoe 34'the catch 396 engages a face 422 of the flange portion of the latch 416 and thus withdraws the latch from behind the stop lug 420 thereby allowing the multiarm lever 406 to swing clockwise, as viewed from above, by the action of thespring 412 'until a stop screw 424 carried by a third arm of the lever 406 engagesa stop face 426 of the bracket 402. Rearward movement of the rod-410 causes the latch lever 384 to be moved away from the roll 388 mounted on the carriage 50 and thus allows said carriage, actuated by the spring 157 to slide to the right (Fig. 3) until the depending boss 154 of the carriage 50' engages the stop collar 385 on the guide rod 150. As the multiarm lever'406' is swung clockwise (Fig. 3) it engages the plunger- 354 of the switch 356 with the result that said plunger is moved from its bridging position across the contacts 358 of this switch to its bridging position across the contacts 358a of the switch thus insuring that the coil K1 of a-relay cannot be energized during the top lift spanking on stage of the cycle of the machine and thus insuring that the solenoid S2 shall not be energized during this stage. It will thus be apparent that during the spanking on stage of the cycle of the machine adjusted for leather work the plunger 314 of the 4-way valve 316 remains in its full-line position (Fig. 5) and accordingly during this stage of the cycle fluid in the line 302, which is connectdto the pressure line 238, is not available for the chamber 367 and, therefore, the drivers 56 are not operated.
I When the plunger'354 bridges the contacts 358a of the switch 356 and the treadle 214' is depressed the solenoids; S1 and S3 are simultaneously energized (a normally closed switch K2'-A of a relay' embodying a coil K2 hereafter referred to'being closed) with the result that and 340 operatively connected to the solenoids S1 and S3 are moved to their dash-dot positions thereby causing the pressure line 238 to be open to the chamber 306 with the result'that the nails projecting from the heel attached to the shoe during this stage of the cycle of the machine are forcedwith primary pressure against the top lift 32 and causingthe line 334 to be closed off from the sump line 352. When this occurs pressure builds up in the line 302' and the spool 292 of the sequence valve is moved to its dash-dot position-thereby allowing oil under a pressure regulated in accordance with the setting of the relief valve 328 to be available for the chamber 306 so as to act against the face 3710f the piston or acturr tants ator 258 thereby augmenting the primary pressure of the attached heel of the shoe against top lift 32 by a pressure which is great enough to insure that the top lift 32 shall be effectively spanked onto the heel 30 of the shoe.
When the top lift 32 has been spanked onto the nails 39 left projecting from the attached heel 30 of the shoe 34, the operator removes his foot from the treadle 214 causing the solenoids S1 and S3 to be deenergized and the plungers 244, 340 of the valves 234, 336 to be moved back to their full-line positions by the springs 246, 344 respectively, with the result that the line 288 is open to the exhaust port 287 and the line 302 is open to the exhaust ports 287 and 352. The chamber 252 is thus open to the pressure line 238, oil which is in this chamber and has a pressure of approximately lbs. per square inch regulated by the relief valve 276, acting against the shoulder 387 of the piston 258 to depress the piston to its starting position against a face 391 of the cylinder 254.
As above explained, at the time the top lift 32 is spanked onto the heel 30 the detent lever 384 is in its dash-line position shown in Fig. 3, the latch 416 having been swung with the multiarrn lever 406 to a position in which it is not engaged by the catch 396 as the rod 262 is lowered. After the operator has removed the shoe 34 from the jack 46 he strikes the knob 174 of the rod 176 causing the clutch 172 to be tripped and the loader block arm 156 to be swung clockwise as viewed from above. As the loader block arm 156 is swung clockwise it engages the upstanding flange 158 of the carriage 58 thereby sliding said carriage to the left over the nailing die 38 against the action of the spring 157. Just before the stop screw 211 engages the main frame 78 to limit clockwise movement of the loader block arm 156, the shutter 210 is released in response to the engagement of the screw 213 with the main frame thereby allowing said shutter to be swung by spring action away from the loader block 92 with the result that the nails 38 in the passages 94 of said block are dropped into the passages 64 of the nailing die 48. As the carriage 50 slides to the left its roll 388 engages a face 432 of the detent lever 384 then in its dash-line position, causing said lever to swing to its full-line position against the action of the rod 410 which is constantly urged rearward by the action of the torsion spring 412, the latch 416 which is slidingly mounted in the multiarm lever 486 sliding behind the stop lug 420 and thus causing the rod and the detent lever to be restored to and held in their full-line positions. As the loader block arm 156 moves to its nail-receiving position beneath the foot plate 96 of the tube holder 98,
the carriage 50, acted upon by the spring 157, slides to the right (Fig. 3) until the roll 388 engages the hook portion of the detent lever 384, the heel receiving station 160 of the carriage 50 at this time being centralized over the nailing die 48 ready to receive the heel 30 to be attached to the shoe next operated upon by the machine. As the jack operating rod 262 is raised during the succeeding operation in which the heel 30 is attached to the shoe 34 a bevel face 434 of the catch 396 engages a bevel face 436 of the latch 416 thereby causing said catch to slide rearward against the action of the spring 398, said catch moving back to its position shown in Fig. 4 after it has been raised above the bottom flange portion of the latch. As the jack operating rod 262 is lowered at the end of the heel attaching operation, the latch 416 is released from behind the stop lug 420 causing the detent lever 384 to be again moved to its dash-line position.
The carriage 50a is provided with a depending flange portion 438 having a bore 440 for receiving the rod 150, comprises a pair of undercut guideways 442 in which a heel holder or form 444 fits, and has a cavity 446 for receiving the rubber heel 40 to which the base lift 42 has been spotted, said form being secured in position in the carriage by a spring-pressed pin 448 slidable in the carriage and adapted to enter a bore (not shown) in the form.
In order to slide the carriage 50a to the left, as viewed in Fig. 8, to clear the flat upper face 70 of the nailing die 48, the loader block arm 156 has pivotally connected to it an adjustable coupling 450 universally connected to the carriage 50a. When the form 444 is in its position shown in Fig. 8 over the nailing die 48 it is substantially in engagement with the flat upper face 70 of said die, a cam roll 452 mounted on the bracket engaging in the left end, as viewed in Fig. 8, of a cam groove 454 formed in the carriage 50a. As the carriage 50a is slid to the left to allow the loader block 92 to deliver nails 44 to the passages 64 of the nailing die 48, a lower portion of the groove 454 engages the roll causing said carriage to be raised slightly about the rod thereby raising the carriage slightly away from the nailing die and accordingly away from an upper face of the bracket 110 which is flush with the upper face 70 of said die to reduce friction between the carriage on the one hand and the nailing die and the bracket on the other hand.
It will be noted that when the rubber heels 40 and their base lifts 42 are being attached to shoes 34 it is desirable that the latch lever 384 shall be inactive and, accordingly, the latch 416 is at all times retained in its latched position behind the stop lug 420. Preparatory to attaching rubber heels 40 and their base lifts 42 to shoes, the spring-pressed pin 397 is partially withdrawn from the housing portion 394a of -the collar 394 and the catch 396 is rotated in said housing portion, after which said spring-pressed pin is released, allowing it to extend into a longitudinal slot 456 formed in the catch. With such an arrangement it will be apparent that as the jack operating rod 262 is raised the catch 396 will be cammed back (to the right in Fig. 4) by its engagement with the beveled face 436 of the latch 416, and when said rod is lowered the beveled face 434 of the catch will engage the latch 416, said catch being cammed rearward in the housing 394a without depressing the latch.
The motor 224 is operated by current supplied by lines 458 which are wired to a primary coil 460 of a transformer T. Connected to opposite ends of a secondary coil 362 of the transformer T are trunk lines 464, 466, respectively, which are bridged by a plurality of automatically controlled circuits. The trunk line 464 has interposed in it a normally closed stop switch 468 which is so positioned that it can be quickly and conveniently opened by the operator in case of an emergency. In order to insure that the machine cannot be started when the cover 144 is in its lowered position while the nailing die 48 and the associated driver head 54 and drivers 56 are being changed, there is provided the abovementioned safety mechanism comprising a screw 470 which, when said cover is in its normal raised position, engages a plunger 472 of a normally open microswitch 474 to close this switch. When the cover 144 is swung to its lowered position the plunger 472 is moved by spring action away from the contacts 476 of the switch thereby opening the trunk line 464 and insuring that the solenoids S1, S2 and S3 cannot be energized should the treadle 214 he accidentally depressed.
In order to power the machine the operator presses a plunger 478 of a startingswitch 480 across the contacts 482 of the switch, causing a coil K of a relay to be energized and accordingly closing normally open switches K-A and K-B of this relay. The closing of the switch K-A causes the motor 224 to start thereby rendering active the fluid pressure means 58 and 62 which are controlled as hereinafter described. The closing of the switch K-B establishes a holding line so that current will flow through the coil K and the truck line 454 after the operator releases the plunger 478 of the normally open starting switch. As above explained the trunk line 464 has interposed in it the safety switch 474 which is closed when the cover 144 is in its raised position. A circuit in which the relay coil K lies has also interposed in it an overloaded relay OR.
When the machine is powered and at rest the solenoids S1 and S2 as above explained, are deenergized, and the spools 244, 314 of the valves 234, 316, respectively, are in their full-line positions shown in Fig. 5, oil from the pump 226 flowing through the pressure line 238, the port 232, the channel 248 and the port 249 of the valve 234, the line 250, the chamber 252 and the line 270 to the chamber 268, the oil returning to the sump 228 through the line 274 and the relief valve 276 in it, the reservoir 272 and the lines 278 and 242. At this time the chamber 282 is open to the exhaust line 287, the chamber 306 is open to the exhaust line 352, and the chamber 367 is open to the exhaust line 359 and accordingly the pistons or actuators 258, 132 are held by fluid pressure against the face 391 of the cylinder 254 and against a face 393 of the cylinder 136 with a force which may be varied in accordance with the setting of the relief valve 276.
The operator then strikes the knob 174 with the result that the one-revolution clutch 172 is engaged and nails 38, then in the passages 94 of the loader block 92, are delivered to the passages 64 of the nailing die 48, the loader block arm 156 engaging the upstanding flange 158 of the carriage 50 to cause the upper face '70 of the die to be cleared. During movement of the carriage 50 to the left, Figs. 2 and3, over the nailing die 48," the detent lever 384 is moved from its dash-line position to its full-line position. As the loader block arm 156 returns to its idle position beneath the tube holder 98, the carriage 50, acted upon by the spring 157, slides to the right (Figs. 2 and 3) and is arrested by the engagement of the roll 388 mounted onsaid carriage with the hook portion of the detent lever 384. The heel 30 and the top lift 32 to be attached to the shoe 34 next to be operated upon are then placed in the heel and the top lift receiving units 160, 160a, respectively, of the carriage 50 and the shoe on the last'36 ispl ac'ed Upon the jack 46 which is then in its forward, full-line position shown in Fig. 1. The operator then manually swings the jack 46 rearward, the rand crease 91 of the shoe 34 being moved into registering engagementwith thelower edge of the heel band 90 of the back gage 60, thereby positioning the shoe lengthwise and widthwis'e with its heel seat located directly over the heel 30 in the carriage 50.
The treadle 214 (Figs. 1 and 7) is next depressed against the action of the weak spring 209 to a position in which it allows the plunger 201 (Figs; 6 and 7) of the switch 220 to be moved by the spring 217 across the contacts 219 of this switch causing, through the normally closed switch K2-A of the relay embodying the coil K2, the solenoid S1 to be energized and the spool 244 of the valve 234 to be moved against the action of the spring 246 to its dash-dot position. Oil'in the presspre line 238 is now available for the chamber 282 and accordingly for the face 304 of the piston or actuator 258 and the chamber 252 is open to the exhaust line'291, said piston being raised until the heel seat of the shoe 34 has been forced with sustained primary or holddown pressure againstthe heel 30 whichis in the carriage 5 0 and is supported by the nailingdie 48.
As the piston 258 rises in the cylinder 254 oil is supplied to the expanding chamber 306 from the reservoir 272. As soon as upward'movement of the piston 258 ceases, oil pressure builds up in the line 288 thereby causing the spool 292 of the sequence valve 290 'to be moved to its dash-dot position and causing oil from the pressure line 238 to be open to oil in the line 302 and accordingly to oil in the chamber 306. It will be noted that at this time the line 302 is open through the line 302a, as above explained, to the exhaust'line 35 2 and accordingly the pressure in the line 302 never builds up to any substantial amount.
14 V In the event that the work is not properly positioned in the machine during the application of the holddown pressure or squeeze to the work, the operator may remove his foot from the treadle 214, thereby causing the arm 207 operating against the spring 217 to open the switch 220 with the result that the jack 46 returns to its raised position. If the operator is satisfied with the position of the work in the machine he further depresses the treadle 214 against the action of the stud 215, which is yieldingly supported by the heavy coil spring 213, thereby moving the plunger 203 of the normally open switch 222 across the terminals 221 of said switch. A normally closed switch K2-B of a relay embodying the coil K2 is closed and the contacts 358 of the switch 356 are bridged by the plunger 354 at the time the switch 220 is closed and accordingly the closing of the switch 222 causes the coil K1 to be energized and resultsin the closing of normally open switches Kl-A, K1-B and K1-C of the above-mentioned relay embodying the coil K1, thereby maintaining the solenoids S1 and S2, as well as the coil K1 energized, even though the operator removes his foot from the treadle 214.
When the solenoid S2 is energized the spool 3140f the valve 316 is moved to its dash-dot position against the action of the spring 318 causing the line 302a and accordingly the line 302 to be cut off from the line 326 leading to the relief valve 328 and to the exhaust or sump line 352, and causing oil in the pressure line 238 to be available for the face 371 of the piston or actuator 258 and for the face 369 of the piston or actuator 132. As-above explained, the face 369 is equal in area to the face 371 of the actuator 258 and accordingly it will'be apparent that when the treadle 214 has been fully depressed the piston 132 is forced upward with a pressure slightly greater than that required to drive nails into the heel 30 and the heel seat of the shoe34, as well as to clench said nails against the heel plate 66 of the last 36, and the heel seat of the shoe is forced against the heel with pressure which is additional to the holddown pressure and is substantially equal to the upward pressure applied against the piston 132.
The striker 375 is so set initially on the piston or actuator 132 that when the drivers 56 have driven the nails 38 a predetermined distance into the work the frusto-conical surface 373 of the striker moves the plunger 379 of the limit switch 381 across the terminals 383 of this switch thereby energizing the coil K2 of the above-mentioned relay with the result that the normally closed switches K2-A and K2-B of this relay are open, and normally open switch K2-C of this relay is closed. The opening of the switch K2'-A causes the solenoid S1 to be deenergized, and when the coil K1 is deenergized by the opening of the switch K2-B, the normally open switches Kl-A, Kl-B and Kl-C are opened and'accordingly the solenoid S2 is deenergized and the various circuits are reset for starting. So long as the operator retains the treadle 214 depressed sufficiently to close the switch 220 the coil K2 will remain energized until the switch is again opened by releasing the treadle. After the switch 220 is released, as often occurs before the completion of this stage of the machine cycle, the coil K2 will be deenergized in response to the opening. of the switch Kl-C.
As a safety precaution against the piston 132 being raised so high that it will strike the head of the cylinder 136, the cylinder has formed in it an exhaust port 484 which is open to exhaust or sump line 486. As above explained, when the spools 244, 314 of the valves 234, 316 are moved back to their full-line or starting positions (Fig. 12) pressure (about 50 lbs. per square inch) regulated by the setting of the relief valve 276 and acting against the shoulders 387 and 389 of the pistons 258, 132, respectively, moves said pistons to their full-line starting positions.
As'above explained, when the jack operating rod 262 is lowered after the heel 30 has been attached to the shoe 34, during the first stage of the cycle of the machine set for accommodating leather work, the latch lever 384 (Fig. 3) is moved from its full-line to its dash line position, thereby releasing the carriage 50 which slides under theaction of the spring 157 until the depending boss 154 of the carriage engages the stop collar 335 secured to the rod 150, the top lift 32 then being centralized lengthwise and widthwise over the nailing die 48 and being located directly beneath the attached heel of the shoe on the jack 46. The operator then depresses the treadle 214 causing the jack 46 to be lowered and accordingly the nails 38 projecting beyond the top lift receiving face 68 of the attached heel of the shoe 34 to be depressed into the top lift 32 with suificient pressure to secure said top lift to the heel. The top lift 32 is permanently attached to the heel by a subsequent well-known slugging" operation. Since the spanking of the top lift onto the attached heel 30 of the heel 34 has been described in detail in connection with the disclosure of the latch lever 384 and its controlling mechanism, no further description of the operation of this machine during the spanking on stage of the cycle of the machine is believed to be necessary.
The operation of the machine used to attach rubber heels 40 and their base lifts 42 to shoes 34 is substantially the same as the operation of the machine during the attachment of the leather heel 39 to the shoe 34. As above explained, when rubber heels are being attached to shoes 34 the latch lever 384 is at all times held in its full-line position shown in Fig. 3, and since the carriage 50a has no roll corresponding to the roll 388, this carriage overrides and is never engaged by the latch lever. It will be understood that if the machine is to be used exclusively for the attachment of rubber heels 40 and their base lifts 42 to shoes 34, the valve 316 may be omitted, the line 302 being directly connected to the line 365.
Having thus described our invention, what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters latent of the United States is:
1. In a machine for attaching heels to shoes, a fixed nailing die, movable nail drivers and a movable jack cooperating with the die, fluid-pressure means for operating the nail drivers, and means for transmitting a reactive force of the nail drivers to the jack to effect its movement.
2. In a machine for operating upon the heel portions of shoes, a work support, fastening inserting mechanism movable in one direction and movable pressing mechanism movable in an opposite direction and cooperating with the support, and fluid pressure equalizing means for transmitting a reactive force of the fastening inserting means to the work pressing means to effect its movement.
3. In a machine for operating upon heel portions of shoes, a fixed support, movable fastening inserting mechanism and movable work pressing mechanism cooperating with the support, and fluid-pressure means for moving the fastening inserting mechanism and the work pressing mechanism, said fluid-pressure means comprising means for moving the work pressing mechanism for a force dependent upon resistance encountered by the fastening inserting mechanism.
4. In a machine for attaching heels to shoes, a work support, movable fastening inserting mechanism and movable work pressing mechanism cooperating with the support, fluid-pressure means for moving the fastening inserting mechanism, and means for transmitting a reactive force of the fastening inserting mechanism to the work pressing mechanism to effect its movement.
5. in a machine for attaching two parts of a shoe together, a movable support for one of the shoe parts, a fixed support for the other of said shoe parts, means for forcing the movable support in one direction toward the fixed support to clamp said shoe parts together with a predetermined liolddown pressure, means for driving fas-' tenings into said shoe parts in a direction opposite to said one direction with a force which is slightly greater than that required to drive the fastenings into said shoe parts and accordingly is variable in accordance with the resistance offered by said shoe parts to the fastenings, and means for forcing, during the entire driving of the fastenmgs into the shoe parts, said movable support toward the fixed support with a pressure which is additional to said holddown pressure and may be variable and is substantially equal to the pressure applied against the fastenings to drive them into the shoe parts and which operates in a direction opposite to said one direction.
6. In a machine for attaching heels to shoes, a fixed nailing die, movable nail drivers and a movable jack cooperating with the die, fluid-pressure means for operating the nail drivers, means for transmitting a reactive force of the nail drivers to the jack to effect its movement, and means responsive to movement of the drivers to a predetermined position for controlling said first and secondnamed means.
7. In a machine for operating upon heel portions of shoes, a fixed support, movable fastening inserting mechanism and movable work pressing mechanism cooperating with the support, fluid-pressure means for moving the fastening inserting mechanism and the work pressing mechanism, said fluid-pressure means comprising means for moving the work pressing mechanism by a force dependent upon resistance encountered by the fastening inserting mechanism, and means responsive to movement of the fastening inserting mechanism to a predetermined position for controlling said fluid-pressure means.
8. In a fastening inserting machine for securing parts of an article together, a fixed abutment, means for applying a predetermined force in one direction against one of the parts of the article to clamp together said parts held against movement by said abutment with sustained holddown pressure, means for driving fastenings in a direction opposite to said one direction with a pressure which is slightly greater than that necessary to drive the fastenings into said parts and which may vary in accordance with the resistance offered by said parts to said fastenings, and means for applying in said one direction against said one of the parts a force which is additional to the sustained holddown pressure and is substantially equal to the force applied against the fastenings in driving them into the shoe parts.
9. In a fastening inserting machine for securing parts of an article together, a fixed abutment, means for applying a predetermined force in one direction against one of the parts of the article to clamp together said parts held against movement by said abutment with sustained holddown pressure, means for driving fastenings in a direction opposite to said one direction with a pressure which is slightly greater than that necessary to drive the fastenings into said parts and which may vary in accordance with resistance offered by said parts to said fastenings, means for applying in said one direction against said one of the parts a force which is additional to the sustained holddown pressure and is substantially equal to the force applied against the fastenings in driving them into the shoe parts, and means responsive to movement of the fastening driving means to a predetermined position in said opposite direction for causing pressure to be released against said shoe parts and for causing movement of said fastening inserting means to be reversed.
10. In a heel attaching machine, fixed and movable supports for receiving respectively a heel and a shoe, fluidpressure means comprising an actuator operatively connected to the movable support, manually actuated means for rendering said fluid-pressure means active to cause said actuator to move said movable support toward the fixed support to force together with primary and secondary pressures between said supports a heel and a heel seat of the shoe, fluid-pressuremeans operative in response to movement of the manually operated means and adapted to drive fastenings through the fixed support and into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe during the application of secondary pressure between the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and means responsive to the driving of fastenings to predetermined positions for causing said fluidpressure means to move said movable support away from the fixed support and for limiting the depth to which the fastenings are driven.
11. In a heel attaching machine, supports for receiving respectively a heel and a shoe, fluid-pressure means comprising an actuator operatively connected to one of the supports, a first valve, a manually operated member, means responsive to movement of said member to one position for operating said valve to cause said actuator operated by said fluid-pressure means to force the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together with primary pressure, fluid-pressure means for inserting fastenings through the other of said supports and into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe to attach the heel to the shoe, a second valve, and means responsive to movement of said member to a second position for operating said second valve to cause said fastening inserting means to drive fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and simultaneously therewith to cause said first-named fluid-pressure means to force the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together with augmented pressure substantially equal to the pressure required to drive said fastenings.
12. In a heel attaching machine, supports for receiving respectively a heel and a shoe, fluid-pressure means comprising an actuator operatively connected to one of the supports, a first valve, a manually operated member, means responsive to movement of said .member to one position for operating said valve to cause said actuator operated by said fluid-pressure means to move in one direction whereby to force the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together with primary pressure, fluid-pressure means for inserting fastenings through the other of said supports and into the heel and the .heel seat of the shoe to attach the heel to the shoe, a second valve, means responsive to movement of said member to a second position for operating said second valve to cause said fastening inserting means to drive fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and simultaneously therewith to cause said first-named fluid-pressure means to force the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together with augmented pressure substantially equal to the pressure required to drive the fastenings, and means responsive to the operation of said second-named fluid-pressure means .to .a predetermined position for operating said valves to cause said actuator .to move in an opposite direction and to limit the extent to which the fastenings are driven into the heel and .the heel seat of the shoe.
13. In a machine for attaching two shoe parts together, a pair of supports for receiving the shoe parts, fluid- I pressure means for effecting relative movement between the supports to squeeze the shoe parts together with primary pressure, drivers for nails, fluid-pressure means for moving the drivers in predetermined paths through one of the supports, and fluid-pressure means responsive to pressure exerted by said drivers against the nails for effecting further relative movement between the supports to squeeze the shoe parts together with augmented pressure and for maintaining the same relative positions of the shoe parts, the support through which the nails are driven and the paths of movement-of the drivers.
=14. -In a fastening inserting machine, an abutment having driver passages for receiving fastenings, means comprising said abutment for squeezing together a pair of shoe parts with a sustained substantially constant .preliminary pressure, fastening inserting means movable in said passages for driving said fastenings into the shoe parts, and means responsive to the force required to drive said'fastenings into the shoe parts :for causing said first-named means additionally to squeeze saidlshoe parts together with a "force substantialy equal toithe fastening driving .force.
=15. In a fastening inserting machine, an abutment having driver passages for receiving nails, fluid-pressure means cooperating with said abutment to squeeze together a pair of shoe parts with a sustained predetermnied preliminary pressure, nail drivers, fluid-pressure means for moving said drivers through said passages to cause them to drive nails into the shoe parts, fluidpressure means responsive to the force required to drive the nails into the shoe parts for causing said first-named fluid-pressure means to squeeze said shoe parts with additional force substantially equal to the force required to drive the nails into said shoe parts, and manually actuated means for controlling said fluid-pressure means. i
16. In a heel attaching machine, a nailing die having passages, a jack, fluid-pressure means for moving the jack in one direction to force with a predermined sus tained pressure a heel seat of a shoe on said jack against a heel supported by the nailing die, drivers movable in the passages of the nailing die, fluid-pressure means for operating the drivers to cause said nails in the passages to be driven into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and fluid-pressure means operatively associated withsaid first and "second-named fluid-pressure means for applying in said one direction to the jack a force which is 'variable and is proportionate to the force required to drive the nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe.
17. In a heel attaching machine, a nailing die having passages, a jack, fluid-pressure means for moving the jack in one direction to force with a predetermined sustained pressure a heel seat of a shoe on said jack aga'insta heel supported by the nailing die, drivers movable in the passages of the nailing die, fluid-pressure means for moving the drivers in one direction to cause the nails in the passages of the nailing die to be driven into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, fluid-pressure means operatively associated with the first and second-named fluid-pressure means for applying in one direction to the jack aforce which is variable and proportionate to the force required to drive the nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and means responsive to movement of the drivers in said one direction for causing said first-named -fluidpressure means to move the jack in a'direction opposite to said one direction and for causing said second-named fluid-pressure means to stop movement of the drivers in said one direction and to cause said drivers tormove in a direction opposite to said one direction.
18. In a heel attaching machine, a nailing die having passages, a jack, fluid-pressure means for .forcing 'aheel seat of a shoe on the jack with a substantially constant sustained holddown pressure against a heel supported by the nailing die, drivers movable in the passages of the nailing die, fluid-pressure means for operating said drivers to cause nails in said passages to be driven into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and means responsive "to pressure required to drive nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and to clench them in the work for causing said first-named fluid-pressure means to force the heel seat of the shoe against the heel with augmented pressure.
19. In a heel attaching machine, a jack for ashoe, ,a nailing die for supporting a heel which ,is to be attached to the .shoe, means for moving the jack towardthe nailing die with a predetermined holddownpressure to force ,the
,heel seat of the shoe mounted on .the jack against the attaching face of the heel mounted on .the =nailing ,die, means for moving the drivers toward the jack with ,a force which is slightly greater than thatrequiredtotdrive nails into the heel and the heel seatof the shoeand which varies in accordance with the resistance encountered by the nails, and means for moving, during .the application of said holddown pressure, the jack toward the nailing die with a force which is additional to the holddown fiorce and is approximately the same as, and varies in :accordance with, the force applied to the drivers :during the I 19 driving of the nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe.
20. In a machine for use in the attachment of heels to shoes, a jack for a shoe on a last, a nailing die for supporting a heel, fluid pressure means for effecting relar tive movement between the jack and the nailing die and heeland the heel seat of the shoe and to clench them against the last, fluid-pressure means responsive to said second-.named fluid-pressure means for forcing the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together, during the driving ofn'ails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, with a force which is applied in a direction opposite to said one ,direction and which is substantially equal to and varies in accordance with the force applied by said second- 1 named fluid-pressure means against the drivers in the driving of nails into the heel and the heel seat of the ,shoe and the clenching of the nails against said last.
21. In a fastening inserting machine, a movable support for receiving one of a pair of shoe parts to be secured together, a fixed support for receiving the other of saidshoe parts, a first actuator operatively connected to said movable support, fluid-pressure means for apply- ,ing force against said first actuator to cause the shoe parts to be clamped with preliminary pressure between said movable and fixed supports, nail drivers, a second actuator operatively connected to said nail drivers, fluid pressure means for moving said second actuator in one direction with a force sufficient to cause the drivers to drive nails into said shoe parts, and fluid-pressure means for applying against said first actuator a secondary force which is equal to the force applied against said second actuator whereby to apply in a direction opposite to said one direction against the movable support an additional force equal substantially to the force required to drive the nails into the work.
,, l 22. In a fastening inserting machine, a movable sup- ,port for receiving one of a pair of shoe parts to be secured together, a fixed support for receiving the other supportsfnail drivers, a second actuator operatively connected to said nail drivers, fluid-pressure means for moving said second actuator and the drivers in one direction with a force sufiicient to cause the drivers to drive nails into said shoe parts, fluid-pressure means for applying against said first actuator a secondary force which is responsive and is equal to the force applied against said second actuator whereby to apply in a direction opposite to said one direction against the movi able support an additional force equal substantially to the force required to drive nails into the work, and means responsive to movement of the drivers in said one directionfor causing the fluid-pressure means to limit movement of the actuators in said directions respectively and to move the actuators in directions opposite to said directions respectively.
'23. In a fastening inserting machine for use in the attachment of two parts of a shoe together, a nailing die which is adapted to support one shoe part and has pas- "sages, a jack for supporting the other shoe part, a holddown actuator having first and second faces respectively,
a freely reversible connection between the jack and the holddown actuator, nail drivers movable in the passages of-the nailing die, a driver actuator which has a face and which is operatively connected to the drivers, manual control means, fluid-pressure means responsive to said 'n'ranual control means for applying against said firstfaceof the actuator a predetermined force thereby causing the jack to be forced toward the drivers with a force which augments said holddown pressure and varies in accordance with the force exerted by the drivers in driving the nails into the shoe parts.
24. In a machine for attaching two shoe parts together, a fixed nailing die for supporting one shoe part, nail drivers movable in the nailing die, a jack for supporting a second shoe part, a holddown actuator which has primary and secondary faces respectively and is operatively connected to the jack for freely reversible positive movement of the same degree, a driver actuator which has a face of substantially the same area as the secondary face of the holddown actuator and is operatively connected to the drivers for freely reversible positive movement of the same degree, fluid-pressure means for applying pressure to the primary face of the holddown actuator to cause the jack to force with holddown pressure said shoe parts together and said one 'shoe part against the die, fluid-pressure means for rendering a common body of fluid under pressure available for said secondary face of the holddown actuator the shoe and to cause the jack to be forced toward the die with a pressure which is additional to said holddown pressure and is equal to and is variable in accordance with the pressures required to drive nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and manual means for rendering active in succession the first and second-named fluid-pressure means,
25. In a heel attaching machine, a nailing die having passages, a clamp actuator and a jack each of which is freely movable positively in response to movement of the other, a driver head which has secured to it nail drivers movable in the passages of the nailing die and which is movable toward and away from the jack, a driver actuator, said driver head and said actuator being freely movable positively in response to movement of the other, means for applying a predetermined sustained primary force to the clamp actuator to move the jack toward the nailing die whereby to force with a preliminary sustained pressure a shoe on the jack against a heel mounted upon the nailing die, means for apply-- ing against the driver actuator a force which is sufficient to cause nails in the passages of the nailing die to be driven into the heel and the heel seat of a shoe by the drivers and which varies in accordance with resistance offered by the heel and the heel seat of a shoe to said nails, and means for applying to the clamp actuator a secondary sustained force which augments said primary force and is substantially equal to the force applied against the driver actuator and which varies in accordance with variations in the force applied against said driver actuator.
26. In a heel attaching machine, a jack for receiving a shoe mounted upon a last having a heel plate, a nailing die having driver passages, means for positioning a heel on said nailing die, nail drivers movable in the passages of than that required to drive the nails into the heel and the 'heel seat of the shoe and is variable and which is additional to said holddown pressure, the jack toward the nailing die to insure that the heel shall be held with substantially the same holddown pressure against the nailing die throughout the nailing operation irrespective of the force required to drive the nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe.
27. In a heel attaching machine, a jack, a nailing die, fluid-pressure means comprising an actuator operatively connected to the jack. manually operated means displaceable to one recognizable position for rendering said fluidpressure means active to cause said actuator tomove said jack toward the nailing die thereby clamping between the jack and the nailing die with holddown pressure a shoe and a heel to be attached to the shoe, nail driving means, an electric means responsive to movement of said manually operative means to a second recognizable position for causing said fluid-pressure means to be automatically controlled to render said nail driving means active to drive nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and to render the actuator active to force the jack toward the nailing die with a force which is substantially equal to the force required to drive nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and which augments the holddown pressure exerted against the jack.
28. In an outside nailing machine, supports for receiving respectively a heel and a shoe, fluid-pressure means comprising an actuator operatively connected to one of the supports, a first valve, a manually actuated member,
means responsive to movement of said member to one recognizable position for operating said valve to cause said actuator to force the heel and the heel seat of a shoe together with preliminary pressure, fluid-pressure means for inserting fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe to attach the heel to the shoe, a second valve, means responsive to movement-of said member to a second recognizable position for operating said second valve to cause the first-named finid-pressure means positively to force the heel and the heel seat together with aug-' 'mented pressure and for operating said fastening inserting means to insert fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe.
29. In a fastening inserting machine, a nailing die having passages, a clamp actuator and a jack each of which is mounted for free positive movement in opposite direc tions in response to movement of the other, a driver head and a driver actuator each of which is mounted for free positive movement in opposite directions in response to movement of the other, nail drivers which are carried by the driver head and are movable in the passages of the die, power means for applying pressure against the clamp actuator to cause the jack to force with holddown pressure a heel seat of a shoe mounted upon said jack against a heel mounted on the nailing die, power means for applying pressure against the driver actuator'to cause the drivers to drive nails in the passages of the nailing die into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and means for applying against the clamp actuator an additional force of a predetermined ratio of the force applied against said driver actuator whereby to apply against the jack a force which is additional to said holddown pressure and is at least equal to and is applied in a direction opposite to the force applied by the drivers against the nails being driven into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe.
30. In a machine for attaching two parts of a shoe together, supports for said shoe parts respectively, fastening inserting means, fluid-pressure means comprising a clamp :piston which isoperatively connected to one of the sup- :ports and has primary and secondary faces and a driver 'piston which is operatively connected to the fastening inserting meansand has a face which is substantially the "same-area as the secondary face of the clamp'piston, and
a fiuid=pressure line, a pair-of control members movable to recognizable :positions respectively, manual means for moving one of said control members to one of said posi- 'tions to cause the pressure line to be connected to the primary face of the clamp piston whereby to 'cause the shoe parts to be clamped together with primary pressure and for thereafter moving the other control member to said recognizable position to cause the pressure line to be open to the secondary face of theclamp piston and to the face of the driving piston whereby to cause said fastening inserting means to drive fastenings into the shoe parts and to cause the shoe parts to be squeezed together with an additional force which is at least as great as the force required to drive fastenings into said shoe parts.
31. In a heel attaching machine, a support "for aheel, a support for a shoe, fluid-pressure means comprising a first actuator which is operatively connected to the shoe support and has relatively small and large faces, a sequence valve active at a predetermined pressure, La transfer line in communication with the large face of the actuator, an exhaust line, a first valve having a control member movable to a projected position to cause fluid under pressure to be available for said small face of the actuator whereby to move the actuator in one direction to force with primary pressure the shoe upon the secondnamed support against the heel and thereafter to render the sequence valve active and thereby causing oil "to "be admitted to the transfer line then in communication with the exhaust line, fastening inserting means, said fluidpressure means comprising a second actuator operatively connected to said fastening inserting means and having a face, and a second valve having-a control member 'movable to a projected position to cause the transfer 'line to be cut olf from the exhaust line and to be open to .said face of the second actuator thereby causing oil under pressure to be available for said face of said second actuator to cause fastenings to be driven by said fastening inserting means into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and to be available for said large face of said first actuator to force the shoe against the heel with augmented pressure, and manually actuated means for causing said first and second valves to be operated in sequence to said projected positions.
32. In a fastening inserting machine for use in the attachment of heels to shoes, a clamp actuator having small and large faces respectively, a driver actuator having a face, a nailing die having passages, fluid pressure means comprising valves having first and second control members respectively, manually actuated means for operating in succession said first and second control members, a jack which is adapted to support a shoe and is operatively connected for free positive movement in opposite directions to the clamp actuator, a driver head which comprises drivers movable in the passages of the nailing die and which is operatively connected for free positive movement in opposite directions to the driver actuator, said fluid pressure means also comprising a pressure line which is open to said small face of the clamp actuator in response to movement of said first control member to a predetermined position, and means responsive to movement of the second control member to a predetermined position for simultaneously opening the face of the driver actuator and said large face of the clamp actuator to the pressure line to cause fastenings in the passages of the nailing die to be driven in one direction into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe andto cause the clamp actuatorto force the jack and-accordingly the heel seat of the shoe on it against the heel in the heeling die in a direction opposite to said one direction.
33. In a machine for attaching two parts of ashoetogether, a fixed support for receiving one of the shoe parts, a movable support for receiving the other shoe part, fastening inserting means movablein said fixed support, fluid pressure means comprising one actuator which is operatively connected for freely reversible positive movement to the movable support, a member forming primary and secondary chambers with the actuator, a
. second actuator which is operatively connected for freely chamber thereby causing displacement of said one actuator and accordingly movement of the movable support toward the fixed support to clamp the shoe parts together with primary pressure, a transfer line, an exhaust line connected through the other of said valves to the transfer line, and a sequence valve responsive to build up pressure in the branch line for opening at a predetermined pressure the transfer line to the branch line, said manually actuated means being adapted to set said other valve in a predetermined position to cut off the exhaust line from the transfer line and to render through the sequence valve fluid under pressure in the branch line available for the transfer line and accordingly for the secondary and the third chambers whereby, to render said fastening inserting means active to drive fastenings into the clamped shoe parts and to apply augmented force against said one actuator and thus to apply against the movable support in addition to said primary pressure an augmented force which varies in accordance with the forceexerted against said second actuator in the driving of the fastenings into the shoe parts.
34. In a machine for attaching a heel to a shoe, a fixed nailing die which is adapted to receive the heel and has passages, a jack for receiving the shoe, fastening inserting means movable in the passages of the nailing die, fluid pressure means comprising one actuator which is operatively connected for freely reversible positive movement to the jack, a member forming primary and secondary chambers with the actuator, a second actuator which is operatively connected for freely reversible positive movement to the fastening inserting means, a second member forming a third chamber with the second actuator, a pressure line, a pair of valves which have control elements respectively and one of which is connected to the pressure line, a branch line between said one valve and the primary chamber, manually actuated means for moving the control element of said one valve to a projected position to render fluid in the pressure line available for the branch line and accordingly for the primary chamber thereby causing displacement of said one actuator and accordingly movement of the jack toward the nailing die to clamp the heel seat of the shoe against the heel with primary pressure, a transfer line, an exhaust line connected through the other of said valves to the transfer line, and a sequence valve responsive to build up pressure in the branch line for opening at a predetermined pressure the transfer line to the branch line, said manually actuated means being adapted to move the control element of the other of said valves to a projected position to cut off the exhaust line from the transfer line and to render fluid under pressure in the branch line available for the transfer line and accordingly for the secondary and the third chambers whereby to render said fastening inserting means active to drive fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and to apply augmented force against said one actuator and thus to apply against the jack in addition to said primary pressure an augmented force which varies in accordance with the force exerted against said second actuator in the driving of the fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, said second member having formed in it an exhaust port which is open to said third chamber should the second actuator during the driving of fastenings advance beyond a predetermined position thereby insuring against movement of the actuator beyond this position.
35. In a heel attaching machine, a jack for a shoe,
' 24 a nailing die which is adapted to support a heel and has nail passages, means for positioning a heel on the nailing die, fluid-pressure means comprising first and second valves having control members respectively which are movable between retracted and projected positions, a clamp actuator which has a holddown face and an equalizing face and is operatively connected to the jack, a pressure line extending to the first valve, a holddown line extending between the first valve and the holddown face of the clamp actuator, an equalizing line one portion of which extends between the equalizing face of the clamp actuator and the second valve, a sequence valve conmeeting the holddown line to said one portion of the equalizing line, nail drivers operative in the passages of the nailing die, a driver actuator which has a face and is operatively connected to the driver head, said equalizing line comprising a second portion extending between the face of the driver actuator and the second valve, an exhaust line, manually operated means movable to a first recognizable position to move the control member of the first valve from its retracted to its projected position for connecting the pressure line to the holddown line thereby applying pressure against the holddown face of the clamp actuator to cause the heel seat of the shoe on the jack to be forced against the heel on the nailing die with holddown pressure and for operating said sequence valve causing oil in the holddown line to be spilled at a predetermined pressure to said one portion of the equalizing line then opened to the equalizing face of the clamp abutment and connected by said second valve to the exhaust line, said manually operated means being movable to a second recognizable position to move the control member of the second valve from its retracted to its projected position to disconnect said one portion of the equalizing line from the exhaust line and to connect it to the second portion of the equalizing line which is open to the face of the driver actuator thus rendering both portions of the equalizing line open to the pressure line and to the equalizing face of the clamp actuator and the face of the driver actuator to cause the drivers to force nails in the passages of the nailing die into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe with a pressure which is slightly greaterthan the resistance encountered by said nails and to cause the heel seat of the shoe to be forced in a direction opposite to the force applied by the nail drivers in driving the nails into the work, by pressure which is proportional to the pressure applied against said nails.
36. In a heel attaching machine, a jack, a nailing die having passages, a fixed member having a cavity for receiving interchangeably nailing dies having passages of different designs, a driver head comprising drivers movable in said passages, a crosshead having guideways for receiving interchangeably driver heads which have drivers of different designs corresponding to the designs of the driver passages of the nailing dies, power means for moving the jack toward and away from the nailing die, power means for reciprocating the nail drivers, treadle mechanism for rendering said power means active, a cover which is movable between a protecting position in which it covers the driver head and an idle position in which it exposes the driver head during the changing of nailing dies and driver heads, and safety mechanism for insuringagainst said power means being rendered active and accordingly the jack and the driver head being operated when the cover is in its idle position even though the treadle is depressed.
37. In a heel attaching machine, a jack, 3. nailing die having passages, a fixed member having a cavity for receiving interchangeably nailing dies having passages of different designs, a driver head comprising drivers movable in said passages, a crosshead having guideways for receiving interchangeably driver heads having drivers of different designs corresponding to the designs of the driver passages of the nailing dies, fluid-pressure means for moving the jack toward and away from the nailing die, fluidpressure means for reciprocating the nail drivers, electrically powered means for controlling the operation of said fluid-pressure means, treadle mechanism for actuatsaid electrically powered means, a cover which is movable between a protecting position in which it covers the nailing die and an idle position in which it exposes the driver head during the changing of nailing dies and driver heads, said electrically powered means comprising a switch, and means carried by the cover for causing said switch to be closed and opened when the cover is in its protecting and idle positions respectively thereby rendering the fluid-pressure means and accordingly the jack and the nail driving means inactive when the machine is powered even though the treadle is depressed.
38. In a heel attaching machine, means for forcing together during successive stages of a cycle of the machine a shoe and a heel on the one hand and an attached heel of the shoe and a top lift on the other hand, means for driving fastenings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe during the first stage of each cycle whereby to attach the heel to the shoe, and means for rendering said last-named means inactive during the second stage of each cycle.
39. In a heel attaching machine, a support fora shoe having an attached heel from a top lift receiving face of which heel attaching nails project, a support for a top lift, fluid-pressure means for relatively moving the supports to cause the top lift and said projecting nails to be pressed together thereby causing the top lift to be spanked onto the 'heel, means for regulating the pressure with which the heel of the shoe and the top lift are forced together, and
manually actuated means for controlling the operation of said fluid-pressure means.
40. In a machine for attaching a heel to ashoe and for spanking a top lift onto the heel in two successive stages respectively of a cycle of the machine, a nailing die having passages, a carriage which is adapted to receive and clamp a heel and a top lift, a jack for a shoe, means for retaining the carriage in a position in which the heel clamped thereto is arranged over the nailing die, means for moving thejack toward the nailing die to force the heel seat of the shoe against the hee l, means .for driving nails in-thepassages of the mailing die into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe with the nails left projecting from a top lift receiving face of said heel, means for moving the jack away from the nailing die after-the nails have been driven, and means responsive to completion of the first stage of said cycle for releasing the carriage for movement to a :positionin which the top liftis arranged beneath the attachedheel'of theshoe on the jack and for rendering the nail drivers inactive during the second stage of the cycle of the machine in which the second stage nails left projecting beyond the attachediheel' of the shoe are forced against the top lift to cause said top lift to be spanked onto the heel. j p
41. In a machine of the class described, a jack for a shoe, a nailing die, a carriage supported by the nailing die and adapted to position a heel and a top lift between the nailing die and the jack during first and second stages respectively of a cycle of the machine, means for driving fastenings, fluid pressure means for moving the jack twice toward the nailing die during the cycle of the machine, once during a first stage of said cycle to clamp the heel seat of the shoe against the heel on the nailing die and again during the second stage of said cycle for forcing fastcnings, which have been driven into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe during said first stage by said firstnamed means and project beyond a top lift receiving face of the heel, into the top lift supported by the nailing die, said fluid pressure means being operatively responsive -to the action of the fastening driving means against the fastenings being driven into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe to cause the jack to be forced toward the nailing die during said first stage with a force which is a con- 'stant amount greater than the force required to drive the fasten'ings into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, and means actuated in response to the operation of the machine during the first stage of its cycle for rendering inactive during the second stage of the cycle the fastening driving means and for causing the jack to be forced toward the nailing die with a predetermined force which is materially less than that imparted to the jack during said first stage of said cycle whereby to force the nails, which project from the heel, into the top lift to attach said top lift to the heel.
42. In a machine for attaching heels to shoes and for securing top lifts to said heels, a jack for a shoe, a nailing die having passages, a carriage for positioning during first and second stages respectively of a cycle of the machine a heel and a top lift over the nailing die and directly below said jack, a spring for constantly biasing the carriage in one direction over said die, means comprising a detent for locating the carriage with the heel therein positioned over the passages of the nailing die and directly beneath the jack, fluid-pressure means for forcing during said first stage the jack toward the nailing die to cause the heel seat of the shoe to be forced with holddown pressure against the heel on the carriage, fluidpressure means for driving nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe and for forcing the jack toward the nailing die with pressure which is additional to said holddown pressure and is substantially equal to the pressure required to drive the nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, a stop, mechanism responsive to the operation of the machine through the first stage of its cycle for releasing the detent to allow the carriage to move under the action of the spring to a position in which the top lift is arranged over the nailing die and directly behea'th the jackto a position determined by the stop, means responsive to said mechanism for rendering said secondname fluid-pressure means inactive and for causing said first-named fluidpressure means to be active during the second stage of said 'cycle to force the jack toward the nailing die whereby to force the nails projecting beyond the heel with said holddown pressure against the top lift, and fluid pr'essu're means rendered active in response to movement 'of said mechanism for applying to the jack a 'consta'n'tpres'sure which is additional to said holddown 45 I pressure and combined with said holddown pressure is adequate to spank said top 'lift onto the top lift receiving face "of "the heel.
43. Ina machine for attaching during a first stage of it's cycle-a hee'l :to a s'hoeand'for spanking during a second stage of its cycle atop lift onto the heel, a jack for supporting aishoe, a nailing die, a carriage which is slidable over the nailing die and is adapted to position a heel and atop lift between t'he'nailing die and the jack during the first "and second stages respectively of the cycle of the machine, means for moving during the first stage of said cycle the jack toward the nailing die with a relatively he'avy pressure to squeeze together the heel and the heel seat of the-shoe, drivers movable in the die, means for are forced together under said relatively heavy pressure, with the nails left projecting beyond a top lift receiving face of the heel, means for moving during the second stage of said cycle the jack toward the nailing die with a relatively light pressure, and means which is adapted automatically to set preparatory to the first stage of said cycle the carriage in a position in which the heel is located between the nailing die and the jack and to render said first and second-named means active and the thirdnamed means inactive and which is adapted automatically to set preparatory to said second stage of said cycle the carriage in a position in which the top lift is positioned between the nailing die and the jack and to render said first and second-named means inactive and the thirdnamed means active.
44. In a machine for attaching during a first stage of its cycle a heel to a shoe and for spanking during the second stage of its cycle a top lift onto the heel, a jack for supporting a shoe, a nailing die, a carriage which is slidable over the nailing die and is adapted to position a heel and a top lift between the nailing die and the jack during the first and second stages respectively of the cycle of the machine, fluid-pressure means for moving during the first stage of said cycle the jack toward the nailing die with a relatively heavy pressure to squeeze together the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, drivers movable in the die, fluid-pressure means for causing the drivers to drive nails in the heel and the heel seat of the shoe, while said heel seat and said heel are forced together under said relatively heavy pressure, with the nails left projecting beyond a top lift receiving face of the heel, fluidpressure means for moving during the second stage of said cycle the jack toward the nailing die with a relatively light pressure, and means which is adapted automatically to set preparatory to the first stage of said cycle the carriage in a position in which the heel is located between the nailing die and the jack and to render said first and second-named means active and the third-named means inactive and which is adapted automatically to set preparatory to said second stage of said cycle the carriage in a position in which the top lift is positioned between the nailing die and the jack and to render said first and second-named means inactive and the third-named means active.
45. In a machine for attaching during a first stage of its cycle a heel to a shoe and for spanking during a second stage of its cycle a top lift onto the heel, a support for the shoe, a support for the heel and the top lift, means for positioning the heel and the top lift over said secondnamed support during the first and second stages respectively of the cycle of the machine, means for driving during the first stage of said cycle nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe with portions of said nails left projecting beyond the top lift receiving face of the heel, and means for relatively moving the supports to squeeze during the first and second stages respectively of said cycle the heel seat of the shoe and the heel on the one hand with relatively high pressure and the attached heel and the top lift of the shoe on the other hand with relatively low pressure.
46. In a machine for attaching during a first stage of its cycle a heel to a shoe and for spanking during a second stage of its cycle a top lift onto the heel, a jack for the shoe, a nailing die for supporting the heel and the top lift, means for positioning the heel and the top lift between the jack and the nailing die preparatory to the first and second stages respectively of the cycle of the machine, means for driving during the first stage of said cycle nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe with portions of said nails left projecting beyondthe top lift receiving face of the heel, means for moving the jack toward the nailing die during said first stage with a relatively heavy force to press the heel seat of the shoe against the heel, means for moving the jack toward the nailing die during said second stage with a relatively light pressure to spank the top lift onto a top lift receiving face of the heel, and mechanism for automatically rendering the third-named means active and the fourth-named means inactive during the first stage and for rendering the fourth-named means active and the thirdnamed means inactive during the second stage of the cycle of the machine.
47. In a machine for attaching during a first stage of it cycle a heel to a shoe and for spanking during a second stage of its cycle a top lift onto the heel, a jack for the shoe, a nailing die for supporting the heel and the top lift, means for positioning the heel and the top lift between the jack and the nailing die preparatory to the first and second stages respectively of the cycle of the machine, fluid-pressure means for driving during the first stage of said cycle nails into the heel and the heel seat of the shoe with portions of said nails left projecting beyond the top lift receiving face of the heel, fluid-pressure means for moving the jack toward the nailing die during said first stage with a relatively heavy force to press the heel seat of the shoe against the heel, fluidpressure means for moving the jack toward the nailing die during said second stage with a relatively light pressure to spank the top lift onto a top lift receiving face of the heel, and mechanism for automatically rendering the third-named means active and the fourth-named means inactive during the first stage and for rendering the fourth-named means active and the third-named means inactive during the second stage of the cycle of the machine.
48. In a machine for attaching during a first stage of its cycle a heel to a shoe and for spanking during a second stage of its cycle a top lift onto the attached heel, means for squeezing the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together with relatively heavy pressure during said first stage, means for squeezing the attached heel and the top lift together with relatively light pressure during said second stage, and means for automatically rendering said first-named means active and the secondnamed means inactive during the first stage of said cycle and for automatically rendering said first-named means inactive and the second-named means active during the second stage of said cycle.
49. In a machine for attaching during a first stage of its cycle a heel to a shoe and for spanking during a second stage of its cycle a top lift onto the attached heel, fluid-pressure means for squeezing the heel and the heel seat of the shoe together with relatively heavy pressure during said first stage, fluid-pressure means for squeezing the attached heel and the top lift together with relatively light pressure during said second stage, and means for automatically rendering said first-named fluidpressure means active and the second-named fluid-pressure means inactive during the first stage of said cycle and for automatically rendering said first-named fluidpressure means inactive and the second-named fluidpressure means active during the second stage of said cycle.
No references cited.
US513436A 1955-06-06 1955-06-06 Heel attaching machines Expired - Lifetime US2746046A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2904788A (en) * 1957-08-27 1959-09-22 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel attaching machines and work conveying means for use therewith
US2994882A (en) * 1959-01-07 1961-08-08 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel attaching machines

Non-Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Title
None *

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2904788A (en) * 1957-08-27 1959-09-22 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel attaching machines and work conveying means for use therewith
US2994882A (en) * 1959-01-07 1961-08-08 United Shoe Machinery Corp Heel attaching machines

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