US2722926A - Torque responsive internal combustion engine governor - Google Patents

Torque responsive internal combustion engine governor Download PDF

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US2722926A
US2722926A US239073A US23907351A US2722926A US 2722926 A US2722926 A US 2722926A US 239073 A US239073 A US 239073A US 23907351 A US23907351 A US 23907351A US 2722926 A US2722926 A US 2722926A
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means
engine
governor
speed
reactive
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US239073A
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Le Roy V Bradnick
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PIERCE GOVERNOR CO Inc
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PIERCE GOVERNOR CO Inc
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D1/00Controlling fuel-injection pumps, e.g. of high pressure injection type
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D2700/00Mechanical control of speed or power of a single cylinder piston engine
    • F02D2700/02Controlling by changing the air or fuel supply
    • F02D2700/0269Controlling by changing the air or fuel supply for air compressing engines with compression ignition
    • F02D2700/0282Control of fuel supply
    • F02D2700/0284Control of fuel supply by acting on the fuel pump control element
    • F02D2700/0287Control of fuel supply by acting on the fuel pump control element depending on several parameters

Description

Nov. 8, 1955 LE ROY v. BRADNICK 2,722,926

TORQUE RESPONSIVE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE GOVERNOR Filed July 28, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet l I a v 75 I 1 E l l I 67 INVENTOR. 451%) V. .BRfiD/V/C'K.

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Nov. 8, 1955 LE ROY v. BRADNICK 2,722,926

TORQUE RESPONSIVE. INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE GOVERNOR Filed July 28, 1951 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 75 y do Nov. 8, 1955 LE ROY v. BRADNICK 2,722,926

TORQUE RESPONSIVE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE GOVERNOR Filed July 28, 1951 .5 SheQts -Sheet 3 I N V EN TOR. 4.47%) 14 ZRHD/V/C'K.

United States Patent Ofiice 2,722,926 Patented Nov. 8, 1955 TORQUE RESPONSIVE INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE GOVERNOR Le Roy V. Bradnick, Anderson, Ind., assignor to The Pierce Governor Company, Inc., Anderson, Ind., a corporation Application July 28, 1951, Serial No. 239,073

24 Claims. (Cl. 123-103) The present invention relates to governing means for automatically controlling the speed of an internal combustion engine. It has for one of its objects that of providing a governing means for automatically controlling the speed of an engine in such a manner that under normal conditions at no load and light loads the engine will operate at comparatively low speeds, and accordingly will deliver low horsepower output, while as additional power demands are impressed upon the engine, the engine speed is increased to meet these increased power demands and vice versa.

Another object of the invention is to provide a governing means for internal combustion engines the speed adjustment of which is automatically changed through the medium of a load sensing means to effect an increase in the speed of the engine as the load demands are increased and vice versa.

Another object of the invention is to provide a speed responsive governor controlling the delivery of fuel to an internal combustion engine, which control will increase the fuel delivery to the engine for effecting an increased speed in the operation of the engine upon the imposition of additional load on the engine and vice versa.

Still another object of the invention is to provide, in a governing means for internal combustion engines which comprises a reactive control device, a load sensing means and a non-reacting linkage coupled between the governing means and the load sensing means, whereby the load sensing means is free to sense change of load on the engine independently of any reaction from the reactive means, thereby to effect an increase in the speed of the engine as the load demands increase.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter in the accompanying specification and claims.

For the purpose of disclosing the invention I have illustrated certain embodiments thereof in the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a schematic drawing of an apparatus embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a governing device embodying my invention.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 4 is a transverse section of the governor illustrated in Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal sectional view of the servomotor illustrated in Fig. l.

Fig. 6 is an illustration of the modification of the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 1, wherein the load sensing device is connected to the exhaust manifold of the engine, and

Fig. 7 is an illustration of a modification wherein the load sensing device is connected to the intake manifold of the engine.

In the apparatus illustrated in Fig. 1, I provide a carburetor 1 delivering fuel supply to the intake manifold 2 of an internal combustion engine 3. This carburetor is provided with a fuel flow control valve 4, and on the air intake side of the carburetor it is provided with a venturi 5.

The position of the control valve 4 is controlled through the medium of a centrifugaliy operated governor 6 having a control lever 7 connected by a suitable linkage 8 with a crank arm 9 on the shaft of the fuel control valve 4. This centrifugally operated governor may be of a well known type wherein there is provided centrifugally operated weights responsive to the speed of the engine driven shaft and operable as the weights move outwardly under centrifugal force to move the control lever 7 in a direction to close the fuel control valve 4. The centrifugally operated governor is of the type illustrated in Fig. 3, which structure will be more fully described hereinafter. The governor shaft 9 is driven by a suitable belt connection 10 or other suitable connection with the engine, the speed of which is to be controlled and is accordingly driven at a speed comparable with the speed of the engine.

The centrifugal force caused by rotating the governor weights is suitably transmitted to the control shaft to which control lever 7 is fastened, and is resisted by a resilient means 11 which is connected to an extension 12 of control lever 7. The other end of resilient means 11 is connected to an adjustable arm 13 mounted on the governor speed change lever 14. The adjustable arm 13 is adjustably fastened by means of jarn nuts 15. The speed setting of the governor 6 may be increased by positioning the governor speed change lever 14 in positions counter-clockwise to that shown, and vice versa.

Under normal no load conditions the governor 6 controls the speed of the engine in a normal manner, that is the governor control lever 7 positions the carburetor lever and throttle valve 4 in such a manner as to maintain no load speed as determined by the governor speed setting.

When load is applied to the engine the governor reacts in the normal manner, that is the governor weights respond to a slight drop in speed and reposition control lever 7 and the throttle valve 4 toward open position in such a manner as to maintain governed speed as determined by the governor calibration.

In order that the speed setting of the governor may be changed in such a manner that when torque load is applied to the engine 3, the fuel feed to the engine will be increased to such an extent that the speed of the engine will be increased, I provide a load sensing means which in the present instance includes a load sensing device 16, a servomotor 17 responding to the movement of the load sensing device. The load sensing device in the present instance comprises a diaphragm 18 mounted within a chamber 19 and operating against a coiled spring 20. The chamber 19 is connected by a conduit 21 to the venturi 5 on the atmospheric side of the throttle valve. Atmospheric pressure is present on the side opposite to chamber 19 of the diaphragm. The diaphragm in turn is connected by suitable linkage 22 with the pilot valve lever 23 of the servomotor 17. It is the purpose of the servomotor to provide the necessary power to increase the speed setting of the speed change lever, without interfering with the sensing force; and to provide a non-compressible means to hold the speed change lever in position. It does this by the action of the power lever 33 on the governor speed change lever 14 through linkage 43. A non-compressible means for holding the speed change lever in position is particularly advantageous because the resilient means 11 is reactive in that tension is transmitted in a backward direction through lever 14. If lever 14 were connected directly to the load sensing device 16, the reactive force of resilient means 11 would constitute another added load on diaphragm 18 and also on spring 20. Therefore, resilient means 11 and spring'20 would necessarily have to be designed to cooperate properly with one another. Since the tensile characteristics of the spring are unpredictable within reasonable tolerances, it would be diflicult to reproduce in manufacturing production one speed responsive governor after another having characteristics identical with one another within reasonable tolerances. The provision of the servomotor which comprises a non-compressible means creates an independent relationship whereby load sensing means 16 operates entirely independently of the reactive spring 11. This servomotor comprises, as illustrated in Fig. 5, a suitable housing 24 having formed therein a cylinder 25 communicating at one end with a trapped oil chamber 26, and at its opposite end with a passage 27 leading to an oil sump from which oil may be taken and delivered by a suitable pressure to the servomotor structure. Operating within the cylinder 25 is a power piston 28 connected at one end through a bifurcated arm structure 29 with an arm 30 mounted on a shaft 31 through the medium of a pin 32, which pin is adapted to engage for movement in one direction with the arm 30. Shaft 31 in turn is provided with a power lever 33 exteriorly of the casing.

The cylinder 25 is provided with a pressure oil inlet, 34, connected to a suitable pump. The power piston 28 has an annular groove 35 which communicates with the oil inlet 34 at all times. The power piston 28 also has a passage 35 between the annular groove 35 and the central bore or cylinder 38 for the pilot valve 40. The pilot valve 40 has two lands 39 and 33 with pressure oil between them, and is actuated by the external pilot valve lever 23 through shaft 42, lever 41, and connecting linkage. The power piston 28 also has ports 36 and passages 37 that provide communication between the pilot valve cylinder 38 and the trapped oil chamber 26. When the unit is at rest as shown in Fig. the left land 39 of pilot valve 40 covers port 36. External forces on power lever 33 transmitted to the power piston 28 through shaft 31, lever 30, and pin 32 cause a trapped oil pressure in chamber 26. Movement of the pilot valve 40 to the right (Fig. 5) causes land 39 to uncover port 36 and establish communication between trapped oil chamber 26 and sump through passages 37, 38 and 27. The external force on power lever 33 causes the power piston 28 to move to the right until power piston port 36 is moved to coincide with pilot valve land 39 closing the passage and stopping movement. Conversely when the pilot valve 40 is moved to the left (Fig. 5) the trapped oil chamber 26 is connected, through port 36 and passage 37, with the pressure oil present between the pilot valve lands 39 and 39'. Oil pressure causes the power piston 28 to move to the left overcoming external forces on power piston lever 33 until port 36 of the power piston 23 is moved to coincide with pilot valve land 39, closing the passage and stopping movement.

The power piston lever 33, Fig. l, is connected by linkage 43 with the lower end of the governor speed change lever 14, which, it will be noted, is pivoted at 44 on the governor casing intermediate of its ends. Accordingly, as the piston 28 is positioned to the left, Fig. 5, under the influence of oil pressure, the power lever 33 is positioned to the right, Fig. 1, and in a direction to position the governor speed change lever 14 in a direction to increase the tension of the spring 11 on the extension 12 of the control arm 7, which increased tension tends to oppose the movement of the governor weights in a direction to close the throttle valve. Hence the governor weights must be rotated at a higher speed to overcome the greater force from the spring. It is to be noted that the greater force exerted by spring 11 has no reactive effect on load sensing means 16, whereby the load sensing means may operate independently of the greater reactive force of spring 11.

In the operation of the device as so far described, when the engine starts with no load, the engine driven governor 6 controls the engine in a normal manner. That is, the governor control lever 7 positions the carburetor lever 9 and throttle valve 4 in such a manner as to maintain the low, no load speed as determined by the governor speed setting. Under these conditions, the pressure at the venturi outlet 5 approaches atmospheric, and the vacuum or pressure difference is insuflicicnt to cause the diaphragm 18 to move against the force of the spring 20. Therefore, normal no load governing conditions exist.

However, when a torque load is applied to the engine, the governor 6 responds to a slight speed drop and moves the carburetor lever toward the right opening the throttle valve 4 enough to maintain engine speed. When the throttle valve is thus opened, the vacuum at the venturi 5 is increased due to increased flow of fuel gases, and this increased pressure dilference acts upon the diaphragm 1.8 to move the same to the right, Fig. 1, against the pressure of the spring 20.

This movement is transmitted to the pilot valve 40, through the linkage 22, the pilot valve lever 23, the pilot valve lever shaft 42, lever 41 and inside link. The movement of pilot valve to the left (Fig. 5) causes pilot valve land 39 to uncover port 36 thereby connecting pressure oil present between the pilot valve lands 39 and 39 at all times, to the trapped oil chamber 26.

Therefore, pressure is exerted on the right hand side of the power piston 28, Fig. 5, to move the power piston 28 to the left thus moving the arm 30, which in turn moves the power piston lever 33 to the right. Fig. 1, moving the governor speed change lever 14- and thereby increasing the tension of the spring 11 and the speed setting of the governor. This movement of the piston will eventually bring the ports 36 into alignment with the pilot valve land 39, thereby shutting off the admission of further fluid under pressure behind the piston 28 and correspondingly the piston will come to rest in its new position.

The increased tension of the governor spring 11 causes the control arm 7 to move to the right and move throttle valve 4 toward open enough to cause the engine to accelerate to the higher speed as determined by the new setting of the governor. While the engine operates at the highest speed, it will be evident that the reactive force in spring 11 is increased, but this increased reactive force is not reflected back to load sensing device 16 due to the non-compressible character of servornotor 17. Hence, the reactive force can have no effect on the operating characteristics of the load sensing means 16.

When load is applied to the engine the action of the speed responsive governor causes the primary sensing at the diaphragm. The action of the power piston lever 33 on the governor speed change lever 14 causes a further opening of the throttle valve 4 which causes a secondary sensing. To attain stable operation, the proper sized orifice must be provided in the line from venturi to diaphragm to correspond to the volume of the chamber, and the acceleration rate of the engine-system. When these conditions have been satisfied, the engine speed settles out at a higher speed determined by the load applied and the calibration and setting of the diaphragm springs.

Conversely, when the engine is operating under load at a higher speed and the load is decreased, the governor 6 responds to a slight increase in engine speed and movcs the carburetor lever closing the throttle valve 4 enough to maintain the engine speed. When the throttle valve 4 is moved toward the closed position the vacuum at the venturi 5 is decreased due to the decreased flow of gases, and the diaphragm 18 is moved to the left (Fig. 1) by the action of spring 20. This movement is transmitted to the pilot valve 40 (Fig. 5) through the levers and links, moving it to the right opening port 36 to sump. This permits the escape of the trapped oil in chamber 26 and permits the movement of the power piston 28, under the influence of the governor forces through speed change lever 14 on power lever 33, to the right. This movement of the speed change lever reduces the speed setting of the governor, and the movement of the power piston 28 to the right (Fig. causes the closing, of the port 36 by its coincidence with pilot valve land 39. The engine speed is consequently reduced to a speed determined by the new setting of the governor speed change lever. From the foregoing description it will be apparent that whether the engine load increases or decreases and whether the engine speed increases or decreases, the reactive force exerted by spring 11 can have no effect on the operating characteristics of load sensing device 16 due to the fact that servornotor 17 does not reflect the reactive force of spring 11 or changes therein.

In Figs. 2, 3 and 4 I have illustrated an embodiment of the control means, which is schematically illustrated in Fig. I. In the structure illustrated in Figs. 2, 3 and 4 there is provided a housing 44 having an opening 45 at one end closed by a closure cap 46, which provides a chamber 47 in which is mounted a flexible diaphragm 48 operating against biasing springs 49. The chamber 47 is adapted to be placed in communication through suitable conduits with the venturi 5 in the manner illustrated in Fig. l. The side of diaphragm 48 opposite to chamber 47 is open to atmospheric pressure. Within this housing there is provided a cylinder 50' formed in a liner 50 having an intake passage 51 communicating with an intake passage 52 connected with the source of supplying oil under pressure. This cylinder also is provided with a discharge passage 53 communicating by the way of a conduit 54 with a second cylinder 55 formed in the casing 44, the purpose of which. will appear more fully hereinafter. Mounted Within this cylinder 50 formed in a liner 50 is a sleeve valve 56 having an annular groove 57 communicating with pilot valve bore 59 in the sleeve valve through passages '58. The annular groove 57 and the passages 58, as well as: the pilot valve bore 59, communicate with the inlet passage 51.

The sleeve valve 56 is also provided with radial ports 60 communicating with an annular groove 61 in the inner walls of the cylinder 50, and also with the pilot valve bore 59 in the center of the sleeve valve 56. Operating within the pilot valve bore 59 is a pilot valve 63 connected by a suitable linkage with the diaphragm 48 and adapted under predetermined conditions to control the ports 60 in the sleeve valve 56 by the pilot valve land 62.

Pressure oil is present between the pilot valve lands 62 and 62' at all times the oil pump is running.

The left end of sleeve valve 56 is fitted with an internally splined adapter which receives the splined end 64 of the governor drive shaft 71 making sleeve valve 56 rotatable with the governor drive shaft 71, but permitting axial movement of sleeve valve 56 in cylinder 50. To drive shaft 71 is mounted a collar 66 which retains a spring 67 the purpose of which is to urge the sleeve valve 56 to the right, against the sleeve valve lever 80; through the bearing and contact areas 82.

The lower left part of Figure 3 embodies a conventional centrifugally actuated mechanical type speed responsive governor. The unit is designed to mount on an accessoryhousing of the engine to be controlled. Governor drive shaft 71 is driven from the engine by a driving means 72 which is rotated proportionate to engine speed. The governor drive shaft 71 has a weight carrier 73 fastened thereto and rotatable therewith. Governor weights 74 are mounted to the weight carrier 73 to be rotatable with the carrier, and also rotatable about the weight carrier pins on the carrier 73. Centrifugal force developed by rotating the governor Weights 74 is transmitted to the thrust sleeve 65, slidably mounted on the governor shaft 71, by means of weight noses 75. By means of thrust bearing 67' mounted on thrust sleeve the force from the weights is transmitted to governor yoke 68 which is fastened to rotatable control shaft 69. Also fastened to control shaft 69 are spring lever 73' (Fig. 2) and control lever (Fig; 4). Centrifugal force from governor weights 74 is resisted by resillent means 7 4' which, at its right end (Fig, 2), is mounted to the governor spring lever 73, and at its left end to the governor speed change lever 76 by means of adjusting screw 75'. Adjustment of governor is accomplished by means of adjusting screw 75 and jam nuts. Speed setting of the governor is accomplished by moving the governor speed change lever 76. A clockwise movement increases the tension on the governor spring, and vice versa. The force from the governor spring 74' keeps the governor weights 74 in a closed position, at which position the engine throttle valve is open, until the engine speed reaches a value at which the centrifugal force from the governor weights becomes great enough to move the control lever to a position in the direction of closed throttle as determined by the load onthe engine and the calibration and speed setting of the governor. Outward movement of the weights moves the control lever in the direction of closed throttle, and vice versa. The system comes to rest when the forces from the weights and spring balance. Consequently, a slight increase in speed of governed engine due to a decreased load will result in movement in the direction of closed throttle by the governor; conversely a slight decrease in speed due to an increased load will result in movement in the direction of opened throttle by the governor.

Above the speed responsive governor a power piston 78 operating in the cylinder 55 is moved to the right, Fig. 3, under the pressure admitted thereon through the passage 54'; and when the power piston 78 is moved to the right, it moves speed change lever 76 correspondingly to the right through roller 77 mounted on speed change lever 76, thereby increasing the tension on the spring 74' and thus increasing the force against which the governor weights are adapted to operate to move the arm 70 toward a closed throttle position.

In addition, when power piston 78 moves to the right to increase the speed setting. of the governor, it carries sleeve valve lever 80 with it through roller 77 on speed change lever 76, and roller 79 on sleeve valve lever 80. This permits sleeve valve 56 to be positioned to the right by spring 67 proportionate to the position of power piston 78. Conversely when the power piston 78 is moved to the left from a high speed setting, spring 81 urges sleeve valve lever 80 to follow, compressing spring 67 through sleeve valve lever contact areas 82, a thrust bearing, and the sleeve valve 56.

The lever arm 83 and the solenoid 84 are for a manual control setting under certain conditions, of the governor mechanism, but detailled description thereof is believed to be unnecessary except to say that by adjusting the lever arm 83 through the influence of a solenoid control member 84, manual adjustment of the control may be effected through effecting pressure on the diaphragm 48 in opposition to the biasing spring 49.

The apparatus disclosed in Fig. 3 operates in substantially the same manner as that disclosed in Fig. 1. When the engine is started with no load, the engine driven centrifugal governor controls the engine in a normal manner. That is, the governor control lever 70 positions the carburetor shaft and the throttle valve 4, Fig. 1, in such a manner as to maintain the low no load speed as determined by governor setting.

However, when torque load is applied to the engine, the governor weights tend to move inwardly in a direction to operate the throttle control lever 70 to move the throttle valve 4 further toward the open position. When the throttle valve is opened, the vacuum at the venturi 5 is increased, thereby increasing pressure difference applied to diaphragm 48. Under these conditions, diaphragm 48 then moves to the right moving the pilot valve 63 to the right, Fig. 3, admitting pressure oil from the inlet passage 51 through the bore 59 and ports 60 to the conduit or passageway 54, and thus to the cylinder 55 behind the power piston 78. This moves the piston 78 to the right, Figs. 2 and 3, thereby positioning the governor speed change lever 76- to the right, thus increasing the tension of spring 74' on spring lever 73, which force is transmitted to the governor weights 74 through governor yoke 68 on the centrifugal governor. The control lever 70 is moved in the direction of open throttle. The engine speed is thereby increased to a value determined by the new speed setting of the governor.

It is to be noted that when the power piston 78 moves to the right, Figs. 2 and 3, the sleeve valve lever 80 is likewise moved to the right, thereby unloading contact areas 82 from the thrust bearing of the sleeve valve 56 and permitting the sleeve valve, under the influence of the spring 67, to move to the right until finally the ports 60 coincide with the pilot valve lands 62, shutting off further pressure to the cylinder 55 and thus maintaining the parts in their newly adjusted position.

When the power output of the engine begins to exceed the demand for power, as an instance of a decrease in loading, the governor control lever 70, moved by the spreading of the governor weights 74, due to slight increase in speed, moves the throttle valve in the direction toward closed position. This movement causes a reduction in the vacuum at the venturi due to the reduced flow of gas, resulting in a reduction in the pressure difference on the diaphragm 48. Under these conditions the biasing springs 49 move pilot valve 63 to the left, Fig. 3, placing the ports 60 in communication with the right hand side of the bore 59 of the sleeve valve thereby permitting the escape of the fluid under trapped pressure in the cylinder 55 to sump, thus permitting piston 78 to be moved to the left, Fig. 3, by the force of the governor spring reducing the tension on the spring 74, thereby reducing the speed setting of the governor. The engine speed is then reduced to a value determined by the new setting of the governor. With the movement of the piston 78 to the left, the sleeve valve lever 80 will move to the left under the influence of the spring 81, moving the sleeve valve 56 to the left until the ports 60 again coincide with the pilot valve land 62, closing the passage and stopping movement.

In Fig. 6 I have illustrated a modification wherein the load sensing device 16 illustrated in Fig. 1 is connected to the exhaust manifold 83', and under these conditions exhaust back pressure is applied to the left hand side of the diaphragm 18, to move the same to the right with increased pressure, instead of venturi vacuum being applied to the right hand side as illustrated in Fig. 1. Exhaust back pressure is a function of the flow of exhaust gases which is proportional to the engine horsepower output. The functioning of the governor system with this sensing medium is based on the utilization of any means to indicate flow of exhaust gases, such as back pressure, pressure drop through a venturi tube, static pressure in a Pitot tube, etc. In other respects the operation of the device is the same; and, of course, the same connections are made as in the structure illustrated in Figs. 2, 3 and 4.

In Fig. 7 I have illustrated a modification wherein the load sensing device 16 illustrated in Fig. 1 is connected to the intake manifold 2, downstream from the carburetor throttle valve 4. Under these conditions the manifold vacuum is applied to the left side of the diaphragm through a restrictor 85. The right side of the diaphragm is open to atmospheric pressure. At no load and light loads, the vacuum is high and moves the diaphragm to the left against the spring 86 positioning the speed change lever 14 at low speed settings. However, when the governor responds to an increase in load the vacuum is decreased permitting the spring to move diaphragm to the right thus increasing the speed setting of the governor speed change lever through the hydraulic servomotor.

Manifold vacuum varies inversely as the throttle valve is opened and is roughly indicative of the engine torque. Due to the great pressure difference between no load and full load vacuum (approximately 18-20" Hg) a highly restricted system is necessary to obtain stable operation.

In other respects the operation of the device is the same,

and, of course, the same connections are made as in the structure illustrated in Figs. 2, 3 and 4.

The invention claimed is:

1. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means continuously responsive to varying load imposed on the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of load on the engine, and a decreased opening of said fuel controlling means upon a decrease of load imposed on said engine.

2. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to the fuel flow to the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of fuel flow to the engine under increased load imposed upon the engine, and a closing of said fuel controlling means under a decrease in load imposed on the engine.

3. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to the exhaust flow of the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an I increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of exhaust flow from the engine under increased load imposed upon the engine and a closing of said fuel controlling means under a decrease in load imposed on the engine.

4. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to the intake manifold pressure of the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of the intake manifold pressure of the engine under increased load imposed upon the engine, and closing said fuel controlling means under a decrease in load imposed upon the engine.

5. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to load imposed on the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with the increase of load imposed upon the engine, and a decreased speed setting of the speed responsive means up'on decrease of load imposed upon the engine.

6. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to the fuel flow to the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with the increase of fuel flow .to the'engine, after increase of load imposed on said engine, and a decreased speed setting of the greases 5,139 speed responsive means upon decrease in fuel flow upon a decrease in load imposed on the engine.

7. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel tothe engine; reactive speed responsive means governing operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to the exhaust flow from the engine and including a continuously responsive nonreactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with the in crease of exhaust flow from the engine upon increase in load imposed on the engine, and a decreased speed setting of the speed responsive means upon a decrease in exhaust flow upon a decrease in load imposed upon the engine.-

8. In an internal combustion engine governonin combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; and load sensing means responsive to the intake manifold pressure of the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive meanssubstantially directly proportional with the increase of the intake manifold pressure of the engine upon increase in load imposed on the engine, and a decrease of intake manifold pressure upon decrease in the load imposed on the engine; 7 j

9. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive resilient means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to load imposed on the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said adjustable means for effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable resilient means substantially directly proportional with the increase of load upon the engine, and a decreased force with a decreased load upon the engine 10. In an internal combustion engine governor,- in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive resilient means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to the fuel flow to the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said adjustable means for effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable resilient means substantially directly proportional with the increase of fuel flow to the engine under increased load imposed upon the engine, and decreasing the force on said speed responsive device with decrease of fuel flow under decrease in load imposed upon the engine.

11. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive resilient means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to the exhaust flow of the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said adjustable means for effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable resilient means substantially directly proportional with the increase of exhaust flow from said engine under an increased load imposed upon the engine, and a decreased force with the decrease of exhaust flow under a decrease in load upon the engine.

12. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable re"- active resilient means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to the intake manifold pressure of the engine and including a continuously responsive non-reactive linkage coupled to said adjustable means for effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable resilient means substantially directly proportional with the increase of the intake manifold pressure of the engine, under an increased load imposed on the engine, and a decreased force under the decrease in manifold pressure upon a decrease in the load imposed on the engine.

13. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing, the operation ofsaid fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to load imposed on the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of load imposed on the engine, and to effect a decreased opening of the fuel controlling means with the decrease of load imposed on the engine.

14. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; nonreactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; load sensing means responsive to the fuel flow to the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of fuel flow to said engine, upon an increased loading imposed on the engine, and to effect a decreased opening of the fuel controlling means with the decrease of load imposed on the engine.

15. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel. to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; load sensing means responsive to the exhaust flow of the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means to effect an increased opening of said fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of exhaust flow from the engine, under an increased load imposed on the engine, and. a decreased opening of the fuel controlling means with the decrease of. exhaust pressure under a decreased load imposed on the engine.

16. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; load sensing means responsive to intake manifold pressure of the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means to effect an increased opening of said .fuel controlling means substantially directly proportional with the increase of the intake manifold pressure of the engine, under an increased load imposed upon the engine, and decreased opening of the fuel controlling means With a. decrease in manifold pressure under a decreased loading of the engine.

17. In an internal combustion engine governor, in

combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to the load imposed on the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with the increased load upon the engine, and a decreased setting of the speed responsive means with a decrease in load imposed upon the engine.

18. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to the fuel flow to the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with an increase of fuel flow to the engine, under an increased load imposed on the engine, and for effecting a decreased speed setting of the speed responsive device under a decreased load imposed on the engine.

19. In an internal combustion engine governor, in

combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; i

and load sensing means responsive to the exhaust flow from the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with an increase of exhaust flow from the engine, under an increased load imposed on the engine, and a decreased speed setting of the speed responsive means under a decreased load imposed on the engine.

20. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; reactive speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said speed responsive means; and load sensing means responsive to the intake manifold pressure of the engine controlling the action of a servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased speed setting of the speed responsive means substantially directly proportional with an increase of intake manifold pressure of the engine under an increased load imposed upon the engine, and a decreased speed setting of the speed responsive means under a decreased load imposed on the engine.

21. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said reactive means and load sensing means responsive to the load imposed on the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for 12 effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable means substantially directly proportional with an increase of the load imposed upon the engine, and a decreased force on said speed responsive means with a decrease of load imposed on the engine.

22. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said reactive means and load sensing means responsive to the fuel flow to the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable means substantially directly proportional with the increase of fuel flow to said engine, with an increased load imposed on the engine, and a decreased force on said speed responsive means with a decrease of load imposed on the engine.

23. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said reactive means and load sensing means responsive to the exhaust fiow from the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increased force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable means substantially directly proportional with the increase of exhaust flow from said engine, with an increased load imposed on the engine, and decreasing the force on said speed responsive means with the decrease in exhaust flow from the engine with a decrease in load imposed on the engine.

24. In an internal combustion engine governor, in combination; means for controlling the admission of fuel to the engine; speed responsive means governing the operation of said fuel controlling means; adjustable reactive means opposing the force of said speed responsive means; a non-reactive, continuously responsive servomotor means controlling the action of said reactive means and load sensing means responsive to the intake manifold pressure of the engine controlling the action of said servomotor means independently of the reaction of said reactive means for effecting an increase in force on said speed responsive means through said adjustable means substantially directly proportional with the increase of intake manifold pressure of the engine, upon an increase in load imposed upon the engine, and effecting a decrease in force on said speed responsive device with a decrease in manifold pressure upon a decrease in load imposed on the engine.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,833,908 Maybach Dec. 1, 1931 1,965,751 Rush July 10, 1934 2,091,163 Schweizer Aug. 24, 1937 2,221,201 Pope, Jr. et al. Nov. 12, 1940 2,262,022 Lundquist et al. Nov. 11, 1941 2,328,452 Hobart Aug. 31, 1943 2,529,437 Weinberger Nov. 7, 1950 2,622,576 Rickenbach Dec. 23, 1952

US239073A 1951-07-28 1951-07-28 Torque responsive internal combustion engine governor Expired - Lifetime US2722926A (en)

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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2780210A (en) * 1955-07-20 1957-02-05 Fairbanks Morse & Co Engine fuel delivery control
US2780209A (en) * 1955-07-20 1957-02-05 Fairbanks Morse & Co Engine fuel delivery control
US2780211A (en) * 1955-07-20 1957-02-05 Fairbanks Morse & Co Engine fuel delivery control
US3250261A (en) * 1963-11-15 1966-05-10 Waukesha Motor Co Limiting device for carbureted turbocharged gas or gasoline engines
DE3128202A1 (en) * 1980-07-16 1982-04-29 Toyo Kogyo Co Rotary engine

Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1833908A (en) * 1929-03-18 1931-12-01 Maybachmotorenbau Gmbh Controlling device for carburetors of internal combustion engines
US1965751A (en) * 1927-06-27 1934-07-10 Ulysses S Rush Signaling device
US2091163A (en) * 1935-04-11 1937-08-24 Bosch Robert Speed-governing apparatus for injection internal combustion engines
US2221201A (en) * 1939-09-16 1940-11-12 Waukesha Motor Co Speed governing mechanism
US2262022A (en) * 1939-03-04 1941-11-11 Wright Aeronautical Corp Engine pressure regulator
US2328452A (en) * 1941-08-30 1943-08-31 Hobart Bros Company Speed regulator for engines
US2529437A (en) * 1944-03-21 1950-11-07 George S Weinberger Governor control for internalcombustion engines
US2622576A (en) * 1950-11-01 1952-12-23 Avco Mfg Corp Two-speed engine governor

Patent Citations (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1965751A (en) * 1927-06-27 1934-07-10 Ulysses S Rush Signaling device
US1833908A (en) * 1929-03-18 1931-12-01 Maybachmotorenbau Gmbh Controlling device for carburetors of internal combustion engines
US2091163A (en) * 1935-04-11 1937-08-24 Bosch Robert Speed-governing apparatus for injection internal combustion engines
US2262022A (en) * 1939-03-04 1941-11-11 Wright Aeronautical Corp Engine pressure regulator
US2221201A (en) * 1939-09-16 1940-11-12 Waukesha Motor Co Speed governing mechanism
US2328452A (en) * 1941-08-30 1943-08-31 Hobart Bros Company Speed regulator for engines
US2529437A (en) * 1944-03-21 1950-11-07 George S Weinberger Governor control for internalcombustion engines
US2622576A (en) * 1950-11-01 1952-12-23 Avco Mfg Corp Two-speed engine governor

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2780210A (en) * 1955-07-20 1957-02-05 Fairbanks Morse & Co Engine fuel delivery control
US2780209A (en) * 1955-07-20 1957-02-05 Fairbanks Morse & Co Engine fuel delivery control
US2780211A (en) * 1955-07-20 1957-02-05 Fairbanks Morse & Co Engine fuel delivery control
US3250261A (en) * 1963-11-15 1966-05-10 Waukesha Motor Co Limiting device for carbureted turbocharged gas or gasoline engines
DE3128202A1 (en) * 1980-07-16 1982-04-29 Toyo Kogyo Co Rotary engine

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