US2719311A - Method of making shoes - Google Patents

Method of making shoes Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2719311A
US2719311A US43133254A US2719311A US 2719311 A US2719311 A US 2719311A US 43133254 A US43133254 A US 43133254A US 2719311 A US2719311 A US 2719311A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
vamp
insole
sections
secured
fingers
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Leo F Donnelly
Acorace Dominic
Original Assignee
Leo F Donnelly
Acorace Dominic
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B9/00Footwear characterised by the assembling of the individual parts

Description

Oct. 4, 1955 F. DONNELLY ET AL 2,719,311

METHOD OF MAKING SHOES Filed May 21, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet l wwwyww ATTORNEY5 1955 L. F. DONNELLY ET AL 2,719,311 METHOD OF MAKING SHOES Filed May 21, 1954 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 10.

INVENTORS .Zeo FfionrreIly ATTORNEYS United States Patent Ofiice Patented Oct. 4, 1955 METHOD OF MAKING SHOES Leo F. Donnelly and Dominic Acorace, Manchester, N. H.

Application May 21, 1954, Serial No. 431,332

Claims. (Cl. 12-142) The present invention relates to shoes and the like and more particularly to the manufacture of shoes having full, molded or shaped uppers.

In the past it has been necessary in order to provide a shoe with a full, molded or shaped vamp to perform on the vamp material what is well known in the art as a lasting operation.

In general, the lasting operation consists in pulling the vamp material of the shoe down over a last onto a sole part such as an insole and stretching, twisting and shaping the material as it is attached to the insole so that the portion above the insole is entirely smooth and is molded to the form and shape of the last. This operation requires the maintenance of expensive equipment which must be operated by skilled workers and constitutes one of the most costly steps in the manufacture of most shoes.

While it is well known that certain types of sandals may be made without a lasting operation, these do not have a vamp which'is molded or shaped to fit the foot. Moreover, sandals and the like generally are not provided with a full vamp, that is, a vamp covering the forward part of the foot which extends from'the ball of the foot around the toes and back to the shank or the beginning of the instep.

The principal object of the present invention is the provision of a method of making shoes having molded or shaped, full vamps which eliminates the necessity of any lasting operation.

Another object of the present invention is the provision of a method of making shoes havingfull shaped uppers which may be easily performed by relatively unskilled labor so as to produce shoes more economical than by methods heretofore known.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of a shoe having complementary vamp sections which are independently shaped and attached to the insole and subsequently secured together to form a unitary, shaped vamp.

A still further object of the present invention is the provision of a shoe and a method of making the same which embodies the advantages of a lasted shoe but substantially overcomes the disadvantages heretofore eX- perienced in making shoes of the lasted vamp type.

Still another object of-the present invention is the provision of a method of making moldedvamp shoes which facilitates the securement of the outsole to the insole by providing free access to the upper surface 20f the insole.

These and other objects of the present invention will become moreapparent during the course of the following specification and appended claims.

The invention may best be understood with reference to the accompanying drawings wherein illustrative em-v bodirnents are shown.

In the drawings: p

Figure l is a perspective view of a shoe constructed 2 in accordance with the principles of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a bottom view of the insole of the shoe;

Figures 3 and 4 are plan views of the complementary vamp sections of the shoes;

Figure 5 is a bottom view of the outsole of the shoe;

Figure 6 is a perspective view illustrating the manner in which a vamp section is shaped and secured to the sole;

Figure 7 is a cross-sectional view showing the disposition of the vamp sections in their inside out and partial formed conditions.

Figure 8 is a perspective view showing a modified form of the shoe;

Figure 9 is a plan view of the vamp sections utilized in the shoe of Figure 8; and

Figure 10 is a plan view of the therein.-

Referring now more particularly to Figures 1-6, it will be seen that there has been provided a shoe constructed in accordance with the present invention which comprises, in general, an insole 10, an outsole 12, vamp sections 14 and 16, quarter sections 18 and 20 and a heel 22. The combined sections 14, 16 and 18, 20, constitute the uppers.

In general, the method of the present invention provides an eifective procedure for making shoes having molded or shaped vamps which eliminates the need for a lasting operation. To accomplish this end the insole 10, after it has been suitably finished in any well known manner, is provided on its bottom surface with accurately located outline markings 24.31 for a. purpose ,herein after to be described- The vamp section 14 is then cut out and suitably finished so as to provide lateral fingers 32, 33 and 34 which are adapted to be attached to the insole embodied bottom of the insole in alignment with markings 24,

25 and 26 respectively. Vamp section 16 is also :cut out and finished in a manner similar tothe section 14 so as to include fingers 35, 36 and 37, which, in turn, are adapted to be secured to the'bottom. of the insole within the markings 27, 28 and 29. In a like manner, quarter sections 18 and 20 are suitably cut out andfin ished and each has one end secured to the underside of the insolewithin the markings 30 and 31 respectively.

It is important that the markings-for the vamp sections be accurately related to the bottom of the insole and .that the vamp sections be accurately cutout so as to provide fingers which may be secured to the insole within the corresponding markings. In securing the vamp sections to the insole with the fingers disposed within the corresponding markings, the vamp sections are made to assume a three dimensional configuration which ultimately results in a molded orshaped vamp on the shoe. In carrying out this step, the operator first aligns one of the fingers, for

example, finger 32, withinits' corresponding marking-24 This procedure is followed until all the fingers are secured accurately in place. Itis to be noted that the fingers and markings are so related that when they are aligned, the vamp section is caused to assume a three dimensional configuration during the course of the twisting and stretching movement necessary to secure them in place. It has been found that this step is greatly facilitated and that the final upper is more smoothly molded when the shaped vamp material is initially disposed outwardly of the attaching SUI: face to proceed away from rather than around the adjacent edge of the sole part. In this way, the edgewill not interfere or become a physical cOnsideratiQnduring securement of the fingers to the sole part. It is feasible, however, that 3. the fingers could be attached to a sole part with the vamp material initially assuming its final partial configuration surrounding the adjacent edge of the sole part, but the interference of the edge must be contended with the undertaking this procedure. Thus, in carrying out the method to produce a shoe such as is shown in Figure l, the fingers are attached to the bottom of the insole so that the vamp sections will be inverted or inside out with respect to the final shaped form of the upper. The fingers may be secured to the bottom surface of the insole by hand or with the aid of an appropriate machine.

In Figure 6 the bottom of insole 10 is shown having vamp section 16 secured thereto by the procedure .outlined above. It is to be noted that the fingers 35, 36 and 37 are accurately aligned within the corresponding markings 27, 28 and 29 and when all of the fingers are secured in place, the vamp section has been twisted and stretched in its securement to the insole to assume an inverted or inside out three dimensional configuration which extends away from the edge of the insole as shown in broken lines in Figure 7. It is to be understood that the exact position of the markings is predetermined so that when the vamp sections are inverted from their inside-out configuration, they will assume a normal-shaped three dimensional configuration which will conform to the wearers foot.

After the vamp and quarter sections have been secured to the bottom surface of the insole in the manner mentioned above, the outsole 12 is properly finished and suitably secured underneath the insole 10 in any suitable manner. In this regard, it is significant to note that by virtue of the sectional construction of the vamp it is possible to sew the outsole to the insole by the use of conventional stitching machines. Moreover, the sectional nature of the vamp enables the outsole to be secured in any manner to the insole much more easily than with conventional vamps, since ready access to the upper surface of the insole is made possible. The heel 22 may then be attached and a sock lining 38 may be provided, if desired.

After the shoe has thus been substantially completed, each of the vamp sections is then inverted into the normal position that it will assume in the finally formed shoe. In carrying out the step of inverting the vamp sections, the material is sprung over the insole edge so that it will readily assume a partially formed final shape such as is shown in full lines in Figure 7. Finally, the free ends of the vamp sections are fastened together in a suitable manner.

In the embodiment shown in Figures 1-7, the vamp section 14 is provided with a series of slots 39 and a strap member 40 is secured to the finger 32 adjacent the outer edge thereof. The vamp section 16 is provided with corresponding slots 42 which, when the vamp sections are inverted into their final shape, are adapted to register with the slots 39 of the vamp section 14. The strap member 40 is then woven through the registering slots to thereby secure the outer free ends of the vamp sections together. As shown in Figure 1, strap member 40 may be extended through the looped free end 44 of the quarter section 20 and may be provided with a buckle 46 on its free end to cooperate with the apertured free end 48 of the quarter section 18.

In preparing and finishing the individual component parts of the shoe, any of the well established practices in the shoe making art may be utilized. For example, the insoles 10 may be made of any suitable material such as fiberboard, leather or the like and may be bound, as at 49, with a suitable material, such as cloth, leather or the like, around its outer edge. The binding may be secured to the outer edge of the insole by any well known means.

The insole is preferably molded in conformity with the size of the heel utilized and for this purpose it may be shaped in any well known manner, such as by molding or by the use of preset insoles. The finished insole may be provided with a shank or arch support, such as metal strap 50, which may be suitably secured to the bottom surface of the insole, as by staples 52 or the like. The outline markings should be traced or imprinted on the bottom of the insole before the insole is finished.

The vamp and quarter sections may be of any suitable material, such as cloth, leather, or the like, and may be cut out by hand or by means of an appropriate machine. It is to be noted that while the vamp and quarter sections may be readily cut into a great variety of shapes, it is essential that they be provided with laterally extending fingers so that they may be stretched and twisted to assume a final molded shape. The vamp sections may be finished in any desired manner such as by stitching, pressing, french cording and the like.

The fingers of the vamp sections and the ends of the quarter sections may be secured to the bottom surface of the insole by any well known means, such as by stapling, stitching, cementing or the like. Moreover, a great variety of means may be employed to secure the free ends of the vamp sections together. Figures 17 illustrate but one such means.- In Figures 8-10 the vamp sections are shown as being secured together by means of snap fasteners. It will be understood that numerous other means may be employed, such as buttons, lacing, riveting, stitching, stapling, and the like. It is also possible to cement the free ends together by a compo process or other similar heat-treated cementing processes.

The outsole 12 may be made of any suitable material such as leather, rubber, plastic, or the like, and if desired a platform may be employed between the outsole and the insole as is well known in the art. The outsole may be secured to the insole by any of the well known methods, such as cementing, stitching or the like. In this regard, it is again emphasized that because the vamp sections are separated during this step, the operation is greatly facilitated and certain modes of securement are made possible which heretofore could not be employed.

The heel may be of any suitable construction and secured in place by any of the well known expedients in the art. As is usual in the shoe making art, the sock lining 38 is glued or otherwise suitably secured to the upper surface of the insole 10.

A shoe as shown in Figures 1-7 may be constructed as follows to give a specific example without limitation. The insole 10 is first cut out of a piece of fiberboard and provided with tucks on the heel and toe portion in a manner well known in the art. Next, the markings 24-31 are imprinted on the bottom surface of the insole. The insole is then molded to conform to the desired heel height and the steel shank piece or arch support 50 is then stapled to the bottom surface thereof, as by staples for example. Subsequently, the strip of plastic binding 49 is stitched to the outer edge of the insole. The vamp and quarter sections are then cut out of a piece of leather, pressed, stitched and french corded into the finished form ready for attachment. The fingers 32 through 37 of each vamp section are then progressively secured to the bottom surface of the insole within their corresponding markings by means of staples.

Again, it is emphasized that the fingers of the vamp' sections must be accurately aligned within their corresponding markings before the staples may be applied and as the fingers are attached, the vamp leather is stretched and twisted to assume an inverted or inside out three dimensional configuration. In a like manner, the quarter sections are stapled to the undersurface of the insole with one end of each in registry with its corresponding marking.

The outsole 12 is preset, pretrimmed and shanked out. The outsole and insole are then properly secured together by stitching or by any of the conventional cementing processes.

In stitching the vamp portions remain inverted until the shoe is made. In cementing the vamp portions are first turned upwardly, and temporarily fastened, to facilitate the operation of the cementing process.

Finished heel 22 is nailed in place and the inner sole cover 38 is then glued to the top surface of the inner sole. After the shoe has'thus been substantially completed, the vamp sections are inverted so as to assume their normal shaped position. The strap member 40 is then fed through the registering slots 38 and 42 in the free ends of the vamp sections and through looped end 44 of the quarter section 20. The buckle 46 is then secured to the free end of the strapmember 40.

To give another specificexample for illustrative purposes only, attention is directed to Figures 8-10 of the drawings. In the embodiment illustrated in Figures 8-10, the insole is prepared and finished in the manner set forth in the preceding example. This embodiment, however, illustrates another one of the infinite varieties of upper outline shapes which are possible. As shown in Figure 9, the uppers include complementary vamp sections 54 and 56 having integral quarter portions which are secured together at their rear ends by a strap member 58. Vamp section 54 includes fingers 59-62 which are adapted to register with markings 6366 respectively on the bottom of the insole. Likewise, vamp section 56 is provided with fingers 6770 which are adapted to register with markings 7174 respectively. Moreover, each vamp section is provided with a pair of cooperating snap fastener elements 76 and 78 for the purpose of securing the free ends thereof together. The strap member is cut out and finished and then stitched to one end of each of the vamp sections as is clearly illustrated in Figure 9. The fingers of each vamp section are then secured to the undersole after being twisted and stretched into registry with its corresponding marking so as to shape the vamp sections into an inverted or inside out three dimensional configuration as stated heretofore. The shoe is then substantially completed in the manner set forth in the previous example by stitching the outsole 12 to the bottom of the insole 10, nailing on the heel 22', cementing the insole cover 38 in place and providing a buckle 46 on one end of the strap member 58. The vamp sections are then inverted from their inside out configuration so that they will assume their partial shaped foot conforming con figuration. Finally, the cooperating snap' fasteners are brought into registry and closed.

It can thus be seen that there has been provided a shoe having all of the characteristic advantages of a lasted vamp shoe and a method of making such shoe which completely eliminates the necessity of any lasting operation with its attendant disadvantages.

The method may be carried out by relatively unskilled Workers and greatly facilitates many of the other conventional operations in the manufacture of shoes, as for example, the securement of the outsole to the insole.

The novel procedure whereby a lasted type shoe may be produced without the need of a lasting operation is easily effected by the step of aligning the fingers provided in the upper sections within the markings provided on the insole and securing, in turn, each of the fingers in place. The upper sections are thus given a three dimensional shape, which, when the free ends thereof are secured together, will fit the foot of the wearer in the manner of lasted uppers. The securement of the fingers of the vamp sections to the insole is preferably effected with the sections in an inside-out shape, turned down, as shown in Figure 6 and in broken lines in Figure 7. This permits the required shaping and molding of the vamp to be performed as it is secured without the impedance of the edge of the insole. When properly shaped and secured in this method, the sections are subsequently sprung over the edge of the insole into their normal shape, as shown in full lines in Figure 7, and then secured together from the top; thus leaving the vamp open from above during the entire preliminary manufacturing proc- 6 I I ess. While with somemodels and styles it is feasible by this method to secure the vamp sections to the insole without turning them down and inside out, the. inside out procedure is normallypreferred since a smoother molded upper, comparable to that produced by conventional. lasting, can be better achieved by this method.

Moreover, while the method of the present'invention has been illustrated for making Womens shoes having but two sole parts; namely, the insole and outsole, it should be noted that the invention is equally applicable to the manufacture of shoes having more than two s ole parts, such as platform shoes and the like. Moreover, the invention is applicable to the manufacture of mens and childrens as well as to Womens shoes, and to all sizes and types of shoes which do not require single piece closed vamp construction. Closed-back shoes can be made; so-

called wedgies, and single sole styles can be achieved by these procedures. It should also be noted that the invention is not limited to the illustrated procedure wherein the fingers are secured to the bottom surface of the insole. It is to be understood that the fingers may be secured to any of the sole parts, for example, in the manufacture of platform shoes, the markings could be provided on the upper surface of the platform and the fingers secured thereto with the vamp sections extending upwardly therefrom without inversion.

While the method of the present invention provides a simple, inexpensive procedure for the manufacture of last type shoes without lasting, it is important to note that the exact outline shape of the upper sections and the exact position of the outline markings must be accurately predetermined before the steps may be carried into effect. In this regard, the formation of the fingers on the upper sections is of essential importance. It is preferable that the upper sections be cut or fabricated in the flat, and the outline shape thereof must be chosen so that when the fingers are forced within the markings and secured in place, the material is made to assume a three dimensional configuration which will be smooth when the free ends are secured together. It has been found that this result may be achieved most effectively when there is provided spaces between the free ends of the fingers sufiicient to permit this configuration without bunching of material at the sole. For example, it can be readily observed that with the upper sections in flat, as shown in Figures 3, 4 and 9, there is provided a V-shaped notch between each pair of fingers of the upper sections which may extend above the insole in the final shaped upper, as shown in Figures 1 and 8.

It is also to be understood that the form of the invention herewith shown and described is to be taken as the preferred embodiment of the same and that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention or the scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A method of making an article of footwear having molded and shaped uppers without lasting which comprises providing a sole part and separate complementary upper sections, each of said upper sections being cut to have fingers extending from one edge thereof, securing said fingers to the lower face of the sole part at predetermined positions thereon with the remainder of the upper section upstanding from said sole face, said fingers when secured at said positions being closer together along convexly curved portions of the sole part than the finger spacings prior to said securing step so that said upper sections during securement are drawn into an inside-out formed condition, subsequently springing the upper sections into right-side-out condition, and securing the opposite edges of said upper sections together to form a molded and shaped upper.

2. A method as in claim 1 wherein the sole part has molded curvature imparted thereto independently of stresses imparted to the sole part by the uppers due to attachment therebetween.

US2719311A 1954-05-21 1954-05-21 Method of making shoes Expired - Lifetime US2719311A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2719311A US2719311A (en) 1954-05-21 1954-05-21 Method of making shoes

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2719311A US2719311A (en) 1954-05-21 1954-05-21 Method of making shoes

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2719311A true US2719311A (en) 1955-10-04

Family

ID=23711455

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2719311A Expired - Lifetime US2719311A (en) 1954-05-21 1954-05-21 Method of making shoes

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2719311A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3323233A (en) * 1964-07-06 1967-06-06 William M Scholl Article of footwear and method of making the same

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2057072A (en) * 1934-11-05 1936-10-13 United Shoe Machinery Corp Manufacture of strap sandals
US2143556A (en) * 1937-11-17 1939-01-10 Hodaly Emerick Soft shoe
US2167858A (en) * 1936-09-16 1939-08-01 Wexler Samuel Shoe and method of making same
US2268967A (en) * 1940-05-09 1942-01-06 Small William Keane Footwear
US2330273A (en) * 1941-07-12 1943-09-28 United Shoe Machinery Corp Manufacture of sandals
US2448301A (en) * 1945-10-12 1948-08-31 Engel Karl Method of making shoes with upwardly deflected soles
GB626582A (en) * 1947-07-10 1949-07-18 Paul Goldschmidt Improvements in and relating to sandals
FR954422A (en) * 1947-09-29 1949-12-26 partial shoe uppers, perfected
US2534975A (en) * 1947-07-31 1950-12-19 Harry H Johnson Shoe with interlaced vamp elements

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2057072A (en) * 1934-11-05 1936-10-13 United Shoe Machinery Corp Manufacture of strap sandals
US2167858A (en) * 1936-09-16 1939-08-01 Wexler Samuel Shoe and method of making same
US2143556A (en) * 1937-11-17 1939-01-10 Hodaly Emerick Soft shoe
US2268967A (en) * 1940-05-09 1942-01-06 Small William Keane Footwear
US2330273A (en) * 1941-07-12 1943-09-28 United Shoe Machinery Corp Manufacture of sandals
US2448301A (en) * 1945-10-12 1948-08-31 Engel Karl Method of making shoes with upwardly deflected soles
GB626582A (en) * 1947-07-10 1949-07-18 Paul Goldschmidt Improvements in and relating to sandals
US2534975A (en) * 1947-07-31 1950-12-19 Harry H Johnson Shoe with interlaced vamp elements
FR954422A (en) * 1947-09-29 1949-12-26 partial shoe uppers, perfected

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3323233A (en) * 1964-07-06 1967-06-06 William M Scholl Article of footwear and method of making the same

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3705463A (en) Construction for shoe, slipper or the like
US2302596A (en) Shoe
US2523449A (en) Adjustable foot covering
US5421050A (en) Shoe construction method
US5012541A (en) Slipper and method of making same
US3095656A (en) Elastic cradle grip for footwear
US4706316A (en) Method for producing footwear
US4745693A (en) Shoe with detachable sole and heel
US3952427A (en) Insole for footwear
US4704808A (en) Shoe having a rigid back part and flexible forepart
US4031586A (en) Insole for footwear
US5392532A (en) Slipper having an insole attached to a peripheral outsole wall
US5896608A (en) Footwear lasting component
US2112884A (en) Manufacture of shoes
US5729918A (en) Method of lasting an article of footwear and footwear made thereby
US3821827A (en) Stitchdown footwear and method of manufacture
US20050138846A1 (en) Shoe heel protector
US2447590A (en) Shoe construction having stitchedin insole and pressure-covered molded heel counter
GB251054A (en) Improvements in the manufacture of boots and shoes
US2244030A (en) Shoe
US29562A (en) Boot and shoe
US2325639A (en) Shoemaking
US2384927A (en) Shoe construction
US5351352A (en) Method of forming a seamless shoe
US2201382A (en) Welt