US2712940A - Record changer - Google Patents

Record changer Download PDF

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Publication number
US2712940A
US2712940A US35166A US3516648A US2712940A US 2712940 A US2712940 A US 2712940A US 35166 A US35166 A US 35166A US 3516648 A US3516648 A US 3516648A US 2712940 A US2712940 A US 2712940A
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Prior art keywords
record
turntable
lever
cam
playing
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US35166A
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Stanley I Macduff
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Bendix Aviation Corp
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Bendix Aviation Corp
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G11INFORMATION STORAGE
    • G11BINFORMATION STORAGE BASED ON RELATIVE MOVEMENT BETWEEN RECORD CARRIER AND TRANSDUCER
    • G11B17/00Guiding record carriers not specifically of filamentary or web form, or of supports therefor
    • G11B17/02Details

Definitions

  • a still more important object of the invention is to provide a device of this sort having a single turntable and tone arm, the latter of which carries a pickup eonstituted to engage either one or the other side, or alternate sides of a record when placed on the turntable.
  • a further object is to provide a record changing mechanism wherein a record may be rejected after it has started to play.
  • a still further object is to provide a record changer which will play automatically any standard 10 inch or 12 inch record.
  • Figure 1 is a top plan view of a phonograph apparatus embodying my invention, showing certain elements in the position they assume during the playing of a record;
  • Figure 2 is a similar view of the phonograph apparatus showing the elements in the position they assume during a record changing operation;
  • Figure 3 is a view in side elevation looking at the device of Figure 1 from the right side, with elements omitted for the sake of clarity;
  • Figure 4 is a view in side elevation looking at the device of Figure 1 from the lower side;
  • Figure 5 is a sectional view on the line 5-5 of Figure 3 with the platform shown in phantom;
  • Figure 5a is a view of the tone arm positioning means at the end of playing a 12 inch record, with some structural elements omitted for the sake of clarity;
  • Figure 5b is a similar view showing the tone arm positioning means during cycling when the tone arm has swung clear of the record disc;
  • Figure 5c is a similar view showing the tone arm positioning means at a later period in the cycle when the tone arm has been swung into playing position;
  • Figure 6 is a bottom plan view of the device of the invention.
  • Figure 7 is a plan view of one side, the underside, of the main cam showing the position of the selecting levers when playing the top side of a record;
  • Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7 of the main cam but with the selecting levers in the position for playing the bottom side of a record;
  • Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 7 of the main cam, but with the selecting levers in the position for playing alternate sides of a record;
  • Figure 10 is a fragmentary plan view of the main cam and selecting levers, showing disengagement of the clutch during alternate play;
  • Figure 11 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 11-11 of Figure 9;
  • Figure 12 is a fragmentary plan view of the trip mechanism and tone arm positioning means
  • Figure 12a is a detail view of two levers of the trip mechanism
  • Figure 12b is a sectional view taken on the lines 12b-12b of Figure 5;
  • Figure 13 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation of the turntable mounting and positioning mechanism
  • Figure 13a is a schematic view of the turntable cam and follower showing the latter in its position during the playing period
  • Figure 13b shows the relative positions of the cam and follower when the turntable is lowered
  • Figure 13c shows the relative positions of the cam and follower when the turntable is swung outside the record circle
  • Figure 13d is a schematic illustration of the cam follower and latch mechanism for the turntable
  • Figure 14 is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the tone arm assembly and the mechanism for vertically positioning the tone arm to play the top and bottom sides of a record;
  • Figure 14a is a fragmentary vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the tone am driving and elevating means
  • Figure 15 is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the drive and clutch mechanism for reversing the direction of rotation of the turntable;
  • Figure 16 is a vertical sectional view of the record supporting and releasing means with parts in elevation
  • Figure 17 shows the construction of the slicing means which compensates for variance in record thickness.
  • Figure 18 is a sectional view taken on the line 18-18 of Figure 17;
  • FIG. 19 is a sectional view partly in elevation taken on the line 19-19 of Figure 5 showing one of the push buttons in released position;
  • Figure 20 is a similar viewvwith the push button latched.
  • Figure 21 is a view taken on the line 21--21 of Figure 5, wth the push button depressed downwardly beyond the latched position.
  • the reference numeral 25 designates a platform which may be supported in any suitable manner on vibration damping mountings, such as springs, not shown.
  • An electric motor 27 is carried by a bracket 28 bolted to the underside of the platform 25 by a bolt 29 which threadedly engages the platform.
  • a gear box 30 is formed with an integral tubular extension 31 having a fiange 32 at its outer end for fastening the gear box to the motor, in any suitable manner.
  • a motor shaft 33 has an end 34 which extends through the tubular portion 31 into the gear box 30.
  • This end of the shaft is equipped with a worm gear 35 drivably engaging a worm wheel 36 keyed to a shaft 37 protruding vertically upwardly and downwardly through the gear box 3%).
  • a pinion gear 38 is carried on the upper end of shaft 37.
  • the pinion gear 38 is provided with an interrupted gear tooth and a continuous gear tooth 39 to be used for a purpose hereinafter described.
  • the lower end of shaft ure13.
  • Clutch member 43 is shifted upwardly, so that transverse pin 44 engages driving pins 48, when it is desired to disengage pulley 47 from driving shaft 37 and connect pulley 46 in driving relationship to the latter shaft.
  • the means i for shifting the clutch member 43 into and out of engagement with the pulleys 46 and 4'! will be described later in connection with the turntable driving mechanism.
  • the platform 25 is equipped with a padded ribbed portion 50 having vertically extending posts 51 circumferentially spaced around a periphery'of a desired diameter.
  • this record receiving means or storage maga zine is sufficient to accommodate the maximum size record to be played, in most instances thiswill be a 12" record.
  • the bushing 56 is drilled radition of the turntable must be provided. That is, with the playing grooves of a record threaded thereon in the Mechanism for withdrawing the turntable from beneath ally at 57, for the reception of setscrews 58, to thereby securely fasten the arm to the sleeve 59.
  • the platform 25 is formed with a boss 60 onits topside to provide a bearing and guide for the sleeve 59, the lower end of which is equipped with a flange 61 having adowntnrned.
  • Aspring 64 encircles the sleeve 59 and is put under compression between the flange 61 and boss 60 to thereby urge the sleeve, and hence the arm and turntable, which are carried by the sleeve, downwardly.
  • the turntable 52, arm 53, and sleeve 59 are supported vertically on a cam 65, on which the cam follower 63 rides.
  • the cam 65 has a hub '66 formed integrally therewith forcooperation with a bearing member 67 supportedby a bracket 68 suitably carried on the underside of the platform by hangers 82.
  • a freely rotatable shaft 69 passes through the bearing 67 and the sleeve 59.
  • a sheave 70 is fixed to one end of the shaft 69 and a double sheave 71 is drivably attached by a spline or similar means to the other end thereof.
  • the turntable 52 is equipped with a pivot pin 72' to one end of which is secured a sheave 73, and the other end of whichprotrudes above the turntable to engage. the hole of a record-to thereby center the same on the tu'rrn'table.
  • a belt 74 rides in the grooves of the sheaves 70 and 73 to thereby drivably connect the turntable 52 to theshaft 69.
  • - Belts 75 and 76 connect respectively the sheaves 46 and -47fto.the double sheave 71'.
  • Belt 76 is crossed so as to rotate shaft 69, and hence the turntable, in-a direction opposite to that imparted thereto by belt 75 '
  • the double sheave 71. is supported at its lower end in a bearing 83 formed in a plate 84 suitably suspended from the same hangers 82 on the underside of the platform as'bracket 68, Since the top and bottom'sides of a record 77 "are same direction on either side, the turntable or record must be rotated in one direction when playing the top side and in the reverse direction when playing the bottom side so that the stylus will follow from the outside to the inside of the record.
  • the desired direction of rotation of the turntable is sensed from the position of the tone arm 73. This is done by pivotally supporting one end of a'l-ever 79 to a brace 80, see Figures 4, 14, and 15, with the other end of the lever resiliently supported by a spring 79a on a bell crank 81 so that raising and lowering the bell crank to raise and lower the tone arm positions theclutch member 43, which is urged against lever 79 by the spring 45. With the tone arm positioned for playing the top side of a record the bell crank 81 is raised, thereby raisinglever 79 which shifts the clutch member upwardly so that sheave 46 drives the double sheave 71.
  • the bell crank With the tone arm positioned for playing the bottom side of a record the bell crank is lowered, thereby allowing spring 45 to urge the clutch 43 into driving engagement withrsheave 47.
  • the double sheave 71 is crossed, this latter sheave will be driven in a reverse direction, thereby reversing the direction of rotation of the turntable.
  • supports the lever 79 is suspended fromhangers 82 and 85 the latter 'of which is secured to the underside of theplatform in much the same manner as the hanger 82.
  • the turntable is centered above the record receiving means 51 and'must therefore be withdrawn afterthe record has been played to permit dropping said record into the magazine therebelow.
  • the arm 53 on which the turntable is carried is swingably supported on the sleeve 59 outside the record circle 86' and hence outside the turntable circumference; That is. the turntable'is pivotally supported on the arm 53 outside the axis of rotation of said turntable.
  • a dog clutch 94 is drivably interposed between the cam 92 an eccentric 91, see Figures 7, 8, 9 andlt').
  • The; clutch includes a bell crank lever 95having ends 96jand 97, and pivotedon the underside of cam 92L A spring; 98 rotates the end 97 of the bell crank 95 into driving en-;
  • boss 101 is drilled through the cam at 102 to receive the downwardly projecting boss:194 integral with.
  • the boss 104' a is bored at 104a to accommodate a concentrically located pilot'shaft 103 integral with said eccentric.
  • a preloaded spring is disposed within the bored portion 104a of boss 104 to urge the pilot shaft 103' downwardly,
  • Figure 13a is a schematic view in side elevation of the contour of the cam surface of cam 65.
  • the arrow below the cam indicates the direction of rotation thereof when swinging the turntable from the position in Figure l to the position in Figure 2.
  • the cam follower 63 With the turntable in its normal playing position of Figure 1 the cam follower 63 is near the top of cam incline 110 and resting against stop 111 which depends from the underside of the platform. This stop, positions the turntable centerwise for playing a record.
  • the gear sector rotates the cam 65 in the direction of the arrow the follower 63 rides down the incline into a V-shaped slot 112, under the force of spring 64, and lowers the turntable, see Figure 13b, to thereby withdraw the turntable from the record.
  • the played records are stored in the record magazine which is located below the turntable.
  • the turntable arm 53 In order to remove the played records from the magazine the turntable arm 53 is manually swung outside the record circle and releasably latched in this position, by a latch 113 and stop pin 11 which engage the cam follower 63, see Figure 13d.
  • the stop pin 114 restricts the are through which the turntable arm can be swung manually outside the record circle.
  • the cam follower rides along the horizontal cam surface 115.
  • the record supporting and releasing means comprises a set of three record slicers and supports 116 rotatably carried in the post 51 integral with the top side of the platform and spaced approximately 120 apart around the periphery of the record circle. Since the construction of the record slicers and supports 116 is identical for all three only one will be described in detail, see Figures 16, 17, and 18.
  • the post 51 provides a main bearing for a sleeve 117, to the upper end of which a record support member 118 is press fitted.
  • the record support member 118 rides on the fiat surface 119 of the post.
  • a sprocket 120 is securely fastened to the lower end of sleeve 117.
  • a continuous chain 121 passes over the sprockets of the three slicers, so that rotation of one slicer rotates all three slicers.
  • a slicer member 122 is mounted axially in line with the record support 118 for limited rotational movement relative thereto.
  • a stub sleeve 123 is press fitted into a bore 124 of the slicer member 122.
  • the stub sleeve 123 is axially aligned with sleeve 117 and is provided with an extension 125 which rotatably fits into bore 126 of the record support member 118. This extension 125 of the stub sleeve acts as a pilot or pivotal guide for the slicer member.
  • the slicer member 122 is provided with blades or fingers 127 and 123 for supporting respectively stacks of 10 and 12 inch records. These blades also function as slicers for separating the lowermost record from a stack.
  • the support member 118 is formed with upper blades or fingers 129 and 1319 for carrying respectively a stack of 10 and 12 inch records during the slicing operation, and fingers 131 and 132 for carrying respectively a 10 or 12 inch record which has been dropped from the stack.
  • the fingers 128 and which support and slice the 12 inch records from a stack of 12 inch records and the fingers 127 and 129 which support and slice the 10 inch records from a stack of 10 inch records are respectively spaced apart vertically a distance equal to the minimum thickness of standard records, see Figure 3.
  • the distance between these fingers is designated by the letters a and b respectively for 10 and 12 inch records.
  • the fingers or blades 127 and 123 have respectively relatively sharp edges 127a and 128:: which facilitates movement of the fingers between the lowermost record of a stack and the stack.
  • the sides of members 118 and 122 are formed to guide a record, a 12 inch record in this case, from the stack to the lowermost finger 132. That is, the sides provide a three point contact at C, D, and E. This contact is also maintained as the slicers rotate since the sides 1155a and 122a are formed with radii that will keep the distance from the three points C, D, and E to the center of the record circle constant.
  • the sides 118i; and 12% are formed with radii that will likewise keep the distance from the contact points to the center of the record circle constant when a 10 inch record is played.
  • the slicer member 122 and the support member 118 are formed with complementary cam surfaces 133 and 134 which permits increasing the vertical distances between fingers 128 and 13b, for example, when a record having a thickness somewhat greater than the allowed minimum thickness is encountered.
  • the cams 133 and 134, of the two members 118 and 122 are held in driving relationship by a spring 135 interposed between head 136, which is located at one end of a rod 137, and the'member 122.
  • the rod 137 passes freely through the sleeve 117 and is threaded at its other end to receive a out 138 which is drawn up tightly against the end of sleeve 117 to thereby preload spring 135. if a relatively thick record is encountered the cam surface 133 slides along cam surface 134 to thereby raise member 122 against spring 135.
  • pins 139 and 141) are carried on the top side of member 118 so as to extend into the hollow portion 141 of member 122 to thereby engage the walls thereof.
  • Pin 139 is positioned so that member 122 can be rotated in a clockwise direction a given amount with respect to member 118 before the pin will engage the side wall of the former member.
  • Pin is positioned to normally engage the inside wall of member 122 so that counterclockwise rotation of the said member is prevented when blade 125 is being withdrawn from beneath a stack of records.
  • a crank or lever 142 is carried by the lower end of one only of rods 137 to provide a drive between the nut 138 and the sleeve, and is releasably engageable with the sprocket 129 through the employment of a detent 143 carried by the upper side of the crank.
  • the sprocket is slotted at 144, 145 and 146, see Figure 6, to receive the detent 143.
  • a lever 147 connects the crank 142 to the lever 93 which in turn has one end secured to the eccen- 7 tric 91. Hence any rotation imparted to eccentric 91 will simultaneously operate the slicers and swing the turntable laterally in timed relationship.
  • button 136 is pushed downwardly against spring 135.
  • the slicers can now be rotated by hand to any desired setting ofthe arrow, see slicer on left, Figure 1, depending on the size of the record to be playedf
  • the rod 137 which carries the eccentric is provided with a head or button having the indicia M, 12 and 10 thereon which denotes respectively a setting of the slicers for manual operation or the automatic playing of 12 inch records, and 10 inch records.
  • Figure 1 shows the position of the slicers for handling 12 inch records. 7 After a record has been played the slicer mechanism and turntable are automatically set in operation, in a manner to be hereinafter described. The initial action of the turntable and slicers are concurrent. Let us assume that a stack of 12 inch records rest on blades 12%, and
  • the turntable carries a record of like size which has just finished playing.
  • the turntable is lowered, depositing the played record on the fingers 132; the turntable is then swung laterally outside the record circle and the slicers'rotated so that the played record which was deposited on'the fingers 132 will now be dropped into the record receiving means therebelow.
  • the played record is being dropped from the fingers 132, it will be noted that fingers 128 have rotated out from under the stack of records 86 which is now supported temporarily on fingers which have rotated under the stack before fingers 128 had completely withdrawn. It will be remembered that fingers 130 are at a lower level than fingers 128.
  • Tone arm device including mechanism for vertically positioning the same carried in gimbals 154 of the tone arm and is of a common form except that it is provided with a double pointed needle 155 arranged to engage in the grooves in either the top or the bottom side of a record which is supported on the turntable.
  • the said reproducer may be electrically connected to any conventional type of'amplifier and speaker for reproduction of the sound.
  • the pivoted end of the pickup is provided with a finger 156 which extends laterally between a pair of leaf springs 157 and 158 secured at one end to the tone arm.
  • a pin 156a Adjacent the end of the finger 156 and between the springs 157 and 158 is a pin 156a secured crosswise in the tone arm and positioned to hold the pickup in a normally neutral position.
  • the springs have load characteristics adjusted so that an equal force is exerted between the needle and the record groove when engaged with either the top or bottom ofa record. It will be noted that the lower spring will be lighter as it is assisted by the weight of the pickup device, and in some instances only one spring may be required if the weight of the pickup device isgreat enough.
  • the bell crank 81 is fulcrumed about 167 and is carried by the brace J 80.
  • An arm 168 of the bell crank is disposed at right angles to the arm 166 and is provided with a roller 169 arranged for rolling contact with an inner cam track 170 and an outer cam track 171 formed in the cam 92.
  • the tone arm When the roller or cam follower 169 rides in the inner 1 cam track 170, see Figures 7 and 14, the tone arm is positioned vertically for playing the top side of a record. With the roller in the outer cam track 171, see Figure 8, the tone arm will come to rest vertically in a position for playing the bottom sideof a record, see dotted line position of tone arm in Figure 14.
  • Mechanism for positioning the tone arm laterally for two sizes of records 176 the other end of which is slotted at 177 to embrace a reduced section 178 of a hub 104.
  • 'Said other end of the lever 176 is equipped with a cam follower 180 which fits into a groove 181 formed in the top side of the cam 92.
  • the end of the reciprocating lever with which the flange 175 is integral is also slotted at 182 to embrace the reduced diameter 172 of the hub 153.
  • the slotted end 182 is held in position by washers 183 encircling the reduced portion 172 of the hub 153, and located one on each side of the lever.
  • a spacer 184 is interposed between the lower washer 183 and the top side of wheel 173.
  • slot 182 is greater than the reduced diameter 172 to permit lateral movement between the hub 153 and the end of the reciprocating lever circumscribing said hub, see Figures 5, 12, and 14.
  • One end of slot 182 is formed with a cam 185 which rides on the reduceddiameter 172 of the hub, when the reciprocating lever is moved to the position shown in Figure 12,
  • the wheel 173 is equipped with a pair of diametrically opposed driving pins 187, which depend from the wheel for engagement with a cross bar 188 carried by shaft 152, see Figure 14a.
  • the cross bar is furnished with slots 189 and 190 at each end for sliding'engagement with the driving pins. This arrangement between the driving wheel 173, which rotates the tone arm laterally, and
  • the vertical shaft 152 which position the tone arm vertically, provides for a concurrent raising or lowering action of the tone arm in conjunctbn with lateral or swinging movement thereof.
  • the drive whee 173 is equipped with a laterally projecting plate 191 on which a pair of pins 192 and 193 are arranged for engagement with a finger 194 carried at one end of a lever 195 pivoted at 196 to the underside of the platform, see Figures 5, 6, and 12.
  • a coil spring 197 has one end secured to the platform and its other end fastened to the finger 194 in a manner tending to rotate lever 195 counterclockwise, as viewed in Figures 6 and 12, or clockwise as viewed in Figures and 5a.
  • a cam 198 is located on the outer periphery of the main cam 92, for engagement with a projection 199 integral with lever 195, to thereby rotate the finger 194' into the position shown in Figure 5a, to permit unimpeded rotation of the tone arm during the playing pe riod.
  • the peripheral cam 198 is of a predetermined length so that the projection 199 will remain in engagement with the cam surface 198 during the initial cycling stage, to thereby hold the finger 194 in the position shown in Figure 50, thus permitting the plate 191, Which carries pins 192 and 193, to be returned to the position shown in Figure 5b.
  • the cam surfaces 201 and 202 are for the 12 and inch records respectively. Since the mode of operation and function of the finger 194 is the same for the 10 inch record, as for the 12 inch record, an explanation of the action of the finger when positioning the tone arm for a record of the former size if believed unnecessary.
  • a function of this mechanism is to sense the end of a record and start the cycling of the machine.
  • a lever 204 is arranged to swing periodically about the pivot 196. This periodic movement is imparted to the lever by having one end thereof biased by a spring 205 into contact relationship with a revolvable cam 206, which is suitably secured to the drive shaft 37.
  • a revolvable cam 206 To the other end of the lever 204 is pivotally mounted an actuating pin 207 for pushing engagement with one end of a lever 208 which is pivotally carried at 209 on the underside of the platform.
  • a lever 210 Overlying said other end of the lever 204 and pivotaily carried at 196, is a lever 210 arranged for limited relative angular movement with respect to lever 204.
  • levers 204 and 210 This limited movement, or lost motion, between levers 204 and 210 is accomplished by the use of a pin 211 which is mounted on lever 204 and projects into an elongated slot 212 or" lever 210.
  • a pin positioning member 213 is rotatably mounted at one end of lever 210.
  • the pin positioning member is provided with a rounded end 214 which rides on the periphery of drive wheel 173 to be frictionally driven thereby.
  • a spring 219 rotates lever 210 so that the rounded end 214 is held in driving relationship to wheel 173.
  • the member 213 is provided with a slot 215 which receives the pivoted end of the actuating pin 207.
  • Theslot 215 is of sufiicient length to permit angular relative movement between levers 204 and 2111, as aforemen-' tioned, and wide enough to allow the member 213 to swing angularly about its pivot to thereby impart angular movement to actuating pin 207, which has an end 216 slidably carried in an upturned element 217 of the pin positioning member.
  • a spring 218 rotates the member 213 in a ciockwise direction against the end 207:: of the actuating pin 207 which acts as a stop.
  • lever 204 For each revolution of the shaft 37 the cam 206 engages the left end of lever 204 to thereby swing the right end of said lever in a clockwise direction so that the rounded end 214 of the pin positioning member 213 is moved away from the periphery of wheel 173, at which time spring 218 rotates the member back to its original position against the pivoted end 207a of pin 207.
  • lever 204 can swing a given angular distance before lever 210 will be rotated because of the slight amount of travel of pin 211 in the enlongated slot 212. This arrangement will permit thrusting the end 216 of the pin 207 forward a slight amount before the rounded end 214 is actually out of contact with the drive wheel.
  • Lever 208 is normally urged against a stop 222 by a spring 223 fastened to one end of the lever.
  • the other end of the lever is provided with a downwardly projecting prong 224 which engages an upwardly projecting prong 225, carried by a crank arm 226, pivotally fulcrumed on pin 227 to the top side of the cam 92.
  • a toothed member 228 is pivotally linked to one end of the crank arm for engagement with the interrupted pinion gear 38.
  • a spring 229 biases the crank arm in a direction tending to move the toothed member 228 into engagement with the interrupted gear tooth.
  • actual engagement between the toothed member and the interrupted gear tooth is normally prevented by the upwardly projecting prong 225 engaging the downwardly projecting prong 224.
  • the trip mechanism does not interfere with the tone arm movement during the cycling phase of the phonograph.
  • the lever 204 is provided with a cam 230 which slides into a recess 231, located in the periphery of the large cam 92, during a non-cycling period, but during a cycling period, that is, as soon as the cam 92 starts to rotate the earn 23% moves out of the recess and onto the periphery of the large cam, to thereby swing the rounded end 214 of member 213 out of contact with wheel 173.
  • the trip mechanism In sensing the end or" the playing period of a record the trip mechanism operates as follows: As the stylus tracks inwardly toward the center of a record the tone arm swings inwardly, thereby revolving the wheel 173, which in turn rotates the pin positioning member 213. The stylus and hence the tone arm track inwardly to- 'cam edges of the blades.
  • the wheel 86 will have a greater velocity per revolution of the turntable when the stylus is trackingin the non playing or tripping grooves than when in the playing grooves.
  • the cam 206 which rotates at approximately the same speed as the record, strikes against an end of the lever 204 every revolution, causing it to swing about pivot 196.
  • the initial movement of lever 204, under the influence of cam 206, is not enough to move the member 213 out of contact with the wheel, so that the pin 207 is thrust forwarda predetermined distance depending upon the angle between the member 213 and lever 204.
  • Continued rotation of earn 206 further swings the lever 204 angularly, whichthrusts the pin forward an additional predetermined distance and subsequently liftsjthe rounded end 214, of the pin positioning member, out of contact with the wheel.
  • Spring 218 then returns the member 213 to its original position and the action is repeated.
  • the platform supports four appropriately marked push buttons arranged in apposition for controlling the operation of the record changing apparatus.
  • the machine operator has a choice of playing all top sides, all bottom sides, or alternate sides of a stack of records.
  • a switch housing 232 is carried on the underside of the platform to support the push buttons, which are normally urged to an inoperative position by springs 233.
  • the three push buttons designated.Top, Bot. (bottom), and fAlt. (alternate) are structurally identical, hence these buttons will be described together.
  • the push buttons carry blades 234, which project through slits 235 in the bottom of housing 232, so that the springs 233 can be secured thereto.
  • the blades are formed with cams 236 and 237, on one edge, for engagement with an inturned section 238 of side 239, which is hinged to top 240 of the housing, in any suitable manner, see Figures l9 and 20.
  • the cam edges of the blades are provided with a catch 241 for engagement with the inturned section 238 when the push buttons are in operative position, see Figure 20.
  • a spring 242 interposed between the sides of the housing, holds the inturned section 238 in engagement with the For controlling the current to the motor 27 a normally closed switch 243 is located at one end of the switch housing 232.
  • the hinged side 239 carries an extension 244, one end of which supports a leaf spring 245 which rides on a button 246 of the normally closed switch 243, to thereby normally hold the switch in open position. Therefore, .with the push buttons in inoperative positions, as shown in Figure 19, switch 243 is maintained in open position, and when the push buttons are in operative position, as shown'in Figure 20, leaf spring 245 has moved otf button 246 so that the switch 243 can close.
  • any one of the other buttons may be disengaged from the bottom section 238 by depressing the Off button.
  • a cam wheel 2 50 carried by one of the sprocket wheels 120, is formed with a cutaway portion 251, which registers with a finger 252 of the bracket 248.
  • the bracket 248 is mounted for horizontal rotation about a pivot pin 253 which is threaded into the top 240 of the switch housing. Depressing the push buttons during a time when the apparatus is set for manual play, at which time the'cut out portion 251 is opposite finger 252, will cause the bracket 248 to rotate clockwise instead of rotating the lever 247, see Figure 21. This action will render the lever 247 inoperative with respect to the push buttons.
  • the finger 252 is in contact with the periphery 254 of the cam wheel, see Figure 5, so that rotation of bracket 248 is prevented and the lever 247 is rotated.
  • roller or follower 169 With which bell crank 81 is integral, follows the inner cam track when the changer apparatus is set so that the tone arm will play the top side of a record, and follows the outer carn'track 171 when the apparatus is set so that the tone arm will play the bottom side of a record.
  • Figure 7 shows the position of the follower 169 with respect to the inner cam track when playing the top side of a record.
  • a gate 255 is provided in order to switch the roller 169 from the inner to the outer track.
  • This gate whichis pivotally carried on the underside of cam 92, forms a portion of the inner track and is normally biased to closed. position by a leaf spring 256.
  • a switch lever 257 is carried on the underside of the platform for horizontal rotation about a bolt stud 258.
  • one end 'of the switch lever is located below the push button marked Bot. to be engaged by the end of its associated blade 234 when the button is depressed.
  • Said one end of the lever is formed with an angularly projecting element 259 on which the end of blade 234, of the Bot.” button rides. Depressing this button rotates the said one end of the lever to the right, see Figure 4.
  • this lever is equipped with a curved extension piece 260 which is shifted to the right, as viewed in Figure 8 to thereby engage a pin 261, of the gate 255,-as it rotates with the cam 92, in the direction of the arrow.
  • a spring 262 having one end secured to the underside of the platform and the other end secured to lever 257 tends to rotate. the leverin a counterclockwise direction, see Figure 6.
  • switch lever 257 When playing bottom side only of a stack of records, switch lever 257 is moved into the position shown in Figure 8 by depressing the Bot. button as explained. However, when playing alternate sides of a stack of records, switch lever 257 is automatically positioned to function in the capacity of a switching lever for gate 255.
  • a lever 264 is arranged in juxtaposition to the former lever and is pivotally secured for vetical rotaticn to a bracket 265 carried by the bolt stud 258, see Figures 7 to 10.
  • a machine bolt 226 supports the lever 264 for vertical rotation.
  • bracket 265 By pivotally mounting bracket 265 on the bolt stud 258 and then pivotally securing the lever 264 to the bracket the lever is capable of horizontal rotation around stud 253 and vertical rotation around the bolt 266.
  • One end of lever 264 underlies the Alt. button so that depressing this button rotates the other end of the l ver upwardly.
  • Said one end of the lever 264 is formed into a U-shaped section 267 with the curved end 260 of lever 257 fioatably positioned therebetween, see Figure 11.
  • the U-shaped section has one side 268 turned outwardly so as to support a pawl 269 which travels in the inner and outer grooves 270 and 271 respectively of the cam 92.
  • Side 272 of the U-shaped section extends vertically beyond the side 268 to thereby engage end 96 of the bell crank lever 95, as shown in Figures 9, l0, and ll.
  • lever 264 Rotation of lever 264 vertically, as aforementioned, so that said other end of the lever moves upwardly, will cause the pawl 269 to initially engage in the outer groove 271, see Figures 7 and 8, and also position the side 272 for movement into engagement with the bell crank 95 when the pawl has shifted to the inner groove 270, as shown in Figure 9. Since the bracket 265, on which lever 264 is carried, is mounted for horizontal rotation about the bolt stud 258, the lever can swing freely from the inner to the outer groove or vice versa. A spring 273, having one end secured to the underside-of the platform and the other end fastened to the lever 264, tends to rotate the lever in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 6.
  • this mechanism includes a lever 275 pivoted to the underside of the platform 25, and equipped with a roller 276 carried on one end of the lever.
  • a rod 277 connects the other end of the lever to the hinged side 239, of the switch housing.
  • a spring 278, has one end secured to said other end of the lever 275 and the other end fastened to the underside of the platform, to thereby urge said roller into contact with the outer periphery of can 92.
  • roller 27 rides out of the circular slot 279 and onto the outer periphery of cam 92, at which time lever 275 is rotated clockwise, as viewed in Figure 5, to thereby slide the rod 277 and nut 28% into engagement with the side 239 so that said side cannot eturn from the position shown in Figure 20 to that of Figure 19, should the push buttons be released before a cycle is completed.
  • the roller will be positioned in the circular slot. This arrangement also provides positive braking means for stopping the cam 92 and its associated parts.
  • the inertia of the moving parts has a tendency to continue the motion of the mechanism, even after a cycle is completed, except that the aforementioned action of the roller on the cam periphery creates a frictional drag on the cam to thereby reduce its momentum.
  • the push button marked Top is depressed downwardly until the bottom section 238 rides on cam 237 to thereby start the motor 27 and rotate lever 247, which actuates the trip mechanism to cycle the machine.
  • This operates the slicers so as to transfer a record from the bottom of the stack to the lower level, on fingers 132, assuming that a 12 inch record is being played.
  • the button Upon release of the button it is engaged by the latch 241.
  • the tone arm follower is moved to the inside cam track 170 which positions the tone arm for playing the top side of a record.
  • the turntable is also swung from its position in Figure l to a position outside the record circle, to permit feeding a record to the receiving means, and then returned to its original position, of Figure l, where the turntable is elevated, to thereby lift the record to be played off the fingers 132.
  • the trip mechanism Upon completion of playing the top side of a record the trip mechanism will be actuated, whereby the cycle is repeated.
  • the button marked Bot. is depressed.
  • the action of the turntable at this time is the same as for playing the top side.
  • the tone arm must now be lowered so as to play the bottom side of a record and this is done by rotating the lever 257, in response to depressing the Bot. button, so that the curved end 260 of said lever will engage the pin 261 to open gate 255, to allow the follower 169 to enter in the outer cam track 171.
  • the slicer and turntable mechanism operate during each cycle.
  • the button marked Alt. is depressed in the same manner as for playing top side or bottom side.
  • the top side of the record is played first and the action of the machine is the same as for all top side play except that there is the additional action of urging the pawl 269 into the outer groove 271, as hereinbefore explained.
  • the initial cycling of the machine so as to feed a record onto the lower level 132 will also cause the pawl to move into the inner groove 276), see Figure 9, to set up the levers 257 and 264 for engagement with the pin 261 and the bell crank lever 95, respectively.
  • the trip mechanism Upon completion of playing the top side of the record, the trip mechanism automatically comes into play, cycling the machine.
  • a turntable swingably supported outside the turntable circumference, means for supporting a stack of records concentrically above said turntable when the latter is in its playing position for supplying records to the turntable to be played, and means for withdrawing said turntable from beneath a played record
  • said first named means including a support for releasably engaging the record'for supporting the same after the turntable has been withdrawn, said first named means being operably connected to said second named means to be operated in timed relationship, whereby said played record is released from said support.
  • a turntable swingably supported on a vertical axis located outside the turntable circumference, means for supporting a stack of records concentrically above the turntable when the latteris in its playing position for supplying records thereto, said means including projecting elements for receiving a played record from said turntable and releasably supporting said record concentric with said stack, and a mechanism drivably connected to said turntable and said means to' drive the same in timed relationship for feeding a record to the turntable and removing said record therefrom after it has been played, whereupon subsequent operation of said means releases said played record from-said projecting elements.
  • a swingable turntable having a diameter such'that a record depositedthereon will have the grooves in both sides exposed for engagement with a stylus, a tone arm movable from one side of a record to the other side thereof and provided with a stylus to engage in the grooves formed in the top and bottom sides of said record, means for releasably supporting a stack'of records above said turntable for transferrlng said records thereto'one at a time, said last named means 7 including upper and lower supports spaced apart vertically, the upper supports being positioned with respect to said stack for selecting and releasing the lowermost record of said stack for subsequent deposit on the turntable, and the lower supports being positioned with respect to said turntable to retrieve the record therefrom after being played, a platform below said turntable for receiving played records, and means to be actuated upon movement of said stylus into the non-playing grooves following reproduction of said record for swinging the turntable out from under said record to deposit the same on said lower supports and for rotating said lower
  • a swingable turntable means for releasably supporting a stack of records above said turntable for transferring said records thereto one at a time
  • saidlastnamed means including upper and lower supports spaced apart vertically, the upper supports being 16 positioned with respect to said stack for selecting and releasing the lowermost record of said stack for subsequent deposit on the turntable, and the lower supports being positioned with respect to said turntable to pick off the records therefrom after being played, a platform below said turntable for receiving played records, and means to be actuated at a predetermined time for mov- 7 ing the turntable downwardlythen laterally out from under the record to deposit the same on said lower support and for rotating said lower support to release said record which is then dropped onto the platform.
  • a turntable for supporting a record thereon during playing thereof, means for'supporting a group of records above said turntable and operative for releasing records therefor'from the group one at a time, means disposed below said turntable for receiving a played record, said first named means including projecting elements for temporarily supporting a played record above said turntable when the latter is under said group. of records and.
  • a horizontal turntable for supporting a record thereon during playing thereof, means for releasably supporting a stack of records above the turntable including upper fingers for releasing a record from said stack, members T actuable with said means comprising lower fingers'for intercepting said released record, means disposed below said turntable for receiving a played record, means for moving the turntable to pick up a record from said lower fingers, rotate said record for playing, deposit the same on the lower fingers, and then withdraw the turntable from beneath the record, and means for actuating said first named means to eject the record from the lower fingers to thereby deposit the record on said receiving means and release another record from the stack to be intercepted by the lower fingers.
  • An automatic phonograph mechanism comprising a turntable for carrying a record during the playing thereof, means for releasably supporting a stack of records above said turntable for release thereto one at a time, said means including three rotatable supports peripherally spaced apart around the turntable, each support having three blades disposed atditferent levels, the top blades of each support providing an upper level for supporting said stack, the intermediate blade of each support providing an intermediate level for temporarily supporting said stack during withdrawal of said top blades therefrom, which aresubsequently rotated back under said stack between the stack and the lowermost record, the bottom blade of each support providing a lower level for intercepting the record dropped from said intermediate level when the temporary support is withdrawn, and means for moving said turntable intoa said turntable to be released thereto one at a time when the latter is in its playing position, said means being provided with a support for releasably holdinga played record until the turntable has withdrawn from beneath said stack of records, and means for moving'said turntable vertically for depositing a played record

Landscapes

  • Automatic Disk Changers (AREA)

Description

July 12, 1955 5 l, acDUFF 2,712,940
RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets-Sheet 1 fiWf/Z/VA MM/ M :9 52 4 July 12, 1955 2,712,940-
S. I. M DUFF RECORD CHANGER l2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 25, 1948 July 12, 1955 MaCDUFF v 2,712,940
' RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets-Sheet 3 Z06 lNV/FA/ 70/? MQQAW July 12, 1955 s. l. MacDUFF 2,712,940
RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets-Sheet 5 July 12, 1955 s. I. MacDUFF 2,712,940
RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets$heet 6 MGM ATTOE/VE Y July 12, 1955 s. L MacDUFF 2,712,940
RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets-Sheet 8 July 12, 1955 s. 1. M cDuFF 2,712,940
RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets-Sheet 1o July 12, 1955 s. I. MaCDUFF 2,712,940
RECORD CHANGER Filed June 25, 1948 12 Sheets-Sheet ll ATTORNEY United States Patent RECORD CHANGER Stanley I. MaeDutY, South Bend, Ind., assignor to Bendix Aviation Corporation, South Bend, Ind., a corporation of Delaware Application June 25, 1948, Serial No. 35,166
9 Claims. (Ci. 274-11)) a time for playing, whereupon the played records are removed from said rotatable support and deposited thereunder.
A still more important object of the invention is to provide a device of this sort having a single turntable and tone arm, the latter of which carries a pickup eonstituted to engage either one or the other side, or alternate sides of a record when placed on the turntable.
A further object is to provide a record changing mechanism wherein a record may be rejected after it has started to play.
A still further object is to provide a record changer which will play automatically any standard 10 inch or 12 inch record.
The above and other objects and features of the invention will be apparent from the following description of the apparatus taken in connection with the accompanying drawings which form a part of this specification, and in which: a
Figure 1 is a top plan view of a phonograph apparatus embodying my invention, showing certain elements in the position they assume during the playing of a record;
Figure 2 is a similar view of the phonograph apparatus showing the elements in the position they assume during a record changing operation;
Figure 3 is a view in side elevation looking at the device of Figure 1 from the right side, with elements omitted for the sake of clarity;
Figure 4 is a view in side elevation looking at the device of Figure 1 from the lower side;
Figure 5 is a sectional view on the line 5-5 of Figure 3 with the platform shown in phantom;
Figure 5a is a view of the tone arm positioning means at the end of playing a 12 inch record, with some structural elements omitted for the sake of clarity;
Figure 5b is a similar view showing the tone arm positioning means during cycling when the tone arm has swung clear of the record disc;
Figure 5c is a similar view showing the tone arm positioning means at a later period in the cycle when the tone arm has been swung into playing position;
Figure 6 is a bottom plan view of the device of the invention;
Figure 7 is a plan view of one side, the underside, of the main cam showing the position of the selecting levers when playing the top side of a record;
Figure 8 is a view similar to Figure 7 of the main cam but with the selecting levers in the position for playing the bottom side of a record;
Figure 9 is a view similar to Figure 7 of the main cam, but with the selecting levers in the position for playing alternate sides of a record;
Figure 10 is a fragmentary plan view of the main cam and selecting levers, showing disengagement of the clutch during alternate play;
Figure 11 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 11-11 of Figure 9;
Figure 12 is a fragmentary plan view of the trip mechanism and tone arm positioning means;
Figure 12a is a detail view of two levers of the trip mechanism;
Figure 12b is a sectional view taken on the lines 12b-12b of Figure 5;
Figure 13 is a vertical sectional view, partly in elevation of the turntable mounting and positioning mechanism;
Figure 13a is a schematic view of the turntable cam and follower showing the latter in its position during the playing period;
Figure 13b shows the relative positions of the cam and follower when the turntable is lowered;
Figure 13c shows the relative positions of the cam and follower when the turntable is swung outside the record circle;
Figure 13d is a schematic illustration of the cam follower and latch mechanism for the turntable;
Figure 14 is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the tone arm assembly and the mechanism for vertically positioning the tone arm to play the top and bottom sides of a record;
Figure 14a is a fragmentary vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the tone am driving and elevating means;
Figure 15 is a vertical sectional view partly in elevation of the drive and clutch mechanism for reversing the direction of rotation of the turntable;
Figure 16 is a vertical sectional view of the record supporting and releasing means with parts in elevation;
Figure 17 shows the construction of the slicing means which compensates for variance in record thickness.
Figure 18 is a sectional view taken on the line 18-18 of Figure 17;
- Figure 19 is a sectional view partly in elevation taken on the line 19-19 of Figure 5 showing one of the push buttons in released position;
Figure 20 is a similar viewvwith the push button latched; and
Figure 21 is a view taken on the line 21--21 of Figure 5, wth the push button depressed downwardly beyond the latched position.
Frame and power mechanism Referring now to Figures 3, 4, 5 and 15 the reference numeral 25 designates a platform which may be supported in any suitable manner on vibration damping mountings, such as springs, not shown. An electric motor 27 is carried by a bracket 28 bolted to the underside of the platform 25 by a bolt 29 which threadedly engages the platform. A gear box 30 is formed with an integral tubular extension 31 having a fiange 32 at its outer end for fastening the gear box to the motor, in any suitable manner. A motor shaft 33 has an end 34 which extends through the tubular portion 31 into the gear box 30. This end of the shaft is equipped with a worm gear 35 drivably engaging a worm wheel 36 keyed to a shaft 37 protruding vertically upwardly and downwardly through the gear box 3%). A pinion gear 38 is carried on the upper end of shaft 37. The pinion gear 38 is provided with an interrupted gear tooth and a continuous gear tooth 39 to be used for a purpose hereinafter described. The lower end of shaft ure13.
37 is'formedinto a hollow tubular-like element 41 having a transverse slot 42 so as to receive an axially shiftable clutch member 43 provided with a transverse pin 44 which slides axially in the slot 42 as the clutch member shifts vertically. The clutch member 43 isurged downwardly by a spring 45 located in the hollow shaft element 41 and acting at one end of the clutch member. A pair of relatively rotatable pulleys 46 and 47 are mounted at the lower end of shaft 37 for free rotation therein except as the pulleys maybe engaged by the transverse pin'44. Pulleys 46 and 47 are equipped with driving pins 48 and 49 respectively for engagement with the transverse pin 44 at times depending on the position of the clutch member 43. In
the position shown in Figure the clutch member 43 is urged downwardly by the spring so that the transverse pin 44, carried by the clutch member, is disposed in driving relationship to the pins 49 of the pulley 47.
Clutch member 43 is shifted upwardly, so that transverse pin 44 engages driving pins 48, when it is desired to disengage pulley 47 from driving shaft 37 and connect pulley 46 in driving relationship to the latter shaft. The means i for shifting the clutch member 43 into and out of engagement with the pulleys 46 and 4'! will be described later in connection with the turntable driving mechanism.
To provide receiving means for the played records the platform 25 is equipped witha padded ribbed portion 50 having vertically extending posts 51 circumferentially spaced around a periphery'of a desired diameter. The
diameter of this record receiving means or storage maga zine is sufficient to accommodate the maximum size record to be played, in most instances thiswill be a 12" record.
Turntable mounting and mechanism for rotating the turntable upper end of sleeve 59. The bushing 56 is drilled radition of the turntable must be provided. That is, with the playing grooves of a record threaded thereon in the Mechanism for withdrawing the turntable from beneath ally at 57, for the reception of setscrews 58, to thereby securely fasten the arm to the sleeve 59. The platform 25 .is formed with a boss 60 onits topside to provide a bearing and guide for the sleeve 59, the lower end of which is equipped with a flange 61 having adowntnrned.
portion 62 to which a cam follower or roller '63 is suitably fastened. Aspring 64 encircles the sleeve 59 and is put under compression between the flange 61 and boss 60 to thereby urge the sleeve, and hence the arm and turntable, which are carried by the sleeve, downwardly. The turntable 52, arm 53, and sleeve 59 are supported vertically on a cam 65, on which the cam follower 63 rides. The cam 65 has a hub '66 formed integrally therewith forcooperation with a bearing member 67 supportedby a bracket 68 suitably carried on the underside of the platform by hangers 82. i a
A freely rotatable shaft 69 passes through the bearing 67 and the sleeve 59. A sheave 70 is fixed to one end of the shaft 69 and a double sheave 71 is drivably attached by a spline or similar means to the other end thereof. The turntable 52 is equipped with a pivot pin 72' to one end of which is secured a sheave 73, and the other end of whichprotrudes above the turntable to engage. the hole of a record-to thereby center the same on the tu'rrn'table. A belt 74 rides in the grooves of the sheaves 70 and 73 to thereby drivably connect the turntable 52 to theshaft 69.- Belts 75 and 76 connect respectively the sheaves 46 and -47fto.the double sheave 71'. Belt 76 is crossed so as to rotate shaft 69, and hence the turntable, in-a direction opposite to that imparted thereto by belt 75 'The double sheave 71.is supported at its lower end in a bearing 83 formed in a plate 84 suitably suspended from the same hangers 82 on the underside of the platform as'bracket 68, Since the top and bottom'sides of a record 77 "are same direction on either side, the turntable or record must be rotated in one direction when playing the top side and in the reverse direction when playing the bottom side so that the stylus will follow from the outside to the inside of the record.
The desired direction of rotation of the turntable is sensed from the position of the tone arm 73. This is done by pivotally supporting one end of a'l-ever 79 to a brace 80, see Figures 4, 14, and 15, with the other end of the lever resiliently supported by a spring 79a on a bell crank 81 so that raising and lowering the bell crank to raise and lower the tone arm positions theclutch member 43, which is urged against lever 79 by the spring 45. With the tone arm positioned for playing the top side of a record the bell crank 81 is raised, thereby raisinglever 79 which shifts the clutch member upwardly so that sheave 46 drives the double sheave 71. With the tone arm positioned for playing the bottom side of a record the bell crank is lowered, thereby allowing spring 45 to urge the clutch 43 into driving engagement withrsheave 47. the double sheave 71, is crossed, this latter sheave will be driven in a reverse direction, thereby reversing the direction of rotation of the turntable. supports the lever 79, is suspended fromhangers 82 and 85 the latter 'of which is secured to the underside of theplatform in much the same manner as the hanger 82.
a played record During the playing of 'a record the turntable is centered above the record receiving means 51 and'must therefore be withdrawn afterthe record has been played to permit dropping said record into the magazine therebelow. As best shown in Figures 1, 2 and 13. the arm 53 on which the turntable is carried is swingably supported on the sleeve 59 outside the record circle 86' and hence outside the turntable circumference; That is. the turntable'is pivotally supported on the arm 53 outside the axis of rotation of said turntable. The means employed for controlling the movements of the turntable to cause the. same to withdraw from a played record, swing laterallyoutside the record circle of the played record, as shown in Figure 2, so that the playedrecord can be deposited in the receiving means, and then swing laterally back into position for playing another record, as shown in Figure 1, comprises a pinion gear 87 fixed to the hub 66 of the cam 65, and a gear sector 88, arranged for engagement with the pinion gear and pivotally carried by pin 89 on bracket 68. The gear sector-88 is rotated by a t lever 90 which has one end pivoted on the gear sector and .the other end drivably connected to an eccentric member 91 rotatably carried by cam 92 which is formedwith. interrupted. peripheral teeth .93 for engagement with the continuous tooth gear 3910f pinion gear'38.
A dog clutch 94 is drivably interposed between the cam 92 an eccentric 91, see Figures 7, 8, 9 andlt'). The; clutch includesa bell crank lever 95having ends 96jand 97, and pivotedon the underside of cam 92L A spring; 98 rotates the end 97 of the bell crank 95 into driving en-;
gagement with a shoulder 99 inthe upper end of the ec:
centric. As best shown in Figuretllt'ne eccentric is in, the form of a hub with a hollow portion 100 into which a 7 boss 101 of the cam,92 ,fits to providea hearing: The
boss 101 is drilled through the cam at 102 to receive the downwardly projecting boss:194 integral with. the
underside of'said platform, see Fig. 14. The boss 104' a is bored at 104a to accommodate a concentrically located pilot'shaft 103 integral with said eccentric. A preloaded spring is disposed within the bored portion 104a of boss 104 to urge the pilot shaft 103' downwardly,
Since the belt 76, which connects. the sheave47 to The brace 80, which:
upwardly in Figure 11, so as to force a rounded projection 1%7 carried by the eccentric into a spherical radius recess 108 in a plate 106, thereby forming a detent to normally hold the eccentric 91 in its normal or record playing position. This arrangement acts to prevent frictional driving of the eccentric if the dog clutch is disengaged, as in playing alternate sides of a record.
Figure 13a is a schematic view in side elevation of the contour of the cam surface of cam 65. The arrow below the cam indicates the direction of rotation thereof when swinging the turntable from the position in Figure l to the position in Figure 2. With the turntable in its normal playing position of Figure 1 the cam follower 63 is near the top of cam incline 110 and resting against stop 111 which depends from the underside of the platform. This stop, positions the turntable centerwise for playing a record. As the gear sector rotates the cam 65 in the direction of the arrow the follower 63 rides down the incline into a V-shaped slot 112, under the force of spring 64, and lowers the turntable, see Figure 13b, to thereby withdraw the turntable from the record. Continued rotation of the cam will now rotate the turntable laterally since the follower is engaged in the slot 112, see Figures 2 and 130. This swings the turntable outside the record circle at which time the lever 90 and eccentric 91 pass over dead center, thereby rotating the gear sector in the opposite direction and returning the turntable to its playing position, first swinging it in until the cam follower engages the stop 111 and then elevating it by means of the inclined surface 119 of the cam 65.
In accordance with the present invention the played records are stored in the record magazine which is located below the turntable. In order to remove the played records from the magazine the turntable arm 53 is manually swung outside the record circle and releasably latched in this position, by a latch 113 and stop pin 11 which engage the cam follower 63, see Figure 13d. The stop pin 114 restricts the are through which the turntable arm can be swung manually outside the record circle. When the turntable arm is swung manually, as aforementioned, to a position outside the record circle the cam follower rides along the horizontal cam surface 115. It should be noted, however, that when the turntable arm is swung outwardly by the action of the gear sector the follower first lowers vertically along the cam incline 110, thereby lowering the turntable, until the V-slot of the cam engages the follower, at which time the cam follower is rotated beneath the latch 113 and stop pin 114.
Means for releasably supporting a stack of records above the turntable and the mechanism for operating said means The record supporting and releasing means comprises a set of three record slicers and supports 116 rotatably carried in the post 51 integral with the top side of the platform and spaced approximately 120 apart around the periphery of the record circle. Since the construction of the record slicers and supports 116 is identical for all three only one will be described in detail, see Figures 16, 17, and 18. The post 51 provides a main bearing for a sleeve 117, to the upper end of which a record support member 118 is press fitted. The record support member 118 rides on the fiat surface 119 of the post. A sprocket 120 is securely fastened to the lower end of sleeve 117. A continuous chain 121 passes over the sprockets of the three slicers, so that rotation of one slicer rotates all three slicers. A slicer member 122 is mounted axially in line with the record support 118 for limited rotational movement relative thereto. A stub sleeve 123 is press fitted into a bore 124 of the slicer member 122. The stub sleeve 123 is axially aligned with sleeve 117 and is provided with an extension 125 which rotatably fits into bore 126 of the record support member 118. This extension 125 of the stub sleeve acts as a pilot or pivotal guide for the slicer member.
The slicer member 122 is provided with blades or fingers 127 and 123 for supporting respectively stacks of 10 and 12 inch records. These blades also function as slicers for separating the lowermost record from a stack. The support member 118 is formed with upper blades or fingers 129 and 1319 for carrying respectively a stack of 10 and 12 inch records during the slicing operation, and fingers 131 and 132 for carrying respectively a 10 or 12 inch record which has been dropped from the stack. The fingers 128 and which support and slice the 12 inch records from a stack of 12 inch records and the fingers 127 and 129 which support and slice the 10 inch records from a stack of 10 inch records are respectively spaced apart vertically a distance equal to the minimum thickness of standard records, see Figure 3. The distance between these fingers is designated by the letters a and b respectively for 10 and 12 inch records. The fingers or blades 127 and 123 have respectively relatively sharp edges 127a and 128:: which facilitates movement of the fingers between the lowermost record of a stack and the stack. As best shown in Figure l the sides of members 118 and 122 are formed to guide a record, a 12 inch record in this case, from the stack to the lowermost finger 132. That is, the sides provide a three point contact at C, D, and E. This contact is also maintained as the slicers rotate since the sides 1155a and 122a are formed with radii that will keep the distance from the three points C, D, and E to the center of the record circle constant. The sides 118i; and 12% are formed with radii that will likewise keep the distance from the contact points to the center of the record circle constant when a 10 inch record is played.
In order to compensate for variance in record thickness the slicer member 122 and the support member 118 are formed with complementary cam surfaces 133 and 134 which permits increasing the vertical distances between fingers 128 and 13b, for example, when a record having a thickness somewhat greater than the allowed minimum thickness is encountered. The cams 133 and 134, of the two members 118 and 122, are held in driving relationship by a spring 135 interposed between head 136, which is located at one end of a rod 137, and the'member 122. The rod 137 passes freely through the sleeve 117 and is threaded at its other end to receive a out 138 which is drawn up tightly against the end of sleeve 117 to thereby preload spring 135. if a relatively thick record is encountered the cam surface 133 slides along cam surface 134 to thereby raise member 122 against spring 135.
As shown in Figures l6, l7, and 18, to limit the relative rotational movement between members 118 and 122 in one direction only, which movement is necessary for the functioning of the cams, 133 and 134, pins 139 and 141) are carried on the top side of member 118 so as to extend into the hollow portion 141 of member 122 to thereby engage the walls thereof. Pin 139 is positioned so that member 122 can be rotated in a clockwise direction a given amount with respect to member 118 before the pin will engage the side wall of the former member. Pin is positioned to normally engage the inside wall of member 122 so that counterclockwise rotation of the said member is prevented when blade 125 is being withdrawn from beneath a stack of records.
A crank or lever 142 is carried by the lower end of one only of rods 137 to provide a drive between the nut 138 and the sleeve, and is releasably engageable with the sprocket 129 through the employment of a detent 143 carried by the upper side of the crank. The sprocket is slotted at 144, 145 and 146, see Figure 6, to receive the detent 143. When the detent is in registry with any one of the slots the spring 135 will pull the detent into engagement with that slot, so that rotation of the crank 142 will impart rotation to the sprocket and hence actuate the slicers. A lever 147 connects the crank 142 to the lever 93 which in turn has one end secured to the eccen- 7 tric 91. Hence any rotation imparted to eccentric 91 will simultaneously operate the slicers and swing the turntable laterally in timed relationship. To disengage the detent'143 from the slot, button 136 is pushed downwardly against spring 135. The slicers can now be rotated by hand to any desired setting ofthe arrow, see slicer on left, Figure 1, depending on the size of the record to be playedf The rod 137 which carries the eccentric is provided with a head or button having the indicia M, 12 and 10 thereon which denotes respectively a setting of the slicers for manual operation or the automatic playing of 12 inch records, and 10 inch records. Figure 1 shows the position of the slicers for handling 12 inch records. 7 After a record has been played the slicer mechanism and turntable are automatically set in operation, in a manner to be hereinafter described. The initial action of the turntable and slicers are concurrent. Let us assume that a stack of 12 inch records rest on blades 12%, and
the turntable carries a record of like size which has just finished playing. At first, the turntable is lowered, depositing the played record on the fingers 132; the turntable is then swung laterally outside the record circle and the slicers'rotated so that the played record which was deposited on'the fingers 132 will now be dropped into the record receiving means therebelow. At the same time that the played record is being dropped from the fingers 132, it will be noted that fingers 128 have rotated out from under the stack of records 86 which is now supported temporarily on fingers which have rotated under the stack before fingers 128 had completely withdrawn. It will be remembered that fingers 130 are at a lower level than fingers 128. After having shifted the stack from fingers 128 to 130 the slicers now reverse,
rotating fingers 128 between the lowermost record in the M stack and the stack. As fingers 128 rotate back under the stack fingers 130 rotate out from under the stack. This action slices the lowermost record from the stack and drops the same onto fingers 132 which were rotated with fingers 128 and are located directly therebelow. The turntable movement is timed to the slicer action so that the turntable is swung back under the stack and elevated into playing position concurrently with the'reverse rotation of fingers 128.
Tone arm device including mechanism for vertically positioning the same carried in gimbals 154 of the tone arm and is of a common form except that it is provided with a double pointed needle 155 arranged to engage in the grooves in either the top or the bottom side of a record which is supported on the turntable. The said reproducer may be electrically connected to any conventional type of'amplifier and speaker for reproduction of the sound. In order that the needle will exert an equal pressure on the top and bottom sides of a record the pivoted end of the pickup is provided with a finger 156 which extends laterally between a pair of leaf springs 157 and 158 secured at one end to the tone arm. Adjacent the end of the finger 156 and between the springs 157 and 158 is a pin 156a secured crosswise in the tone arm and positioned to hold the pickup in a normally neutral position. The springs have load characteristics adjusted so that an equal force is exerted between the needle and the record groove when engaged with either the top or bottom ofa record. It will be noted that the lower spring will be lighter as it is assisted by the weight of the pickup device, and in some instances only one spring may be required if the weight of the pickup device isgreat enough. An adapter 159 having a flange 160 'extendinglaterally from one side thereof, is securely fastened tothe upper end of snag-94o contact with an arm 166, of a bell crank 81, which raises and lowers the tone arm to the desired position above or below a r ecord, as the case maybe. The bell crank 81 is fulcrumed about 167 and is carried by the brace J 80. An arm 168 of the bell crank is disposed at right angles to the arm 166 and is provided with a roller 169 arranged for rolling contact with an inner cam track 170 and an outer cam track 171 formed in the cam 92. When the roller or cam follower 169 rides in the inner 1 cam track 170, see Figures 7 and 14, the tone arm is positioned vertically for playing the top side of a record. With the roller in the outer cam track 171, see Figure 8, the tone arm will come to rest vertically in a position for playing the bottom sideof a record, see dotted line position of tone arm in Figure 14.
Mechanism for positioning the tone arm laterally for two sizes of records 176, the other end of which is slotted at 177 to embrace a reduced section 178 of a hub 104. 'Said other end of the lever 176 is equipped with a cam follower 180 which fits into a groove 181 formed in the top side of the cam 92. The end of the reciprocating lever with which the flange 175 is integral is also slotted at 182 to embrace the reduced diameter 172 of the hub 153. The slotted end 182 is held in position by washers 183 encircling the reduced portion 172 of the hub 153, and located one on each side of the lever. A spacer 184 is interposed between the lower washer 183 and the top side of wheel 173. The width of slot 182 is greater than the reduced diameter 172 to permit lateral movement between the hub 153 and the end of the reciprocating lever circumscribing said hub, see Figures 5, 12, and 14. One end of slot 182 is formed with a cam 185 which rides on the reduceddiameter 172 of the hub, when the reciprocating lever is moved to the position shown in Figure 12,
ciprocating lever when the tone arm has been moved laterally to a position for eugageemnt with a record. When the reciprocating lever is moved so that the reduced diameter 172 is at the other end of the slot 182, that is, at the end opposite from the each 185, the flange 175 is in frictional engagement with the wheel 173. Actually, as quickly as the cam 185 rides off the reduced diameter 172 a spring 186, having one end fixed to the underside of the platform, pulls the flange into frictional engagement with the wheel 173.
The wheel 173 is equipped with a pair of diametrically opposed driving pins 187, which depend from the wheel for engagement with a cross bar 188 carried by shaft 152, see Figure 14a. The cross bar is furnished with slots 189 and 190 at each end for sliding'engagement with the driving pins. This arrangement between the driving wheel 173, which rotates the tone arm laterally, and
the vertical shaft 152, which position the tone arm vertically, provides for a concurrent raising or lowering action of the tone arm in conjunctbn with lateral or swinging movement thereof.
in order to arrest the tone arm at the correct lateral position above or below a 10 or 12 inch record, as the case may be, the drive whee 173 is equipped with a laterally projecting plate 191 on which a pair of pins 192 and 193 are arranged for engagement with a finger 194 carried at one end of a lever 195 pivoted at 196 to the underside of the platform, see Figures 5, 6, and 12. A coil spring 197 has one end secured to the platform and its other end fastened to the finger 194 in a manner tending to rotate lever 195 counterclockwise, as viewed in Figures 6 and 12, or clockwise as viewed in Figures and 5a. A cam 198 is located on the outer periphery of the main cam 92, for engagement with a projection 199 integral with lever 195, to thereby rotate the finger 194' into the position shown in Figure 5a, to permit unimpeded rotation of the tone arm during the playing pe riod. As best shown in Figures 5, 5a, and 8 the peripheral cam 198 is of a predetermined length so that the projection 199 will remain in engagement with the cam surface 198 during the initial cycling stage, to thereby hold the finger 194 in the position shown in Figure 50, thus permitting the plate 191, Which carries pins 192 and 193, to be returned to the position shown in Figure 5b. As soon as the tone arm has been swung outside the ecord circle the cam 198 is moved past the projection 199, at which time the spring 197 rotates the lever 195 into the position shown in Figure 50, where finger 194 will engage pin 193 when the tone arm is returned to its playing position on a 12 inch record.
The position of finger 194, when the projection 199 is not riding on cam 198, depends on whether the feeler 200 which is integral with lever 195, rides on cam surfaces 201 or 292, of sprocket cam 203. The cam surfaces 201 and 202 are for the 12 and inch records respectively. Since the mode of operation and function of the finger 194 is the same for the 10 inch record, as for the 12 inch record, an explanation of the action of the finger when positioning the tone arm for a record of the former size if believed unnecessary.
Trip mechanism For a detailed disclosure of this mechanism see Figures 5, 12, 12a, and 1217.
A function of this mechanism is to sense the end of a record and start the cycling of the machine. To perform this function a lever 204 is arranged to swing periodically about the pivot 196. This periodic movement is imparted to the lever by having one end thereof biased by a spring 205 into contact relationship with a revolvable cam 206, which is suitably secured to the drive shaft 37. To the other end of the lever 204 is pivotally mounted an actuating pin 207 for pushing engagement with one end of a lever 208 which is pivotally carried at 209 on the underside of the platform. Overlying said other end of the lever 204 and pivotaily carried at 196, is a lever 210 arranged for limited relative angular movement with respect to lever 204. This limited movement, or lost motion, between levers 204 and 210 is accomplished by the use of a pin 211 which is mounted on lever 204 and projects into an elongated slot 212 or" lever 210. For positioning the actuating pin 207 for engagement with the lever 208 a pin positioning member 213 is rotatably mounted at one end of lever 210. As best shown in Figures 12 and 12b the pin positioning member is provided with a rounded end 214 which rides on the periphery of drive wheel 173 to be frictionally driven thereby. A spring 219 rotates lever 210 so that the rounded end 214 is held in driving relationship to wheel 173. The member 213 is provided with a slot 215 which receives the pivoted end of the actuating pin 207. Theslot 215 is of sufiicient length to permit angular relative movement between levers 204 and 2111, as aforemen-' tioned, and wide enough to allow the member 213 to swing angularly about its pivot to thereby impart angular movement to actuating pin 207, which has an end 216 slidably carried in an upturned element 217 of the pin positioning member. As viewed in Figure 5, a spring 218 rotates the member 213 in a ciockwise direction against the end 207:: of the actuating pin 207 which acts as a stop. Movement of the tone arm toward the center of a record, as during the playing thereof, under the influence of the stylus tracking inwardly toward the center rotates wheel 173 clockwise which causes the pin positioning member to swing counterclockwise, against the action of spring 218, to thereby move the end 216, of the pin 207, to the right, as viewed in Figure 5. If the end 216, of pin 207, is swung far enough to the right it will engage a downturned end 220 of one end of the lever 208. For each revolution of the shaft 37 the cam 206 engages the left end of lever 204 to thereby swing the right end of said lever in a clockwise direction so that the rounded end 214 of the pin positioning member 213 is moved away from the periphery of wheel 173, at which time spring 218 rotates the member back to its original position against the pivoted end 207a of pin 207. In this connection it should be remembered that lever 204 can swing a given angular distance before lever 210 will be rotated because of the slight amount of travel of pin 211 in the enlongated slot 212. This arrangement will permit thrusting the end 216 of the pin 207 forward a slight amount before the rounded end 214 is actually out of contact with the drive wheel. Whether or not the end 216 of the actuating pin engages the end 220, of lever 208, when the pin positioning member is returned by spring 218, depends on how far the end 216 is swung before the pin positioning member is moved out of driving engagement with the wheel 173.
Lever 208 is normally urged against a stop 222 by a spring 223 fastened to one end of the lever. The other end of the lever is provided with a downwardly projecting prong 224 which engages an upwardly projecting prong 225, carried by a crank arm 226, pivotally fulcrumed on pin 227 to the top side of the cam 92. A toothed member 228 is pivotally linked to one end of the crank arm for engagement with the interrupted pinion gear 38. A spring 229 biases the crank arm in a direction tending to move the toothed member 228 into engagement with the interrupted gear tooth. However, actual engagement between the toothed member and the interrupted gear tooth is normally prevented by the upwardly projecting prong 225 engaging the downwardly projecting prong 224. Any rotation of lever 20%, such as would be imparted thereto by the actuating pin 207, wiil disengage the downwardly projecting prong 224 from prong 225, to thereby perm' crank arm 226 to be rotated under the influence of the spring 229. This action causes the toothed member 22$ to move into meshing relationship with the driving pinion 33 to thereby rotate the cam 92 so that the cam teeth will be rotated into registry with the continuous gear teeth of the pinion gear 33.
it is essential that the trip mechanism does not interfere with the tone arm movement during the cycling phase of the phonograph. To insure such non-interference the lever 204 is provided with a cam 230 which slides into a recess 231, located in the periphery of the large cam 92, during a non-cycling period, but during a cycling period, that is, as soon as the cam 92 starts to rotate the earn 23% moves out of the recess and onto the periphery of the large cam, to thereby swing the rounded end 214 of member 213 out of contact with wheel 173.
In sensing the end or" the playing period of a record the trip mechanism operates as follows: As the stylus tracks inwardly toward the center of a record the tone arm swings inwardly, thereby revolving the wheel 173, which in turn rotates the pin positioning member 213. The stylus and hence the tone arm track inwardly to- 'cam edges of the blades.
ward the center of a record a predetermined distance during each revolution of the turntable as the record is being played. Sincethe non-playing or tripping grooves of a; record have a greater lead than the playing grooves, the wheel 86 will have a greater velocity per revolution of the turntable when the stylus is trackingin the non playing or tripping grooves than when in the playing grooves.
The cam 206, which rotates at approximately the same speed as the record, strikes against an end of the lever 204 every revolution, causing it to swing about pivot 196. The initial movement of lever 204, under the influence of cam 206, is not enough to move the member 213 out of contact with the wheel, so that the pin 207 is thrust forwarda predetermined distance depending upon the angle between the member 213 and lever 204. Continued rotation of earn 206 further swings the lever 204 angularly, whichthrusts the pin forward an additional predetermined distance and subsequently liftsjthe rounded end 214, of the pin positioning member, out of contact with the wheel. Spring 218 then returns the member 213 to its original position and the action is repeated. When the stylus reaches the end of a record where the groove has a greater lead, that is, when the stylus passes into the tripping groove, the tone arm, and hence the wheel 173, will rotate faster, to thereby swing the pin 207 at an angle such that it will be thrust into the downturned end 220 of lever 208 when the rounded end of member 213 is moved out of contact with the wheel.
Selector means and cycling control mechanism As best shown in' Figures 1 and 2, the platform supports four appropriately marked push buttons arranged in apposition for controlling the operation of the record changing apparatus. The machine operator has a choice of playing all top sides, all bottom sides, or alternate sides of a stack of records. With reference toFigures 4 and 5 a switch housing 232 is carried on the underside of the platform to support the push buttons, which are normally urged to an inoperative position by springs 233. The three push buttons designated.Top, Bot. (bottom), and fAlt. (alternate) are structurally identical, hence these buttons will be described together. As best shown in Figures 4, 5, 6, 19, 20 and 21 the push buttons carry blades 234, which project through slits 235 in the bottom of housing 232, so that the springs 233 can be secured thereto. The blades are formed with cams 236 and 237, on one edge, for engagement with an inturned section 238 of side 239, which is hinged to top 240 of the housing, in any suitable manner, seeFigures l9 and 20. The cam edges of the blades are provided with a catch 241 for engagement with the inturned section 238 when the push buttons are in operative position, see Figure 20. A spring 242, interposed between the sides of the housing, holds the inturned section 238 in engagement with the For controlling the current to the motor 27 a normally closed switch 243 is located at one end of the switch housing 232. The hinged side 239 carries an extension 244, one end of which supports a leaf spring 245 which rides on a button 246 of the normally closed switch 243, to thereby normally hold the switch in open position. Therefore, .with the push buttons in inoperative positions, as shown in Figure 19, switch 243 is maintained in open position, and when the push buttons are in operative position, as shown'in Figure 20, leaf spring 245 has moved otf button 246 so that the switch 243 can close.
With this arrangement of the push buttons only one button at a timecan be in operative position. For example, if the push button marked Bot. is latched as shown in Figure 20, and the push button marked Top is pushed downwardly so that the catch 241 of the latter button engages the bottom section 238, this will release 'the Bot. button. The Ofi push button is identical with the other buttons exceptthat the former button does not have the catch element 241 on its cam edge. There- 12 fore, any one of the other buttons may be disengaged from the bottom section 238 by depressing the Off button.
Depressing the push buttons, as aforementioned, not only allows the normally closed switch 243 to close, to thereby start the motor, but also actuates the trip mechanism for cycling the machine if pushed downwardly far enough so that the cam 237 rides on the bottom section 238, as shown in Figure 21. This action of cam 237 against the bottom section 238 rotates the side 239 into contact with one end of a set screw 247a which threadedly engages an end of a lever 247, which is carried by a bracket 248, secured to the top 240 of the switch housing. A tie rod 249 connects the other end of the lever 247 to the lever 208. Hence depressing any one of the push buttons downwardly to where the side 239 is rotated into engagement with said one end of lever 247, as where cam 237 is caused to ride against the bottom section 238, will rotate said lever counterclockwise to thereby revolve lever 208, see Figure 5, which releases the tooth member 228 for driving engagement with the pinion gears 38.
To prevent actuating the trip mechanism when the apparatus is set for manual operation, a cam wheel 2 50, carried by one of the sprocket wheels 120, is formed with a cutaway portion 251, which registers with a finger 252 of the bracket 248. The bracket 248 is mounted for horizontal rotation about a pivot pin 253 which is threaded into the top 240 of the switch housing. Depressing the push buttons during a time when the apparatus is set for manual play, at which time the'cut out portion 251 is opposite finger 252, will cause the bracket 248 to rotate clockwise instead of rotating the lever 247, see Figure 21. This action will render the lever 247 inoperative with respect to the push buttons. However, under conditions of automatic playing the finger 252 is in contact with the periphery 254 of the cam wheel, see Figure 5, so that rotation of bracket 248 is prevented and the lever 247 is rotated.
As previously pointed out the roller or follower 169, with which bell crank 81 is integral, follows the inner cam track when the changer apparatus is set so that the tone arm will play the top side of a record, and follows the outer carn'track 171 when the apparatus is set so that the tone arm will play the bottom side of a record. Figure 7 shows the position of the follower 169 with respect to the inner cam track when playing the top side of a record. In order to switch the roller 169 from the inner to the outer track, a gate 255 is provided. This gate, whichis pivotally carried on the underside of cam 92, forms a portion of the inner track and is normally biased to closed. position by a leaf spring 256. For opening the gate 255 a switch lever 257 is carried on the underside of the platform for horizontal rotation about a bolt stud 258. As best shown in Figures 4 and 6, one end 'of the switch lever is located below the push button marked Bot. to be engaged by the end of its associated blade 234 when the button is depressed. Said one end of the lever is formed with an angularly projecting element 259 on which the end of blade 234, of the Bot." button rides. Depressing this button rotates the said one end of the lever to the right, see Figure 4. The other end of this lever is equipped with a curved extension piece 260 which is shifted to the right, as viewed in Figure 8 to thereby engage a pin 261, of the gate 255,-as it rotates with the cam 92, in the direction of the arrow. A spring 262 having one end secured to the underside of the platform and the other end secured to lever 257 tends to rotate. the leverin a counterclockwise direction, see Figure 6.
The gate is thus opened and held in this position until the free end thereof rotates pastthe follower 169, at which time the pin 261 rides oil the curved extension 260, and the gate is then closed by the spring 256. A seccam track. When playing bottom side only of a stack of records, switch lever 257 is moved into the position shown in Figure 8 by depressing the Bot. button as explained. However, when playing alternate sides of a stack of records, switch lever 257 is automatically positioned to function in the capacity of a switching lever for gate 255.
in order to automatically shift switch lever 257, as aforementioned, a lever 264 is arranged in juxtaposition to the former lever and is pivotally secured for vetical rotaticn to a bracket 265 carried by the bolt stud 258, see Figures 7 to 10. A machine bolt 226 supports the lever 264 for vertical rotation. By pivotally mounting bracket 265 on the bolt stud 258 and then pivotally securing the lever 264 to the bracket the lever is capable of horizontal rotation around stud 253 and vertical rotation around the bolt 266. One end of lever 264 underlies the Alt. button so that depressing this button rotates the other end of the l ver upwardly. Said one end of the lever 264 is formed into a U-shaped section 267 with the curved end 260 of lever 257 fioatably positioned therebetween, see Figure 11. The U-shaped section has one side 268 turned outwardly so as to support a pawl 269 which travels in the inner and outer grooves 270 and 271 respectively of the cam 92. Side 272 of the U-shaped section extends vertically beyond the side 268 to thereby engage end 96 of the bell crank lever 95, as shown in Figures 9, l0, and ll. Rotation of lever 264 vertically, as aforementioned, so that said other end of the lever moves upwardly, will cause the pawl 269 to initially engage in the outer groove 271, see Figures 7 and 8, and also position the side 272 for movement into engagement with the bell crank 95 when the pawl has shifted to the inner groove 270, as shown in Figure 9. Since the bracket 265, on which lever 264 is carried, is mounted for horizontal rotation about the bolt stud 258, the lever can swing freely from the inner to the outer groove or vice versa. A spring 273, having one end secured to the underside-of the platform and the other end fastened to the lever 264, tends to rotate the lever in a counterclockwise direction, as viewed in Figure 6. When the pawl 269 is not in the grooves 275) and 271 the spring 273 will swing the lever 264 and hence the pawl 269 against a circular stop 274, which is an extension of one of the walls of the outer groove 271. Therefore, unless the pawl is in either groove 270 or 271 it is urged against the circular stop 274. It will be noted, see Figures 6 and 11, that the spring 262 normally swings the end 269, of lever 257, into contact with the U-shaped end 267 of the lever 264. Therefore any horizontal rotation of lever 264, due to the pawl 269 traveling in grooves 270 and 271, will also move the end 260.
In order to prevent interrupting a cycle once it has been initiated, there is provided a latch mechanism, which precludes opening the switch 243 until a cycle has been completed. As best shown in Figure 5, this mechanism includes a lever 275 pivoted to the underside of the platform 25, and equipped with a roller 276 carried on one end of the lever. A rod 277 connects the other end of the lever to the hinged side 239, of the switch housing. A spring 278, has one end secured to said other end of the lever 275 and the other end fastened to the underside of the platform, to thereby urge said roller into contact with the outer periphery of can 92. There is lost motion in one direction between the rod 277 and the side 239 so that the latter can be swung outwardly by depressing the push buttons. The roller 276 rests in a circular slot 279 when the machine is not cycling, and the rod 277 is moved in a direction, under the influence of spring 273, to permit the side 239 and hence the bracket 244 to return to its normal position, see Figures and 19. The rod 277 slides freely through the side 239 and is provided with a stop nut 280 on one end for engagement with said side. However, once a cycle is initiated, the roller 27 rides out of the circular slot 279 and onto the outer periphery of cam 92, at which time lever 275 is rotated clockwise, as viewed in Figure 5, to thereby slide the rod 277 and nut 28% into engagement with the side 239 so that said side cannot eturn from the position shown in Figure 20 to that of Figure 19, should the push buttons be released before a cycle is completed. At the end of the cycle the roller will be positioned in the circular slot. This arrangement also provides positive braking means for stopping the cam 92 and its associated parts. That is, the inertia of the moving parts has a tendency to continue the motion of the mechanism, even after a cycle is completed, except that the aforementioned action of the roller on the cam periphery creates a frictional drag on the cam to thereby reduce its momentum.
To play the top sides of a record stack which has been placed on the slicers the push button marked Top is depressed downwardly until the bottom section 238 rides on cam 237 to thereby start the motor 27 and rotate lever 247, which actuates the trip mechanism to cycle the machine. This operates the slicers so as to transfer a record from the bottom of the stack to the lower level, on fingers 132, assuming that a 12 inch record is being played. Upon release of the button it is engaged by the latch 241. During the cycling stage of the machine the tone arm follower is moved to the inside cam track 170 which positions the tone arm for playing the top side of a record. The turntable is also swung from its position in Figure l to a position outside the record circle, to permit feeding a record to the receiving means, and then returned to its original position, of Figure l, where the turntable is elevated, to thereby lift the record to be played off the fingers 132. Upon completion of playing the top side of a record the trip mechanism will be actuated, whereby the cycle is repeated.
To play the bottom side of a record the button marked Bot. is depressed. The action of the turntable at this time is the same as for playing the top side. However, the tone arm must now be lowered so as to play the bottom side of a record and this is done by rotating the lever 257, in response to depressing the Bot. button, so that the curved end 260 of said lever will engage the pin 261 to open gate 255, to allow the follower 169 to enter in the outer cam track 171. In playing the bottom side only of a record stack the slicer and turntable mechanism operate during each cycle.
For alternate side play of a record the button marked Alt. is depressed in the same manner as for playing top side or bottom side. The top side of the record is played first and the action of the machine is the same as for all top side play except that there is the additional action of urging the pawl 269 into the outer groove 271, as hereinbefore explained. The initial cycling of the machine so as to feed a record onto the lower level 132 will also cause the pawl to move into the inner groove 276), see Figure 9, to set up the levers 257 and 264 for engagement with the pin 261 and the bell crank lever 95, respectively. Upon completion of playing the top side of the record, the trip mechanism automatically comes into play, cycling the machine. However, the slicers and the turntable are not operated at this time, since side 272 of the U-shaped section, see Figures 10 and 11, has rotated the dog clutch 94 out of engagement with the shoulder 99. As the cam 92 rotates, the pin 261 rides on the curved end 266 to thereby open the gate 255 so that the cam follower 169 will enter the outer cam track 171, lowering the tone arm for playing the bottom side of the record. During this cycling phase the pawl has now traveled into the inner groove so that the turntable and slicers will come into operation upon completion of playing the bottom side of the record. The cycling will now repeat alternately until the stack is played.
Although this invention has been described in connection with certain specific embodiments, the principles are susceptible of numerous other applications that will readily occur to persons skilled the art. Having thus described the various featuresof the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by selectively connecting the tone'arrn for playing alternate sides of a record, means operative upon'completion of playing the record for depositing the same in said storage means said last mentioned means including a plurality of members arranged to support a played record directly above said turntable, and means to be actuated upon movement of the stylus into the non-playing grooves following reproduction of a record for causing the turntable to transfer the record to said members and thence move out from under said record.
2. In a phonograph, a turntable swingably supported outside the turntable circumference, means for supporting a stack of records concentrically above said turntable when the latter is in its playing position for supplying records to the turntable to be played, and means for withdrawing said turntable from beneath a played record, said first named means including a support for releasably engaging the record'for supporting the same after the turntable has been withdrawn, said first named means being operably connected to said second named means to be operated in timed relationship, whereby said played record is released from said support. 7
3. In a phonograph, a turntable swingably supported on a vertical axis located outside the turntable circumference, means for supporting a stack of records concentrically above the turntable when the latteris in its playing position for supplying records thereto, said means including projecting elements for receiving a played record from said turntable and releasably supporting said record concentric with said stack, and a mechanism drivably connected to said turntable and said means to' drive the same in timed relationship for feeding a record to the turntable and removing said record therefrom after it has been played, whereupon subsequent operation of said means releases said played record from-said projecting elements. 7
4. In a phonograph, a swingable turntable having a diameter such'that a record depositedthereon will have the grooves in both sides exposed for engagement with a stylus, a tone arm movable from one side of a record to the other side thereof and provided with a stylus to engage in the grooves formed in the top and bottom sides of said record, means for releasably supporting a stack'of records above said turntable for transferrlng said records thereto'one at a time, said last named means 7 including upper and lower supports spaced apart vertically, the upper supports being positioned with respect to said stack for selecting and releasing the lowermost record of said stack for subsequent deposit on the turntable, and the lower supports being positioned with respect to said turntable to retrieve the record therefrom after being played, a platform below said turntable for receiving played records, and means to be actuated upon movement of said stylus into the non-playing grooves following reproduction of said record for swinging the turntable out from under said record to deposit the same on said lower supports and for rotating said lower supports to release said record which is dropped onto the platform,
.5. In a phonograph, a swingable turntable, means for releasably supporting a stack of records above said turntable for transferring said records thereto one at a time, saidlastnamed means including upper and lower supports spaced apart vertically, the upper supports being 16 positioned with respect to said stack for selecting and releasing the lowermost record of said stack for subsequent deposit on the turntable, and the lower supports being positioned with respect to said turntable to pick off the records therefrom after being played, a platform below said turntable for receiving played records, and means to be actuated at a predetermined time for mov- 7 ing the turntable downwardlythen laterally out from under the record to deposit the same on said lower support and for rotating said lower support to release said record which is then dropped onto the platform.
6. In a device for reproducing sound from a record, a turntable for supporting a record thereon during playing thereof, means for'supporting a group of records above said turntable and operative for releasing records therefor'from the group one at a time, means disposed below said turntable for receiving a played record, said first named means including projecting elements for temporarily supporting a played record above said turntable when the latter is under said group. of records and.
being moved into or out of its playing position, and means operatively connected to said first named means and to said turntable for withdrawing the latter from beneath a record after the playing thereof whereby said record is deposited on said projecting elements, and for rotating said first named means to cause the release of said played record frorn'the projecting elements onto said receiving means, whereupon the turntable is then returned to a position for receiving a record from said group and said first named means is rotated to its initial position to release a'record from said group.
7. In a device for reproducing sound from a record, a horizontal turntable for supporting a record thereon during playing thereof, means for releasably supporting a stack of records above the turntable including upper fingers for releasing a record from said stack, members T actuable with said means comprising lower fingers'for intercepting said released record, means disposed below said turntable for receiving a played record, means for moving the turntable to pick up a record from said lower fingers, rotate said record for playing, deposit the same on the lower fingers, and then withdraw the turntable from beneath the record, and means for actuating said first named means to eject the record from the lower fingers to thereby deposit the record on said receiving means and release another record from the stack to be intercepted by the lower fingers. V
8. An automatic phonograph mechanism comprising a turntable for carrying a record during the playing thereof, means for releasably supporting a stack of records above said turntable for release thereto one at a time, said means including three rotatable supports peripherally spaced apart around the turntable, each support having three blades disposed atditferent levels, the top blades of each support providing an upper level for supporting said stack, the intermediate blade of each support providing an intermediate level for temporarily supporting said stack during withdrawal of said top blades therefrom, which aresubsequently rotated back under said stack between the stack and the lowermost record, the bottom blade of each support providing a lower level for intercepting the record dropped from said intermediate level when the temporary support is withdrawn, and means for moving said turntable intoa said turntable to be released thereto one at a time when the latter is in its playing position, said means being provided with a support for releasably holdinga played record until the turntable has withdrawn from beneath said stack of records, and means for moving'said turntable vertically for depositing a played record on said
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2950920A (en) * 1953-10-07 1960-08-30 James L D Morrison Automatic phonographs
US3038727A (en) * 1954-08-27 1962-06-12 Hansen Hans Christian Record feeding arrangements

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US1469152A (en) * 1921-01-21 1923-09-25 Geoffrey M Boumphrey Sound-reproducing machine
US1597391A (en) * 1919-02-24 1926-08-24 Clemma R Raney Phonograph
US1875641A (en) * 1929-04-09 1932-09-06 Deca Disc Phonograph Company Automatic talking machine
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US2068449A (en) * 1933-11-06 1937-01-19 Downs Arthur Robert Gramophone or the like
US2090746A (en) * 1934-04-19 1937-08-24 Charles Leslie Franks Automatic record changer for phonographs
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US839902A (en) * 1906-06-26 1907-01-01 Walter Carl Spurgeon Phonograph and disk-holder.
US1597391A (en) * 1919-02-24 1926-08-24 Clemma R Raney Phonograph
US1404870A (en) * 1920-04-13 1922-01-31 Rafael J Mardonez Phonograph
US1469152A (en) * 1921-01-21 1923-09-25 Geoffrey M Boumphrey Sound-reproducing machine
US1456614A (en) * 1921-09-21 1923-05-29 C C Rush Automatic record-transferring mechanism for phonographs
US1875641A (en) * 1929-04-09 1932-09-06 Deca Disc Phonograph Company Automatic talking machine
US1910685A (en) * 1929-06-10 1933-05-23 Fisken Graeme Kearney Telephone message recording device
US2068449A (en) * 1933-11-06 1937-01-19 Downs Arthur Robert Gramophone or the like
US2090746A (en) * 1934-04-19 1937-08-24 Charles Leslie Franks Automatic record changer for phonographs
US2159836A (en) * 1936-12-09 1939-05-23 Alm Karl Martin Automatic phonograph
US2378086A (en) * 1939-01-11 1945-06-12 Seeburg J P Corp Automatic phonograph
GB541156A (en) * 1940-05-24 1941-11-14 Gilbert Slater Improved automatic gramophone
US2323365A (en) * 1940-07-18 1943-07-06 Edward F Andrews Automatic phonograph
US2348766A (en) * 1940-10-19 1944-05-16 Zenith Radio Corp Automatic record playing and changing apparatus
US2318654A (en) * 1941-05-09 1943-05-11 Benjamin F Wissner Automatic phonograph
US2622884A (en) * 1942-08-28 1952-12-23 Rca Corp Phonograph
US2457668A (en) * 1943-11-01 1948-12-28 Carl R Hart Automatic phonograph
US2598584A (en) * 1944-09-28 1952-05-27 Miller Walter Turntable for record changers
US2550794A (en) * 1946-04-26 1951-05-01 Gen Instrument Corp Tone arm and operating mechanism for automatic record changer phonographs
US2506926A (en) * 1946-11-08 1950-05-09 Seeburg J P Corp Automatic phonograph

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2950920A (en) * 1953-10-07 1960-08-30 James L D Morrison Automatic phonographs
US3038727A (en) * 1954-08-27 1962-06-12 Hansen Hans Christian Record feeding arrangements

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