US2707381A - Knitted fabric and knitted garments - Google Patents

Knitted fabric and knitted garments Download PDF

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US2707381A
US2707381A US138468A US13846850A US2707381A US 2707381 A US2707381 A US 2707381A US 138468 A US138468 A US 138468A US 13846850 A US13846850 A US 13846850A US 2707381 A US2707381 A US 2707381A
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courses
yarn
knitted
fabric
bulge
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Lombardi Vincent
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Lombardi Vincent
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/10Patterned fabrics or articles
    • D04B1/102Patterned fabrics or articles with stitch pattern
    • D04B1/108Gussets, e.g. pouches or heel or toe portions
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/22Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration
    • D04B1/24Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/22Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration
    • D04B1/24Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel
    • D04B1/246Upper torso garments, e.g. sweaters, shirts, leotards
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2403/00Details of fabric structure established in the fabric forming process
    • D10B2403/03Shape features
    • D10B2403/033Three dimensional fabric, e.g. forming or comprising cavities in or protrusions from the basic planar configuration, or deviations from the cylindrical shape as generally imposed by the fabric forming process
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2403/00Details of fabric structure established in the fabric forming process
    • D10B2403/03Shape features
    • D10B2403/033Three dimensional fabric, e.g. forming or comprising cavities in or protrusions from the basic planar configuration, or deviations from the cylindrical shape as generally imposed by the fabric forming process
    • D10B2403/0331Three dimensional fabric, e.g. forming or comprising cavities in or protrusions from the basic planar configuration, or deviations from the cylindrical shape as generally imposed by the fabric forming process with one or more convex or concave portions of limited extension, e.g. domes or pouches
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D10INDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10BINDEXING SCHEME ASSOCIATED WITH SUBLASSES OF SECTION D, RELATING TO TEXTILES
    • D10B2501/00Wearing apparel
    • D10B2501/04Outerwear; Protective garments
    • D10B2501/042Headwear

Description

May 3, 1955 v. LOMBARDI KNITTED FABRIC AND KNITTED GARMENTS 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fi led Jan. 13, 1950 Fig. 2a.

r ndAhh/n n v g //7 Vince/72 Lombard 1 u n u%wumH Hwnmu uan? wwmwwwxmm y 3, 1955 v. LOMBARDI 2,707,381

KNITTED FABRIC AND KNITTED GARMENTS Filed Jan. 15, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Mhcenflombara? fl 74/4 y.

y 3, 1955 v. LOMBARDI KNITTED FABRIC AND KNITTEDGARMENTS Filed Jan. 15, 1950 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 H M U W fig/2 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jan. 13, 1950 Muenfor: V/ncem Zomba/a0 v. LOMBARDI KNITTED FABRIC AND KNITTED GARMENTS May 3, 1955 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan. 15, 19so 13? w H4 /85 I86 I67 I88 y a M ma mb Wm M m w m L 7 w,

Filed Jan. 13, .1950

y 3, 1955 v. LOMBARDI 2,707,381

KNITTED FABRIC AND KNITTED GARMENTS' 7 Sheets-Sheet 76 //7 VQUfO/f. Vin can) Lombard! May 3, 1955 v. LOMBARDI KNITTED FABRIC AND KNITTED GARMENTS 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed Jan. 13, 1950 2,707,381 Patented May 3, 1955 2,707,381 KNITTED FABREE AND KNITTED GARMENTS Vincent Lombardi, South Miami, Fla. Application January 13, 1950, Serial No. 138,468 30 Claims. (Cl. 66-471) This invention relates to knitted fabric containing bulge portions, and to garments formed therefrom. The provision of bulge portions in knitted fabrics is desirable not only because of the attractive appearance of the fabric containing a plurality of bulges arranged in the form of a design, but also because bulge portions are desirable in, or usable in the formation of, a variety of types of garments having a plurality of transversely aligned bulges.

In my Patent 2,229,105 I have shown a type of fabric wherein there are provided open-ended bulges. These have advantages for certain design purposes, but are useless for functional employment in garments and are dis advantageous for use under conditions where the open end of the bulge might tend to catch on obstructions or protuberances, as when used in sportswear in open country.

I have found, however, that by the wherein the ends of the bulges are knitted or otherwise tied into the fabric at the ends of the courses there may be formed fabric wherein the bulges are adapted for provision of a fabric employment for new and functional purposes and which are free from substantial tendencies to catch or tear, and it is to such fabrics, to garments formed therefrom, that the present invention is directed.

Pursuant to the invention in its broader aspects, such bulges may be formed in various ways, as by interspersing successions of one, two, or three shorter courses with successions of one, two, or three longer courses in a portion of the fabric which may have four sides or may be continuous, by inserting a multiplicity of shorter courses between two longer courses, or by otherwise inserting shorter yarn in the fabric; by interknitting end loops of the shorter courses with loops of the .onger courses or with loops of other of shorter courses, by catching the ends of the shorter courses into the fabric without knitting, or by otherwise tying in the yarn; by making the shorter courses of the same or different length, and, if of difierent lengths, in disposing the shortest courses near the center or near the outer side of the bulge; or by operations of various other sorts.

The invention accordingly comprises the features of construction, combinations of elements and arrangement of parts, all of which will be exemplified hereinafter and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the claims.

For a fuller understanding of the nature of the invention, reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic rear view of a portion of one form of fabric embodying the invention;

Fig. 2 is a reduced-scale perspective schematic view of a piece of fabric including the portion shown in Fig. 1, showing the same rolled over to form a tube lying at right angles to the fabric as formed on a circular knitting machine;

Fig. 2a shows on a small scale a hat formed of the piece of fabric of Fig. 2;

and objects Fig. 3 is a perspective schematic view of another form of fabric;

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic rear view of a portion thereof on a larger scale.

Fig. 5 is a schematic view similar to Fig. 3 showing a further modification.

Fig. 6 is a large-scale perspective schematic view of another modification;

Fig. 7 is a diagrammatic view thereof on a still larger scale;

Fig. 8 is a fiat schematic rear view of a portion thereof;

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 6 showing a further modification;

Fig. 10 is a flat schematic rear view thereof.

Figs. 11, 12, and 13 are fiat schematic rear views of other modifications;

Figs. 14, 15, and 16 are flat schematic views of various types of design fabric embodying the invention;

Fig. 17 is a schematic view of one of the bulges of Fig. 16;

Fig. 18 is a flat schematic view thereof.

Fig. 19 is a schematic front view of still another form of fabric embodying the invention;

Fig. 20 is a similar view of an additional form; and

Fig. 21 is a front view of a bathing suit embodying the invention.

In the form of construction shown in Figs. 1 and 2 there is provided body yarn which may be of any desirable type and may be fed to the knitting needles in any desirable manner. As exemplified, it is wrap yarn, four such yarns 9, 1-9, 11, and 12 being shown, each knitted respectively in sections (I, D, and E of the fabric. Each of these yarns is knitted back and forth in its own section in successive courses, of which courses 23 thru 31 are shown in Fig. 1. In order to form bulge, and, in the present instance, to help to tie the sections together, wrap yarns 1d, 15, and 16 are knitted into the fabric. The yarn 14 is knitted in section C and extending to the right thereof, the yarn 15 bridges sections C and D, and the yarn 16 bridges the sections D and E. in certain of the wales in which they appear, the yarns 14, 15, and 16 are knitted in courses which, in the present instance are interspersed by the courses of the yarns 10, 11, and 12, toprovide a continuous bulge at these wales.

Yarn 15 is knitted in supplemental courses 23a and 2312, the latter being shorter than the former, and the yarn 15 being caught without knitting between the loops of courses 23b and 2 1 in wales j and d. It is also knitted in supplemental courses 25a and 25b, 27a and 27b, and 29a and 2%. Course 27b is shorter than course 27a and the yarn 15 is caught-in between the loops of rows 27a and 28 in wales j and d.

Yarn 16 is knitted in courses 23a, 25a, 27a and 2%. Courses 23a and 27a are only three wales wide, and the yarn 16 is caught without knitting between loops in rows 23 and 24 and rows 27 and 28 in wales 0 and q.

Yarn 14 is knitted similarly to yarn 16,

There is thus provided in a regular and even manner excess yarn for forming a continuous bulge running lengthwise of the otherwise fiat fabric. The bulge rises simultaneously from the fabric at both sides and the sections are firmly tied thereto.

The yarn 10 is fed by any suitable wrap feed which has, as exemplified, a swing of the extent C. B, and E indicate the extent of swing of the feeds for the yarns 11 and 12 respectively. The yarn at the leftband edge of each of these sections is tied into the adjacent section, where necessary, as indicated at 32 in Fig. 1. Such inter-connection may be in one of the manners set forth in my co-pending application S. N. 122,392, filed October 20, 1949, now Patent No. 2,687,631, or by staggered interknitting as shown in my patent 2,373,126, for example. Yarns 14, and 16 are fed by yarnfeeds having swings of the extents B2, C2, and D2 respectively. The yarns 10 and 11, and 11 and 12 are additionally tied together by catching the right-hand yarn (Fig. 1) in each instance into the lefthand yarn without knitting as indicated at 32.

Bulges of this type may be utilized in a variety of ways, and for a variety of purposes. There is shown in Figs. 2 and 2a a striking form of article embodying the fabric of Fig. l. The yarns 9, 19, 11, 12, 14, 15, and 16, and the swing of their yarnfeeds, will be found indicated in Fig. 2. As the fabric is knitted, the portion containing the yarns 14, 15, and 16 tends to gather itself in a continuous U-shaped bulge 33; and when a piece of the fabric is cut off on the lines 34 and 35, the piece may take the shape shown in Fig. 2 where the yarn 12 provides cylindrical-shaped portions 36 and 37 and the yarns 10, 11, 14, 15, and 16 provide a U-shaped central flange 33. This fabric may readily be formed into a hat as shown in Fig. 2a by turning one of the cylindrical portions inside out and tucking it under the other, so that the flange becomes the brim of the hat.

Many other types of bulges may be provided. A very simple form is shown in Figs. 3 and 4, wherein a moundlike bulge which rises from both its walewise sides and its coursewise ends is located in the middle of a piece of fabric, the coursewise ends of the bulge being tied into the fabric as in Fig. 1 so that the rise will be gradual on these ends of the bulge as well as at the walewise sides where the ends of the strands are tied in.

The fabric is composed of main yarn 37, and wrap yarns 38, 39, and 40. The yarn 37 may be fed by a yarnfeed which traverses the entire needle bed, and which is knitted in courses 41, 42, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55,

57, 59, and others as shown in detail in Fig. 4, and indicated by the continuous horizontal lines in Fig. 3; and the yarns 39 and 40 may be knitted in short courses 46, 50, 52, 54, 56, 58, etc., and in shorter courses 44, 48, 60, etc., as shown, the extent of swing of their yarnfeeds being indicated at B3, C3, and D3, respectively.

The knitted structure of the fabric is particularly shown in Fig. 4. It is to be noted that the wrap yarns run back and forth, and are, where necessary, extended to the side of the shorter courses, being caught between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row as indicated in 61, as in the formation of a laid-in fabric. The course 44 and a symmetrical course at the far end of the bulge are the shortest of all, and yarn is caught in at two such points in spaced wales at each side of the bulge.

In Fig. 5 there is shown a form of fabric having a multiplicity of bulges which run diagonally but which are otherwise similar to the bulge of Fig. 3. As will be seen these closely spaced bulges overlap. The portion of fabric shown is formed of main yarn 62, and of wrap yarns 63, 64, 65, and 66 fed respectively by yarnfeeds having swings indicated at B4, C4, D4, and E4.

Extra courses of yarn 63 provide bulges 63a and 63b; extra courses of yarn 64 provide bulges 64a, 64b, and 640; extra courses of yarn 65 provide bulges 65a and 65b, and extra courses of yarn 66 provide bulges 66a and 66b. It is to be noted that the extra courses are inserted after two regular courses, so that the bulges of Fig. 5 are not so high as the bulge of Fig. 3.

In Figs. 6, 7, and 8 there is shown a construction wherein the extra courses, instead of being interspersed with spaced numbers of other courses, are interspersed in large groups to provide a bulge which curves outwardly from its base and protrudes well above the body of the fabric. As shown, the fabric is formed of a single yarn formed into courses 71 and 72 which run the full width of the extended portion of the fabric (which may be the extent of swing of a yarnfeed); a course 73 which runs from the left-hand side (Fig. 8) of the portion of the fabric to the right-hand end of the bulge; courses 74 thru 82 which run back and forth from end to end of the bulge; a course 83 which runs from the left-hand end of the bulge to the righthand side of the portion of the fabric; and courses 84 and 85 which run from side-toside of the portion of the fabric. In the present instance the yarn runs from left to right in the odd-number courses and from right to left (Fig. 8) in the evennumber courses, and the courses 74-73 are of gradually increasing extent and the courses 73-32 are of gradually decreasing extent.

A type of bulge which is of very similar shape, but formed in a slightly different manner is exemplified in Figs. 9 and 10. Here, courses 91 and 92 extend for the full extent of the swing of a wrap yarnfeed; course 93 corresponds to course 73; courses 94-98 are of gradually decreasing extent; courses 93-102 are of gradually increasing extent; course 103 corresponds to course 83; and courses 104 and 1115 run the full extent.

Still other variations are shown in Figs. 11, 12, and 13. In Fig. 11 there are full courses 111 and 112; partial course 113; decreasing courses 114-118; partial course 119; and full courses 120 and 121. In Fig. 12 there are full courses 131 and 132; partial course 133; decreasing courses 134-136; increasing courses 137-138; decreasing courses 139-141 partial course 141; and full courses 142 and 143. In Fig. 13 there are full courses 141 and 142; partial course 143; decreasing courses 144-147; partial courses 143-149; short course partial courses 151 and 152; increasing courses 153-156; partial course 157; and full courses 158 and 159.

Figs. 14-15 show various design effects which may be secured in accordance with the invention. Whereas in the preceding figure, the space between close parallel lines indicates a course of knitting, here the lines merely indicate the contour of the bulge. As approximately indicated, the bulges are of the type shown in Fig. 10, altho bulges formed in various other ways may, of course, be used. The design shown in Fig. 14 includes a number of larger bulges 160 and a number of smaller bulges 161; the feature in the showing being in the positioning of the bulges. Bulges of many different types arranged in a wide variety of manners may, of course, be employed.

The fabric of Fig. 14 may be formed of wrap yarns fed from yarnfeeds having swings indicated at B5, C5, D5, E5, and F5, with each yarn knitted back and forth, and the yarn of a left-hand section in each instance being caught into the left wale of a right-hand section, as between a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row.

The design of Fig. 15 includes large bulges 162 and 163, and small bulges 164. Except for the bulges 163 which bridge the section borders, the fabric is made up of yarns from feeds having extents B6, C6, D6, and E6, for example, as shown in Fig. 10. Feeds having extents B7, C7, D7, and E7 may be used for the formation of the bulges 163 and, if desired, may be used for the formation of some or all of the bulges 164, as shown in Fig. 15.

Highly effective designs may be produced where bulges of various colors are provided in a fabric. Such a fabric is shown in Fig. 16. The body of the fabric is formed of main yarn, which may be white in color. The bulges are formed of wrap yarn fed by yarnfeeds the extent of swing of which is indicated at the top of the figure. The color of each of the bulges is indicated in the drawing, and the yarnfeed-swings are labeled to show these colors. The bulges, themselves, may be generally similar in construction to the bulge of Fig. 10. Except that the bulge and body yarns are different, so that there are no partial courses of the body yarn, the bulge is formed of courses 181-186 of decreasing extent and courses 187-192 of increasing extent, as shown in Figs. 17 and 18.

One feature of the present invention is the forming of designs wherein certain wrap yarns are knitted together or separately in design portions. For example, there is shown in Fig. 19 a fabric composed entirely of wrap yarns, and embodying bulges in design formation within other design portions. The fabric is composed of various wrap yarns including yarn 271 fed by yarnfeed C8, yarn 272 fed by yarnfeed C9, yarn 273 fed by yarnfeed D8, yarn 274 fed by yarnfeed D9, and yarn 275 fed by yarnfeed E8, each yarnfeed being schematically indicated by the extent of its swing. Yarn 271 is knitted in full courses in rows 281-284, in central courses of diminisl1- ing extent in rows 285-294, in central courses of increasing extent in rows 296-305, and in full courses in rows 306-309 to provide background yarn. Yarn 272 is knitted to form a portion of a border 320, all of a border 321, and a portion of a border 322. These borders may, for example, be six wales wide. Yarn 273 is knitted to provide background yarn in a mirror image of the background yarn knitted by yarn 271. A central bulge 325 is provided by courses of yarn 272 alternating with courses the left-hand portions of which are composed of yarn 271 and the right-hand portions of which are composed of yarn 273.

As shown by the dotted lines, yarns 271 and 273 are caught into the fabric without knitting, caught by a loop in one row and a loop in an adjacent row in alternate courses, where they cross the border 321; and the yarn 272 is similarly caught into the fabric without knitting where it crosses the knitted background yarn.

The major portion of the border 322 is formed of yarn 274, and an inner border 326 is formed of yarn 273 in its left-hand portion and of yarn 275 in its right-hand portion, the latter yarn serving to provide a background portion similar to that provided by the yarn 271. central bulge 328 is formed of courses of yarn 274, interspersed with courses the left-hand portions of which are formed of yarn 273 and the right-hand portions of which are formed of yarn 275. As shown by the dotted lines, the yarns are caught into the fabric without knitting, in the manner indicated above, at the points where they cross other knitted yarn.

Instead of both yarns being knit to form bulges in the central portions of the designs, one of the yarns may be knit an the other caught-in without knitting in the manner indicated above. In Fig. the same yarns are embodied in the fabric in the same manner as in Fig. 19 except that in the central diamond-shaped designs only courses of one yarn are provided at a time. In the diamond 330, for example, the yarn 274 is knitted; and in the diamond 331, the yarn 271 is knitted at the left, the yarn 273 is knitted at the right, and the yarn 272 is caught-in without knitting.

In Fig. 21, there is shown a bathing suit composed of knitted fabric having transversally alined bulges 275 and 276 embodying the invention.

The term extent of swing as used is intended to refer to the maximum extent of feed of Wrap yarn in a particular instance even though the actual swing of the wrap feed may itself be larger.

Since certain changes may be made in the constructions set forth, and different embodiments of the invention may be provided without departing from the scope of the in vention, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawing shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A knitted fabric providing bulges arranged in a predetermined pattern, each of at least a plurality of said bulges containing a greater number of courses than the fabric at the sides thereof, at least a part of each of most of the excess courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses.

2. A fabric as set forth in claim 1 wherein there are a still greater number of courses in an interior portion of at least certain of said bulges.

3. A fabric as set forth in claim 2 wherein the number as by being 4.

of courses increases regularly toward the central portion of at least certain of said bulges.

4. A knitted fabric comprising a plurality of sections formed by individually-knitted wrap yarns and providing a greater number of courses in a certain portion than in other portions to produce a bulge, at least a part of each of most of the excess courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses.

5. A knitted fabric comprising a plurality of sections formed by individually-knitted wrap yarns and providing a greater number of courses in a certain portion than in other portions to produce a bulge, at least: a part of each of most of the excess courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses, said excess courses being provided by the same yarn as the aforesaid yarn.

6. A knitted fabric composed of wrap yarn knitted to form longer courses and wrap yarn kitted to form shorter courses inserted therein to provide a bulge: at least a part of each of most of said short courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses.

7. A knitted fabric comprising a plurality of sections formed by individually-knitted wrap yarns and providing a greater number of courses in a certain portion than in other portions to produce a bulge, at least a part of each of most of the excess courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses, said excess courses being provided by yarn other than the aforesaid yarn.

8. A knitted fabric comprising a plurality of sections formed by individually-knitted wrap yarns and providing a greater number of courses in a certain portion than in other portions to produce a bulge, at least :a part of each of most of the excess courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses, said excess courses being provided by yarn other than the aforesaid yarn and bridging said sections.

'9. A knitted fabric comprising main yarn, and short courses of wrap yarn inserted in the fabric in a certain portion to produce a bulge, at least a part of each of most of said short courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses.

10. A fabric as set forth in claim 1 wherein at least a plurality of said bulges comprises short courses and shorter courses both interspersed with longer courses of yarn which extends from outside the bulge.

11. A knitted fabric providing bulges arranged in a predetermined pattern, each of at least a plurality of said bulges comprising short courses interspersed with longer courses to produce a bulge, at least a part of each of most of said short courses being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the yarn being substantially contained within said bulge the ends of the short courses being tied into the longer courses so that the bulge has closed sides.

12. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 11 wherein the bulge extends continuously walewise of the fabric.

13. A knitted fabric providing bulges arranged in a predetermined pattern, each of at least a plurality of said bulges comprising a succession of short courses inserted between a pair of longer courses and tied at their ends into the longer courses, to provide a bulge with parallel courses which merges with the fabric at all sides, at least a part of each of most of the excess courses being composed of a yarn which is substantially contained within said bulge.

14. A knitted fabric determined pattern,

providing bulges arranged in a preeach of at least a plurality of said bulges comprising parallel multiple-Wale single yarn courses of varying length, said yarn being substantially contained within the bulge.

15. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 1 and comprising a multiplicity of closed-sided bulges disposed in design formation thereabout.

16. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 1 wherein the bulge has diverging ends from one side to the center of the bulge.

17. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 1 wherein the ends of the bulge diverge from one side to the center of the bulge and converge from the center to the other side of the bulge.

18. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 1 wherein the ends of the bulge converge from one side to the center of the bulge.

19. A knitted fabric comprising a bulge the ends of which diverge and then converge, and which is formed of inserted parallel courses which decrease in length from one side to the center of the bulge and courses which increase in length from the center to the other side of the bulge.

20. A knitted fabric comprising yarn knitted to provide a background area, other yarn knitted in an area within the background area, and a bulge within said inner area.

21. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 20, wherein the bulge is composed of the first-mentioned yarn and said other yarn.

22. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 21, wherein the first-mentioned yarn appears again between said other yarn and said bulge.

23. A knitted fabric composed of wrap yarns certain of which are knitted to provide a background area, and other of which are knitted within the background area, certain of the background yarn passing behind said other yarn and being caught into the fabric without knitting where it passes behind the other yarn.

24. A knitted hat comprising a fabric having a greater number of courses in a certain portion than in other portions to produce a bulge, the ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses, the rim of the hat being composed of the sides of the bulge arranged in juxtaposed position.

25. A knitted fabric wherein the yarns run transversely and which provides a greater number of courses in interior portions than in the surrounding portions to produce bulging design portions, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses, said design por tions being quadrilateral.

26. A knitted fabric wherein the yarns run transversely and which provides a greater number of courses in interior portions than in the surrounding portions to produce bulging design portions, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses, said'design portions being rectangular.

28. A knitted fabric comprising yarn knitted to provide a background area wherein substantially all the loops are composed of one yarn, other yarn knitted in an area within said background area wherein substantially all the loops are composed of other yarn, background yarn knitted in an area which is within said inner area and wherein substantially all the loops are composed of said background yarn, and said other yarn knitted in an area within the area within said inner area and wherein sub stantially all the loops are composed of other yarn.

29. A knitted garment providing a plurality of transversely aligned bulges each containing a greater number of courses in a certain portion than in other portions, at least a part of each of most of the excess courses in each of individual ones of said bulges being provided by a single yarn extending over a multiplicity of wales, the coursewise ends of the excess courses being tied into longer courses.

30. A knitted fabric comprising yarn which is knitted to provide a background area wherein substantially all the loops are composed of said yarn, other yarn which is knitted in an interior area wherein substantially all the loops are composed of said other yarn, certain of the first-mentioned yarn passing behind said other yarn in said interior area and being caught into the fabric without knitting where it passes behind said other yarn, and the first-mentioned yarn being knitted in an area which is within said interior area and in which substantially all the loops are composed of the first-mentioned yarn, certain of said other yarn passing behind said first-mentioned yarn in the last-mentioned area and being caught into the fabric without knitting.

27. A knitted fabric as set forth in claim 1 wherein each of said plurality of said bulges is interior and straight-sided.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Re. 23,094 Sheppard Mar. 22, 1949 271,338 Lasher Jan. 30,1883 545,479 Holmes 7 Sept. 3, 1895 733,926 Williams July 14, 1903 963,864 Carter July 12, 1910 1,023,313 Hirner Apr. 16, 1912 1,682,870 Van Heusen Sept. 4, 1928 1,843,100 Stout Jan. 26, 1932 1,906,212 Lacks et al Apr. 25, 1933 1,949,439 Wilcomb Mar. 6, 1934 2,121,489 Rutledge et al June 21, 1938 2,150,773 Lawson et a1. Mar; 14, 1939 2,217,558 McAdams Oct. 8, 1940 2,229,105 Lombardi Jan. 21, 1941 2,244,604 Bell June 3, 1941 2,287,143 Smetana June 23, 1942 2,397,247 Davidson Mar. 26, 1946 2,431,068 Minton Nov. 18, 1947 2,440,280 Lawson Apr. 27, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS 269,202 Great Britain Dec. l, 1927

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Cited By (16)

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US2738566A (en) * 1955-05-17 1956-03-20 Carter William Co Puckered knit fabric and method of producing same
US2899812A (en) * 1959-08-18 Knitted fabrics or articles
US2939303A (en) * 1956-08-16 1960-06-07 Textile Machine Works Method of making a hosiery heel pocket
US2976708A (en) * 1959-02-02 1961-03-28 Barnett D Gordon Knitted garment with breast cups
US3092987A (en) * 1959-02-06 1963-06-11 Levine Alex Element of apparel and method of making the same
US3103111A (en) * 1962-06-07 1963-09-10 Hawthorne Knitting Mills Inc Body bulge receiving cup and method of making same
US3241340A (en) * 1961-12-05 1966-03-22 Kendall & Co Circular knit garment with added shaping material
US3425246A (en) * 1966-09-22 1969-02-04 Kendall & Co Protuberance covering tubular elastic garments
US3479844A (en) * 1967-07-06 1969-11-25 Pilot Res Corp Form-fitting seamless garment and method
US20030056551A1 (en) * 2001-08-22 2003-03-27 Song-Taek Li Method for manufacturing a brim-integrated type cap
US20080110210A1 (en) * 2006-10-20 2008-05-15 Tung-Hua Tai Visor with fixed pattern curve
US20170073860A1 (en) * 2015-09-10 2017-03-16 Medi Gmbh & Co. Kg Flat-knitted material in the form of a pants part comprising the seat
WO2018203895A1 (en) * 2017-05-02 2018-11-08 Nike Innovate C.V. Upper-torso garment with three-dimensional knit structures
US10145042B2 (en) 2017-05-02 2018-12-04 Nike, Inc. Upper-torso garment with tubular-jacquard knit structure
US10179960B2 (en) 2017-05-02 2019-01-15 Nike, Inc. Upper-torso garment with tubular-jacquard knit structure
US10368590B2 (en) 2015-11-03 2019-08-06 Nike, Inc. Flat-knit support garment for upper torso

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US733926A (en) * 1901-09-23 1903-07-14 Robert w scott Stocking.
US963864A (en) * 1910-01-03 1910-07-12 Horace A Carter Knitted fabric.
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US1843100A (en) * 1930-05-24 1932-01-26 Ainslie Knitting Machine Co In Knitted article and method of making same
US2217558A (en) * 1932-10-19 1940-10-08 Nolde & Horst Co Seamless knitted fabric and method of producing the same
US2150773A (en) * 1933-01-23 1939-03-14 Hemphill Co Knitted fabric and process for knitting the same
US2121489A (en) * 1937-05-13 1938-06-21 Vassar Company Knit breast pocket for garments and method of producing same
US2229105A (en) * 1939-11-17 1941-01-21 Lombardi Knitting Machine Co I Knitted fabric
US2244604A (en) * 1940-05-02 1941-06-03 Walter J Horn Stocking
US2287143A (en) * 1940-07-25 1942-06-23 Ernest A Feustel Knitted fabric
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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2899812A (en) * 1959-08-18 Knitted fabrics or articles
US2738566A (en) * 1955-05-17 1956-03-20 Carter William Co Puckered knit fabric and method of producing same
US2939303A (en) * 1956-08-16 1960-06-07 Textile Machine Works Method of making a hosiery heel pocket
US2976708A (en) * 1959-02-02 1961-03-28 Barnett D Gordon Knitted garment with breast cups
US3092987A (en) * 1959-02-06 1963-06-11 Levine Alex Element of apparel and method of making the same
US3241340A (en) * 1961-12-05 1966-03-22 Kendall & Co Circular knit garment with added shaping material
US3103111A (en) * 1962-06-07 1963-09-10 Hawthorne Knitting Mills Inc Body bulge receiving cup and method of making same
US3425246A (en) * 1966-09-22 1969-02-04 Kendall & Co Protuberance covering tubular elastic garments
US3479844A (en) * 1967-07-06 1969-11-25 Pilot Res Corp Form-fitting seamless garment and method
US6681601B2 (en) * 2001-08-22 2004-01-27 Song-Taek Li Method for manufacturing a brim-integrated type cap
US20030056551A1 (en) * 2001-08-22 2003-03-27 Song-Taek Li Method for manufacturing a brim-integrated type cap
US20080110210A1 (en) * 2006-10-20 2008-05-15 Tung-Hua Tai Visor with fixed pattern curve
US20170073860A1 (en) * 2015-09-10 2017-03-16 Medi Gmbh & Co. Kg Flat-knitted material in the form of a pants part comprising the seat
US10368590B2 (en) 2015-11-03 2019-08-06 Nike, Inc. Flat-knit support garment for upper torso
WO2018203895A1 (en) * 2017-05-02 2018-11-08 Nike Innovate C.V. Upper-torso garment with three-dimensional knit structures
US20180317570A1 (en) * 2017-05-02 2018-11-08 Nike, Inc. Upper-torso garment with three-dimensional knit structures
US10145042B2 (en) 2017-05-02 2018-12-04 Nike, Inc. Upper-torso garment with tubular-jacquard knit structure
US10179960B2 (en) 2017-05-02 2019-01-15 Nike, Inc. Upper-torso garment with tubular-jacquard knit structure
US10415164B2 (en) 2017-05-02 2019-09-17 Nike, Inc. Upper-torso garment with three-dimensional knit structures

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