US2704167A - Drum handling attachment for lift trucks - Google Patents

Drum handling attachment for lift trucks Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2704167A
US2704167A US21189551A US2704167A US 2704167 A US2704167 A US 2704167A US 21189551 A US21189551 A US 21189551A US 2704167 A US2704167 A US 2704167A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
drum
shoes
movement
means
shoe
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Herbert J Framhein
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Yale and Towne Manufacturing Co
Original Assignee
Yale and Towne Manufacturing Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66FHOISTING, LIFTING, HAULING OR PUSHING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, e.g. DEVICES WHICH APPLY A LIFTING OR PUSHING FORCE DIRECTLY TO THE SURFACE OF A LOAD
    • B66F9/00Devices for lifting or lowering bulky or heavy goods for loading or unloading purposes
    • B66F9/06Devices for lifting or lowering bulky or heavy goods for loading or unloading purposes movable, with their loads, on wheels or the like, e.g. fork-lift trucks
    • B66F9/075Constructional features or details
    • B66F9/12Platforms; Forks; Other load supporting or gripping members
    • B66F9/18Load gripping or retaining means
    • B66F9/187Drum lifting devices
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S294/00Handling: hand and hoist-line implements
    • Y10S294/902Gripping element

Description

H- J. FRAMHEIN Filed Feb. 20, 1951 DRUM HANDLING ATTACHMENT FOR LIFT TRUCKS March 15, 1955 INVENTOR H. TFF! (a);

BY W1 ATTORNEY Il/l/l/l/l/ll/l/l/d VIII Ill/II United States Patent DRUM HANDLING ATTACHMENT FOR LIFT v TRUCKS Herbert J. Framhein, Chicago, Ill., assignor to The Yale & Towne Manufacturing Company, Stamford, Conn., a corporation of Connecticut Application February 20, 1951, Serial No. 211,895

Claims. (Cl. 214-653) This invention relates to attachments whereby industrial lift trucks may be adapted for the handling of containers such as drums, and more particularly to an attachment of the class in which movable dogs or shoes are provided for supporting engagement with opposite side portions of the drum or container.

The shoes and attachments of this general class have a concave or equivalent formation embracing substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, and their relationship is such that they must undergo some movement between positions in which they support and discharge the drum. The movement of the shoes into drum supporting position is preferably occasioned by the drum itself when the drum enters between the shoes, and it is therefore desirable that the shoes move freely to drum supporting position without any very large amount of friction or other resistance.

It is also desirable that the movement of the shoes to discharging position be relatively free since usually this movement also is caused by the drum when it leaves the shoes, the drum at that time having been deposited on the ground or other suitable support and the truck moving away from it to withdraw the shoes. However, if the shoes are freely movable while they are carrying the drum, they are likely to discharge it accidentally as a result of vibration or starting and stopping of the truck, and this is particularly true when the truck travels upon inclined surfaces.

1 have now provided a drum handling attachment of the general class described that operates automatically and without the use of latches to retain a drum firmly against accidental discharge while freely receiving and discharging the drum when required to do so. As one feature of my novel drum handling attachment, the opposed shoes will move in response to the weight of the drum to actuate a holding means which prevents release of the drum.

Preferably, this movement is in a direction different from the lateral movement of the shoes into supporting and discharging positions, and occurs preferably as a tilting movement that brings friction means into play for holding the shoes against lateral movement. The actuation of the friction means is preferably through a pivot construction which provides for tilting of each shoe about a horizontal axis when subjected to the weight of the drum, and an outward extension which carries a part of the friction means on each shoe. The result of this arrangement is that the drum cannot be discharged as long as its weight is carried by the shoes while at other times any substantial restraint on lateral movement of the shoes is avoided.

I have thus outlined rather broadly the more important features of my invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that my contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional features of my invention that will be described hereinafter and which will form the subject of the claims appended hereto. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception on which my disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures for carrying out the several purposes of my invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims to be granted me shall be of suflicient breadth to prevent the appropriation of my invention by those skilled in the art.

Referring now the drawing:

Fig. 1 is a plan view showing a preferred form of my novel drum handling attachment partly broken away to show the friction means, and also indicating by a broken line a drum held between the shoes.

Fig. 2 is a side view showing the attachment on a larger scale.

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken at the location of the line 33 in Fig. 2, showing the shoe at one side of the attachment, and a portion of a drum held thereby.

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 44 of Fig. 2 showing the construction of the clamping means whereby the attachment is held upon the forks.

In the preferred form of my novel drum handling attachment, the mounting of the attachment on the lift truck is provided through a pair of suitable lifting forks, 10, 11, attached to the truck in the usual outwardly extending parallel positions. It will be understood by those acquainted with the material and article handling art, that forks of this type have a lifting movement whereby they may lift articles beneath which they may be inserted, or to which they may be otherwise attached, so that the articles may be transported to the desired location by the true We are here concerned with the handling of drums or articles of a similar shape, and the spacing of the forks 10, 11, is so adjusted that the forks may extend adjacent opposite sides of a drum D, when the drum is in an upright position. The drum D is adapted to be supported at B by opposite side portions of my attachment, these portions being of reversed formation but otherwise identical, and comprising base plates 12, 13 superposed on the respective forks 10, 11.

In order to secure the base plates 12, 13 to the forks, channel members 14, 15 are welded to the rear ends of the base plates 12, 13 in such a way as to form depending sleeve portions adapted to receive the forks. Directly above the channel members 14, 15, upstanding angle members 16, 17 are welded or otherwise attached to the base plates 12, 13, these angle members being connected by a cross rod 18, having left and right-hand threaded engagement with the respective angle members. Thus, it will be seen that the base plates 12, 13 may be slid onto the forks 10, 11, and the cross rod rotated to clamp the sleeve portions 14, 15 in firm frictional engagement upon the forks. The outer ends of the base plates 12, 13 are held in proper alignment with the forks by headed pins 19, 20, inserted in corresponding apertures in the base plates and in the forks. In order to assist in guiding the forks when they are being applied to a drum, and also to assist in locating the attachment properly when it is being applied to the forks, the outer ends 21, 22 of the base plates 12, 13 are preferably tapered and turned downwardly.

The support of the drum -D is provided through a pair of elongated shoes, indicated generally at 23 and 24. During the times that these shoes are idle and the weight of the drum D is not actually supported thereby, the shoes rest flatwise upon the base plates 12, 13. The shoes 23, 24 have front end portions 25, 26, and rear end portions 27, 28, that extend laterally toward the opposite shoe and that preferably provide a concave arrangement conforming to the shape of the drum D, these end portions being so arranged that they may be engaged under a peripheral flange or bead B on the drum D so as to support the drum.

While the construction described will aflford stable support for the drum, it will be seen that movements of the shoes 23, 24, must occur in order to permit the drum to be admitted and discharged from the shoes in a direction longitudinally of the forks 10, 11. Such movements of the shoes are permitted by mounting central portions of the shoes upon vertical pivot pins 29, 30, attached to the base plates 12, 13, adjacent the inner edges of these plates. Thus, when the drum D is withdrawn horizontally from between the forks 10, 11, the front end portions 25, 26, of the shoes may swing apart with attendant inward swinging of the rear end portions 27, 28, while a reverse movement of the shoes will occur when the drum is inserted between the forks. The inserting movement of the drum D is limited by a pair of stop lugs 31, 32, formed on the rear ends of the shoes 23, 24, these lugs engaging vertical studs 33, 34, on the base plates 12, 13, whereby to define the supporting positions of the shoes. The discharging positions of the shoes 23, 24, are similarly defined by vertical studs 35, 36, that are adapted to be engaged by notches 37, 38, at the front ends of the shoes 23, 24, so that the shoes cannot swing past the positions in which they are set to receive another drum. Because of the described construction, the shoes 23, 24 are laterally swingable between well defined receiving and discharging positions, and these swinging movements are substantially free from any resistance other than the inconsequential resistance due to the small amount of friction between the shoes and the upper surfaces of the base plates 12, 13.

I have provided my improved drum handling attachment, however, with a novel and very advantageous means whereby the shoes will retain a drum supported thereby, and cannot release the drum accidentally. In order to accomplish this, I construct the pivotal mountings of the shoes 23, 24, in such a way that the shoes may swing not only in a horizontal plane, but may also have a certain tilting movement about horizontal axes. Thus, it will be observed that the shoes 23, 24, are formed with apertures 39 (Fig. 3) which serve as bearings for the shoes upon the pivot pins 29, 30, and that these apertures 39 are substantially wider than the diameter of the pivot pins, so that a loose connection is provided between the shoes and the pins. As a result of this arrangement, the weight of a drum applied to the outer end portions 25, 26, 27, 28, of the shoes will result in tilting the shoes about the inner edges of the base plates 12, 13, as fulcrums so that outward extensions 40, 41, of the shoes 23, 24, will move upwardly. The outward extensions 40, 41, are provided on their upper surfaces with lower friction members 42, 43, which engage fixed upper friction members 44, 45, when the shoes are tilted, thereby preventing lateral swinging movement of the shoes. The upper friction members 44, 45, are preferably mounted upon the lower surfaces of a pair of upper plates 46, 47 that are fixed in positions parallel to the base plates 12, 13. In order to hold the upper plates, the upper ends of the pivot pins 29, 30, and the vertical studs 33, 34, 35, 36, are shouldered and provided with retaining nuts.

The friction members 42, 43, 44 and 45 may be of any material having a suitable coefiicient of friction, such as compressed fibre. It is within the scope of the invention, however, to provide the required frictional effect merely by serrating adjacent surfaces of the shoes 23, 24, and the stationary upper plates 46, 47, without providing distinct friction members, and the friction members as described in this application are intended to embrace such serrated surfaces.

The shoes 23, 24, are so balanced that they will return to horizontal positions as soon as they are relieved of the weight of the drum. In these positions of the shoes the friction members will be released and the drum D may be easily withdrawn from between the forks with attendant swinging movement of the shoes or, as is usually the case, the drum will remain stationary upon a support while the forks are withdrawn in a rearward direction. Consequently, it will be seen that the shoes may very readily receive and discharge the drum, and lifting movement of the truck forks will automatically lock the shoes to prevent discharge of the drum while it is supported by the shoes.

It is believed that the operation of my improved drum handling attachment will be clearly apparent from the foregoing description.

I now claim:

1. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum therebetween by engagement with the periphery of the drum, means mounting one of said shoes for movement on said device whereby to permit said one shoe to move relatively to the other shoe into and out of engagement with a drum therebetween, the said mounting means also permitting movement of said one shoe in a direction other than that in which it moves into and out of engagement with said drum, and means responsive to movement of said one shoe in said other direction to lock said shoe against movement on said device relatively to the other shoe whereby to hold the drum in position between said shoes.

2. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum therebetween by engagement with the periphery of the drum, means mounting one of said shoes for movement on said device whereby to permit said one shoe to move laterally relatively to the other shoe into and out of engagement with a drum therebetween, the said mounting means also permitting movement of said one shoe in a direction other than that in which it moves into and out of engagement with said drum, means for locking said one shoe against said lateral movement relatively to said device on said mounting means to hold the drum in position between said shoes, and means responsive to movement of said one shoe in said other direction for applying the weight of the drum supported by said shoes for actuating said shoe locking means.

3. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for normal lateral movement relatively to said device to receive and discharge the drum between said shoes, means whereby the weight of a drum lifted by said shoes moves said shoes relatively to said normal lateral movement on said mounting means, and means whereby said movement locks said shoes against further lateral movement whereby to hold the drum in position between said shoes.

4. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral movement relatively to said device into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum between said shoes, means for locking said shoes against said lateral movement relatively to said device on said mounting means to hold the drum in position between said shoes, and means whereby said shoes apply the weight of the drum supported thereby for actuating said shoe locking means.

5. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral pivotal movement relatively to said device into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum between said shoes, means for locking said shoes against said pivotal movement relatively to said device on said mounting means to hold the drum in position between said shoes, and means whereby said shoes move under the weight of the drum supported thereby for applying the weight of the drum to actuate said shoe locking means.

6. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral movement relatively to said device into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum between said shoes, friction members engageable with one another for locking said shoes against lateral movement relatively to said device on said mounting means to hold the drum in position between said shoes, and means whereby said shoes apply the weight of the drum supported thereby for moving said friction members into engagement with one another.

7. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral pivotal movement relatively to said device into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum between said shoes, friction members engageable with one another for locking said shoes against said pivotal movement relatively to said drum on said mounting means to hold the drum in position between said shoes, and means whereby said shoes move under the weight of the drum supported thereby for applying the weight of the drum to engage said friction members with one another.

8. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum therebetween by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting one of said shoes for lateral movement and tilting movement on said device, said lateral movement causing said one shoe to move relatively to the other of said shoes whereby said one shoe moves into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum between said shoes, said tilting movement occurring under the weight of a drum supported by said shoes, and means responsive to tilting of said one shoe to lock said shoe against lateral movement on said device relatively to the other shoe whereby to hold the drum in position between said shoes.

9. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum therebetween by engagement around said substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting one of said shoes for lateral movement and tilting movement on said device, said lateral movement causing said one shoe to move relatively to the other of said shoes whereby said one shoe moves into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum between said shoes, said tilting movement occurring under the weight of a drum supported by said shoes, and friction members moving into engagement with one another upon tilting of said one shoe for locking said one shoe against said lateral movement relatively to said other shoe to hold the drum in position between said shoes.

10. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of opposed shoes for supporting a drum therebetween by engagement around substantial portions of. the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral pivotal movement and tilting movement on said device, said lateral pivotal movement causing said shoes to move relatively to each other whereby to move into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum therebetween, said tilting movement occurring under the weight of a drum supported by said shoes, and friction members moving into engagement with one another upon tilting movement of said shoes for locking said shoes against said lateral pivotal movement to hold the drum in position between said shoes.

11. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of shoes, each of said shoes having front and rear end portions extending laterally toward the corresponding portions of the other shoe for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial opposite portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral pivotal movement and tilting movement on said device, said lateral pivotal movement causing said shoes to move relatively to each other whereby said shoes move into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum therebetween, said tilting movement occuring under the weight of a drum supported by said end portions of said shoes, and means responsive to tilting of said shoes for locking said shoes against said lateral pivotal movement to hold the drum in position between said shoes.

12. In a drum handling device of the class described, a pair of shoes, each of said shoes having front and rear end portions extending laterally toward the corresponding portions of the other shoe for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means mounting said shoes for lateral pivotal movement and tilting movement on said device, said lateral pivotal movement causing said shoes to move relatively to each other whereby said shoes move into and out of engagement with the drum for receiving and discharging the drum therebetween, said tilting movement occurring under the weight of a drum supported by said end portions of said shoes, and friction members engaged upon tilting of said shoes for holding said lateral pivotal movement whereby to prevent discharge of the drum from between said shoes.

13. In a drum handling attachment for fork lift trucks of the class described, a pair of lifting forks, a pair of shoes, each of said shoes having front and rear end portions extending laterally toward the corresponding portions of the other shoe for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means loosely pivoting one of said shoes on each of said forks and providing loose connections of said shoes to said forks for horizontal swinging movement whereby said end portions may be projected and retracted for receiving and discharging a drum therebetween, said loose connections permitting horizontal tilting of said shoes under the weight of a drum supported by said end portions, and means responsive to tilting of said shoes under the weight of the drum for locking said shoes against horizontal swinging movement wlhereby to hold the drum in position between said s oes.

14. In a drum handling attachment for fork lift trucks of the class described, a pair of lifting forks, a pair of shoes, each of said shoes having front and rear end portions extending laterally toward the corresponding portions of the other shoe for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means loosely pivoting one of said shoes on each of said forks and providing loose connections of said shoes to said forks for horizontal swinging movement whereby said end portions may be projected and retracted for receiving and discharging a drum therebetween, said loose connections permitting horizontal tilting of said shoes under the weight of a drum supported by said end portions, and friction members engaged upon tilting of said shoes under the weight of a drum for holding said shoes against horizontal swinging movement whereby to prevent discharge of the drum from between said shoes.

15. In a drum handling attachment for fork lift trucks of the class described, a pair of lifting forks, a pair of shoes, each of said shoes having front and rear end portions extending laterally toward the corresponding portions of the other shoe for supporting a drum by engagement around substantial portions of the periphery of the drum, means loosely pivoting one of said shoes on each of said forks and providing loose connections of said shoes to said forks for horizontal swinging movement whereby said end portions may be projected and retracted for receiving and discharging a drum therebetween, said loose connections permitting horizontal tilting of said shoes under the weight of a drum supported by said end portions, a pair of plates fixed on said forks and located above said shoes outwardly of their pivoting means, and friction members between said plates and said shoes engaged upon tilting of said shoes for holding said shoes against horizontal swinging move- ;nent whereby to prevent discharge of the drum thererom.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 459,430 Zahrn Sept. 15, 1891 1,018,260 Myrholm Feb. 20, 1912 1,900,569 Lederer Mar. 7, 1933 1,929,447 Remde Oct. 10, 1933 2,077,349 Hobbis Apr. 13, 1937 2,385,512 Heath Sept. 25, 1945 2,412,873 Cosley Dec. 17, 1946 2,554,433 Warren May 22, 1951 2,584,918 Salsas Feb. 5, 1952 2,604,220 Frischmann July 22, 1952

US2704167A 1951-02-20 1951-02-20 Drum handling attachment for lift trucks Expired - Lifetime US2704167A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2704167A US2704167A (en) 1951-02-20 1951-02-20 Drum handling attachment for lift trucks

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2704167A US2704167A (en) 1951-02-20 1951-02-20 Drum handling attachment for lift trucks

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2704167A true US2704167A (en) 1955-03-15

Family

ID=22788725

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2704167A Expired - Lifetime US2704167A (en) 1951-02-20 1951-02-20 Drum handling attachment for lift trucks

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2704167A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2782066A (en) * 1955-07-08 1957-02-19 Shell Dev Co Jaw construction for lift trucks
US2812089A (en) * 1954-05-27 1957-11-05 Yale & Towne Mfg Co Rotating clamp attachment for lift trucks
US2816674A (en) * 1955-02-25 1957-12-17 Pierce W Koontz Drum truck
US2821316A (en) * 1955-05-27 1958-01-28 Canadian Mobile Co Ltd Roll clamp for lift truck
US2827189A (en) * 1955-10-27 1958-03-18 Robert N Sergeant Lift truck attachment for handling drums
US2842275A (en) * 1956-02-23 1958-07-08 Kughler Edwin Russell Drum handling apparatus
US2848128A (en) * 1956-02-20 1958-08-19 Chicago Tramrail Corp Rim lift hoist for barrels
US3112835A (en) * 1962-02-26 1963-12-03 Gierhart Melvin Device for lifting a drum while controlling tilting thereof
US3319815A (en) * 1964-09-24 1967-05-16 Tamco Inc Load handling attachment for fork lift trucks
EP0365865A1 (en) * 1988-10-27 1990-05-02 EDELHOFF POLYTECHNIK GMBH & CO. Fork-lift truck with an auxiliary device for lifting containers or the like
US5009565A (en) * 1989-11-20 1991-04-23 Liberty Diversified Industries, Inc. Fork lift attachment
US5020963A (en) * 1988-12-06 1991-06-04 Osaka Taiyu Co., Ltd. Device for clamping container
US5281076A (en) * 1991-05-08 1994-01-25 Liberty Diversified Industries Forklift attachment
US20040084590A1 (en) * 2002-03-04 2004-05-06 Michael Dorrian Transport device

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US459430A (en) * 1891-09-15 Barrel-truck
US1018260A (en) * 1911-06-12 1912-02-20 Julius Martinson Barrel-truck.
US1900569A (en) * 1930-11-21 1933-03-07 Herbert H Lederer Apparatus for handling merchandise
US1929447A (en) * 1930-07-16 1933-10-10 Baker Raulang Co Industrial truck
US2077349A (en) * 1936-01-22 1937-04-13 Wash Company Container pick-up truck
US2385512A (en) * 1944-12-26 1945-09-25 Heath Robert Power shovel and loading device
US2412873A (en) * 1944-11-16 1946-12-17 Westinghouse Electric Corp Bottle holder
US2554433A (en) * 1945-07-19 1951-05-22 Millard R Warren Block handling machine
US2584918A (en) * 1948-11-29 1952-02-05 Salsas Anastasio Puig Elevator conveyer truck
US2604220A (en) * 1949-03-25 1952-07-22 Towmotor Corp Grab mechanism for industrial trucks

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US459430A (en) * 1891-09-15 Barrel-truck
US1018260A (en) * 1911-06-12 1912-02-20 Julius Martinson Barrel-truck.
US1929447A (en) * 1930-07-16 1933-10-10 Baker Raulang Co Industrial truck
US1900569A (en) * 1930-11-21 1933-03-07 Herbert H Lederer Apparatus for handling merchandise
US2077349A (en) * 1936-01-22 1937-04-13 Wash Company Container pick-up truck
US2412873A (en) * 1944-11-16 1946-12-17 Westinghouse Electric Corp Bottle holder
US2385512A (en) * 1944-12-26 1945-09-25 Heath Robert Power shovel and loading device
US2554433A (en) * 1945-07-19 1951-05-22 Millard R Warren Block handling machine
US2584918A (en) * 1948-11-29 1952-02-05 Salsas Anastasio Puig Elevator conveyer truck
US2604220A (en) * 1949-03-25 1952-07-22 Towmotor Corp Grab mechanism for industrial trucks

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2812089A (en) * 1954-05-27 1957-11-05 Yale & Towne Mfg Co Rotating clamp attachment for lift trucks
US2816674A (en) * 1955-02-25 1957-12-17 Pierce W Koontz Drum truck
US2821316A (en) * 1955-05-27 1958-01-28 Canadian Mobile Co Ltd Roll clamp for lift truck
US2782066A (en) * 1955-07-08 1957-02-19 Shell Dev Co Jaw construction for lift trucks
US2827189A (en) * 1955-10-27 1958-03-18 Robert N Sergeant Lift truck attachment for handling drums
US2848128A (en) * 1956-02-20 1958-08-19 Chicago Tramrail Corp Rim lift hoist for barrels
US2842275A (en) * 1956-02-23 1958-07-08 Kughler Edwin Russell Drum handling apparatus
US3112835A (en) * 1962-02-26 1963-12-03 Gierhart Melvin Device for lifting a drum while controlling tilting thereof
US3319815A (en) * 1964-09-24 1967-05-16 Tamco Inc Load handling attachment for fork lift trucks
EP0365865A1 (en) * 1988-10-27 1990-05-02 EDELHOFF POLYTECHNIK GMBH & CO. Fork-lift truck with an auxiliary device for lifting containers or the like
US5020963A (en) * 1988-12-06 1991-06-04 Osaka Taiyu Co., Ltd. Device for clamping container
US5009565A (en) * 1989-11-20 1991-04-23 Liberty Diversified Industries, Inc. Fork lift attachment
US5281076A (en) * 1991-05-08 1994-01-25 Liberty Diversified Industries Forklift attachment
US20040084590A1 (en) * 2002-03-04 2004-05-06 Michael Dorrian Transport device
US20050141979A1 (en) * 2002-03-04 2005-06-30 Michael Dorrian Transport device
US6991412B2 (en) 2002-03-04 2006-01-31 Honda Canada, Inc. Transport device
US7338238B2 (en) 2002-03-04 2008-03-04 Honda Canada, Inc. Transport device

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3208768A (en) Material handling apparatus
US3270900A (en) Automatic bin dumping apparatus
US3757967A (en) Storage rack with dual safety bridge
US3529736A (en) Devices for raising loads to permit the handling thereof
US3620388A (en) Collapsible pallet with pivotal end supports
US3261637A (en) Self-releasing pickup unit
US4653728A (en) Apparatus for operating and transferring manhole cover
US3820673A (en) Loading and unloading means for cable reels and other structures
US3424487A (en) Glass transporting rack
US3819075A (en) Device for loading a skip on to a vehicle
US3063667A (en) Retractable supports for cargo
US3262595A (en) Lift truck clamp attachment
US3850322A (en) Side loading device for fork lift trucks
US2271624A (en) Load handling mechanism for industrial trucks
US5897286A (en) Forklift pallet stop
US3448880A (en) Article grasping device for fork lift trucks
US2702641A (en) Carrier rack for drums
US2468579A (en) Extensible load-supporting means for trucks
US3486648A (en) Roll dumping bin
US6390759B1 (en) Integrated brake/tilt-release mechanism for a dolly with a pivoting carriage
US4572382A (en) Storage and transportation rack
US2696928A (en) Pivoted platform truck
US3014604A (en) Freight handling means and method
US2706658A (en) Device for handling tubular articles
US2552804A (en) Flat tire dolly