US2695065A - Well packer, setting apparatus, and dump bailer - Google Patents

Well packer, setting apparatus, and dump bailer Download PDF

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US2695065A
US2695065A US17292750A US2695065A US 2695065 A US2695065 A US 2695065A US 17292750 A US17292750 A US 17292750A US 2695065 A US2695065 A US 2695065A
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cylinder
packer
means
piston
packing element
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Deuben C Baker
Martin B Conrad
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Baker International Corp
Baker Hughes Production Tools Inc
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Baker International Corp
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B23/00Apparatus for displacing, setting, locking, releasing, or removing tools, packers or the like in the boreholes or wells
    • E21B23/06Apparatus for displacing, setting, locking, releasing, or removing tools, packers or the like in the boreholes or wells for setting packers
    • E21B23/065Apparatus for displacing, setting, locking, releasing, or removing tools, packers or the like in the boreholes or wells for setting packers setting tool actuated by explosion or gas generating means

Description

Nov. 23, 1954 R BAKER ET AL 2,695,065

WELL PACKER, SETTING APPARATUS AND DUMP BAILER Filed July 1o, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet l T. wz y 7%@ Ar ToeA/EYS Y 5 She'ets-Sheevl 2 R. C. BAKER ET Al- WELL PACKER. SETTING APPARATUS AND DUMP BAILER Nov. 23, 1954 Filed July l0, 1950 NOV. 23, 1954 R, C, BAKER ETAL WELL PACKER, SETTING APPARATUS AND DUMP BAILER 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed July l0, 1950 nuria w, .a

INVENTORS. C. BAKER,

usen MART/N 7- TQENE V5 United States Patent O WELL PACKER, SETTING APPARATUS, AND DUMP BAILER Reuben C. Baker, Coalinga, and Martin B. Conrad, Downey, Calif., assignors to Baker Oil Tools, Inc., Vernon, Calif., a corporation of California Application July 10, 1950, Serial No. 172,927 23 Claims. (Cl. 166-63) The present invention relates to subsurface well apparatus, and more particularly to well packers, apparatus for setting such packers in well bores, and devices for dumping cementitious material upon the set packers.

An object of the invention is to provide an improved well packer having an inflatable packing element capable of being expanded to a larger extent, for the purpose of sealing against the wall of an enclosure, such as a well casing, or an open or uncased well bore.

Another object of the invention is to provide a well tool having an initially retracted element expandible hydraulically against the wall of a confining enclosure, and embodying improved check valve means for preventing back flow of the fluid under pressure.

A further object of the invention is to porvide a well packer having an improved back pressure valve for insuring that the packing element of the packer will remain in an inflated condition.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a well packer having an inflatable packing element, in which the pressure on the element, due to the hydrostatic head of fluid in the well bore, is equalized automatically internally and externally of the element.

Still a further object of the invention is to limit automatically the maximum pressure differential that can be imposed upon an inflatable packing element to a safe value; so as to preclude bursting or rupturing of the element.

Yet a further object of the invention is to limit automatically, to a safe value, the volumetric expansion of an inflatable packing element of a well packer.

Another object of the invention is to provide a setting tool and well packer combination capable of being lowered in a well bore on a running-in string, such as a wire line, in which a pumping mechanism for inflating a packing element of the packer is contained within the setting tool itself, allowing such mechanism to be retrieved from the set packer and used repeatedly in setting other packers in the same or other well bores.

A further object of the invention is to provide a setting tool and well packer combination, in which the pumping mechanism of the setting tool is released automatically from the packer when the latter has a predetermined inllating pressure differential imposed upon it, or when its packing element has been inflated to a predetermined volumetric extent.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a setting tool and well packer combination, in which `the setting tool embodies a pumping mechanism for inflating the packing element of the packer, and also a dump bailer for depositing cementitious material on the set packer.

This invention possesses many other advantages, and has other objects which may be made more clearly apparent from a consideration of several forms in which it may be embodied. Such forms are shown in the drawings accompanying and forming part of the present specification. These forms will now be described in detail, illustrating the general principles of the invention; but it is to be understood that such detailed description is not to be taken in a limiting sense, since the scope of the invention is best defined by the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure l is a longitudinal section through an apparatus disposed in a well bore, with the parts in position for lowering the .equipment .in the wel! bore; v

. sleeve 20, and also ICC Fig. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section of part of the equipment illustrated in Fig. l;

3 is a cross-section taken along the line 3-3 on 1g.

Fig. 4 is a cross-section taken along the line 4--4 on Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary longitudinal section, on a still further enlarged scale, illustrating the check valve mechanism used in preventing return flow of fluid from the interior of the inflatable packing element;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 1, illustrating the packer set against the wall of an open well bore;

Fig. 7 is a View similar to Fig. 1, illustrating the setting tool released from the set packer and the contents of the bailer dumped upon the packer;

Figs. 8 and 8a together constitute a longitudinal section through another embodiment of well apparatus disposed in the well bore, Fig. 8a constituting a lower continuation of Fig. S;

Fig. 9 is a View similar to Fig. 8a, illustrating the packer expanded against the wall of the well bore;

Fig. 10 is a view similar to Fig. 8a, illustrating the setting tool released from the packer and the contents of the dump bailer portion of the setting tool deposited upon the set packer.

In the form of apparatus disclosed in Figs. l to 7, inclusive, a well packer A is provided which is releasably secured to a setting tool B, which is, in turn, attached to the lower end of a running-in string C, such as a wire line. The lower portion of the setting tool may be constituted as a bailer or container D capable of retaining cementitious material E for deposit upon the packer after the latter has been set in the well bore F.

The combination of apparatus disclosed is so devised that the setting tool B will expand and set the packer A in the well bore, then become released when the setting pressure reaches a predetermined value, or when the setting tool pumps a predetermined volume of fluid intothe packer; and upon such release, the contents E of the bailer D are deposited upon the set packer.

As illustrated, the well packer includes a central main body portion 10 having an annular flange or shoulder 11, upon which a lower body abutment 12 rests.` An upper body abutment 13 is threadedly, or otherwise, attached to the upper end of the central body portion 10 in longitudinally spaced relation to the lower body abutment, providing a space around the central body for the accommodation of an inflatable packing element 14 of rubber or rubber-like material. The upper end of this element 14 is mounted between a depending upper abutment skirt 15 and the central body 10, while the lower end of the packing element is similarly confined between the central body and an upwardly extending skirt 16 of the lower abutment 12.

The packing element 14 has upper and lower inwardly directed flanges 17 having internal generally cylindrical surfaces 18 adapted to snugly engage the cylindrical surface of the central body 10. These flanges also have inclined surfaces 19 facing each other and cooperable with companion surfaces on a spaced and clamp sleeve 20 disposed around the central body within the inflatable element 12 and between the flanges 17. It is apparent that tightening of the upper body abutment 13 on the central body clamps the upper packing flange 17 between the upper body abutment and spacer secures the lower packing flange 17 between the lower body abutment 12 and spacer sleeve 20. The direction of inclination of the tapered surfaces on the spacer sleeve and packing flanges is such as to urge the flanges 17 inwardly against the body 10, and thereby preclude leakage therealong.

The packing element 14 is designed for outward expansion under the influence of fluid G under pressure pumped or forced into its interior. Such fluid under pressure passes into a central passage 21 in the body 10, and through radial body ports 22 and spaced sleeve ports 23 to the interior of the packing 14. The subjecting of the fluid in the passage 21 and ports 22, 23 to a sutilciently high pressure will stretch and inflate the packing sleeve 14 in a lateral outward direction toward sealing engagement with the wall of the confining enclosure, such as the wall of an uncased well bore F. However, once such inflation takes place, the inating iluidk or fluent material G must be prevented from owing back out of the inflated sleeve 14. This action is forestalled by providing a check valve 24, across the body ports 22.

As illustrated, the body ports 22 open into a peripheral or circumferential body groove 25 having tapered side walls 26 converging inwardly toward each other. A back pressure valve in the form of a round rubber seal ring 27, or O ring, is disposed in the groove 25 and tends inherently to contract into snug sealing engagement with the tapered walls 26 of the groove. Such engagement preferably occurs with the ring disposed somewhat outwardly of the outer ends of the body ports 22.

When fluid under pressure is forced through lthe body passage 21 and ports 22, it will enter the inner portion of the peripheral groove 25. This pressure will then stretch the back pressure valve ring 27 outwardly, to allow the uid to pass around the ring into the outer, large portion of the tapered groove 25, from where it can flow through the clamp sleeve ports 23 to the interior of the packing sleeve 14. When the internal, pressure is relieved, the elastic valve member 27 contracts into snug engagement with the tapered wallsv 26 of the groove and prevents the fluid from owing in a reverse direction through the body ports 22.

The back pressure valveelement 27 is capable of withstanding comparatively high pressures. The back pressure urges the ring into the narrow portion of the tapered peripheral groove and etfectively wedges it into irm sealing engagement with the groove walls 26, thereby insuring against leakage back through the body ports 22. Actual tests have shown that the valve ring can withstand several thousand pounds unit back pressure, without leaking or becoming fluid cut.

The packing sleeve 14 is inliatable to a considerable extent. As an example, it may be expanded toa diameter of two to three times its initial retracted diameter with safety. For this reason, a well packer A can be lowered through a well casing (not shown) having a diameter much less than the diameter of the well bore F in which the packer is to be set.

The ination of the packer A is accomplished through use of a setting tool B lowered with the packer in the well bore. This setting tool includes a cylinder 28, consisting of a cylinder sleeve 29 threaded onto an upper head 30, and also onto a lower head 31. The lower headis threaded into a coupling 32 threadedly receiving a lower setting sleeve or bailer barrel or container 33, having a sleeve 34 threaded onits other end encompassing a cylindrical portion 13a of the upper body abutment 13. This sleeve 34 is initially detachably secured to the body abutment by one or more shear screws 35. Leakage between such sleeve 34 and the body abutment 13 is prevented by a suitable seal ring 36, such as an O ring, mounted in the abutment and engaging the inner wall of the sleeve.

The cylinder 28 contains a fluent material G, such as a liquid, which also lls the passage 37 throughl a compression tube 38 extending centrally through the lower head 31. This compression tube is threaded onto the upper end of a tubular extension 39, which is, in turn, threaded yinto a coupling 40 secured to a thrust tube or nipple 41 extending into the upper end of the packer body 10. The nipple has a lower pilot portion 42 of reduced diameter forming a shoulder 43 engaging a companion shoulder 44 in the body 10.

` The upper end of the compression tube 38 is threadedly secured to a pressure piston 45 located a short distance above the lower cylinder head 31,. Leakage along the exterior of this piston is prevented by suitable seal or piston rings 46 engaging the wall of the cylinder sleeve 29.

As stated above, the liquid G fills the cylinder sleeve 29 and also the central passage 37 through the compression tube 38, tubular extension 39, nipple 41 and body passage 21', as well as the ports 22 in the latter, the tapered'perip'heral groove 25 and the sleeve ports 23. A oatmg or pumping piston 47 rests upon the upper end of the liquid G in the cylinder sleeve, suitable piston rings 48 being provided onV the piston for slidable seallng engagement with the cylinder sleeve 29. It is apparent that as the floating piston 47 is forced downwardly 1n the cylinder sleeve 29, the liquid G is forced out of the cylinder 2 8 and through the tubular mem- 4 bers 38, 39, 41 into the packer body 10, from where it will unseat the back pressure valve member 27 and pass into the interior of the packing sleeve 14, inating the latter to the extent desired.

The pressure imposed on the liquid G acts downwardly over the cross-sectional area of the pressure piston 45, urging the latter downwardly, together with the various tubular members 38, 39, 41 attached thereto. in view of the engagement of the nipple shoulder 43 with the body shoulder 44, a downward thrust is imparted upon the packer body 10. Such thrust is resisted by the shear screws 35 attaching the body to the lower sleeve 34, which is rigidly secured to the cylinder 28 through the barrel 33 and coupling 32.

The parts are originally held in the assembled relationship illustrated in Fig. l, with the shear screws 35 intact, the appropriate location of the parts being insured by engagement of a shoulder 49 on the compression tube 38 with the underside of the lower cylinder head 31. In addition, the hydrostatic head of fluid in the well bore is allowed to act on the underside of the pressure piston 45, passing through an upper window or opening 50 in the setting tool barrel 33, and through a longitudinal bleeder port 51 extending through the lower head 31.

Downward movement of the floating piston 47, for the purpose of forcingthe liquid G downwardly and inating the packing element 14, is produced as a result of the combustion of a power charge or railway flare 52 containing its own source of oxygen. This power charge rests upon the floating piston 47 and is initially disposed within a combustion chamber 53 in the upper cylinder head 30. The upper end of the power charge is ignitable by firing a cartridge 54 disposed within a gun barrel 55 that is clamped between the cylinder head 30 and a cable head 56 threaded into the latter. The wire line cable C is attached to the cable head 56 in a known manner, and has an electrically conductive wire or core 57 connected to a heating tilament 58 in the cartridge.

During the lowering of the apparatus through the uid in the well bore, the hydrostatic head acting on the exterior of the packing element 14 increases. It is preferred to neutralize this hydrostatic head, and for this reason thewell tluid is allowed to enter the tubular members 38, 39, 41 through ports 59 that` may be provided in the compression tube 38 below the lower cylinder head 31. Thus, the well fluid can pass through the window or opening 50, and thence through the ports 59, this pressure being exerted upon the liquid G in the tubular members, as well as within the packer itself. However, when pressure is being applied by the oating piston 47 to the liquid G in the apparatus, the ports 59 are to be closed, so as to prevent escape of uid from the apparatus. For this reason, the ports 59 are controlled by a one-way check or back pressure valve-60, which may be similar to the check valve 24 located in the packer A, although acting in a reverse direction.

Thus, the compression tube 38 may be provided with an inner circumferential groove 61 communicating with the radial ports 59,. This groove has tapered side walls 62 converging in an outward direction toward each other. A rubber O ring check valve member 63 is disposed in this groove 61, and inherently tends to expand outwardly into engagement with the taperedl side walls 62. Pressure exerted within thel compression tube 38 in excess of the hydrostatic head externally thereof seats the O ring 63 against the tapered side wall. 62, and prevents iiuid passage outwardly through the ports 59. However, when the hydrostatichead of iluid in the well bore overbalances the Huid pressure within the cylinder 28 and tubular members 38, 39, 41, the 0 ring 63 is urged inwardly out of sealing engagement with the tapered side wall seats 62 and allows the hydrostatic pressurey to be exerted upon the liquid in the apparatus.

The apparatus is assembled with the parts occupying therelative positions illustrated in Fig. 1. Prior to attache ment of the setting tool B to the well packer A, the liquid G is placed in the setting tool with the floating piston 47 adjacent the upper cylinder head 30. The liquid is prevented from dropping out of the cylinder 28 and the tubular members 38, 39, 41 by jamming a soft rubber ball 64, or equivalent cork element, into the lower end of the nipple 41. The setting tool B is then assembled appropriately 1n place on the packer A, the nipple 41 being piloted into the central body portion 10 until its '5 shoulder 43 engages the body shoulder 44, and with a seal ring 65 on the nipple engaging the wall of the body passage 21 to prevent leakage in an upward direction from the latter. The shear screws 35 then are threaded into the setting sleeve 34 and upper abutment 13.

The apparatus is then lowered into the well bore F. In the event that the bore hole contains uid, the hydrostatic head is equalized by the fluid pressure being imposed upon the liquid G in the tool through the expedient ot' well packer A is to be set.

When the setting location in the well bore is reached, the electric circuit through the cartridge filament 58 is completed, ring the cartridge 54, and causing the flame issuing therefrom to ignite the upper end of the power charge 52. This latter combustible fuel commences burning and generates a gas at a gradually increasing pressure. This gas under pressure acts downwardly on the floating piston 47, which begins to move downwardly in the cylinder sleeve 29, forcing the liquid G ahead of it. The liquid iirst ejects the soft rubber ball 64 from the nipple passage, the latter coming to rest in the body passage 21 below its ports 22. The liquid G in the tool is subjected to a pressure, as a result of the movement of the floating piston 47, greater than the hydrostatic head of fluid in the well bore. This pressure holds the upper check valve ring 63 in closed position against the tapered walls 62 of the circumferential groove 61, and effectively closes the upper ports 59. The pressure also acts in an outward direction upon the lower check valve O ring member 27, urging it away from its seats 26 and allowing the fluid G to pass through the body ports 22 and clamp sleeve ports 23 into the interior of the packing element 14. As the pressure increases, the uid G pumps or inates the packing element 14 in a lateral outward direction until it comes in contact with the wall of the well bore F, whereupon the packing element may elongate along the well bore wall in up and down directions (see Fig. 6).

As the oating piston 47 moves downwardly, because of the continued burning of the power charge 52, it forces the liquid G ahead of it and approaches the pressure piston 45.

The downward force on the liquid G is being transmitted in a downward direction through the pressure piston 45 onto the compression tube 38, and also onto the packer body through the abutting shoulders 43, 44. In the event that the floating piston 47 develops sufficient pressure in the liquid G, before engaging the pressure piston 45, to overcome the shear value of the screws 35, the latter will be disrupted and the setting tool B automatically released from the well packer.A. Following such release, the setting tool can be elevated, which removes the nipple 41 from the packer body 10. However, the check valve member 27 in the packer immediately contracts against or remains in engagement with its tapered seats 26, and precludes any of the liquid in the inllated packing element 14 from passing back into the packer body 10 through the ports 22. In other words, the packing element 14 remains in an inated condition, because of the closing of the back pressure valve 24.

In the event that the floating piston 47 does not exert a sulcient differential pressure on the liquid G in the apparatus to overcome the strength of the shear screws 35, it will eventually make physical contact with the pressure piston 45. Thereafter, the pressure of the liquid G cannot be increased to any further extent. However, the power charge 52 is continuing to burn and build up an increasing pressure in the cylinder 28 above the floating piston 47. This pressure trst acts downwardly on the floating piston 47, and, in view of its abutment against the pressure piston 45, exerts a downward force on the latter and the tubular members 38, 40, 41, which is transmitted to the body 10. The gaseous pressure force eventually exceeds the shear strength of the screws 35 and disrupts the latter, thereby releasing the setting tool B from the well packer A.

It is, accordingly, apparent that the well packing 14 cannot be inflated to any greater extent after the floating piston 47 engages the pressure piston 45. As a result, the liquid G in the equipment is predetermined so volume displaced by the oating piston 47 in moving bethat thev the mandrel 92 and into 81 in the tween its uppermost and lowermost-positions will be insuicient to pump the packing sleeve 14 to an inordinately high extent and cause it to burst or rupture. A denite limit is placed on the extent the volume of the packing element can be increased by pumping uid into it. Regardless of this fact, a predetermined limit is also placed upon the pressure of the uid that can be imposed on the packing sleeve 14, as described above. Accordingly, assurance is had that the packing sleeve will not be inated to too great an extent or subjected to too great a pressure dilferential, insuring against its failure while being set in the well bore F against the wall of the latter.

After the shear screws 35 have been disrupted, the setting tool B may be elevated to the top of the hole, and used again in connection with the setting or inflation of another well packer..

The setting tool B may include a bailer portion D for dumping cementitious material E upon the set packer A immediately upon release of the setting tool from the packer. Thus, the lower portion D of the tool connected to the cylinder 28 may be filled with cementitious material E, such as cement slurry or a liquid synthetic thermosetting resin, the material being inserted into the barrel 33 through the window 50, to fill the annular space between the tubular elements 39, 41 and the barrel. After the setting tool B has expanded the packer A against the wall of the well bore F, the shear screws 35 are disrupted, which not only releases the setting tool B from the packer A, but opens the lower end of its bailer portion D and allows the cementitious material E to be dumped upon the set packer (see Fig. 7).

It is to be noted that the valve control bleeder holes 59, for equalizing the hydrostatic head internally and externally of the apparatus, are located above the bailer window or opening 50; so that the cementitious material E in the bailer cannot be forced into the setting tool B by the hydrostatic head.

The well apparatus illustrated in Figs. 8 to l0, inclusive, is essentially the same as disclosed in Figs. l to 7, inclusive. The well packer A includes a central body portion 10a having a lower head 11a upon which a lower abutment 12a rests. The packing sleeve 14 encompasses the central body 10a and is disposed within the lower abutment skirt 16, as well as within the depending skirt 15 of an upper abutment 13a resting upon a body shoulder 80. As in the other form of packer, a spacer and clamp sleeve 20a is provided having ports 23a communicable with the body ports 22a, which open into the central body passage 21a. In the present instance, however, instead of the O ring check valve element closing the body ports, a tapered groove 25a is formed in the periphery of the spacer sleeve 20a, and contains the seal ring type of check valve member 27a. In addition, leakage along the body 10a is prevented by providing suitable seal rings abutments 12a, 13a and spacer sleeve 20a on opposite sides of the ports 23a engaging the wall of the body 10a.

The packer parts are held in proper assembled relation on the body 10a by a two-part or split collar 83 received within a peripheral groove 84 at the upper end of the body 10a, and resting against the upper end of the upper abutment 13a, This collar is held in position by a plurality of cap screws 85 extending through it and threaded into the upper abutment 13a.

The setting tool B includes a cylinder 86 consisting of a cylinder sleeve 87 that is threaded onto the upper head slidable downwardly in the cylinder 86 and is secured to a piston rod 90 extending through the lower head 88 and into the central bore 91 of an actuating mandrel 92,

A cross-piece 93 extends through the lower portion of the piston rod 90 and through opposed longitudinally cxtending slots 94 in the actuating mandrel 92 into a setting ring 95 that is threaded on the upper end of an actuating 'sleeve 96. This sleeve extends downwardly along 98, and also a lower head 31a secured to the lower end of the latter. A bailer barrel or container 33a is threaded into the lower head 31a, and has a sleeve 34a secured to, its lower portion and encompassing the abutment 13a, leakage between the latter two elements being prevented, as before, by a suitable seal 36 in the abutment engaging i the sleeve. The bailer D also has a suitable opening or window 50 in its upper portion through which cementitious material E may be placed.

A tension member or rod 99 extends upwardly through the pump piston 47a, being threadedly attached to the lower end of the actuating mandrel 92. This rod extends downwardly through the pump cylinder head 31a, and also through the bailer barrel 33a, being threaded into a lower coupling 100 attached to a tension stud 101 which is threaded into the upper end of the packer body a. This tension stud 101 functions as a releasable connection for detachably securing the setting tool B to the well packer A, as described hereinafter.

Initially, the pump piston 47a is disposed in the upper portion of the cylinder 28a. Leakage around the exterior of the piston is prevented by Vsuitable piston rings 48a engaging the wall of the cylinder sleeve 28a; whereas, leakage within the piston 47a is prevented by suitable rod packing rings 102 engaging the exterior of the tension member 99. Similarly, leakage between the lower cylinder head 31a and rod member 99 is prevented by one or more seal rings 103 in the head engaging the exterior of the rod member.

The cylinder 28a is filled with liquid between its lower head 31a and the pump piston 47a, this liquid being capable of passing into vthe lower portion of the tension member 99 through an inlet port 104 above the lower cylinder head 31a that communicates with a central passage 105 in the member 99. This passage also communicates with a passage 106 through the tension stud 101 that opens into the central packer body passage 21a.

As in the other form of the invention, the hydrostatic head of fluid in the well bore can be equalized by passing inwardly through the check valve arrangement 60 formed in the tension member 99, preferably below and adjacent the cylinder head 31a and above the bailer window 50.

A ller pipe 107 extends through, and is secured to, the pump piston 47a and through a hole 108 in the upper pump cylinder head 97. The liquid G in the cylinder is introduced through this ller pipe 107, which can then be closed by a suitable pipe plug 109. Downward movement of the pump piston 47a is also facilitated by the provision of a suitable bleeder hole 110 in the cylinder sleeve 29a above the piston 47a and adjacent the upper cylinder head 97 The setting tool piston 89 is moved downwardly as a result of combustion of the power charge S2, which is fired by the cartridge 54 and through the use of parts that correspond to those employed in the other form of the invention.

The apparatus is made up with the parts occupying the relative positions illustrated in Figs. 8 and 8a. The liquid G is introduced into the pump cylinder 28a through the ller pipe 107 which is then closed by the threaded pipe plug 109. The apparatus is lowered in the well bore by means of the wireline C until the desired setting location is reached. The cartridge 54 is then tired to ignite the power charge 52, gas pressure being generated in the combustion chamber 53 and upper end of the cylinder 86 to urge the piston 89 and piston rod 90 downwardly, and to reactively urge the cylinder 86 in an upward direction. Since the cylinder 86 is connected to the actuating mandrel 92, which, in turn, is attached to the tension member 99, secured to the tension stud 101 and body 10a, the upward force on the cylinder 86 is transmitted 'to the packer body 10a. This upward force is resisted by a downward force imposed on the body 10a, transmitted from the piston 89, through the piston rod 90, cross-piece or anvil 93, setting ring 95, and actuating sleeve 96, to the pump piston 47a. The downward force on the pump piston is transmitted to the liquid G, and through the latter acts downwardly on the pump cylinder head 31a, which is secured lto the bailer barrel 33a. From the barrel, the downward force is exerted on the setting sleeve 34a, which is engaging the upper body abutment 13a.

As the pressure in the combustion chamber 53 increases, the downward force on the pump piston 47a increases, urging the latter downwardly in the pump cylinder 28a and forcing the liquid G down through the tension member passage 105 and tension stud 101 into the body passage 21a, from where it passes outwardly through the body ports 22a and spacer sleeve ports 23a, displacing or opening the check valve 27a and flowing into the interior of the rubber packing sleeve 14. As the pump piston 47a moves downwardly, the uid G is 8 forced into the packing sleeve 14, inating the latter into engagement with the wall of the Well bore F.

The pump piston '47a continues to movedownwardly until the pressure imposed on the liquid G exceeds a value that corresponds to the ultimate strength of the reduced diameter portion 101e: of the tension stud 101. When this value is exceeded, vthe downward force on the cylinder head 31a, bailer barrel 33a, sleeve 34a and packer body 10a pulls the stud apart at its reduced diameter portion 101a and disconnects the setting tool B from the well packer A. When this action occurs, the ination pressure is discontinued. However, the check valve 27a closes over the spacer sleeve ports 23a, and prevents the fluid from escaping from the interior of the packing sleeve 14, holding the latter expanded against the wall of the well bore.

In the event that the pressure corresponding to the ultimate strength of the reduced diameter portion 101a of the tension stud 101 is not reached, The pump piston 47a will engage the cylinder head 31a, the gas pressure generated by the power charge 52 then acting directly on the lower cylinder head 31a, and, through the bailer barrel 33a and setting sleeve 34a, upon the packer body. This pressure will eventually increase to a point exceeding the tensile strength of the stud 101, pulling it apart and releasing the setting tool B from the well packer A.

It is to be noted, as in the other form of the invention, that the engagement of the pump piston 47a with the lower cylinder head 31a prevents any further inflation of the packing element 14. As a result, only a predetermined maximum volume of ination can take place, which is the volume ofthe liquid displaced by the piston 47a from the pump cylinder 28a prior to its engagement with the lower cylinder head 31a. This precludes the packing sleeve 14 from being inated to too great an extent, that might cause its failure. l

As in the other form of invention, cementitious material E may be contained within the barrel portion D of the setting tool B. Upon disruption of the stud 101, the setting tool B maybe elevated t0 dump the contents E of the bailer D upon the set packer A, which will harden and form a plug in the well bore supplementing the packer or bridge plug A. Following such dumping, the setting tool B can be elevated to the top of the well bore F.

The invention described herein and relating to the check valves 24 and 60 forms the subject matter of the continuation-in-part application of Martin B. Conrad, Serial No. 186,883 tiled September 26, 1950, for Check Valves, now Patent No. 2,671,466.

The inventors claim:

l. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a iluid pump; means for conducting fluid from said pump into said packlng element to iniiate thersame; and releasable means connectmg said setting tool to said packer and releasable in response to a predetermined force imposed by said pump on said releasable means when operating in a direction to force uid into said packing element to detach said setting tool from said packer.

2. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying cylinder means and piston means slidable in said cylinder means; means for conducting uid from said cylinder means into said packlng element; uid pressure power means for moving said piston means in said cylinder means to apply pressure to said iluid and inate said packing element; and releasable means connecting said setting tool to said packer and releasable in response to a predetermined force imposed by said pump on said releasable means when operatlng in a direction to force fluid into said packing element to detach said setting tool from said packer.

3. 4In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; means releasably connecting said cylinder to said packer; means for conducting fluid from said cylinder into said packing element; and uid pressure power means for moving said piston in said cylinder to apply pressure to said fluid and inflate said packing element. y

4. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packmg element; a setting tool lembodying a uid pump; means for conducting uid longitudinally from vsaid pump and into said packing element; means engaging said packer and subject to the pressure of said iluid to exert a longitudinal force on said packer; and readily disruptable means releasably connecting said setting `tool-to said packer and disruptable by the `force of said iluid under pressure when said pressure reaches a predetermined maximum value.

5. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a luid pump; means for conducting uid from said pump into said packing element to inflate the same; and means for preventing return ilow of uid from within said packing element, said preventing means comprising opposed side walls tapering toward each other to provide a circumferential groove and an elastic ring in said groove movable inherently into sealing engagement with said side walls; and releasable means connecting said setting tool to said packer and releasable in response to a predetermined force imposed by said pump on said releasable means when operating in a direction to force iluid into said packing element to detach said setting tool from said packer.

6. In a well packer: body means; a packing element on Vsaid body means inflatable by uid under pressure; said body means including a spacer sleeve within said packing element clamping said packing element to said body means, said spacer sleeve allowing uid to pass into the interior of said packing element; said body means having an opening for conducting uid under pressure past said spacer sleeve into said packing element; said body means having a circumferential groove communicable with said opening and defined by opposed side walls tapering toward each other; and an elastic ring in said groove movable inherently into sealing engagement with said side walls to close said opening.

7'. In a well packer: body means; a packing element on said body means inflatable by uid under pressure; said body means including a spacer sleeve within said packing element clamping said packing element to said body means, said spacer sleeve allowing iluid to pass into the interior of said packing element; said body means having an opening for conducting Huid under pressure past said spacer sleeve into said packing element; said body means having a circumferential groove communicable with said opening and dened by opposed side walls tapering inwardly toward each other; and an elastic ring in said groove contractible inherently into sealing engagement with said side walls to close said opening.

S. ln well apparatus to be disposed in a well bore: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool connected to said packer and embodying a fluid pump; means for conducting fluid from said pump to said packing element to inflate the same; means providing a passage opening into said pump and the well bore to provide uid communication between the well fluid and said pump and conducting means; and a check valve in said passage preventing outward ow of uid therefrom.

9. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying cylinder means engaging said packer and a piston slidable in said cylinder means; means for conducting iuid from said cylinder means into said packing element to inflate the same, said conducting means engaging said packer; means releasably connecting one of said means to said packer; the other o said means being engageable and movable by said piston relative to said means releasably connected to said packer to release said releasable means.

10. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; means releasably securing said cylinder to said packer; means for conducting fluid from said cylinder into said packing element to inate the same, said conducting means engaging said packer; and means for moving said piston in said cylinder into engagement with said conducting means to move the same relative to said cylinder to release said securing means.

1l. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder engaging said packer and a piston slidable in said cylinder; means for conducting uid from said cylinder into said packing element to inflate the same; means releasably securing said conducting means to said packer; and means for moving said piston in said cylinder into engagement with said cylinder to move said cylinder relative to said conducting means to release said securing means.

12. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; readily disruptable means detachably securing said cylinder-to said'packer; a tubular member extending into said cylinder and-packer for conducting uid in said cylinder into said packing element; means for moving said piston in said cylinder to force the uid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate said packing element; said piston being movable into engagement with said tubular member to move the same relative to said cylinder to disrupt said readily disruptable means.

13. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; means including a readily disruptable connection detachably securing said cylinder to said packer; a tubular member extending into said cylinder and packer for conducting fluid in said cylinder into said packing element; said tubular member being mounted in said packer-in force transmitting relation thereto; means for moving said piston in said cylinder to force the uid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inate said packing element; said piston being further movable into engagement with said tubular member to exert a thrust on said tubular member to thereby move said packer relative to said cylinder to disrupt said readily disruptable means; and valve controlled means in said tubular member for allowing iluid ow from the exterior to the interior of said tubular member, said valve controlled means preventing return llow of lluid in the reverse direction.

14. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable pac -ng element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; a container member adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container member being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; a tubular member extending through said container member into said cylinder and packer to conduct fluid from said cylinder into said packing element, one of said members being connected to said well packer; means for moving said piston in said cylinder to force the iiuid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate the packing element; and valve controlled means in said tubular member above the lowermost portion of said opening for allowing fluid llow from the exterior to the interior of said tubular member, said valve controlled means preventing uid ow in the reverse direction.

15. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; a container adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; a tubular member extending through said container into said cylinder and packer to conduct uid from said cylinder into said packing element; means for moving said piston in said cylinder to force the fluid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate the packing element; valve controlled means in said tubular member above the lowermost portion of said opening for allowing fluid flow from the exterior to the interior of l said valve controlled means preventing fluld flow in the reverse direction; and readily disruptable means detachably securing said container to said packer.

16. In well apparatus: a well packer' having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable in said cylinder; a container member adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container member being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; a tubular member extending through said container member into said cylinder and packer to conduct fluid from said cylinder into said packing element; means for moving said piston in said cylinder to force the fluid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate the packing element; valve controlled means in said tubular member above the lowermost portion of said opening for allowing fiuid llow from the exterior to the interior of said tubular member, said valve controlled means preventing uid ow in the reverse l1 direction; and readily disruptable means connecting one of said members to said packer.

17. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable downwardly in said cylinder; a container member adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container member being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; a tubular member extending through said container member into said cylinderV and packer to conduct fluid from said cylinder into said packing element; readily disruptable means connecting one of said members to said packer; means for moving said piston downwardly in said cylinder to force the fluid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate the packing element, said piston moving downwardly into engagement with one of said members to move the same relative to the other of said members to disrupt said readily disruptable means.

- 18'. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inliatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a piston slidable downwardly in said cylinder; a container adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; a tubular member extending through said container intoV said cylinder and packer to conduct iiuid in said cylinder into said packing element; readily disruptable means connecting said tubular member to said packer; means for moving said piston downwardly in said cylinder to force the iiuid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to infiate the packing element, said piston being movable downwardly into engagement with said cylinder to move the same relative to said tubular member to disrupt said readily disruptable means.

19. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a first piston slidable in said cylinder; said cylinder having a head below said piston; means including a readily disruptable connection detachably securing said cylinder to said packer; a tubular member extending into said cylinder and packer for conducting fiuid in said cylinder into said packing element; a second piston secured to said tubular member within said cylinder and above said head; said tubular member being inserted in said packer in force transmitting relation thereto; means for moving said first piston in said cylinder to force the fiuid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate said packing element; said first piston being further movable into engagement with said second piston to shift said second piston and tubular member relative to said cylinder and disrupt said readily disruptable means.

20. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a first piston slidable in said cylinder; a cylinder having a head below said first piston; a container adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; readily disruptable means detachably securing said container to said packer; a tubular member extending through said container into said cylinder and packer for conducting fiuid in said cylinder into said packing element; a second piston secured to said tubular member within said cylinder and located above said head; means for moving said iirst piston in said cylinder to force the fiuid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate said packing element; said first piston being further movable into engagement with said tubular member to exert a thrust on said tubular member to thereby move said packer relative to said cylinder to disrupt said readily disruptable means.

21. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element; a setting tool embodying a cylinder and a first piston slidable in said cylinder; said cylinder having a head below said first piston; a container adapted to hold a substance to be deposited in the well bore and having an upper inlet opening and a lower outlet, said container being secured to said cylinder and engaging said packer; means for closing said lower outlet; readily disruptable means detachably securing said container to said packer; a tubular member extending through said container into said cylinder and packer for conducting fiuid in said cylinder into said packing element; a second piston secured to said tubular member within said cylinder and located above said head; means for moving said first piston in said cylinder to force the uid in said cylinder into said tubular member and packing element to inflate said packing element; said first piston being further movable into engagement with said tubular member to exert a thrust on said tubular member to thereby move said packer relative to said cylinder to disrupt said readily disruptable means; and a valve controlled means in said tubular member above the lowermost portion of said opening for allowing fiuid ow from the exterior to the interior of said tubular member, said valve controlled means preventing fiuid iiow in a reverse direction.

22. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inatable packing element; a setting tool embodying cylinder means and piston means slidable in said cylinder means; means releasably connecting one of said means to said packer; means for conducting fluid from said cylinder means into said packing element; and fluid operated means for moving said piston means in said cylinder means to apply pressure to said fluid to inate said packing element and release said releasable means.

23. In well apparatus: a well packer having an inflatable packing element, a setting tool embodying cylinder means and piston means slidable in said cylinder means; means releasably connecting one of said means to said packer; means for conducting fiuid from said cylinder means into said packing element; and means providing a motivating gaseous medium under pressure in said cylinder means for moving said piston means in said cylinder means to apply pressure to said fluid to infiate said packing element and release said releasable means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Turechek et al. Nov. 18,

US2695065A 1950-07-10 1950-07-10 Well packer, setting apparatus, and dump bailer Expired - Lifetime US2695065A (en)

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Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2807325A (en) * 1954-12-27 1957-09-24 Houston Engineers Inc Gas operated well seal
US2915124A (en) * 1956-06-01 1959-12-01 Aerojet General Co Jet type bailer with gas generating mechanism
US2959226A (en) * 1956-10-26 1960-11-08 Jersey Prod Res Co Inflatable packer formation tester
US2974727A (en) * 1957-12-31 1961-03-14 Gulf Research Development Co Well perforating apparatus
US2978029A (en) * 1959-05-11 1961-04-04 Jersey Prod Res Co Plug for well boreholes
US2982358A (en) * 1956-09-21 1961-05-02 Cicero C Brown Hydraulic set packer
US2994378A (en) * 1957-03-13 1961-08-01 Jersey Prod Res Co Treatment of a well with the drill string in the well
US3163112A (en) * 1962-08-02 1964-12-29 Jersey Prod Res Co Well preforating
US3650325A (en) * 1969-04-22 1972-03-21 Schlumberger Technology Corp Well bridging apparatus having a detachable setting means
US3776308A (en) * 1971-08-17 1973-12-04 Lynes Inc Safety valve arrangement for controlling communication between the interior and exterior of a tubular member
US3872925A (en) * 1973-04-24 1975-03-25 Gearhart Owen Industries Through-tubing bridge plug
US4163562A (en) * 1977-04-18 1979-08-07 Lawrence Sanford Inflatable packer
US4840231A (en) * 1988-04-22 1989-06-20 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for setting an inflatable packer
US20050126791A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-06-16 Phil Barbee Reciprocating slickline pump
US20060081380A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2006-04-20 Hoffman Corey E Collar locator for slick pump
US20080066902A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-03-20 Gerald Bullard Bridge plug and setting tool
US20090173489A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-07-09 Gerald Bullard Bridge plug and setting tool
US20090255691A1 (en) * 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 Baker Hughes Incorporated Permanent packer using a slurry inflation medium
US20100122814A1 (en) * 2008-11-20 2010-05-20 Picou Robert A Apparatus and Method for Depositing a Slurry in a Well
US20110265987A1 (en) * 2010-04-28 2011-11-03 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole Actuator Apparatus Having a Chemically Activated Trigger
US20120160483A1 (en) * 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Carisella James V Hybrid Dump Bailer and Method of Use

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US1693619A (en) * 1923-05-26 1928-12-04 Sandford Dent Noiseless check valve
US1515066A (en) * 1924-01-07 1924-11-11 Ochs Clarence Pressure gun for fishing tools
US1850218A (en) * 1931-02-17 1932-03-22 John C Thomas Hydraulic or air expanded packer
US2177601A (en) * 1937-01-15 1939-10-24 George P Verrett Casing packer
US2186230A (en) * 1938-08-11 1940-01-09 Warren L Bald Hydraulic oil well packer
US2202173A (en) * 1939-06-29 1940-05-28 Alvin L Straub Well cementing device
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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2807325A (en) * 1954-12-27 1957-09-24 Houston Engineers Inc Gas operated well seal
US2915124A (en) * 1956-06-01 1959-12-01 Aerojet General Co Jet type bailer with gas generating mechanism
US2982358A (en) * 1956-09-21 1961-05-02 Cicero C Brown Hydraulic set packer
US2959226A (en) * 1956-10-26 1960-11-08 Jersey Prod Res Co Inflatable packer formation tester
US2994378A (en) * 1957-03-13 1961-08-01 Jersey Prod Res Co Treatment of a well with the drill string in the well
US2974727A (en) * 1957-12-31 1961-03-14 Gulf Research Development Co Well perforating apparatus
US2978029A (en) * 1959-05-11 1961-04-04 Jersey Prod Res Co Plug for well boreholes
US3163112A (en) * 1962-08-02 1964-12-29 Jersey Prod Res Co Well preforating
US3650325A (en) * 1969-04-22 1972-03-21 Schlumberger Technology Corp Well bridging apparatus having a detachable setting means
US3776308A (en) * 1971-08-17 1973-12-04 Lynes Inc Safety valve arrangement for controlling communication between the interior and exterior of a tubular member
US3872925A (en) * 1973-04-24 1975-03-25 Gearhart Owen Industries Through-tubing bridge plug
US4163562A (en) * 1977-04-18 1979-08-07 Lawrence Sanford Inflatable packer
US4840231A (en) * 1988-04-22 1989-06-20 Baker Hughes Incorporated Method and apparatus for setting an inflatable packer
US20050126791A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-06-16 Phil Barbee Reciprocating slickline pump
US20060081380A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2006-04-20 Hoffman Corey E Collar locator for slick pump
US7600566B2 (en) 2003-12-15 2009-10-13 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Collar locator for slick pump
US7172028B2 (en) * 2003-12-15 2007-02-06 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Reciprocating slickline pump
US20090173489A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-07-09 Gerald Bullard Bridge plug and setting tool
US7559364B2 (en) * 2006-09-14 2009-07-14 Gerald Bullard Bridge plug and setting tool
US20080066902A1 (en) * 2006-09-14 2008-03-20 Gerald Bullard Bridge plug and setting tool
US7757756B2 (en) 2006-09-14 2010-07-20 Gerald Bullard Bridge plug and setting tool
US20090255691A1 (en) * 2008-04-10 2009-10-15 Baker Hughes Incorporated Permanent packer using a slurry inflation medium
US20100122814A1 (en) * 2008-11-20 2010-05-20 Picou Robert A Apparatus and Method for Depositing a Slurry in a Well
US8256513B2 (en) 2008-11-20 2012-09-04 Picou Robert A Apparatus for depositing a slurry in a well
US8113282B2 (en) * 2008-11-20 2012-02-14 Picou Robert A Apparatus and method for depositing a slurry in a well
US20110265987A1 (en) * 2010-04-28 2011-11-03 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole Actuator Apparatus Having a Chemically Activated Trigger
US8322426B2 (en) * 2010-04-28 2012-12-04 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Downhole actuator apparatus having a chemically activated trigger
US20120160483A1 (en) * 2010-12-22 2012-06-28 Carisella James V Hybrid Dump Bailer and Method of Use
US8813841B2 (en) * 2010-12-22 2014-08-26 James V. Carisella Hybrid dump bailer and method of use
US9822597B2 (en) 2010-12-22 2017-11-21 James V. Carisella Hybrid dump bailer and method of use

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