US2689694A - Thread guide - Google Patents

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Publication number
US2689694A
US2689694A US259086A US25908651A US2689694A US 2689694 A US2689694 A US 2689694A US 259086 A US259086 A US 259086A US 25908651 A US25908651 A US 25908651A US 2689694 A US2689694 A US 2689694A
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Prior art keywords
thread
guide
thread guide
guides
surfaces
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Expired - Lifetime
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US259086A
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Hunter George Adamson
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E I du Pont de Nemours and Co
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E I du Pont de Nemours and Co
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Priority to US259086A priority Critical patent/US2689694A/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H57/00Guides for filamentary materials; Supports therefor
    • B65H57/006Traversing guides
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H57/00Guides for filamentary materials; Supports therefor
    • B65H57/04Guiding surfaces within slots or grooves
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65HHANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL, e.g. SHEETS, WEBS, CABLES
    • B65H2701/00Handled material; Storage means
    • B65H2701/30Handled filamentary material
    • B65H2701/31Textiles threads or artificial strands of filaments

Description

p 21, 1954 GA. HUNTER 2,689,694

THREAD GUIDE Filed Nov. 30, 1951 INVENTOR.

GEIORGE ADAMSON HUN Tn .BY

ATTORNEY.

Patented Sept. 21, 1954 George Adamson Hunter Chattanooga. Tenn assignor to E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application November 30, 1951, Serial No. 259,086

2 Claims. 1

This invention relates to the winding of threads, and more particularly to reciprocating thread guides for use therein.

Reciprocating thread guides are used in winding straight sided cakes. When winding such cakes at high speeds it is necessary for the guides to reciprocate at high frequencies in order to obtain good bobbin formation. The textile industry, however, has long been restricted to guides which reciprocate rather slowly and has therefore not been able to attain the high winding speeds which the other parts of the winding equipment are capable of withstanding.

High frequency reciprocation of these thread guides has not been practical previously because it involves an extremely rapid reversal in the direction of the kinetic energy of the guide at the points of stroke reversal. This rapid change in the direction of the kinetic energy produces extremely high momentary stresses in the guides and cam-followers which, after a few hundred cycles at high speed, causes ordinary guides and/or followers to fall through fatigue. Attempts to overcome this fatigue deficiency of common fabricating materials, such as steel, steel alloys, brasses, bronzes and the like, by the use of massive guides necessitates an excessive power input and, in addition, the large mass of the guide places undue stress on the cam-followers which causes excessive wear and breakage. A further difficulty encountered at high winding speeds is that the high thread velocity results in an unexpectedly severe wear on guide surfaces, especially when winding highly delustered threads.

It is an object of this invention to provide a thread guide which combines light weight, high strength and fatigue resistance. It is a further object of this invention to provide a reciprocating thread guide which is resistant to mechanical wear where it slides over the guide bars. It is a still further object of this invention to provide a unitary reciprocating thread guide whose thread guiding and thread contacting surfaces are extremely resistant to wear even when winding a highly delustered synthetic filament or yarn.

Other objects will become apparent from the following description and claims.

The objects of this invention are accomplished by forming the main body of the reciprocating thread guide of nylon, providing a thread-guiding slot faced with a fused, hard, mineral material, and providing wearresistant surfaces on other portions of the guide which contact the thread during string-up. The invention will be more readily understood by reference to the drawing, which illustrates preferred embodiments of shown in Figure 1, in order to show the con-- the thread guide.

Figure 1 is an end view of a thread guide and associatedbobbin winding mechanism,

Figure 2 is an enlargement of the thread guide struction more clearly,

Figure 3 is a cross-section of one embodiment of thread guide in accordance with this invention, taken on the line 33 of Figure 2,

Figure 4 is a modified form of the embodiment of the invention shown in Figure 3.

Referring to Figure 1, a thread or yarn I 0 passes downward through guiding portion ll of the thread guide and is Wound into a package l2 about bobbin I3, which is rotatably supported on shaft 14. The bobbin is rotated by frictional contact with a motor-driven drive roll [5. The thread guide is slidably supported on horizontal rod it; by sleeve bearing l! integrally molded into the guide. Above bearing I1 is an additional bearing l8 which slides on guide bar l9. Nylon is an admirable material for these bearing surfaces because of its long life, resistance to deformation and fatigue, and light weight. It is highly resistant to wear as a bearing material and the "bearings need only an initial light oiling, so that one source of yarn contamination and soiling is eliminated.

The righthand projection 20 of the thread guide contains a hole into which the end of cam-follower 2! is fitted. A motor-driven cam shaft 22 is provided with a continuous helical groove like thegrooves on the barrel of an automatic Yankee screw driver. The cam-follower fits into and follows this groove to provide a reciprocating motion to the thread guide.

Referring to Figure 3, the thread-guiding surfaces comprise slot 25 and leading edges 26. These are surfaces which must be made resistant to wear produced by the thread in order to provide the guide with a suitably long life. One manner in which this may be accomplished is to force pins 2'! of a fused, hard, mineralmaterial into holes 28 drilled or molded into the guide body at the base of the slot so as to align the pins with the slot edges. These pins are a force fit in these holes such that the resilient nylon body holds them firmly. These pins contact the thread during the entire winding of the package and should be highly wear-resistant. A good material has been found to be Alsimag, a fused titanium di-' oxide supplied by the American Lava Company. Other suitable materials include fused silica, titania, zirconia, alumina and their comounds, e. g.,

porcelain and glass. The leading edges 26, which contact the thread only during string-up, are plated with a layer of hard wear-resistant metal, e. g., nickel, which is then polished smooth. Additionally, the plating is carried over the ends of the pins 21 to provide added insurance against the pins slipping out of place, to prevent breakage of the pins by anchoring the outer end, and to present a smooth surface for facilitating the automatic string-up feature described below.

Alternatively, as shown in Figure 4, these wearresistant surfaces may be provided by a chromeplated or wear-resistant steel alloy wire 30 coving edges 26, and also serving as means for holding hollow mineral pins 3| in the guide slot. Other methods for holding wear-resistant surfaces in place will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art.-

In Figure l is shown the normal thread line running through the guide slot. At the stringup, the thread is brought down on one side of the guide and wrapped around the bobbin to start the winding operation. Then, as the thread guide reciprocates, the thread automatically rides over the rounded edge and falls into the slot in its normal running position.

For convenience, the invention will be described in terms of a thread winding device in which the mode of reciprocation is by means of a relatively small diameter cam shaft containing a continuous helical groove similar to the groove on the barrel of an automatic Yankee screw driver. The cam-follower protruding from the hole in the projection 20 of the thread guide must have a flat tapered end to make the cam-follower run in the given groove. Otherwise, at the crossovers of two slots it could inadvertently get into the wrong groove and go in the wrong direction. At the ends of the traverse stroke, this fiat tapered cam-follower (sometimes called a boat-tail cam-follower) has to rotate through the angle prescribed by the slot reversals. Consequently, the cam-follower must be a reasonably loose fit in the hole of the reciprocating thread guide. Due to this factor, light strong metals such as aluminum, magnesium, or aluminum-magnesium alloys cannot be used as a fabrication material for these guides, because of a peening action between the cam-follower and the side walls of the hole which quickly destroys the usefulness of the thread guide, and because the ductility of these metals and alloys produces flaring of the end portions of the elongated cylindrical bores which serve as bearing surfaces when the force couples induced at the reversal points act upon them.

Actually the thread guides of this invention are advantageous with any grooved cam shaft, whether the groove crosses itself as described above or whether the groove has no cross-overs. When the groove has no cross-overs it is normal practice to make the cam-follower an integral part of the guide (e. g., by making the follower stem a press fit or a threaded fit in the hole of projection 20) and to provide a roller on the follower end rather than the boat-tail described above.

Additionally, the thread guide of this invention can be used with any reciprocating guide bar, however actuated. Again, in this instance, it is the usual custom to make the connecting link between the guide and the bar an integral part of the guide as described above. Thusit can be seen that these methods of construction eliminate the peening action betweenthe camfollower and the side walls of the hole in projection 20, but they do not eliminate the equally destructive forces which flare the end portions of the elongated cylindrical bores serving as the bearing surfaces when these guides are made of the light and strong yet ductile metals and alloys of aluminum and magnesium.

The molded nylon thread guides of this invention can be operated up to 800 or 1,000 cycles per minute, or even more, without failing by fatigue or by damage to the guide or through wear or deformation of the bearing surfaces. Reciprocating thread guides made of steel usually fail in the range of 200 to 400 cycles per minute. Hence, by the use of the guides of this invention at 800 cycles per minute, instead of at the customary 200 cycles per minute for the guides of the prior art, it is possible to increase the thread wind-up speed four-fold.

Since many different embodiments of the invention may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited by the specific illustrations except to the extent defined in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A reciprocating thread guide comprising in combination a main body of nylon and a threadguiding slot formed by parallel pins of a fused, hard, mineral material and surfaces for guiding a thread into said slot during string-up, said surfaces being provided with wear-resistant inserts.

2. A reciprocating thread guide comprising in combination a main body of nylon and a threadguiding slot formed by parallel pins of a fusible, hard, mineral material and surfaces for guiding a thread into said slot during string-up, said surfaces being formed of a wear-resistant material.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,912,256 Coradi May 30, 1933 2,246,086 Austin June 17, 1941 2,298,34 Childs Oct. 13, 1942 2,299,344 Perry Oct. 20, 1 2,434,227 Rowe Jan. 6, 1948 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 472,081 Great Britain Sept. 16, 1937 410,180 Italy Mar. 25, 1945 OTHER REFERENCES Modern Plastics, Injection Molding of Nylon, pages -120 and 166, Akin & Teagarden.

Product Engineering, July 1950, Nylon in Bearings and Gears Wall, pages 102-107.

US259086A 1951-11-30 1951-11-30 Thread guide Expired - Lifetime US2689694A (en)

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3004733A (en) * 1959-06-04 1961-10-17 Alva C Spivey Yarn guide element
US3042341A (en) * 1958-07-23 1962-07-03 Du Pont Traverse thread guide
US3086722A (en) * 1962-04-26 1963-04-23 Du Pont Yarn traverse mechanism
US3130938A (en) * 1963-05-13 1964-04-28 Fiber Industries Inc Thread guide
US3706420A (en) * 1970-11-23 1972-12-19 Manuel Lapidas Yarn winding mechanism
US4557429A (en) * 1983-07-06 1985-12-10 Daiwa Seiko, Inc. Level winder for double-bearing reel of fishing rod
EP0172664A2 (en) * 1984-08-20 1986-02-26 JAMES MACKIE & SONS LIMITED Improvements in and relating to textile yarn winding apparatus
US4666101A (en) * 1983-07-06 1987-05-19 Daiwa Seiko Inc. Level winder for double-bearing reel
US20100193110A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Joseph Allen Eckstein Method for High-Speed Continuous Application of a Strip Material to a Substrate Along an Application Path on the Substrate
WO2010088318A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 The Procter & Gamble Company System for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material at laterally shifting locations
WO2010088022A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Strip guide for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material at laterally shifting locations
US20100193135A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Joseph Allen Eckstein System and Method for High-Speed Continuous Application of a Strip Material to a Moving Sheet-Like Substrate Material at Laterally Shifting Locations
US10059553B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2018-08-28 The Procter & Gamble Company System and method for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1912256A (en) * 1931-06-16 1933-05-30 Schwarzenbach Huber Company Thread guide and traverse bar bracket
GB472081A (en) * 1936-07-18 1937-09-16 Robert Holt Improvements in and relating to the traversing thread guides of yarn-winding machines
US2246086A (en) * 1940-01-08 1941-06-17 Du Pont Bearing
US2298345A (en) * 1940-10-31 1942-10-13 Eastman Kodak Co Yarn winding machine
US2299344A (en) * 1940-07-18 1942-10-20 Abbott Machine Co Winding machine guide
US2434227A (en) * 1945-04-13 1948-01-06 Standish S Rowe Strand guide

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1912256A (en) * 1931-06-16 1933-05-30 Schwarzenbach Huber Company Thread guide and traverse bar bracket
GB472081A (en) * 1936-07-18 1937-09-16 Robert Holt Improvements in and relating to the traversing thread guides of yarn-winding machines
US2246086A (en) * 1940-01-08 1941-06-17 Du Pont Bearing
US2299344A (en) * 1940-07-18 1942-10-20 Abbott Machine Co Winding machine guide
US2298345A (en) * 1940-10-31 1942-10-13 Eastman Kodak Co Yarn winding machine
US2434227A (en) * 1945-04-13 1948-01-06 Standish S Rowe Strand guide

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3042341A (en) * 1958-07-23 1962-07-03 Du Pont Traverse thread guide
US3004733A (en) * 1959-06-04 1961-10-17 Alva C Spivey Yarn guide element
US3086722A (en) * 1962-04-26 1963-04-23 Du Pont Yarn traverse mechanism
US3130938A (en) * 1963-05-13 1964-04-28 Fiber Industries Inc Thread guide
US3706420A (en) * 1970-11-23 1972-12-19 Manuel Lapidas Yarn winding mechanism
US4557429A (en) * 1983-07-06 1985-12-10 Daiwa Seiko, Inc. Level winder for double-bearing reel of fishing rod
US4666101A (en) * 1983-07-06 1987-05-19 Daiwa Seiko Inc. Level winder for double-bearing reel
EP0172664A2 (en) * 1984-08-20 1986-02-26 JAMES MACKIE & SONS LIMITED Improvements in and relating to textile yarn winding apparatus
EP0172664A3 (en) * 1984-08-20 1986-10-15 James Mackie & Sons Limited Improvements in and relating to textile yarn winding apparatus
WO2010088318A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 The Procter & Gamble Company System for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material at laterally shifting locations
US20100193110A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Joseph Allen Eckstein Method for High-Speed Continuous Application of a Strip Material to a Substrate Along an Application Path on the Substrate
US20100193138A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Joseph Allen Eckstein System for High-Speed Continuous Application of a Strip Material to a Moving Sheet-Like Substrate Material at Laterally Shifting Locations
WO2010088022A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 The Procter & Gamble Company Strip guide for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material at laterally shifting locations
US20100193139A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Joseph Allen Eckstein Strip Guide for High-Speed Continuous Application of a Strip Material to a Moving Sheet-Like Substrate Material at Laterally Shifting Locations
US20100193135A1 (en) * 2009-01-30 2010-08-05 Joseph Allen Eckstein System and Method for High-Speed Continuous Application of a Strip Material to a Moving Sheet-Like Substrate Material at Laterally Shifting Locations
CN102300527A (en) * 2009-01-30 2011-12-28 宝洁公司 Strip guide member on the sheet-like base material for high speed and continuously moving the strip material is applied to the displaced position in the transverse direction
US8171972B2 (en) 2009-01-30 2012-05-08 The Procter & Gamble Company Strip guide for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material at laterally shifting locations
US8182627B2 (en) 2009-01-30 2012-05-22 The Procter & Gamble Company Method for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a substrate along an application path on the substrate
CN102300527B (en) 2009-01-30 2014-05-28 宝洁公司 Strip guide for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material at laterally shifting locations
US10059553B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2018-08-28 The Procter & Gamble Company System and method for high-speed continuous application of a strip material to a moving sheet-like substrate material

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