US2684171A - Tank insulation - Google Patents

Tank insulation Download PDF

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Publication number
US2684171A
US2684171A US68709A US6870948A US2684171A US 2684171 A US2684171 A US 2684171A US 68709 A US68709 A US 68709A US 6870948 A US6870948 A US 6870948A US 2684171 A US2684171 A US 2684171A
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United States
Prior art keywords
sheets
tank
stud
sheathing
blocks
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Expired - Lifetime
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US68709A
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Charles E Ernst
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Johns Manville Corp
Johns Manville
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Johns Manville
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D90/00Component parts, details or accessories for large containers
    • B65D90/02Wall construction
    • B65D90/06Coverings, e.g. for insulating purposes

Description

July 20, 1954 c. E. ERNST 2,684,171

TANK INSULATION Filed Dec. 51. 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet l xNvENToR 45 (2M/@fs T Een/.rz

www @ma ATTORNEY July 20, 1954 Filed Dec. 31, 1948 TLCIIZ 5? Sii@ C. E. ERNST TANK INSULATION 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR f @im ATTORN EY atented July 20, 1954 air TATEES (Cl. :E20- 115) 1 Clair.-

vThe present invention relates to insulated structures and more particularly to improved insulating constructions for the side walls of tanks andthe like.

yHeretofore it has beenproposed to insulate the walls of tanks used in the refining and storage of petroleum products and for other purposes, the prior installations comprising insulating blankets or slabs applied to the tank Walls, and in some instances, covered by a weatherresistant sheathing supported from the tank wall by metal framing members. The principal object of the instant invention is the provision of an improved construction of this general type which will be free of any metallic, heat-conducting paths through the insulation and, at the same time, provide for the support of an outer sheathing while permitting the sheathing and tank to relatively contract and expand under varying temperature conditions.

Another object of the invention is the pro-` vision of an insulated construction including an insulating layer and an outer, weather-resistant sheathing, the latter being supported from the `tank wall by structural members including thermal insulating blocks interposed between the sheathing and the tank wall, the supporting means being of a character to permit the tank "and sheathing to relatively contract and expand without disruption of the weatherproong characteristics of the sheathing.

Another object of the invention is the pro* 'vision of a construction in which the sheathing is laid in horizontal courses with the courses in overlappingor shingled relationship. The lower edges of 'the overlapping sheets are supported from the edges of the overlapped sheet, the supporting means allowing limited, relative shifting `of the sheets.

'My invention will be` more fully understood land further objects and advantages thereof will "become apparent when reference is made' to the more detailed description of a preferred emrbodiment of the invention which is to follow and Fig. 3 is a sectional view on an enlarged scale,

taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a sectional View on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 4--4 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 but showing a horizontal joint in the process of assembly;

Fig. \6 is a perspective view of a clip element employed in the formation of the horizontal joint;

Figfl is a sectionalview on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 'l-Tof Fig. 1;

Fig.v S is a sectional View on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 8 8 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is a sectional view on'an enlarged scale, taken on the line 9-9 of Fig. l;

.FiglO is a perspective view of a stud splicing strip; and,

Fig. l1 is an exploded view of a stud and supporting elements.

Y Referring now tothe drawings and rst to Fig. l, there is shown a tank Iii of the type conventionally. employed for the storage of petroleum products and the like, and suitably composed of steel sheets riveted or otherwise secured together in any conventional manner.

ln accordance with the instant inventiommembers le (see particularly Figs. l, 2, 3 and 11)are .secured to the tank wall in alignment to form vertieal'rows at intervals circumferentiallyV of the tank, the spacing of the rows being determinedv by' the number of'stud members, later to be described, required to support the insulating cover. Members lli may be either welded to the tank or, where this is not advisable, they may be secured by bands or cables extending circumferential'ly around the tank. The particular shapeof the members may be varied but preferably is substantially that shown in Fig. ll where 'a member lll includes a forwardly projecting central section I6 having perforations I3 to receive fasteningelements, the section it being integrally connected tolateral nanges 20 by sidewalls 22.

'Flanges 2i! are adapted to rest against the tank walland to be secured thereto by welding where such operation is permissible. To readily adapt the member to securement by banding where welding is not advisable, the flanges are extended beyond the central section to underlie the band, illustrated in dotted lines at 24. Members It support blocks 2t 'which are secured thereto by "screws 23'passin'g through perforations H3 and with their heads received within the recess behind the central section le. Blocks 2t are made of a strong, thermal insulating, board-like material. suitably for this purpose an insulating material comprising highly compressed, densined, asbestos andcbinder `compound is used. However, other known materials having "relatively high strength and screw holding ability may be employed as desired.

Secured to the outer faces of the vertically aligned blocks 26 are stud sections 30, each consisting of a channel member having rearwardly directed flanges 32, and a central recessed section 36. The stud sections are of a length for easy handling and suitably a number of them may be required to extend the height of the tank wall. The connection of the required number of sections for a full length stud is made by links 36 (see Figs. 7 and 10). Central recessed section 3c is provided with perforations 40 at locations opposite blocks 25 for the reception of screws 38, whereby the stud sections are supported from the blocks. The central recess 34 also serves as a drainage channel for any moisture which may penetrate between the sheathing joints. It will be appreciated that the block will be located at the juncture of stud sections (see Fig. 7). Also, blocks are placed adjacent the top and bottom of the tank to support the ends of the studs (see Figs. 9 and 8, respectively). The block at the bottom rests on an angle or the like 39. Suitably the sheathing extends somewhat below the block as shown in Fig. 8. The periorations i5 are of elongated shape to permit the stud sections to move vertically to a limited extent on screws 39 to allow for expansion and contraction of the stud section and/or the tank wall. Connecting member 35, previously referred to, is placed behind the adjacent ends of the stud sections and secured to one by the screws 38 which enter the block and to the other by bolts 52.

The entire area of the tank wall, except where interrupted by blocks 29, is covered by suitable insulating material lili. For this purpose blocks of magnesia insulation of a thickness to t between the tank wall and the inner ends of flanges 32 may be secured in any suitable or conventional manner, such as by banding. Other blanket or panel type insulations of known types are also suitable.

The insulating layer is protected against the weather by an outer sheathing l0 consisting of a plurality of courses of sheets 48 laid in horizontal, overlapping or shingled arrangement (see Figs. 1, 4, and 7) The sheets may be of any suitable, weather-resistant, moisture-proof, permanent material, a hardened, compressed, asbestos-cement composition being preferred as it has been found to be ideally suitable for this purpose. The sheets are arranged to have their vertical joints overlie studs 30 (see Fig. 3) and are secured thereto by means now to be described. It will be appreciated that ordinarily the sheets will span more than one stud space, as illustrated in Fig. 1, so that the joints will normally be only on alternate studs. Overlying the edges of the sheets at the joints are vertically extending battens 50, suitably composed of a hardened, compressed, asbestos-cement material of the same type as that of which the sheets are made. The battens are in sections of lengths approximately corresponding to that of the vertical dimension of the sheets and their ends are overlapped as illustrated. Sheets 48 are spaced apart at the joints, as shown in Fig. 3 to allow for expansion and contraction and are held against the studs by the batten strips. The latter are secured to the studs by suitable fastening devices, such as sheet metal screws 52, which project between the edges of the sheets and into the recessed central section of the stud.

The horizontal edges of the sheets are secured by clips 54 (see particularly Figs. 4 and 5) the clips being placed at suitable intervals. Clips 51% are of L-shape and include a leg 56 and flange 59, the latter being of a width slightly greater than the thickness of the material oi the sheets. The clip is perforated at 60 to receive a fastener such as a sheet metal screw 62. In assembling the sheets of each course, the clip 54 is placed in position, as illustrated in Fig. 5, with screw 62- driven far enough into the perforation 69 to just hold the clip in position. The overlapping sheet is then slid downwardly on the overlapped sheet until screw `62 contacts the upper edge of the overlapped sheet. Screw 62 is then tightened to firmly bind the sheets together under the spring tension of the clip.

The construction described above provides complete insulation of the tank wall while fully protecting the insulation from the weather. The special features of the construction which permit relative movement of the tank and the sheathing insure that different rates of contraction and expansion of the tank or of the elements of the insulating cover will not cause buckling or loss of weather-tightness of the sheathing. Also, there are no through metal paths for heatconduction through the insulation.

Having thus described my invention in rather full detail, it will be understood that these details need not be strictly adhered to but that various changes and modifications may suggest themselves to one skilled in the art, all falling within the scope of the invention as defined by the subjoined claim.

What I claim is:

In an insulated structure for a tank wall, an elongated stud section extending vertically of the wall, supporting members secured to the tank wall, insulating blocks between the ineinbers and stud section adjacent the ends of the latter, fastening means extending through said members into said blocks, elongated openings in the stud section opposite the blocks receiving fasteners extending through the stud section and into the blocks, weather-resistant sheets with their horizontal edges in overlapping relationship, horizontally adjacent sheets forming joints on said stud section, means securing said sheets to said stud section while allowing horizontal movement therebetween, and means securing the overlapping edges of the sheets to allow vertical movement thereof.

References Cited in the ille of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,614,411 Thomson Jan. 1l, 1927 1,940,277 Streasau Dec. 1 9, 1933 2,050,503 Ray Aug. 11, 1936 2,117,397 Bonsall May 17, 1938 2,206,680 Sitton July 2, 1940 2,256,375 Bonsall Sept. 16, 1941 2,256,961 Pearson et al Sept. 23, 1941 2,268,517 Small Dec. 30, 1941 2,273,485 George Feb. 17, 1942 2,293,744 Miles et al. Aug. 25, 1942 2,295,103 Friedly Sept. 8, 1942

US68709A 1948-12-31 1948-12-31 Tank insulation Expired - Lifetime US2684171A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2928565A (en) * 1955-09-06 1960-03-15 Thorpe Insulation Company Insulated structure
US2959318A (en) * 1958-07-01 1960-11-08 North Thames Gas Board Containers for liquefied gases
US3104025A (en) * 1961-01-06 1963-09-17 Conch Int Methane Ltd Insulated storage tank
US3270908A (en) * 1959-10-16 1966-09-06 Maxime A Faget Space capsule
US3339778A (en) * 1963-04-24 1967-09-05 Chantiers De La Seine Maritime Insulated tank for liquids at low temperatures
US3370392A (en) * 1965-05-11 1968-02-27 Mersey Insulation Company Ltd Mounting of linings for thermal insulation
US3378162A (en) * 1965-10-01 1968-04-16 B & B Engineering Company Inc Insulated tanks
US3485409A (en) * 1966-09-01 1969-12-23 Linde Ag Tankship container for liquefied gas
US3486284A (en) * 1964-03-27 1969-12-30 Hans Steinberger Cold storage plant
US3670917A (en) * 1970-11-04 1972-06-20 Hitachi Shipbuilding Eng Co Storage tanks for ultra low temperature liquids
US4223496A (en) * 1977-04-21 1980-09-23 Siempelkamp Giesserei Gmbh & Co. Kg High pressure, high-temperature vessel, especially for nuclear reactors
US4480419A (en) * 1982-06-25 1984-11-06 Crites Robert C Method for attaching furring adjacent to columns

Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1614411A (en) * 1923-11-13 1927-01-11 Thomson Edward Allan Heat-insulation lining for cold-storage chambers
US1940277A (en) * 1930-08-18 1933-12-19 Smith Corp A O Pressure vessel
US2050503A (en) * 1934-07-20 1936-08-11 White Castle System Of Eating Sectional wall panel
US2117397A (en) * 1937-06-12 1938-05-17 Standard Railway Equipment Mfg Insulated car wall
US2206680A (en) * 1938-01-28 1940-07-02 Elbert R Sitton Heat insulation curtain
US2256375A (en) * 1938-07-09 1941-09-16 Standard Railway Equipment Mfg Insulated car wall
US2256961A (en) * 1940-01-24 1941-09-23 Ernest W Pearson Refrigerator car insulation and method of applying it
US2268517A (en) * 1939-04-28 1941-12-30 Standard Railway Equipment Mfg Insulated wall construction
US2273485A (en) * 1939-05-19 1942-02-17 Jerome R George Wall construction
US2293744A (en) * 1941-03-17 1942-08-25 Johns Manville Wall construction and method and means for making the same
US2295103A (en) * 1940-07-17 1942-09-08 Johns Manville Insulated structure

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1614411A (en) * 1923-11-13 1927-01-11 Thomson Edward Allan Heat-insulation lining for cold-storage chambers
US1940277A (en) * 1930-08-18 1933-12-19 Smith Corp A O Pressure vessel
US2050503A (en) * 1934-07-20 1936-08-11 White Castle System Of Eating Sectional wall panel
US2117397A (en) * 1937-06-12 1938-05-17 Standard Railway Equipment Mfg Insulated car wall
US2206680A (en) * 1938-01-28 1940-07-02 Elbert R Sitton Heat insulation curtain
US2256375A (en) * 1938-07-09 1941-09-16 Standard Railway Equipment Mfg Insulated car wall
US2268517A (en) * 1939-04-28 1941-12-30 Standard Railway Equipment Mfg Insulated wall construction
US2273485A (en) * 1939-05-19 1942-02-17 Jerome R George Wall construction
US2256961A (en) * 1940-01-24 1941-09-23 Ernest W Pearson Refrigerator car insulation and method of applying it
US2295103A (en) * 1940-07-17 1942-09-08 Johns Manville Insulated structure
US2293744A (en) * 1941-03-17 1942-08-25 Johns Manville Wall construction and method and means for making the same

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2928565A (en) * 1955-09-06 1960-03-15 Thorpe Insulation Company Insulated structure
US2959318A (en) * 1958-07-01 1960-11-08 North Thames Gas Board Containers for liquefied gases
US3270908A (en) * 1959-10-16 1966-09-06 Maxime A Faget Space capsule
US3104025A (en) * 1961-01-06 1963-09-17 Conch Int Methane Ltd Insulated storage tank
US3339778A (en) * 1963-04-24 1967-09-05 Chantiers De La Seine Maritime Insulated tank for liquids at low temperatures
US3486284A (en) * 1964-03-27 1969-12-30 Hans Steinberger Cold storage plant
US3370392A (en) * 1965-05-11 1968-02-27 Mersey Insulation Company Ltd Mounting of linings for thermal insulation
US3378162A (en) * 1965-10-01 1968-04-16 B & B Engineering Company Inc Insulated tanks
US3485409A (en) * 1966-09-01 1969-12-23 Linde Ag Tankship container for liquefied gas
US3670917A (en) * 1970-11-04 1972-06-20 Hitachi Shipbuilding Eng Co Storage tanks for ultra low temperature liquids
US4223496A (en) * 1977-04-21 1980-09-23 Siempelkamp Giesserei Gmbh & Co. Kg High pressure, high-temperature vessel, especially for nuclear reactors
US4480419A (en) * 1982-06-25 1984-11-06 Crites Robert C Method for attaching furring adjacent to columns

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