US2677531A - Built-up, plate type heat exchanger having spiral flow - Google Patents

Built-up, plate type heat exchanger having spiral flow Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2677531A
US2677531A US17774450A US2677531A US 2677531 A US2677531 A US 2677531A US 17774450 A US17774450 A US 17774450A US 2677531 A US2677531 A US 2677531A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
plate
heat
transfer
figure
spiral
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Sr Alvin Hock
Leva Max
Original Assignee
Hock Sr
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F28HEAT EXCHANGE IN GENERAL
    • F28FDETAILS OF HEAT-EXCHANGE AND HEAT-TRANSFER APPARATUS, OF GENERAL APPLICATION
    • F28F3/00Plate-like or laminated elements; Assemblies of plate-like or laminated elements
    • F28F3/08Elements constructed for building-up into stacks, e.g. capable of being taken apart for cleaning
    • F28F3/083Elements constructed for building-up into stacks, e.g. capable of being taken apart for cleaning capable of being taken apart
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S165/00Heat exchange
    • Y10S165/355Heat exchange having separate flow passage for two distinct fluids
    • Y10S165/356Plural plates forming a stack providing flow passages therein
    • Y10S165/361Circular flow passages between plates

Description

May 4 A. HOCK, SR., ET AL BUILT-UP, PLATE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER HAVING SPIRAL FLOW 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 4, 1950 y N e fiMwL @CQ m ML Bnventors. '4 AWN l 0CM5f.

" Max LEn A,

Gttornegs.

y 4, 4 A. HOCK, sR., ET AL BUILT-UP, PLATE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER HAVING SPIRAL FLOW 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 4, 1950 Zia, X

mm 3 4 r 5 X a J 1% w W a a a B diw aeew (IttornegS.

M y 1954 A. HOCK, SR, ET AL 2,677,531

BUILT-UP, PLATE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER HAVING SPIRAL FLOW Filed Aug. 4, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 May 4, 1954 A, HOCK, SR, ET L 2,677,531

BUILT-UP, PLATE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER HAVING SPIRAL FLOW Filed Aug. 4, 1950 a Q 2 M 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 attornegs.

ZSnnemors.

y 4, 1954 A. HOCK, SR, ET AL BUILT-UP, PLATE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER HAVING SPIRAL FLOW 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Aug. 4, 1950 ukes.

NW Mm Zhmentors. r41-V/N Hocx, .53, M41 LEI/4,

dams/did (Ittornegs.

Patented May 4, 1954 UNITED OFFIQTE BUILT-UP, PLATE TYPE HEAT EXCHANGER HAVENG SPIRAL FLOW' Alvin Hock, Sin, Hamilton, Ohio, and Max Leva, Pittsburgh, Pa; said Love. assignor to said Hock, Sr.

8 Claims. l

Our invention relates to improvements in builtup, plate type heat exchangers.

A principal object or" our invention is to pro vide a heat exchanger particularly adapted for the heating or cooling of one liguid by another which is extremely efficient in operation.

Another object of our invention is to provide a built-up, plate type heat exchanger which can be quickly and easily taken apart and assernbled as desired.

A further object of our invention is to provide a heat exchanger which can be cleaned with a minimum amount of effort and a minimum loss of time.

Still another object of our invention is to to provide a heat exchanger made up of a plurality of heat exchange plates and spacer plates separated by gaskets arranged in novel manner and carried by certain of the plates.

An important object of our invention is to provide a path or" flow for each or the liquids passed through the heat exchanger that insures a maximum amount of heat transfer.

A further object of our invention is to provide a heat transfer plate which, when positioned between two flat plates, forms two paths of flow, each path forming a spiral, one on either side or said heat transfer plate.

Another object oi our invention is to provide a spiral channel having a particular configuration when viewed in cross section arranged so as to provide maximum heat transfer, minimum back pressure and a path of fiow unobstructed by air bubbles and the like.

ether objects and advantages of our :1ven tion wii become apparent to those skilled i: the art during the course of the following description and from reference to the accompanying drawings in which like numerals are employed to designate like parts throughout the same and in which:

Figure 1 is sioe elevation of one form of our invention wherein a plurality of plates are arranged in two sections and employed with change-over located between the sections,

Figure 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2 of Figure 3.,

Figure 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1,

Figure 4 is an exploded view of a plurality of plates diagrammatically disclosing the flow of the liquids through the heat exchan er,

Figure 5 is an enlarged front elevation of a heat transfer plate employed with our heat exchanger,

Figure 6 is a sectional view taken on the line fi-6 of Figure 5,

Figure 7 is an enlarged sectional View taken on the line Z -T of Figure 5,

Figure 8 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 88 of Figure 5,

Figure 9 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line 99 of Figure 5,

Figure :10 is an enlarged front elevation of a spacer plate employed in our heat exchanger,

Figure 11 is a sectional view taken on the line |l--li of Figure 10,

Figure 12 is an enlarged sectional view taken the line i2l2 of Figure 10,

Figure 13 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line l3|3 of Figure 10,

Figure 14 is an enlarged sectional view taken on the line I i-l4 of Figure 10,

Figure 15 is a section taken through one of the gaskets employed in our heat exchanger,

Figure 16 is a section taken through a heat exchanger built according to our invention, the section being taken on a line corresponding to the line lfi-i'5 shown in Figure 5,

Figure 17 is a side elevation of a heat exchanger built according to our invention and made up of only one section rather than the two shown in Figure 1,

Figure 18 is a sectional view taken on the line i8-lfi of Figure 1'7,

Figure 19 is an exploded view of a plurality of the plates forming our heat exchanger and diagrammatically disclosing the paths of flow of the various liquids through the heat exchanger,

Figure 20 diagrammatically discloses the how channel relationship of the fiuid from which the heat is being taken to the fluid which is absorbing the heat,

Figure 21 is a view similar to that of Figure 20 but showing a reversed position of the fluids, and

Figure 22 is a view similar to that of Figure 20 but showing a reversed shape of the flow channel.

General arrangement and princ ple of operation The type of heat exchanger to which our invention relates is that wherein a heat transfer plate having troughs formed therein is maintained between a pair of fiat plates, there being a plurality of heat transfer plates arranged in this manner. These plates are formed with ports and provided with gaskets and the troughs of the heat transfer plate arranged in a spiral, so that a liquid from which it is desired to remove heat may travel through the spiral trough located on one side of the heat transfer plate and so that a fluid which is to take up the heat from the first fluid may travel in the spiral trou located on the other side of the transfer plate and in the opposite direction. To this end one of the fluids enters the spiral trough at the center of the heat transfer plate and makes its way to the perimeter of said plate while simultaneously with this the other fluid enters the spiral trough on the opposite side of the plate and at the perimeter thereof, this fluid then flowing in a spiral to near the center of the transfer plate. It is to be understood that the heat exchanger as a whole comprises a stack of plates arranged in this manner and that the fluid which is introduced near the perimeter of the heat transfer plates passes through the various spiral troughs substantially simultaneously and that the fluid which is introduced near the center of the heat transfer plates passes through its spiral troughs substantially simultaneously. That is to say, the

passage of the liquids is not serpentine or tortuous in the sense of passing from one spiral plate and then into the next, rather, equal portions of one type of fluid flow in the same direction in the spiral passageways provided on one side of the heat transfer plates, each portion traveling through its respective spiral substantially simultaneously with each of the other portions, and equal portions of the other type of fluid flow in the passageways located on the other side of the heat transfer plates, and in the opposite direction to the flow of the first portions, each of these last portions also flowing through its respective spiral substantially simultaneously with the other of said portions.

In a heat exchanger of this type the amount of heat taken from one fluid and absorbed by the other is determined, aside from special features of construction that will be explained later, by the length of the spiral passageways. In any one section, that is, in any one group of plates arranged as generally described above, the number of heat transfer plates determines only the quantity of fluid that can be handled in a given time; the actual lowering or raising of the temperature of the fluid being treated is, assuming other factors to be constant, determined by the length of the spiral. If it is not feasible to construct a spiral of sufflcient length to effect the temperature change desired, the liquid can be passed through one stack of plates in the manner described and then collected and passed through a second stack of plates, this having the effect of lengthening the spiral path of travel. An arrangement of this type is shown in Figure 1.

In Figure l we have shown a heat exchanger which comprises the legs 30 and SI, the lateral frame members 32 (only one of which is shown) upon which the various plates are hung, and two groups or sections of plates, one generally indicated at 33 and the other at 34. These sections are separated by change-over means generally indicated at 35. The heat exchanger includes a pair of end members 36 and 37. Also, in connection with the end member 31 we have provided screw-down mechanism comprising the spider 38, bolts 39, springs 4e, screw 4| and crank 42. This screw-down mechanism is of conventional design and so arranged that the stacks. of plates comprising the sections 33 and 34 can be forced together with any desired amount of pressure. The

springs 45 add resiliency necessary to accommodate expansion and contraction of the plates caused by the temperature of the various fluids flowing therethrough.

Although the heat exchanger developed by us is particularly adapted and suited for use in breweries wherein it is desired to cool the wort by cold water, it is to be understood that we do not intend to be limited by the specific fluids used although we shall hereinafter refer to the liquids as wort and water for the sake of convenience and clear description. Thus the heat exchanger of Figures 1, 2 and 3 is shown provided with a conduit 43 for the entrance of wort, a conduit 44 for the exit of water, an exit conduit 45 for wort and an entrance conduit 46 for Water. The conduits 43 and 44 lead into the member 35; the conduits 45 and 46 lead into the member 31. Each of the plate sections 33 and 34 comprises a plurality of heat transfer plates 47 alternately arranged with a plurality of spacer plates 48 (see Figure 4). The end spacer plates may comprise the inner faces 35a and 31a of the end members 36 and 3?.

As is best seen in Figures 5 and 6, and as will be described in greater detail shortly, each of the heat transfer plates 41 comprises a metal plate into which there has been pressed or otherwise formed a spiral passageway on one side of the plate and a corresponding spiral passageway on the other side thereof. Each of the spacer plates 48, as is best seen in Figures 10 and 11 and as will be described in greater detail shortly, comprises a metal plate which is substantially flat. When a plate 48 is pressed against a plate 41, a spiral trough is formed in such manner that liquid flowing between the plates must flow through the spiral trough.

The general principle of operation of a heat exchanger of this type is diagrammatically illustrated in Figure 4. In this figure the water is depicted as flowing on the backside of the heat transfer plates 4'! and, therefore, the arrows indicating its path of travel on the plates are shown in broken lines. The wort is here shown as traveling on the front sides of the heat transfer plates 41 and therefore the arrows depicting such travel are shown in full lines on these plates. Each of the plates 41 and 48 (with the xception of the end plates) is formed with four ports, one each at the upper right and left hand portions of the plate as viewedin Figure 4 and a pair located substantially centrally of the plate. These ports are indicated at 49, 50, 5! and 52. Some of these ports are diagrammatically shown as having portions broken away as at 49a, 50a, 5m and 52a. Wherever a port is shown as so broken, it means that the fluid flowing through that port is also free to flow on that side of the plate on which the break in the port is indicated.

A portion of a quantity of water that enters the heat exchanger through the conduit 46 flows through the port 49 and into the spiral passage located on the backside of the first plate 41 (viewed in Figure 4 from right to left) as is indicated by the break 49a shown on the front side of the spacer plate 48. Some of the Water introduced into the exchanger through the conduit 46, however, passes on through the ports 49 to the second heat transfer plate 4"! where, as indicated by the break 49a on the port 49 shown on the back end plate 36a, this water also travels in a spiral trough on the backside of this second heat transfer plate 41. Because the water will be introduced intothe conduit 45 in great quantity, the water flowing in the spiral trough on the first plate 47 and that flowing in the spiral trough on the backside of the second plate 41 will be traveling through their respective channels subma num stantially simultaneouslywith one another. After the water flows through the spiral channels in the manner described it comes to the port 52 located near the perimeter of each plate. This water then flows out of the heat exchanger through the conduit 34. Since the ports '52 located on the front side of the heat transfer plates are not broken, the water cannot pass into channels located on the front sides of the heat transfer plates and therefore it will discharge through the conduit 44 as just explained.

A quantity of hot wort is introduced into the heat exchanger through the conduit 43. A portionof this wort will, as indicated by the break 51a in the port 51 of each of the heattransfer plates 41, enter the spiral channel located on the front side of one of the heat transfer plates 4''! and simultaneously therewith another portion of the wort will enter in the. channel located on the front side of another of these plates 41'. When the wort has passed through its: respective channels it is discharged from the exchanger by means of the ports 55 which communicate with theexit conduit 45. As indicated by the full line ports shown on the spacer plate 48. and back; end

plate 35a the wort cannot getinto theispiral channel located on the backside of the heat transfer plates 47.

From the foregoing description it should be clear that the general principle of operation of our heat exchanger involves conducting a quantity of hot wort through a spiral channel located one one side of a heat transfer plate, the spiral commencing near the perimeter of the plate and ending near the center thereof, and: at the same time passing a quantity of cold water into a spiral passage located on the other side of said heat transfer plate, the latter spiral passage beginning near the center of the plate and ending near its perimeter. This arrangement isrepeated for a plurality of plates, the various heat transfer plates being separated by spacer plates which serve to close the front side of the channels and insure that the liquids follow the spiral paths rather than flow over the edges separating one convolution from another.

In Figure 16 we have shown a section taken. through a unit generally corresponding to that shown in Figure 1. This unit comprises a first section 33 of plates 41 and 48 alternately arranged and maintained between a portion 35a of the change-over means 35 and the face 35a of the end member 35. Also included is a second section 34 comprising a plurality of plates 4] and 43 alternately arranged and maintained between v the portion 35b of the change-over means 35 and and the face 330: of the end member 31. It will be understood that the members 35 and 31 are clamped together by the screw down mechanism shown in Figure l or by other suitable arrange ments such as, for example, a hydraulic system conventional in arts of this general class.

The various plates are provided with gaskets which serve to insure the proper flow of the wort and water. Hot Wort which is introduced through the conduit 43 will be directed on the upper side of each of the heat transfer plates 41 (upper side as viewed in Figure 16) and will make its way to the center of the heate'xchanger via the spiral troughs formed by the heat transfer plate ll as closed by the spacer plate d8. In Figure 16 the relative position of the Wort is indicated by solid arrows, that of the Water by broken arrows. The wort which travels the plurality of spiral paths substantially simultaneexits via the conduit 45.

ously to the port .near the center of' the exchanger then -passesthrough the opening 35b into the change-over box 35. This change-over box 35 comprises a portion 35a having a central rib 53 and a portion 351) with a similar rib 54. Gaskets 55 and 55- serve to maintain the portions 35a and 35b in liquid tight relation to one another.

The batch of. wort which is passed through the opening; 350 into the change-over means 35 is then directed through the passage 35d which leadsinto the second section 34. This wort again travels through spiral paths on the upper side of the heat transfer plates to a location near the :centerof the heat exchanger from which it then In this manner hot beer introduced at 43 is subjected to a first cooling action and then, by means of the second section- 34, is subjected to a further cooling after which it is discharged from the heat exchanger at 45.

The cold water or cooling medium used is introduced at '45. This cold fluid then passes through the spiral troughs located on the underside of each of the heat transfer plates 41 to the outer edges of the plates from which location it is then directed into the change-over means 35 via the passage 51. This fluid then passes-through the opening 58 and again takes aspire-lcourse on the underside of the plates 41 from nearthe center of the exchanger to the outer edges thereof. This fluid then exits thoughthe conduit M. It should be noted that bythis arrangement we have insured that the coldest. water is in heat exchange relation with the coolest wort and that the warmest water is inv heat exchange relation with the hottest wort. Bythis provision we insure that the heat always passes from-the wort to the Water and not from the water to the wort at any stage. Thus the hottest. wort which is introduced at 43 is in its first stage (section 33) somewhat cooled by the water which was introduced at 58. This water, while somewhat warm from its passage through the section 34, .is still much cooler than the hot wort and it therefore serves to further cool the wort. The somewhat cool Wort from section 33 then passes into section 34 via the passageway 3501. This somewhat cool wort contacts the very cold water introduced at and again the result is that the wort is further cooled while the water becomes somewhat warmer.

The heat transfer plate The heat transfer plate 4'! utilized in our heat exchanger is shown in detail in Figures 5 through 9-. As shown in Figure 5 the plate 47 is of a shape which nicely lends itself to the provision of: a spiral passage and the pair of ports 5| and 52. It should be noted that the particular side of the heat transfer plate shown in Figure 5 is the wort side,. that is, it is the side of the plate on which the fluid from which it is desired to remove heat travels. The corresponding side of :this, plate in Figures 6 through 9 is the upper side as viewed in those figures. As will be pointed out shortly it is extremely important that the fluid from which. it is desired to remove heat passes through the spiral troughs located on the upper side of the heat transfer plate ll and not onithe'l'ower side thereof.

The-spiraltroughs on the plate 41 may be described .as follows. A pair of oppositely disposed spiral grooves 58 and 60' are pressed or otherwisesuitablyaformed in=the plate 41. Each groove 59 and-6.0 is joined by a wall 61 which, in order to provide a maximum amount of heat transfer surface, is preferably slanted. The grooves just referred to are those which lie immediately adjacent one another. Formation of the grooves 59 and '50 results in a pair of oppositely disposed ridges 62 and 63 as viewed in cross section (see especially Figure 7). The spiral grooves 59 and 60 are arranged in fairly wide convolutions such that the distance from a given convolution of the ridge e: to the next ridge 63, reading from right to left in Figure 7, is substantially greater than the lateral distance between said given convolution of the ridge '52 and the next ridge 63, reading from left to right in this figure. The grooves 59 and 60 reading from right to left, are joined by a portion 5 which, while slanted, is, again to insure greater heat transfer surface, staggered as at Ma. Thus the spiral trough on the upper side of the heat transfer plate 4! is defined by the pair of ridges 62 which are joined by the staggered slanted portion 84 and one of the slanted portions 66. The trough on the lower side of the plate ll! which corresponds to the spiral trough just described is defined by the ridges which are joined by the same slanted staggered portions 64 one of the other slanted portions iii.

In brief then, the heat transfer plate may be described as having a spiral ridge 62 on one side thereof, the plate remaining between convolutions of this ridge constituting the major portion of the bottom of a trough having the ridge for its sides, and as having another spiral ridge 63 located on the other side thereof and slightly offset from the ridge 62. remaining between convolutions of this ridge 63 is the same as that remaining between convolutions of the ridge 02. The trough on this other side of the heat transfer plate thus has the same major bottom portion as that of the -rst trough described but has sides corresponding to the convolutions of the ridge-63. The minor bottom portion of the trough between convolutions of the ridge 62 consists of a slant wall Bl the minor bottom portion of the trough between convolutions of the ridge 63 consists of that slant wall 6! next adjacent the slant wall 6| first considered.

We have mentioned that with a heat transfer plate constructed in the manner just described it is extremely important that the fluid from from which the heat is to be removed flows through the spiral troughs located on the upper side of the plate it, that is, through the trough defined by the convolutions of the ridge 62. That this is true is clearly shown in Figures 20, 21 and 22. In Figure the hot wort is indicated as beginning its travel in the spiral trough located near the perimeter of the plate 4'! and working its way towards the center of the plate. In this connection it should be understood that Figures 20, 21 and 22 show portions of the plate 41 as found on the right side of Figure 16. The water is traveling in the opposite direction on the opposite side of the plate, that is, it is traveling in the trough formed by the convolutions of the spiral ridge 63. For the sake of illustration only we have indicated that the hot wort is cooled as it passes successively from the outermost portions of the trough into the innermost portions. The change in temperature of this wort from convolution to convolution is indicated as 190 F., 170 F., and 150 F. Thesefigures are by way of illustration only. Similarly, the water flowing in the spiral trough defined by The plate 54 convolutions of the ridge 63 is illustrated as becoming warmer as indicated by the figures F., F., and F. It will be observed that a trough defined in cross-section by a pair of convolutions of the ridge E2 varies from a shallow portion at the right side thereof to a deeper portion at the left side, reading in the general direction of flow of the wort from the outside towards the center, or as viewed from right to left in Figure 20. As will now be shown this relationship is also important.

From the temperatures arbitrarily chosen for the purpose of illustration and indicated in the respective troughs shown in Figure 20, it will be observed that the wort in the convolution desi nated F., is being cooled through the heat transfer portions fi l-64a by water which is at 130 F., and, through the portion 6|, by water which is 110 F. If these same figures are used and the same direction of flow used, but the water and wort reversed as to the sides of the plate 41 on which they are located, an entirely different result is obtained. This is shown in Figure 21. In this figure it will be observed that wort at 170 F., is cooled by water at 130 through the heat transfer portion til-454a, and also by water at 150 through the heat transfer portion 61. Thus it will be observed that wherein the wort of Figure 20 is cooled by water 130 and 110, this same wort when located on the opposite side of the plate and cooled by water arranged in the same sequence, is cooled by water at 130 and 150. It is thus obvious that the arrangement of Figure 20 is much more efficient. For this reason it is a distinct feature of our invention that the wort, or the fiuid from which it is desired to remove heat, is located on the particular side of the plate 41 as just described.

In Figure 22 the Wort is shown at the same temperatures and moving in the same temperatures and moving in the same direction and located on the same side of plate 41 as is the case in Figure 20. The water of Figure 22 is also arranged in the same way as that of Figure 20. In Figure 22 there has, however, been one important change. This change has been a reversal of the ridges 62 and 63, that is, whereas in Figure 20 the ridge 62 extends upwardly from the plate 41, in Figure 22 this ridge 62 extends downwardly thereof. This reversal results in the trough located on the upperside of the plate 41 varying, in the direction of flow of the wort from the outside towards the center, from a deep portion to a shallow portion, which is opposite from that arrangement specified in Figure 20. This reversal results in the same inefiicient operation inherent in the arrangement described in connection with Figure 21. Thus the 170 wort is cooled by water at 130 and by water at 150 whereas in Figure 20 the 170 wort was cooled by water at 130 and 110. Figures 21 and 22, of course, illustrate substantially the same point. Whereas in Figure 21 the water and wort are shown as reversed in position from that of Figure 20, in Figure 22 the plate 41 has simply been turned upside down and the water and wort maintained in the general position of Figure 20. In either event, Figures 21 and 22 show that the arrangement of Figure 20 is the most eflicient and it is such arrangement that applicants particularly stress.

. Ln Figures 5 through 9 another feature of our invention is shown. As most clearly shown in Figures 8 and 9 the heat transfer plate 41 is provided with a groove 65 which generally corresponds with the perimeter of the plate 41. In this groove 65 there is firmly secured a gasket 66 of suitable material. This gasket is the only gasket which is fixed to the plate 4]. On the underside of the plate 4? and surrounding the port 5| is a groove '57 adapted to receive a gasket which is secured to the spacer plate 48 as will be described more fully shortly. The purpose of this latter groove and gasket is to insure that water on the underside of plate fill does not enter the port 5! and thus mix with the wort on the upperside of plate 4'5. In this connection it should be remembered that wort is passed through the port 5|.

As shown in Figure 9 the port 52 issurrounded by a groove '63 located on the upperside of plate 41. This groove is designed to receive a gasket which is fixed to a spacer plate 56. The purpose of this groove and gasket is to insure that water, which is passed through the port 52, does not enter onto the upperside of plate 41 and mix with the wort which is there flowing. In addition. to these grooves, the plate 4'! is provided with a small ridge 69 which is located outwardly from the groove 65 and which extends completely around the plate 4?. The purpose of this ridge is to provide an abutment for a gasket located on a spacer plate 48 as will be described shortly.

In similar manner it will be observed, in Figure '7, that the port is provided with a groove '10 located on the underside of plate 41 and adapted to receive a gasket fixed in a spacer plate 48, The port 49 is surrounded by a groove ll located on the upperside of plate 4.1 and this groove is also adapted to receive a gasket located in a spacer plate 48.

Inorder to insure that the wort which is finally discharged from the end of the trough indicated at 12 in Figure 5 contacts the greatest possible surface. of the plate 41, we have provided a baffle 13 between the port 50 and the discharge end 12 of the wort trough, This bafile prevents the wort from immediately passing through the port 50 and thereby leaving the heat exchanger. With the baffle positioned as indicated, it is first necessary that the wort pass around it before it can reach the opening 50. This arrangement insures that the wort will contact a greater surface area about the ports 50 and 49 thereby increasing the efficiency of the heat exchanger.

The spacer plate In Figures 10 through 14 we have shown the spacer plate utilized in our heat exchanger. This spacer plate comprises a flat plate provided with a plurality of ports 49, 50, 5! and 52 which correspond to the ports similarly designated and located in the heat transfer plate 41. The spacer plate this also provided with a number'of grooves in which gaskets are located as shall now be described.

As most clearly seen in Figures 11, 13 and 14, the spacer plate 48 is provided with a groove it which extends completely around the plate and generally corresponds to the perimeter thereof. In this groove 14 there is fixed a suitable gasket 15. This groove and gasket are so designed that when a plurality of the plates ii and 48 are stacked in alternating fashion, the gasket l5 will abut against the underside of the plate 41 and against the ridge 69 provided therein. It should be observed that the'gasket IE-is so located that it will bear against the plate All through a line of contact which is outside of the gasket 66 carried by the plate-41.. The importance of this will be described shortly.

onto the lower surfaces of the plate 41.

As best seen in Figure 12 the port 5c is surrounded by a flange 76 having indentations 11. Corresponding to the flange 36 is a groove 18 in which there is fixed a suitable gasket 19. When placed on top of a heat transfer plate 41 the flange it is adapted to bear against a shoulder 8% provided in the plate 41 about the corresponding port 59. This contact of the flange 16 with the shoulder 80 insures added stability in the heat exchanger. The indentations Tl serve to permit wort located on the upperside of plate 4 to enter theportsfifi and thereby bedischarged from the exchanger (or carried by means of the change-over box 35 to another section of the exchanger). At the same time the gasket 79 is designed to fit within the groove 10 located on the heat transfer plate and in this manner wort which is passed through the ports 56 is prevented from flowing onto the underside of the heat transfer plate 47.

Again referring to Figure 12 it will be observed that the port 49 is provided with a flange Bi which surrounds it on the upperside of the plate 48. This flange 8! is indented as shown at 82. A groove 83 corresponds to the flange 8i and a gasket 3:3 is fixed within this groove. When a heat transfer plate ll is placed on top of the plate 48-.

the flange 81 bears against a corresponding shoulder 85 surrounding the port 49 and located on the transfer plate 41. :At the same time the gasket 8 -5 fits into the groove 1| located on the heat transfer plate immediately below the spacer plate 48. "Water which flows through the ports 49 flows onto the underside of the various heat transfer plates 41 by reason of the indentations 32 providedin the flange 81. The contact between flange 8i and shoulder 85 lends stability to the heat exchanger. The gasket 84 and groove 'lll' prevent any of this water from flowing onto the upperside of the heat transfer plate 41.

The ports El and 52 are arranged in the same manner as the ports 49 and 5.0. Thus in Figure 13 there is shown a flange 86, groove 8?, gasket '88 and indentations 89. The flange 86 bears against a shoulder 90 provided on the plate 41 for its respective port 5|. The gasket 33 is received by the groove 61 provided in a plate 47. Wort which flows through the ports 5| is thus permitted to flow onto the upper surface of the plate i'i but is prevented by the gasket 88 from flowing As shown in Figure 14 the port 52 is provided with a flange 5|, groove '92, gasket 93 and indentations The flange 9i bears against a shoulder 95 provided on the plate 4! for the port 52 and the gasket 93 fits into the groove 88 also provided on the plate 4's. By this arrangement water is permitted to flow from the underside of the 'heat transfer plate 4'! into the ports 5?. from which it is led from the exchanger. This water is,

however, prevented from reaching the uppersides.

of the heat transfer plate t? by reason of the gasket 93 and its position in the groove 68.

In Figure 15 we haveshown a section through a gasket which we employ in connection with the ports provided in the spacer plate 48. By way of example this gasket has been depicted as that used about the port 52. It should be observed that the gasket 93 is provided with cut away portions 93c corresponding to the indentations 94. This gasket is scalloped as indicated at 95 in order to provide a tighter fit in its respective groove 68.

The position of the various gaskets is clearly shown Figure 16. It was earlier emphasized that a particular feature of our invention was the fact that the main gasket carried by the spacer plate 48 was located outside of the main gasket 66 carried by the heat transfer plate 41. To this end the spacer plate 48 is provided with a ridge 9? against which the gasket 66 abuts (see Figures 13 and 16). The purpose of the main gasket '55 is to hold the water within the confines of the heat transfer and spacer plates. The purpose of the main gasket 66 is to maintain the wort within the confines of the heat transfer and spacer plates. The reason for specifically locating the gasket 15 on the outside of the position of gasket 66 is to prevent the wort from accumulating in the dead spaces that develop as indicated at 98 in Figure 16. This particular arrangement of the gasket 66 and 15 not only makes the unit easier to clean in that there is no chance of the wort becoming caught in dead spaces and adhering to the plates therewithin but also it lends greater sanitation to the heat exchanger as a whole. As clearly shown in Figure 16 it is not possible for the wort to become trapped beyond the confines of gasket 66. It should also be noted that all of the port gaskets are fixed to the spacer plate 48 and that the only gasket fixed to the heat transfer plate is the main gasket 6%. This arrangement makes our heat exchanger extremely easy to assemble, disassemble and clean. Such arrangement is a distinct feature of our invention.

One-section heat exchanger In Figures 17, 18 and 19 we have shown a heat exchanger which is generally similar to that shown in Figure l but differs in that we employ only one stack of spacer plates and heat transfer plates rather than the two stacks 33 and 34 used in the embodiment of Figure 1. In the embodiment of Figure 17 we are able to provide a heat exchanger in which all of the inlet and outlet connections are located at one end of the machine. Instead of using two sections to effect the cooling or heating of the liquid as is desired, we employ the one section which in most cases will utilize larger plates in order to provide longer spiral troughs and thus obtain results favorable with those obtained by the exchanger of Figure 1. On the heat transfer plates 41 the flow of the water is indicated in solid lines and the flow of the beer in broken lines. In this connection it should be distinctly understood that the flow of the water, of the wort and the arrangement of the channels correspond to the requirements illustrated in Figures 20 through 22 and fully explained aboveT Thus as the wort moves from the perimeter of the plate 41 in a spiral path ending near the center of this plate, the channel, as viewed in cross section, must be such that the portion near the perimeter is shallower than that near the center of the plate.

Cold water which enters the exchanger through the ports is circulates outwardly into the ports 52 through which it is exited. To accomplish this it will be observed that the last spacer plate or end clamping member 31 will have no ports therethrough. Thus water which is collected in the ports 50 can exit from the exchanger only by coming back out the front end thereof, that is, the same end of the exchanger from which it started. Similarly, wort which is introduced through the ports 5| and spirally circulated to the ports 56 must also be discharged from the machine at the same end thereof. Because the quantity of water introduced into the exchanger :i'i receives equal portions of water which are I started through their respective spiral troughs substantially simultaneously with one another.

This is also true of the wort.

It is to be understood that modifications can be made to our invention within the scope and spirit thereof and although we have shown our invention as embodied in certain structure we do not intend to be limited by such structure except insofar as it is specifically included in the subjoined claims. Having thus described our invention what we claim as new and what we desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. A heat exchanger for transferring heat from one fluid to a second fluid which comprises a pair of spacer plates and a heat transfer plate therebetween, said heat transfer plate having a spiral ridge on each side contacting the respective spacer plates, said ridges being offset on the two sides of said heat transfer plate and the adjacent ridges on opposite sides of said heat transfer plate being connected by a wall of substantial slant extending between said spacer plates so that the convolutions of each ridge constitute on the opposite sides of said heat transfer plate a spiral trough, the successive convolutions of each ridge being separated by said slant wall and a second slant wall of greater length than said first mentioned slant wall, said slant walls constituting the bottom of said spiral troughs, the

r spiral trough between successive convolutions of the ridge on one side of said heat transfer plate extending from a shallow portion adjacent an outer convolution to a deeper portion adjacent the next convolution inwardly of said outer convolution, the spiral trough on the other side of said heat transfer plate having its shallow portion opposite the deep portion of the spiral trough on said one side of said heat transfer plate and having its deep portion opposite the shallow portion of the spiral trough on said one side of said heat transfer plate, means for producing a flow of said one fluid in the spiral trough on said one side of said heat transfer plate and in a direction from the outermost convolution to the innermost convolution, and means for producing a flow of said second fluid in the spiral trough on said other side of said heat transfer plate and in a direction from the innermost convolution to the outermost convolution.

2. The heat exchanger of claim 1 in which said second slant wall is stepped.

3. A spacer plate for use in heat exchangers of the type described, said spacer plate being substantially fiat and having a pair of centrally located openings therein and a pair of openings located near the edge of said plate, a groove on one side of said plate surrounding one opening of said pair of centrally located openings and adapted to have a gasket fixed therein, a groove on said one side of said plate surrounding one opening of said other pair of openings and adapted to have a gasket fixed therein, and raised portions on the other side of said plate substantially opposite each of said grooves, said raised portions having indentations therein.

4. The spacer plate of claim 3 including a groove on said other side of said plate surrounding the other opening of said pair of centrally located openings and adapted to have a gasket fixed therein, a groove on said other side of said answer plate surrounding the other opening of said other pair of openings and adapted to have a gasket fixed therein, and raised portions on said one side of said plate substantially opposite each of said last two mentioned grooves, said raised portions having indentations therein.

5. A heat exchanger for transferring heat from one fluid to another which comprises a plurality of alternateiy heat transfer plates and spacer plates: each of said heat transfer plates having a fluid conducting spiral trough on each side thereof, said spiral troughs being directly opposite one another, a pair of centrally located ports, a pair of ports located adjacent the edge of said heat transfer plate, the spiral trough on one side of said heat transfer plate extending from one of said edge ports to one of said central ports and the spiral trough on the other side of said heat transfer plate extending from the other of said central ports to the other of said edge ports, a. groove on one side of said heat transfer plate, a gasket fixed in said groove, and a ridge on said heat transfer plate outwardly oifset from said groove and located on the other side of said heat transfer plate; each of said spacer plates being substantially flat and having a pair of centrally located openings therein and a pair of openings located near the edge of said spacer plate, a groove on one side of said spacer plate located adjacent the perimeter of said spacer plate and surrounding all of said openings, a gasket fixed in said groove, and a ridge inwardly offset from said groove and located on the other side of said spacer plate; said heat transfer plates and said spacer plates being so arranged that the gasket fixed in a heat transfer plate bears against a said inwardly offset ridge located on a spacer plate, and the gasket fixed in a spacer plate bears against the outwardly offset ridge of a heat transfer plate, whereby when the plates are in stacked relation the gaskets fixed in said spacer plates lie outside of the gaskets fixed in said heat transfer plates.

6. A heat exchanger for transferring heat from one fluid, to another which comprises a plurality of alternately arranged heat transfer plates and spacer plates: each of said heat transfer plates having a spiral trough located on each side thereof, a pair of centrally located ports, a pair of ports located adjacent the edge of said heat transfer plate, the spiral trough on one side of said heat transfer plate extending from one of said edge ports to one of said central ports and. the spiral trough on the other side of said heat transfer plate extending from the other of said central ports to the other of said edge ports, a gasket receiving groove on one side of said heat transfer plate surrounding one port of said pair of centrally located ports, a gasket receiving groove on said one side of said heat transfer plate surrounding one port of the other pair of ports, a gasket receiving groove on the other side of said plate surrounding the other port of said pair of centrally located ports, and a gasket receiving groove on said other side of said heat transfer plate surrounding the other port of said other pair of ports; each of said spacer plates being substantially flat and having a pair of centrally located openings therein and .a pair of openings located near the edge of said spacer plate, a groove on one side of said spacer plate surrounding one opening of said pair of centrally located openings, a gasket fixed in said groove, a groove on said one side of said spacer plate surrounding one opening of the other pair of openings, at

14 gasket fixed in this last mentioned groove, a groove on the other side of said spacer plate surrounding the other opening of said pair of centrally located openings, a gasket fixed in this last mentioned groove, a groove on said other side of said spacer plate surrounding the other opening of said other pair of openings, and a gasket fixed in this last'mentioned groove, each of the grooves in said spacer plate having a raised portion on that side of said spacer plate which is opposite fromthat side in which the respective groove is located, said raised portions having indentations; said heat transfer plates and said spacer plates being so arranged that the gasket fixed in the I groove surrounding one of the centrally located openings willfit into the groove surrounding one of the centrally located ports, and the gasket fixed in the groove surrounding one of the other pairs of openings will fit into the groove surrounding one of the other pair of ports, and the indented raised portion surrounding one of the centrally located openings will bear against a heat transfer plate about one of the centrally located ports on the side of said heat transfer plate opposite that in which the gasket receiving groove for said last mentioned port is formed, and the indented raised portion surrounding one of the other pair of openings will bear against a heat transfer plate about one of the other pair of ports on the side of said heat transfer plate opposite that in which the gasket receiving groove for said last mentioned port is formed.

7 A heat exchanger for transferring heat from one fluid to a second fluid which comprises a pair of spacer plates and a heat transfer plate located therebetween, said heat transfer plate having a spiral trough located on each side thereof, said heat transfer plate having four ports, one pair of said ports communicating with the spiral trough on one side of said heat transfer plate and the other pair of said ports communicating with the spiral trough on the other side of said heat transfer plate, one port of each pair being adjacent the innermost end of the respective spiral trough with which it communicates, and the other port of each pair being adjacent the outermost end of the respective spiral trough with which it communicates, said spacer plate being provided with two pairs of openings, one pair of said openings registering with one of said pairs of ports and the other pair of openings registering with the other of said pairs of ports, and four port gaskets carried by said spacer plate, each gasket surrounding a said opening, one pair of said gaskets being positioned on one side of said spacer plate and the other pair of said gaskets being positioned on the other side of said spacer plate, each of said port gaskets being maintained in a groove surrounding a, said opening, said groove being so formed as to provide a raised portion on the side of said spacer plate opposite that side on which the groove is located, said raised portion having a plurality of indentations, whereby when said spacer plate and said heat transfer plate are maintained together one pair of said gaskets abuts said heat transfer plate about one pair of said ports, and one pair of indented raised portions abuts said heat transfer plate about the other pair of said ports.

8. A heat exchanger for transferring heat from one fluid to another which comprises a pair of spacer plates and a heat transfer plate located therebetween, said heat transfer plate having a spiral trough on each side thereof, means for directing said one fluid into the outer convolu- 15 tions of the spiral trough on one side of said heat transfer plate, means for directing the other fluid into the inner convolutions of the spiral trough on the other side of said heat transfer plate, means for removing said one fluid from between said plates atthe inner end of the spiral trough on said one side of said heat transfer plate, means for removing the other fluid from between said plates at the outer end of the spiral trough located on said other side of said heat transfer plate, a first gasket surrounding the spiral trough in which said one fluid flows, said first asket being located between said heat transfer plate and one of said spacer plates, and a second gasket surrounding the spiral trough in which the other fluid flows, said second gasket being located between said heat transfer plate and the other of said spacer plates, said gaskets being offset from one another so that said second gasket lies bel6 yond said first gasket, said first gasket being fixed in a groove provided in said heat transfer plate, and said second gasket being fixed in a roove provided in a said spacer plate, and said second gasket bearing against a ridge provided on said heat transfer plate.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS \Number Name Date 2,039,216 Feldmeier Apr. 28, 1936 2,217,567 Seligman et a1 Oct. 8, 1940 2,251,066 Persson et a1 July 29, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 396,696 Great Britain July 31, 1933 496,830 Great Britain Dec. 7, 1938

US2677531A 1950-08-04 1950-08-04 Built-up, plate type heat exchanger having spiral flow Expired - Lifetime US2677531A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2677531A US2677531A (en) 1950-08-04 1950-08-04 Built-up, plate type heat exchanger having spiral flow

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2677531A US2677531A (en) 1950-08-04 1950-08-04 Built-up, plate type heat exchanger having spiral flow

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2677531A true US2677531A (en) 1954-05-04

Family

ID=22649823

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2677531A Expired - Lifetime US2677531A (en) 1950-08-04 1950-08-04 Built-up, plate type heat exchanger having spiral flow

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2677531A (en)

Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3098522A (en) * 1959-08-07 1963-07-23 Gen Motors Corp Stacked plate heat exchangers
US3120742A (en) * 1960-10-24 1964-02-11 Denisoff Alexander Constantine Tank cooling system
US3196937A (en) * 1963-09-24 1965-07-27 Rosenblads Patenter Ab Two unit plate heat exchanger with end supports
FR2317616A1 (en) * 1975-07-08 1977-02-04 Air Ind Multiplate heat exchanger with spiral water flow - has spirally wound spacer strips between plates
US4128125A (en) * 1975-08-28 1978-12-05 Alfa-Laval Ab Spiral heat exchanger
US4162703A (en) * 1976-02-12 1979-07-31 Aktiebolaget Atomenergi Plate-type heat exchanger
EP0108377A1 (en) * 1982-11-04 1984-05-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger
WO1986000395A1 (en) * 1982-12-29 1986-01-16 Hightech Heatexchange I Malmö Ab A heat exchanger
EP0208957A1 (en) * 1985-06-25 1987-01-21 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger
EP0273462A2 (en) * 1986-12-31 1988-07-06 Kabushiki Kaisha Tsuchiya Seisakusho Heat exchanger
US5492171A (en) * 1990-12-17 1996-02-20 Alfa Laval Thermal Ab Plate heat exchanger, a method of producing a plate heat exchanger and means for performing the method
WO1998044305A1 (en) * 1997-04-02 1998-10-08 Creare Inc. Radial flow heat exchanger
WO2003093749A1 (en) 2002-05-03 2003-11-13 Dana Canada Corporation Heat exchanger with nested flange-formed passageway
US20040206487A1 (en) * 2001-07-09 2004-10-21 Ralf Blomgren Heat transfer plate, plate pack and plate heat exchanger
US20050082049A1 (en) * 2003-10-21 2005-04-21 Viktor Brost Plate heat exchanger
US7178581B2 (en) 2004-10-19 2007-02-20 Dana Canada Corporation Plate-type heat exchanger
US20100065251A1 (en) * 2006-11-27 2010-03-18 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Clamping device for flow module plates, reactor plates or heat exchanger plates
US8778285B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2014-07-15 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Clamping system
US9046310B2 (en) 2008-09-23 2015-06-02 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Plate heat exchanger
US9073031B2 (en) 2009-04-15 2015-07-07 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Flow module
US20150260461A1 (en) * 2012-11-30 2015-09-17 Sgl Carbon Se Plate heat exchanger having sealed construction
US20150314405A1 (en) * 2014-05-02 2015-11-05 Hyundai Motor Company Apparatus and method for manufacturing heat exchanger for vehicle
US20160245597A1 (en) * 2015-02-23 2016-08-25 Modine Manufacturing Company Heat Exchanger for Cooling a Flow of Compressed Air Using a Liquid Coolant

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB396696A (en) * 1932-01-30 1933-07-31 Reginald Luther Munday Improvements in plate apparatus for exchanging heat between fluids
US2039216A (en) * 1935-08-16 1936-04-28 Cherry Burrell Corp Plate heat exchanger
GB496830A (en) * 1936-09-23 1938-12-07 Bergedorfer Eisenwerk Ag Improvements in plate heat exchangers
US2217567A (en) * 1936-04-22 1940-10-08 Aluminium Plant And Vessel Com Plate-type heat exchanger
US2251066A (en) * 1937-05-22 1941-07-29 Persson Ruben Alef Heat exchange apparatus

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB396696A (en) * 1932-01-30 1933-07-31 Reginald Luther Munday Improvements in plate apparatus for exchanging heat between fluids
US2039216A (en) * 1935-08-16 1936-04-28 Cherry Burrell Corp Plate heat exchanger
US2217567A (en) * 1936-04-22 1940-10-08 Aluminium Plant And Vessel Com Plate-type heat exchanger
GB496830A (en) * 1936-09-23 1938-12-07 Bergedorfer Eisenwerk Ag Improvements in plate heat exchangers
US2251066A (en) * 1937-05-22 1941-07-29 Persson Ruben Alef Heat exchange apparatus

Cited By (33)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3098522A (en) * 1959-08-07 1963-07-23 Gen Motors Corp Stacked plate heat exchangers
US3120742A (en) * 1960-10-24 1964-02-11 Denisoff Alexander Constantine Tank cooling system
US3196937A (en) * 1963-09-24 1965-07-27 Rosenblads Patenter Ab Two unit plate heat exchanger with end supports
FR2317616A1 (en) * 1975-07-08 1977-02-04 Air Ind Multiplate heat exchanger with spiral water flow - has spirally wound spacer strips between plates
US4128125A (en) * 1975-08-28 1978-12-05 Alfa-Laval Ab Spiral heat exchanger
US4162703A (en) * 1976-02-12 1979-07-31 Aktiebolaget Atomenergi Plate-type heat exchanger
EP0108377A1 (en) * 1982-11-04 1984-05-16 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger
WO1986000395A1 (en) * 1982-12-29 1986-01-16 Hightech Heatexchange I Malmö Ab A heat exchanger
US4742866A (en) * 1985-06-25 1988-05-10 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger
EP0208957A1 (en) * 1985-06-25 1987-01-21 Nippondenso Co., Ltd. Heat exchanger
EP0273462A2 (en) * 1986-12-31 1988-07-06 Kabushiki Kaisha Tsuchiya Seisakusho Heat exchanger
EP0273462A3 (en) * 1986-12-31 1988-10-05 Kabushiki Kaisha Tsuchiya Seisakusho Heat exchanger
US4892136A (en) * 1986-12-31 1990-01-09 Kabushiki Kaisha Tsuchiya Seisakusho Heat exchanger
US5492171A (en) * 1990-12-17 1996-02-20 Alfa Laval Thermal Ab Plate heat exchanger, a method of producing a plate heat exchanger and means for performing the method
WO1998044305A1 (en) * 1997-04-02 1998-10-08 Creare Inc. Radial flow heat exchanger
US6170568B1 (en) * 1997-04-02 2001-01-09 Creare Inc. Radial flow heat exchanger
US7677301B2 (en) * 2001-07-09 2010-03-16 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Heat transfer plate, plate pack and plate heat exchanger
US20040206487A1 (en) * 2001-07-09 2004-10-21 Ralf Blomgren Heat transfer plate, plate pack and plate heat exchanger
US20040040697A1 (en) * 2002-05-03 2004-03-04 Pierre Michel St. Heat exchanger with nested flange-formed passageway
US6863122B2 (en) 2002-05-03 2005-03-08 Dana Canada Corporation Heat exchanger with nested flange-formed passageway
WO2003093749A1 (en) 2002-05-03 2003-11-13 Dana Canada Corporation Heat exchanger with nested flange-formed passageway
US20050082049A1 (en) * 2003-10-21 2005-04-21 Viktor Brost Plate heat exchanger
US7178581B2 (en) 2004-10-19 2007-02-20 Dana Canada Corporation Plate-type heat exchanger
US20100065251A1 (en) * 2006-11-27 2010-03-18 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Clamping device for flow module plates, reactor plates or heat exchanger plates
US9528775B2 (en) 2006-11-27 2016-12-27 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Clamping device for flow module plates, reactor plates or heat exchanger plates
US9182180B2 (en) * 2006-11-27 2015-11-10 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Clamping device for flow module plates, reactor plates or heat exchanger plates
US8778285B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2014-07-15 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Clamping system
US9046310B2 (en) 2008-09-23 2015-06-02 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Plate heat exchanger
US9073031B2 (en) 2009-04-15 2015-07-07 Alfa Laval Corporate Ab Flow module
US20150260461A1 (en) * 2012-11-30 2015-09-17 Sgl Carbon Se Plate heat exchanger having sealed construction
US20150314405A1 (en) * 2014-05-02 2015-11-05 Hyundai Motor Company Apparatus and method for manufacturing heat exchanger for vehicle
US20160245597A1 (en) * 2015-02-23 2016-08-25 Modine Manufacturing Company Heat Exchanger for Cooling a Flow of Compressed Air Using a Liquid Coolant
CN105909370A (en) * 2015-02-23 2016-08-31 摩丁制造公司 Heat exchanger for cooling a flow of compressed air using a liquid coolant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3380517A (en) Plate type heat exchangers
US3265126A (en) Heat exchanger
US3460611A (en) Heat exchanger of plate fin modules
US3552488A (en) Plate-fin heat exchanger
US3216495A (en) Stacked plate regenerators
US3147800A (en) Serpentined heat exchanger
US4235281A (en) Condenser/evaporator heat exchange apparatus and method of utilizing the same
US2596642A (en) Heat exchanger
US4683101A (en) Cross flow evaporative coil fluid cooling apparatus and method of cooling
US2991978A (en) Steam heaters
US2655007A (en) Shell freezer and method of freezing liquids
US2812165A (en) Header units for plate type heat exchanger
US4211277A (en) Heat exchanger having internal fittings
US5392849A (en) Layer-built heat exchanger
US3931854A (en) Plate-type heat-exchange apparatus
US3893509A (en) Lap joint tube plate heat exchanger
US4435339A (en) Falling film heat exchanger
US1946234A (en) Heat exchanger
US4139054A (en) Plate-fin heat exchanger
US3862661A (en) Corrugated plate for heat exchanger and heat exchanger with said corrugated plate
US2264820A (en) Combination oil and water cooler
US2039593A (en) Heat transfer coil
US2415154A (en) Outboard engine cooling device
US4621685A (en) Heat exchanger comprising condensed moisture drainage means
US3570593A (en) Heat-exchanger