US2675995A - Well-drilling rig - Google Patents

Well-drilling rig Download PDF

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US2675995A
US2675995A US11630A US1163048A US2675995A US 2675995 A US2675995 A US 2675995A US 11630 A US11630 A US 11630A US 1163048 A US1163048 A US 1163048A US 2675995 A US2675995 A US 2675995A
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shaft
clutch
drum
beams
shafts
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Charles E Geiser
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Charles E Geiser
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B1/00Percussion drilling
    • E21B1/02Surface drives for drop hammers or percussion drilling, e.g. with a cable

Description

April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER WELL DRILLING RIG 9 Sheets- Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 27, 1948 NVENTOR. Charlie EGelser April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 27, 1948 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. Charlie E gels er April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER 2,675,995

WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 2'7, 1948 9 Sheets-Sheet 3 V IN V EN TOR. 9 Charlie E. G'iSer 0 0 8; 0 BY i April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER WELL DRILLING RIG 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Feb. 27, 1948 INVENTOR. Charlie EGeiser a I I! His Qgeni April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER 2,675,995

WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 27, 1948 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 IN VEN TOR. Charlie E Get Se!" 5 agent April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER I 2,675,995 I WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 27, 1948 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR. Charlie 5629136 BY WA zwm April 20, 1954 c. E. GElSER 2,575,995

WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 27,'l948 9 Sheets-Sheet 7 II II I 90 IN V EN TOR.

I Charlie 5 Geiser A Hz g mt April 20, 1954 c. EpGEISER 2,575,995

WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 27, 1948 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 /64 1 /42 a i l INVENTOR.

Charlie E. Gels er W His agent April 20, 1954 c. E. GEISER WELL DRILLING RIG Filed Feb. 27, 1948 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 INVENTOR. Charlie Geiser 5 agent Patented Apr. 20, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WELL-DRILLING RIG Charlie E. Geiser, Artesia, N. Mex. Application February 27, 1948, Serial No. 11,630

8 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in well drilling rigs, particularly of the cable drill type adapted for drilling of oil and gas wells by a spudding operation.

Such prior spudders have been used heretofore, but they have involved complex structures in which the operating mechanisms are not compact, Which has presented difficulties in operation, and also in the transportation of the equipment in moving it from well to well.

An object of this invention is to improve the construction of Well drilling apparatus of the character described, by arranging the assembly into a compact unit that will be eificient for operation and transportation.

A further object of the invention is to improve the manner of controlling and operating the several power driven units of the apparatus, particularly the drums on which the cable is wound, to provide multiple sets of operations thereof, and effective control by clutches and brakes.

These objects may be accomplished by mounting the several cable drums in tandem relation within the frame of the spudder and locating the drive units, including the brake and control units laterally from the frame structure in a compact assembly which will be efficient for operation and may be moved Without difficulty from well to well. The location of the clutch and brake units and the drive for the several cable drums, laterally with respect to the frame that encloses the drum but within the supporting frame, produces a compact machine effect and eliminates complex mechanism that has been required heretofore in such spudders, enabling the device to be manufactured at low cost and to be transported readily from well to well without substantial disassembly.

This embodiment of the invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a side elevational view of the drilling apparatus;

Fig. 2 is an elevational view of the opposite side thereof;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view thereof;

Fig.4 is a horizontal sectional view showing parts of the assembly in plan, taken on the line 4 4 of Fig. '1;

Fig. 5 is a front elevational view of the drilling apparatus;

Fig. 6 is a vertical cross sectional view taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. -7 is a perspective view of .the drilling and reverse clutch, shown removed from the drilling apparatus;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of one of the. cable guide pulley blocks;

thereunder.

. 2 Fig. 9 is a vertical cross section on the line 99 of Fig. l;

Fig. 10,is a fragmentary side elevational view, partly in section of the clutch and brake mechanism for the sand reel;

Fig. 11 is a fragmentary perspective view of the bell crank and shifter mechanism for the sand reel clutch;

Fig. 12 is a cross sectional view taken on the line 12-42 of Fig. l;

Fig. 13 is a cross sectional view taken on the line |3l3 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 14.- is a fragmentary view, partly in section to illustrate the spudder cross header and spudding sheave and shock absorber in locked posi-' tion;

Fig. 15 is a cross sectional view taken on the line I5-l5 of Fig. '14;

Fig. 16 is a view similar to Fig. 14 but with the lock cap removed and with the spring partially compressed to show the shock absorbing action, and;

Fig. 1'7 is a cross sectional view taken on the line I1Il of Fig..l6.

The well drilling apparatus or spudder shown as one embodiment of this invention comprises an open frame construction, including pairs of longitudinal sills I and 2, at each opposite side of the frame extending in vsicle-by-side relation and connected through cross sills 4.

Connected with the sills l and 2, at one end of the frame, is an axle 6, on which wheels'll are mounted for supporting that end portion of the frame during transportation and also during operation, if desired, although it is preferred that the opposite ends of the frame be supported on blocks shown at 10 and I2, during the operation of the rig.

Upstanding from the sills I and 2 and the cross sills 4, at opposite ends of the rig are posts It and 16. Intermediate the opposite ends of the frame are standards is, spaced at intervals both longitudinally and transversely of the frame to sup port thereon girders 20 and 22, arranged in pairs at each opposite side of the frame over the sills I and 2, as shown in Fig. 9. The girders 20 and 22 are connected together at the opposite ends of the frame by cross beams 24. These girders and beams form the supporting frame for the operating parts of the spudder, while the sills and standards described above, form the subframe The parts of these frames are securely fastened together and braced to provide a rigid structure, capable of withstanding the conditions of operation that may be encountered in service.

At one end of the structure is supported a frame 26, upon which a source of power is adapted to be provided, such as an internal combustion engine 28. Any suitable power unit may be used, as desired, but the engine 28 is shown as connected through a belt drive 30 with a jack shaft 32, journaled in bearings 34 on the post 14.

Also supported on the diagonal braces between the standards l4 and I8 and the frame 20-24 is a shaft 36, which shaft is journaled in bearings 3'5. Shafts 38 and 4B are journaled in suitable bearings 39 and M, respectively, on the frame, which shaft extend transversely from side to side, as shown in Fig. 3. These shafts support drums designated, respectively, at A2, 44, and 46. The drum 4,2 is of the character known as the sand reel drum and is journaled free on the shaft 36, for turning movement relative thereto, except when connected by clutch engagement as hereinafter described. The drum M is the drilling drum and is keyed to the shaft 38 to turn therewith. The drum 46 is the calf wheel or casing drum and is journaled for free turning movement on shaft 40.

The opposite ends of the shaft 48 have fixed thereon cranks 43 connected through pitmans 59, with spudding arms 52, being pivoted thereto at 54. The spudding arms 52 extend lengthwise of the frame structure, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2,

and are pivotally mounted on the upper ends of the post It by a cross rod 55. The free ends of the spudding arms 52 are secured in rigid relation by a tubular connecting rod or header 53.

The mast is shown at 58, in the form of a rectangular frame structure as illustrated in Figs. 1 and 5, the lower end of which includes a cylindrical base member'6ll adapted to be engaged in seats 62 in the projecting ends of the sill 2. This structure forms a detachable mounting for the mast, whereby it may be supported in proper position over the well or be removed therefrom during transportation. The upper end of the mast 58 carries a mast head, generally designated at 64, having sheaves 66 adapted to receive the respective lines, such as the sand line 58 from the drum 42 or the drilling line H1 from the drum 44, and the casing lin H from the drum 4B. The mast 58 may be anchored in its set position by guy lines 59.

The sand line 68 is shown as extending from the drum 42 over a pulley block assembly, generally designated at 12, and shown more in detail in Fig. 8. This assembly includes a sheave l4, journaled at E6, in one end of a frame 18. In the opposite end of the frame 18 is mounted a guide roller 80-, journaled therein at 82, in position to engage and ride upon th rod 56, to permit the sand line 68 to travel back and forth on the drum 42. The frame 18 may be of any fabricated structure capable of holding the sheave and pulley in proper relation.

The drilling line 10 extends from the drum 44 over a sheave 84 of a pulley block assembly 86, as shown in Fig. l. The unit 86 is the same in construction as the pulley block assembly 72, described above a-nd illustrated in Fig. 8. The pul: ley block assembly 86, preferably has two pulleys 83 and 84 positioned at right angles to each other. Such a pulley block assembly allows a rolling action ofpulley 83 along rod 85 to permit the cable 10 to be evenly spooled upon drum 44. By having the pulleys 83 and 84 mounted at right angles to each other and pivoted on their respective axes, the pulley 84 will automatically align with the cable 10 as it comes from the spudding sheave 88.

The pivotal mounting of the pulleys permits angular movement thereof relative to rod 35 so that said pulleys will align with the sheave 88 to properly guide the cable 10 onto the winding drum 44.

A rod 87 is provided to support the weight of the pulley block assembly 86 when the line 10 is not in tension, however, when the line 10 is in tension, the pulley block assembly will be lifted clear of the rod 81.

From the sheave 84, the drilling lin 70 extends about a sheave 88 carried by the header 53 on the spudding arms 52, and shown more in detail in Figs. 14-17. From the sheave 88, the line extends over one of the sheaves on the mast 58, thence to drilling tools in the well. The drill, supported by the line 10, is adapted to be raised and lowered as the spudding arm 52 rock vertically.

The sheave 88 is carried by a yoke 90, in which it is journaled, and which yoke is pivotally connectedat 92 to the upper end of eye-bolt 94, that extends downwardly through the connecting header 53 of the spudding arms 52. The bolt 94 extends through a sleeve 96 in the tubular connecting rod or header 53, the lower end of which sleeve 9% is open and slidably receives therein a plate 98, slidably mounted on the bolt 9'4 and con-. fined by nuts H10. A coiled spring I02 is interposed between the plate 38 and the closed upper end of the sleeve 96. In order to relieve the drilling machine of shock, yieldable action is provided for the sheave 88. When sufficient depth is reached that the cable has sufficient stretch or elasticity to compensate for the shock, the cap H35 may be secured to the bolt 93 by nut I08 and the sheave 88 then becomes rigid with respect to connecting header 53, as shown in Figs. 14-17. It is to be pointed out that no dissassembly of partsis necessary in order to eliminate the shock absorbing feature, and by the removal of nuts I08 and cap H16, the shock absorbing feature is put back into function in a few minutes time.

The shaft 38 is shown as provided with cat heads I ID, on opposite ends thereof which may be used, if desired, upon power operation of the shaft. V

The parts are driven from the jack shaft 32, operated by th power plant or engine 28, as described above. The jack shaft 32 has a pulley l 12, on one end thereof, in the form illustrated, and may be provided with clutches H4 and H6 for connecting the jack shaft 32 to the pulley H2, if desired. These forward and reverse clutches H4 and H8, respectively, may be of the well known construction adapted for alternate engagement, according to the movement of a clutch control lever connected therewith for forward or reverse operationby lever H1. The lever H1 is adapted to operate clutches H4 and H6 by forward and reverse movement thereof. At a midpoint between the engagement of the respective clutches is a disengaged or neutral position for lever H1. Upon movement of clutch lever H7 in one direction, the rod I i la is moved in the same direction.

The rod l I la actuates a three-way bell crank lever 1b. This causes clutch H4 to be engaged by movement of lever Hl'c which causes turning movement of pulley H2 in one direction. Uponnism to cause a gripping action of friction clutch band H701 and through planetary gears within the clutch, will cause a reversal of pulley I I2 with respect to jack shaft 32. i

The pulley H2 is adapted to be connected through V-belts H3 and I2I with pulleys H8 and I28, of different sizes, which latter pulleys are mounted on the shaft 36 for operating this shaft. The respective pulleys II8 and I20 are adapted to turn free on the shaft 36 but to be connected with the shaft by clutches I22 and I 24, respectively, whereby to operate the shaft at different speeds according to which of the clutches I22 or I24 is engaged. These clutches I22 and I24 are adapted to be controlled. by a rod I26 (Fig. 4) extending therefrom to a control lever I28 for alternate engagement.

The sand reel drum 42, Figs. 9 and 10, which is also journaled free on the shaft 36, may be connected therewith by a clutch I30 to rotate with the shaft when desired.

The shaft 36 carries a drive pulley I32, shown as connected through V-belts I34, with a band wheel I36 journaled freely on the shaft 48. The band wheel I36 may be coupled with the shaft 48 by a clutch I38 to rotate the shaft, inasmuch as the band wheel is power driven through V-belts I34 from the jack shaft 36. Upon operation of the shaft 48, the cranks 48 and pitman 58 will be operated to rock the spudding arms 52.

The band wheel I36 is shown as connected through a sprocket I39, and through chain I48, with a sprocket wheel I42, journaled free on the shaft 38, but coaxial therewith. A clutch I44 is adapted to connect the sprocket wheel I42 with the shaft 38, so as to drive this shaft and the drilling drum 44 when desired, upon operation of the band wheel I 36. The drilling drum 44 is shown also as provided with a brake unit I48 connected with the shaft 38 to control the operation thereof.

The drilling drum 44 is securely keyed to shaft 38, as is the brake friction drum I45 so when drum 44 rotates the brake friction drum I45 will rotate in unison therewith. A brake band I46 is provided to partially encircle brake friction drum member I45, which brake band is anchored to a rod I46a extending between side sills I and 2 The opposite end of the brake band is connected to one end of a bell crank I461). The otherend of the bell crank I46?) is connected to a brake rod I460 which extends forward and is connected with a lever I46d within easy reach of the operator.

The casing drum 46 is J'ournaled free on the shaft 46, but is adapted to be connected therewith by means of a clutch I48. The casing drum 46 has a pair of brake bands I41 adapted to be anchored to a rod I41a extending between sills 2. The opposite ends of the brake bands are connected to a lever I41b which is connected to a shaft that is keyed to operating lever I41d in position to be operated by the operator.

As shown in Fig. .4, the drums 42, 44, and 46 are mounted on the respective shafts between the beams 22 of the supporting frame, while the drive provisions for the respective shafts and the controls of the shafts are located between the beams 26 and 22, at each opposite side of this frame. This has the effect of better control of the respective drums and the winding shafts thereof, and it also provides for arranging the rig in a more compact, practical manner, and also gives a stronger framework.

While the respective clutches described'may be operated in any suitable manner, I have shownin Fig. 4, a series of control rods "extending therefrom to a control position at the front end of the rig, where an operator may have access to a series of control'levers therefor. As mentioned above, the clutches I22 and I24 are operated by a control lever I28, which lever is adapted to rotate rod I26'through an arcuate movement, which in turn shifts clutch levers carrying yokes I58 and I5I to operate clutches I22 and I24, respectively.

These clutches are preferably of the friction type, although any suitable clutch, whether positive or friction, may be used as desired. By having the clutches I22 and I24 operable by a single lever I28, either of the clutches may be disen gaged, and by movement of the lever I28, with the lever shifted through neutral or disengaged position, the other clutch may be shifted into engagement without having to change to a different lever to accomplish the desired result. Furthermore, by having clutches arranged in this manner, and by providing clutches of the friction type, the shifting of the clutches which will effect a change in ratio of speed with respect to the drive member, enables the speeding up of the drum 42 or the slowing down thereof for greater pulling power, without loss of the momentum established while in the other speed. In a similar manner, the clutches I38, I44 and I48 are controlled from the operating position of the rig. The clutch I 38 has a link I52 connected with a shaft I54 extending to a control lever I56. The cltuch I48 has the yoke I49 thereof connected by a link I58, with a shaft I68 that is shown as provided with a foot pedal I62, as shown in Fig. 13. The clutch I44 has the yoke thereof connected through a link I64 with a shaft I66 provided with a control lever I68. These clutches may be operated selectively to provide the desired operating connections for the rig.

The clutch I33 for controlling the sand reel or drum 42 has an operating yoke I18 connected therewith, as shown in Fig. 9, for shifting the clutch. The yoke I18 is connected with one side of a bell crank lever I12, as shown in Figs. 10 and. '11, from which a shift rod I14 extends to a control lever I16.

Also associated with the sand reel or drum .42 are brake bands I18, as shown in Figs. 9 and 10, extending about the flanges of the drum. One end of each of the brake bands I18 is anchored at I 88, as shown in Fig. 10, while the opposite end thereof is connected with one arm of bell crank lever I82, the other end of which is attached to a link I84 which extends to a rocking member I86, having a bifurcated upper end that is in position to be actuated by the lever I16. A spring I88 is connected with the link I84, normally tending to move the latter to release the brake bands I18, and move bifurcated lever I86 against stop pin I 96. The rocking member I 86 is so disposed with respect to the lever I16 that, upon disengagement of the clutch I38, the movement of the lever I16 in a direction to disengage the clutch will actuate the rocker member I86, to apply friction to the sand reel or drum 42,'by brake bands I18, for stopping the free turning movement of this drum on the shaft 32.

The apparatus is adapted for use in the customary manner of operating a spudder either to cause a drilling action of the tool by the rocking action of the spudding arms 52, or to raise or lower the respective lines relative to the well. The mounting of the guide block assemblies 12 and 86, facilitates the action of the cables in the even winding on or the even unwinding from the respective drums.

'' It will be evident from the foregoing description, that the sand reel drum 42, drilling drum M, and casing drum 46 arranged between the inner sills 2 of the frame work of the rig, in tandem relation, and are journaled on shafts 36, 38 and 66, respectively. Furthermore, it is to be pointed out that the sand reel shaft 36 forms a countershaft wtih dual speeds through which power is transmitted to pulley I32 which drives the band wheel I35.

The shaft 46 has a band Wheel I36 journaled thereon but engageable therewith by engagement of clutch I38. The casing drum 46 is also journaled on shaft and is engageable therewith by a clutch I 28. Ihis shaft 40 performs the triple functions of, first, supporting the band wheel, which in turn, will rotate sprocket I39 secured integral with band wheel I36 and which sprocket is adapted to drive sprocket I42 through chain I46. If the clutch I64 is engaged, shaft 38 of the drilling drum M will be driven to raise or lower the drilling tools within the well. And, secondly, if the clutch It? is not engaged, and the clutch I38 is engaged, the shaft 66 will be driven, which will rotate cranks 43 disposed on either end thereof, so as to operate spudder arms 52 through pitmans 56. Third, when it is desired to operate the casing drum 4%, the itmans 50 are usually removed from the cranks 4S, and the clutch I48 is engaged with the drum 4% on which cable may be spooled, and which cable is adapted to pass over one of the sheaves 5 to raise or lower the casing within the well.

The sand reel drum 42 is journaled on shaft 36 and is engageable therewith by clutch I30. It is desirable to have a sand reel that will operate at high speeds for light loads, and at slow speed for heavier loads. The sand reel has been placed upon the shaft 36, which normally would be a separate and. independent shaft, however, this same shaft serves as a clutch shaft, so as to obtain the high and low speeds as desired, and obviates the necessity of additional shafts on which to mount the drum and other mechanism.

The particular clutch arrangement of the forward drive clutch IId, reverse drive clutch II6, low speed clutch I22 and high speed clutch I24, makes possible two speeds of the clutch or sand reel shaft 36 to be had in each direction, which gives great versatility to the operation of the machine to adapt it to a specific job at the correct speed.

The motor drive unit 28 may be provided with a transmission and clutch 29, if so desired, which will give additional speeds thereto. I

7 Control levers Ii'l', I28, Mid, IMCZ, I56, I62, I68 and 575 are provided, within easy access to the operator of the machine, for controlling the operation of the various functions of the drilling apparatus. Ihe lever III serves the dual function of operating the forward and reverse movement of the clutches H4 and H6. The lever I'IB serves the dual purpose of operating the engage: ment and disengagement of clutch I30 and engagement and disengagement of brake bands I18 on sand reel 42.

Engine power unit 23 is shown as having V- belt pulleys 3i driving through V-belts 36 to a drive pulley 33 on jack shaft 32.

The lever I23 serves the dual purpose of enga ing and disengaging clutches I22 and I24. From the foregoing description, it can be readily appreciated that the amount of mechanism required to buildand operate the rig has been materially reduced, thus simplifying the construction and operation of the drilling rig. By the reduction of the number of controls and the reduction of the number of drives and shafts incident thereto, a substantial saving in the weight of the machine is to be had. The reduction of the number of working parts makes for easier and more efficient operation of the machine and for the same reason, wear and replacement is greatly reduced.

Additional features that are provided for in this rig that have not been found in such rigs heretofore, are cable spooling guide sheaves I4 and 84 which are free to move transversely on shafts 56 and 85 in accordance with the normal spooling action of the cable, which also have pivotal action to permit alignment with the cable.

Furthermore, a shock absorbing feature for the sheave 88 has been provided, as shown in Figs. 14-17, inclusive, and which may be locked out by a cap I06 and nuts I08 when the drilling has acquired sufficient resiliency and to make the shock absorbing feature unnecessary, which is usually at from 1000 to 1200 feet.

I claim:

1. In well drilling apparatus, the combination of a supporting frame comprising laterally spaced pairs of spaced beams, a plurality of shafts mounted on the frame, drums carried by the shafts between the pairs of beams, driving means connected with one of the shafts between the beams of one pair, driving means connecting the first-mentioned shaft with another of said shafts and located between the beams of another of said pairs of beams, clutches for connecting the driving means with the respective shafts, manual control means for the clutches extending to an operating position externally of the frame, a. spudder arm, means for operating the spudder arm from one of said shafts, a sub-frame including upright posts and supporting said supporting frame, and means mounting the spudder arm on at least one of the upright posts.

2. In well drilling apparatus, the combination of a supporting frame comprising laterally spaced pairs of spaced beams, a plurality of shafts mounted on the frame, drums carried by the shafts between the pairs of beams, driving means connected with one of the shafts between the beams of one pair, driving means connecting the first-mentioned shaft with another of said shafts and located between the beams of another of said pairs of beams, clutches for connecting the driving means with the respective shafts, manual control means for the clutches extending to an operating position externally of the frame, a spudder arm, means for operation of the spudder arm from one of said shafts, a sub-frame including sills and having the supporting frame mounted thereon, a pair of said sills having seats in the upper faces thereof, and a mast mounted in the seats and supported thereby adapted to form a guide for a line from at least one of the drums.

3. In well drilling apparatus, the combination of a supporting frame comprising spaced pairs of spaced beams, a plurality of shafts mounted on the frame, one of said shafts being an intermediate shaft, drums carried by the respective shafts, power means connected with one of the shafts between the beams of one pair, driving means connecting said shaft with said intermediate shaft and located between the beams of the other pair, driving means connecting said intermediate shaft with another of said shafts and located between the beams of said other-pair, clutch means for controlling the connection of said driving means with the respective shafts, a spudder arm, and means connected with said intermediate shaft for operating said spudder arm.

4. In well drilling apparatus, the combination of a supporting frame comprising pairs of spaced beams, a driving shaft, an intermediate shaft and a driven shaft mounted on said frame, rotatable drums on said driving shaft and said intermediate shaft, a drum fixedly mounted on said driven shaft for rotation therewith, power means connected with said driving shaft between the beams of one pair, driving means connecting said driving shaft with said intermediate shaft and located between the beams of the other pair, driving means connecting said intermediate shaft with said driven shaft and located between the beams of said other pair, clutch means for selectively controlling the connection of said driving means with the respective shafts, clutch means on said driving shaft and said intermediate shaft respectively for connecting said rotatable drums to said shaft for rotation therewith, a spudder arm, and means connected with one of the shafts for operating said spudder arm.

5. In well drilling apparatus the combination of a frame structure comprising pairs of horizontally spaced beams spaced apart, a plurality of shafts mounted on the frame, at least one of said shafts being supported on all of said beams, reels carried by the shafts between the pairs of beams, power driving and controlling mechanism for the shafts located between the beams of at least one pair, a spudder arm, and means actuated by one of said shafts for operating the spudder arm.

6. In a portable well drilling apparatus having winding drums and a spudder arm, the combination of a supporting frame comprising four vertical pairs of transversely spaced longitudinal beams, winding drums carried by shafts, which shafts are mounted between the two upper central transversely spaced longitudinal beams, power transmission means positioned between the outer pairs of said transversely spaced longitudinal frame members for selectively driving the respective winding drums mounted on said shafts, power means connected to one of said shafts and clutch means for selectively connecting said power means with said respective winding drums for rotation thereof, and further clutch means for selectively connecting said spudder arm with said power means.

'7. In a drilling rig, the combination of a supporting frame comprising laterally spaced pairs of spaced beams, a bearing on each of said beams which bearings are axially aligned, a shaft journaled in said bearings, a winding drum journaled on said shaft between the beams of one pair of said laterally spaced pairs of beams, gear means journaled on said shaft and positioned between the beams of another pair of laterally spaced pairs of beams, clutch means on said shaft for connecting said gear means in driving relation with said shaft, and further clutch means on said shaft for connecting said winding drum in driven relation therewith.

8. In a drilling rig the combination of a supporting frame comprising laterally spaced pairs of spaced beams, a bearing on each of said beams which bearings are in axial alignment, a shaft journaled in said bearings, a crank on each end of said shaft and secured thereto exterior of each outermost beam, spudder arms mounted above said beams for arcuate movement, connecting means interconnecting said spudder arms with said cranks to move said spudder arms through said arcuate movement upon rotation of said cranks mounted on said shaft, a winding drum journaled on said shaft between the beams of one pair of said pairs of laterally spaced beams, a band wheel journaled on said shaft and positioned between the beams of another pair of said laterally spaced pairs of beams, a clutch means on said shaft for connecting said band wheel with said shaft, and further clutch means on said shaft for connecting said winding drum in driven relation therewith.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 141,967 Van Houten Aug. 19, 1873 548,109 Benjamin Oct. 15, 1895 753,319 Saunders Mar. 1, 1904 806,886 Glenn et al Dec. 12, 1905 807,784 Shyrock Dec. 19, 1905; 921,680 Downie May 18, 1909 925,960 Smith et a1 June 22, 1909 948,425 Loomis Feb. 8, 1910 1,689,455 Ross Oct. 30, 1928 1,775,341 Greve Sept. 9, 1930 2,030,692 Edwards Feb. 11, 1936 2,082,865 Wigness et al June 8, 1937 2,094,813 Penick et al Oct. 5. 1937 2,157,951 Buschman May 9, 1939 2,162,005 Elmire June 13, 1939 2,228,346 Downie Jan. 14, 1941 2,249,117 Crandall July 15, 1941 2,276,224 Cardwell Mar. 10, 1942 2,372,232 Thornburg Mar. 27, 1945 2,387,245 Davidson et a1. Oct. 23, 1945 2,453,184 Berry Nov. 9, 1948 2,473,628 Allison June 21, 1949

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US807784A (en) * 1905-05-03 1905-12-19 Leonard D Shryock Well-drilling apparatus.
US921680A (en) * 1905-12-26 1909-05-18 Keystone Driller Co Drilling-machine.
US925960A (en) * 1907-12-14 1909-06-22 George W Smith Well-drilling machine.
US948425A (en) * 1909-02-24 1910-02-08 George Dudley Loomis Well-drilling machine.
US1775341A (en) * 1926-06-29 1930-09-09 Oil Well Supply Co Rotary hoist
US1689455A (en) * 1927-02-11 1928-10-30 Donald M Carter Drilling apparatus
US2094813A (en) * 1935-07-15 1937-10-05 Arthur J Penick Rotary drilling machine
US2030692A (en) * 1935-10-07 1936-02-11 William J Edwards Attachment for spudding and drilling machines
US2082865A (en) * 1935-12-14 1937-06-08 Cornelius R Wigness Well drilling mechanism
US2228346A (en) * 1937-04-24 1941-01-14 Downie Robert Rex Cable winding machine
US2162005A (en) * 1937-10-21 1939-06-13 Howard H Elmire Well drilling machine
US2157951A (en) * 1938-09-24 1939-05-09 Henry W Buschman Well drilling cable control
US2276224A (en) * 1939-02-24 1942-03-10 Cardwell Mfg Company Inc Well servicing and drilling machine
US2249117A (en) * 1939-12-23 1941-07-15 Robert L Crandall Cable spooling device
US2372232A (en) * 1942-08-13 1945-03-27 Bucyrus Erie Co Spooling device for cable tool drills
US2387245A (en) * 1943-07-12 1945-10-23 Bucyrus Erie Co Spooling device
US2473628A (en) * 1944-08-19 1949-06-21 Motor Res Corp Winding device or winch
US2453184A (en) * 1947-12-29 1948-11-09 Green & Berry Inc Cable spooling device for well drilling rigs

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