US2672169A - Woven endless belt - Google Patents

Woven endless belt Download PDF

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US2672169A
US2672169A US22277451A US2672169A US 2672169 A US2672169 A US 2672169A US 22277451 A US22277451 A US 22277451A US 2672169 A US2672169 A US 2672169A
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portion
body
edge
strands
woven
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Walters Gustav
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Walters Gustav
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D3/00Woven fabrics characterised by their shape
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D1/00Woven fabrics designed to make specified articles
    • D03D1/0094Belts
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D2700/00Woven fabrics; Methods of weaving; Looms
    • D03D2700/02Belts

Description

G. WALTERS WOVEN ENDLESS BELT March 16, 1954 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 25, 1951 March 16, 1954 G LT WOVEN ENDLESS BELT 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 25, 1951 6 f for/7 ey March 16, 1954 G, WALTERS WOVEN ENDLESS BELT 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 25, 1951 March 16, 1954 WALTERS WOVEN ENDLESS BELT 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 25, 1951 Patented Mar. 16, 1954 UNITED STATES FTENT OFFICE WOVEN ENDLESS BELT Gustav Walters, Middletown, Conn. Application April 25, 1951, Serial No. 222,774 20 Claims. (01. 139-383) This invention relates to improvements in Woven-endless belts, and more particularly to woven-endless belts to be used as belts for pulleytravel mechanical purposes, such a drive belts, conveyor belts and abrasive belts, abrasive belts being those which have an abrasive such rouge, emery, etc., adhered thereto for polishing, abrading, etc.

In the usual way of making woven-endless belts for pulley-travel mechanical purposes, the longitudinal strands are endless but the transverse strands are non-endless, and therefore belts do not have selvage side edges as woven. with the result that such edges tend to unravel and destroy the side edge construction of the belt, in consequence of which such belts have to be thrown away due to this edge destruction.

One object of the invention, therefore, to provide an improved woven-endless textile belt for pulley-travel mechanical uses, in which the non-selvage side edges thereof are of improved construction so as to give longer life to the eds..- p-ortic-ns of the belt, and at the same time to not substantially interfere with the mechanical functioning action of the center or main or body portion of the belt.

With the above and other objects in. view will appear to those skilled in the art from the present disclosure, this invention includes all. features in said disclosure which are novel over the prior art.

In the description and claims, various parts and steps are identified by specific terms for convenience, but they are intended to be generic in their application as the prior art permits.

In the accompanying drawings forming part of the present disclosure, in which certain ways of carrying out the invention are shown for illustrative purpose:

1 is a perspective View illustrating a woven-endless belt made in accordance with the present invention, mounted on a pair of pulleys;

2 is an edge view of the belt illustrated in 1;

Fig. .3 is a top plan view of Fig. 2;

4 is an enlarged sectional view on line i i of Fig. 2;

5 is a top plan view similar to Fig. 3 of a woven-endless tubular fabric comprising a pin-- rality of belt sections which are ultimately to be out into separate belt sections or belts;

6 is enlarged schematic view on line li-Mfi of Fig.5, illustrating the way that each longitudinal or weft strand of each ply of the body portion always remains in its own ply.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged schematic sectional view on line 1-1 of Fig. 2 illustrating one weave construction;

Fig. 8 is a schematic top plan view of the weave construction of Fig. 7;

Fig. 9 is a schematic top plan view similar to Fig. 8 of a modified weave construction;

Fig. 10 is a schematic top plan view similar to Fig. 9 of another modified weave construction;

Fig. 11 is a schematic fragmental View similar to the left end portion of Fig. 7, of another modified weave construction;

Figs. 12 to 17 inclusive are views similar to Fig. 11, of other modified weave constructions;

Fig. 18 is a sectional view of a fragment of a belt showing the left body and edge portions corresponding to Figs. 7 and 11 to 17 inclusive;

Fig. 19 is a View similar to Fig. 18 of a modified construction of edge portion;

Fig. 20 is a View similar to Fig. 19 of still another modified construction of edge portion;

Fig. 21 is a view similar to Fig. 12 of a modified weave construction in which the edge portions are of two-ply construction;

Fig. 22 is a view similar to Fig. 21 of a modified edge portion construction;

Fig. 23 is a sectional view of a fragment of a belt showing the left bodyand edge-portions corresponding to Figs. 21 and 22;

Fig. 24 is a view similar to Fig. 22 of a modified weave construction in. which the edge portions are of three-ply construction;

Fig. 25 is a sectional view of a fragment of a belt showing the left body and edge portions corresponding to Fig. 24;

Fig. 26 is a view similar to Fig. 11 of a modified weave construction in which the body portion is of three-ply construction; and

Fig. 27 is a view similar to Fig. 26 in which the body portion is of four-ply construction.

Referring to Figs. 1 to 8 of the drawings showing the form of the invention illustrated therein, the belt 30 is of woven-endless construction having a two-ply central or main or body portion 3! and two opposite edge-portions 32. The body portion of the belt can be said to be the belt proper which performs the mechanical functions for which the belt is intended, and the edge-portions are for the purpose of securing a satisfactory locking of the longitudinal edge strands against unraveling.

In the weaving of this belt, as shown in Fig. 5, a woven endless fabric 33 is woven with alternate body portions 3!, and thinner portions 32a from which the edge portions 32 are formed. Each belt unit or belt 30 is made by cutting longitudito have it of indefinitely great nally through the thin portions 320, as indicated by the broken lines-of-cut 34, to form the edge portions 32 of the belt 38. Ordinarily, the edgeportions 32 of a belt will be given some further treatment to increase their resistance to unraveling, before such a belt is to be actually employed for a belt use. And the body portion of the belt may also be given further treatment before being used as a belt, all as will be more fully hereinafter set forth.

Referring to Fig. 7 which is matic cross-sectional view on line "ll- 71 of Fig. 2, and to Fig. 8 which is a schematic plan view of Fig. 7, in which the longitudinal strands of the lower ply of the body portion are shown offset somewhat from their positions directly beneath the longitudinal strands of the upper-ply for clearness, the body portion 3i of the belt 30 is of two-ply construction consisting of the upper or outer ply 35 and the lower or inner ply 36, and each of the edge portions 32 is a single-ply construction. The upper ply 35 of the body portion 3% has endless longitudinal or weft strands 3i and the lower ply St has endless longitudinal or weft strands 35. Each edge-portion 32 has endless longitudinal or weft strands 39, and the endless longitudinal strands 3'7, 33 and 39 are all woven with non-endless transverse warp strands or sets of warp strands M, H, 52 and 53 which extend integrally, continuously across the bodyportion and both edge portions as clearly shown in Figs. 7 and 8. The transverse warp strands 45 and 42 are binder or binder-warp strands in the body-portion 3!, which bind the two plies 35 and 35 together and make this what is known as a solid-woven two-ply construction. Strands such as the strands it, 45,42 and 43 of Fig. '7, are known to those skilled in the art as warps or warp strands. But where warp strands or portions of warp strands such as M and $2 in the body portion 3i, bind together two or more plies of woven material such as plies 35 and 36 of the body-portion 3i, they are more particularly known as binder warps or binder-warp strands. And where it is desired to distinguish strands such as s1 and t3, and the portions of strands such as it and 42 which extend across the edgeportion 32, which do not bind two or more plies together, from binder-warp strands, the former are called ground warps or ground-warp strands.

In the claims, the term endless longitudinal or weft strand or strands is used in its sense as understood by those killed in the art, that is, that although a weft strand is ordinarily of indefinitely great length except when it breaks during weaving or the weaving of a different size of weft strand is to be started, it is not necessary length if th picks constituting a weft strand or strands are com stituted of weft strands, a majority of-which are long enough to form at least three successive picks of the helix in which the weft strand extends in weaving a tubular fabric, so that the an enlarged schetubular fabric will have ample strength along the locations of the beginning and end of the picks.

Referring to Fig. 6 in which the plies 35 and 36 are represented in broken-line outline, it will be seen that the longitudinal weft strand 31 of the outer ply 35 of the body portion starts from the right hand side of Fig. 6, passes along through the outer ply of the lower layer of the tubular fabric 33, then around the outer ply of the upper layer of the fabric 33 and down at 31a to continue the helix formed by the weft-strand 3'! until it finally is completed and emerges as indicated at the right of Fig. 6 as the strand portion 311). And similarly, the weft strand 38 of the inner ply 36 starts at the left side of Fig. 6 and proceeds around the inner ply 3G and up at 35a to continue the helix formed by the weft strand 38 until it emerges at the left of Fig. 6 as the strand portion 38b. It will be observed that the helix formed by the weft strand 3'! never leaves its ply 35 while being woven in the fabric, until finally it emerges from the fabric as portion 31b. And similarly the weft strand 38 of the inner ply 36 continues around in the form of a helix while being woven in this ply 38 without at any time being woven in the ply 35, until finally it emerges as portion 3822 at the left side of Fig. 6. While it is possible to have the weft strands cross back and forth so that they are woven first in one ply, then in the other ply, and then back in the first-mentioned ply of the body portion, and so on, I have found that this prior art method of weaving the weft strands in the plies of the body portion of a belt. results in an inferior construction of belt, considerably due to the stresses on the body portion of the belt in use, especially when the belt is run at high speed, causing a rupturing of the weft strand where it passes from one ply to another, with consequent more speedy destruction of the belt.

The modified construction of the belt 44 of Fig, 9 is the same as the belt construction illustrated in Figs. '7 and 8 except that instead of having the transverse strands Woven as singles, they are woven as pairs of strands 45, 46, 41 and 48.

The modified belt construction 49 illustrated in Fig. 10 is the same as the belt construction illustrated in Fig. 9 except that although the pairs of transverse strands 50, 5|, 52 and 53 are Woven as pairs in the body portion 54 they are Woven as singles5fla, 50b, 5m, 5w, 52a, 52b and 53a, 53b, in the edge portions 55, to thus bring about a better looking action than is accomplished in the construction of Fig. 9.

Th modified belt construction 56 of Fig. 11 differs from the belt construction illustrated in Fig. 7 in that the longitudinal strands 57 and 58 of the two plies of the body portion 59 are shown as the same size as the longitudinal strands 6-0 of the edge portions GI, and by having the two sets of additional transverse strands B2 and 63.

The modified belt construction 64 of Fig. 12

differs from the belt construction of Fig. 11 in that the longitudinal strands 65 and 66 of the two plies of the body portion 61 are larger than th longitudinal strands 68 of the edge portions 59.

Th modified belt construction 10 of Fig, 13 differs from the belt construction of Fig. 12 in that in the body portion H, each of the shed groups of four longitudinal strands l2 and I3, of the two plies, takes the place of the single individual longitudinal strands 55 and 66 of the corresponding two plies of the belt construction of Fig. 12.

The modified belt construction 14 of Fig. 14 has pairs or groups of longitudinal strands l5 and 15a, in each shed of upper ply 16 of body portion 11, and corresponding shed pair 18 and 18a in the lower ply 19 of the body portion H.

The modified belt construction of Fig. 15 has the shed pairs of longitudinal strands 8| and am of upper ply 82 of the body 83, and the shed pairs 84, 84a of the lower ply 85, each said longitudinal body strand being of the same size as the longitudinal strands 80 of the edge portion .81.

"The modified Fbelt construction 88 of Fig. '16 ha shed pairs of large longitudinal strands '89, 89a in the upper ply of the body portion 9i, and shed pairs of small longitudinal strands 92, 92a in the lower ply '93 of the body portion 9-! The modified belt construction 94 of Fig. 17 has each of the plies 9 5 and 96 of th body por-' tion 91 woven with an over-two-under-two twill weave. The-transverse strands $38, 99, I00, I01 form a repeat group in the upper ply 95, and the transverse strands I02, I03, I 04, I 05 form a repeat group in the lower ply 96. And the transverse strands I06 form binder strands for binding the two plies together. When the transverse strands reach the edge portion I01, they are woven in a plain over-one-under-one weave as shown in previous figures.

The belt I08 of Fig. 18, portion I00 out off relatively in Fig. 18, can have each portion I09, and the body portion H0 also, if desired, treated with rubber or other elastomer and vulcanized so that when an edge portion I09 rubs against a flange of a pulley or the like, it temporarily flexe out of the way and thus resists tendency of the longitudinal strands thereof to unravel, and thus maintain the belt in serviceable condition.

Or a belt III as illustrated in Fig, 19 can have the edge portion thereof cut from the woven fabric originally of a greater width and folded and cemented with rubber or other elastomer and/or sewed to form the edge portion I I 2.

Or a belt II3 as shown in Fig. 20 can have a still wider edge portion cut from the woven fabric and folded up and cemented and/or sewed to the edge portion I M.

Instead of having the edge portions of a belt of single ply construction, a belt such as belt I I5 shown in Fig. 21 can have a two-ply body portion H6, and have an edge portion II I having two plies H8 and II 9, and these edge portion plies can be cemented and/or sewed together to provide a suitable non-raveling edge portion.

01- a belt construction I20 as illustrated in Fig. 22 can have the transverse strand I2I and I22, not only act as binder strands in the body portion I23, but continue on as binder strands to bind the two plies I24 and I25 of the edge portion I25 together.

Th belt construction I21 of Fig, 28, illustrates a belt made in accordance with the two-ply edge constructions illustrated in Figs. 21 and 22 with the two plies I28 and I29 forming the edge portion I30.

The belt construction I3I illustrated in Fig. 24 has a two-ply body portion I32, and the threeply edge portion I33 consisting Of the three plies I34, I35 and 136.

The belt 13'! of Fig. 25 has the three-ply edge portion I38 formed of the three plies I39, I40 and MI of woven construction as shown in Fig. 24.

By proportioning the size of the average shedarea of the longitudinal strands in the edge portions as compared to the size of the average shedarea of the longitudinal strands in the body portion of the constructions of Figs. 21 to 25, it is possible to have the two plies or three plies, as the case may be, provide a thickness which will not be more than, but will be th same as or less than, the thickness of the body portion.

The belt construction i 42 of Fig. 26 is made-with its body portion I43 formed of three plies I,

by having the edge narrow as illustrated M5 and H6, each "shed area of each pjly having apair of longitudinalstrands *I-I'I and MIa therein. The edge portion EI4'8 is a single-ply construction. The bodyiportion 143 of Fig. '26 contains no ground-warp strands, but contains only binder-warp strands, and therefore as a result of th absenceof ground-warp strands and the consequent absence oi the restrictive action of ground-warp strands, the body portion has greater transverse elastic stretch sidewise or edgewise in the general plane of the body portion than if ground-warp strands were also present. The binder-warp strands a and I5ilb connect only the innermost ply I46 and the intermediate ply I '45 together, and the -binder-warp strands 15m: and 150d connect only the intermediate ply M5 and the outermost ply IM together.

The belt construction I49 shown in Fig. 27 is a four ply body portion I50 and a single D13 edge portion I51.

Where the edge portion of a belt is to have only a single woven ply, whethersuch ply is to be straight with a cut edge, or folded with the folds sewed together, such single woven ply should be more flexible than the body portion. Where the edge portion is to consist of only a single woven ply that is straight and with a cut edge, it is important that it shall be more flexible than the body portion so that by treating the edge portions with rubber or other elastomer and vulcanizing them, when the edge portions rub against flanges of pulleys or the like, they will temporarily flex out of the way and thus resist tendency to unravel the longitudinal strands thereof, and thus maintain the belt in serviceable condition.

Inasmuch as belts made in accordance with the present invention always have at least two woven plies in the body portion, when it is desired to .ave a cut-edge straight single woven ply in each of the edge portions, it is possible to have ample flexibility in the edge portions as compared to the body portion, to inhibit um'avelingaction in the edge portions, even through the average shed area or" the longitudinal strands of the edge portion is as great as or somewhat greater than the average shed. area of the longitudinl strands of th body portion. A more definite definition of this relation is to say that the average shed area of the longitudinal strands in each edge portion should be substantially less than the average shed area of the longitudinal strands in the body portion multiplied by thenumber of plies in the body portion, and where there are two or more outedge woven plies in each edge portion, this still serves as a suitable definition of relationship of the edge and body portions. Where there are two or more cut-edge woven plies in edge portion, the flexibihty of the-edge portion, for a given average shed area in the edge portion will be less than in the case of a single ply, but increased looking action against non-raveling action is given as a result of the cementing of the layersor plies together with rubber or other elastomer and/or the action of transverse binder strands when used, orsewing the plies together when that is done. And it is more advantageous to have the average .shed area of the longitudinal strands of each edge portion not more than one half that of the average shed area of the longitudinal strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of Woven plies in the body portion, and itis still more advantageous to have the average shed area of the longitudinalstrands of each edge portion not more than one-fourth of the average shed area of the longitudinal strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

Belts in accordance with the present invention may have the longitudinal and/or transverse strands mad of any suitabl material, such as cotton, nylon, etc.

My application Serial No. 222,772 filed April 25', 1951, describes means and methodsuitable for making woven-endless fabric from which belts in accordance with this invention may be made.

The invention may be carried out in other spe cific ways than those herein set forth without departing from the spirit and essential charac teristics of the invention, and the present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range of the appended claims are intended to be embraced therein.

I claim:

1. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

2. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transvers warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being not more than half the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

3. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse Warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and ,connecting the body portion and edge portions together each edge. portion having at least one woven ply; andthe average shedarea of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being not more than one-fourth the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

4. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having only a single woven ply; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

5. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having only a single woven ply; and the average shedarea of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion; and most of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion being in shed groups.

6. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal. weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than, the average shed-area. of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion; and most of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion being in shed groups.

'7. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent -to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in'a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge strands to the general plane of the body portion, and each of said woven plies of each edge portion containing rubber-like material; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

14. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply, at least certain of said transverse warp strands being woven in said body portion as binder-warp strands connecting the plies of the body portion together; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

15. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft Woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portionstogether; each edge portion having at least one woven ply, certain of said transverse warp strands being woven in said body portion as binder-warp strands connecting the lies of the body portion together, and certain others of said transverse warp strands being woven only in the inner ply of said body portion; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

16. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two Woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply, the said transverse warp strands being woven in said body portion as binderwarp strands connecting the plies of the body portion together; and the average shedarea of the longitudinal weft strands of each edgeportion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

17. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless more-than-two-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply, the said transverse warp strands being woven in said body portion as binder-warp strands connecting the plies of the body portion together, certain of said binder-warp strands connecting an intermediate ply and the innermost ply together, and certain others of said binder-warp strands connecting an intermediate ply and the outermost ply together; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shedarea of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

18. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless three-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transversewarp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connectin the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portionhaving at least one Woven ply, the said transverse warp strands being woven in said body portion as binder-warp strands connecting the plies of the body portion together, certain of said binder-warp strands connecting only the innermost and intermediate plies together, and certain others of said binder-warp strands connecting only the intermediate and outermost plies together; and the average shedarea of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strand of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

19. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless three-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyond each side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together; each edge portion having at least one woven ply, the said transverse warp strands being -wovenin said-body portion as binder-warp strands connecting the plies of the body portion together, certain of said binderwarp strands connecting only the innermost and intermediate plies together, and certain others of said binder-warp strands connecting only the intermediate and outermost plies together; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longit dinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion, and the longitudinal weft strands of each ply of the body portion being in shed. groups.

20. A woven-endless pulley-travel belt having a woven-endless multi-ply body portion and two woven-endless edge portions, each edge portion being adjacent to and transversely beyond a side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion; the body portion and edge portions each having endless longitudinal weft strands woven with non-endless transverse warp strands, the transverse warp strands extending continuously transversely across the body portion and across and beyondeach side edge of the body portion in a direction away from the body portion and connecting the body portion and edge portions together, and with the longitudinal weft strands of each woven ply of the body portion always being woven exclusively in one woven ply and not also being woven in any other woven ply; each edge portion having at least one woven ply; and the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of each edge portion being substantially less than the average shed-area of the longitudinal weft strands of the body portion multiplied by the number of woven plies in the body portion.

GUSTAV WALTERS.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 82,640 Richards et al Sept. 29, 1868 505,294 Lyall Sept. 19, 1893 708,907 McLean Sept. 9, 1902 776,087 Robitschek Nov. 29, 1904 848,121 Moore Mar. 26, 1907 2,333,824 Schoepf Nov. 9, 1943 2,391,674 Brown et al. Dec. 25, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 6,475 Great Britain of 1898 429,743 Great Britain June 5, 1935

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2741273A (en) * 1954-01-18 1956-04-10 Arthur S Brown Mfg Co Picker stick check strap for looms and method of making the same
US2866483A (en) * 1954-06-01 1958-12-30 Fenner Co Ltd J H Textile materials for power transmission and conveyor belting
US2899987A (en) * 1955-05-19 1959-08-18 Certificate of correction
US3002536A (en) * 1959-01-30 1961-10-03 Dunlop Rubber Co Mechanical belting
US3449185A (en) * 1965-01-13 1969-06-10 John S Plenderleath Method of fusing a thermoplastic film in the gap of the weft between alternate warp threads of a woven fibrous band
US3612110A (en) * 1968-10-22 1971-10-12 Gerald Charles Wildi Woven tapes
US4452284A (en) * 1977-08-16 1984-06-05 Hermann Wangner Gmbh & Co. Kg Paper machine screen and process for production thereof
US4460023A (en) * 1980-10-16 1984-07-17 Huyck Corporation Method of making dryer fabric having zones of different permeability
US4784190A (en) * 1980-10-16 1988-11-15 Huyck Corporation Dryer fabric having longitudinal zones of different permeability
US5857497A (en) * 1985-08-05 1999-01-12 Wangner Systems Corporation Woven multilayer papermaking fabric having increased stability and permeability
US6152187A (en) * 1998-08-31 2000-11-28 Texo Ab Heald frame weaving machine for forming strengthened tubular-woven products

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US82640A (en) * 1868-09-29 Improvement in endless belts
US505294A (en) * 1893-09-19 James lyall
GB189806475A (en) * 1898-03-17 1899-03-11 Reddaway & Co Ltd F Improvements in and in the Manufacture of Woven Driving Belting.
US708907A (en) * 1900-05-12 1902-09-09 Andrew Mclean Stiff-finished woven fabric.
US776087A (en) * 1904-05-23 1904-11-29 Rudolf Robitschek Surgical bandage and material for making same.
US848121A (en) * 1904-05-23 1907-03-26 Multiple Woven Hose & Rubber Co Multiply fabric.
GB429743A (en) * 1934-12-22 1935-06-05 James Carr And Sons Ltd Improvements in textile driving tapes
US2333824A (en) * 1941-01-17 1943-11-09 Asten Hill Mfg Co Ironer roll covering unit
US2391674A (en) * 1944-05-11 1945-12-25 Arthur S Brown Method of making transmission belts

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US82640A (en) * 1868-09-29 Improvement in endless belts
US505294A (en) * 1893-09-19 James lyall
GB189806475A (en) * 1898-03-17 1899-03-11 Reddaway & Co Ltd F Improvements in and in the Manufacture of Woven Driving Belting.
US708907A (en) * 1900-05-12 1902-09-09 Andrew Mclean Stiff-finished woven fabric.
US776087A (en) * 1904-05-23 1904-11-29 Rudolf Robitschek Surgical bandage and material for making same.
US848121A (en) * 1904-05-23 1907-03-26 Multiple Woven Hose & Rubber Co Multiply fabric.
GB429743A (en) * 1934-12-22 1935-06-05 James Carr And Sons Ltd Improvements in textile driving tapes
US2333824A (en) * 1941-01-17 1943-11-09 Asten Hill Mfg Co Ironer roll covering unit
US2391674A (en) * 1944-05-11 1945-12-25 Arthur S Brown Method of making transmission belts

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2741273A (en) * 1954-01-18 1956-04-10 Arthur S Brown Mfg Co Picker stick check strap for looms and method of making the same
US2866483A (en) * 1954-06-01 1958-12-30 Fenner Co Ltd J H Textile materials for power transmission and conveyor belting
US2899987A (en) * 1955-05-19 1959-08-18 Certificate of correction
US3002536A (en) * 1959-01-30 1961-10-03 Dunlop Rubber Co Mechanical belting
US3449185A (en) * 1965-01-13 1969-06-10 John S Plenderleath Method of fusing a thermoplastic film in the gap of the weft between alternate warp threads of a woven fibrous band
US3612110A (en) * 1968-10-22 1971-10-12 Gerald Charles Wildi Woven tapes
US4452284A (en) * 1977-08-16 1984-06-05 Hermann Wangner Gmbh & Co. Kg Paper machine screen and process for production thereof
US4460023A (en) * 1980-10-16 1984-07-17 Huyck Corporation Method of making dryer fabric having zones of different permeability
US4784190A (en) * 1980-10-16 1988-11-15 Huyck Corporation Dryer fabric having longitudinal zones of different permeability
US5857497A (en) * 1985-08-05 1999-01-12 Wangner Systems Corporation Woven multilayer papermaking fabric having increased stability and permeability
US6152187A (en) * 1998-08-31 2000-11-28 Texo Ab Heald frame weaving machine for forming strengthened tubular-woven products

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