US2670831A - Hydraulic motion-transmitting mechanisms for printing machines and other purposes - Google Patents

Hydraulic motion-transmitting mechanisms for printing machines and other purposes Download PDF

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US2670831A
US2670831A US132382A US13238249A US2670831A US 2670831 A US2670831 A US 2670831A US 132382 A US132382 A US 132382A US 13238249 A US13238249 A US 13238249A US 2670831 A US2670831 A US 2670831A
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piston
type
driving piston
cylinder
card
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US132382A
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Harold G Barrett
Godfrey E Thomson
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REYNOLDS PRINTASIGN Co
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REYNOLDS PRINTASIGN Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41KSTAMPS; STAMPING OR NUMBERING APPARATUS OR DEVICES
    • B41K3/00Apparatus for stamping articles having integral means for supporting the articles to be stamped
    • B41K3/44Means for handling copy matter

Description

March 2, 1954 H.
HYDRAULIC MoTIoN PRINTING MACHINES A Filed Dec. l0, 1949 March 2, 1954 H. G. BARRETT ETAL 2,670,831 HYDRAULIC MOTION-TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR PRINTING MACHINES AND OTHER PURPOSES Filed Dec. 1G, 1949 l0 Sheets-Sheet 2 BARRETT ET AL -TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR HINES AND OTHER PURPOSES March 2, 1954 H, G
HYDRAULIC MOTION PRINTING MAC Flled Dec 1o, 1949 Io sheets-sheet :s
BARRETT ET AL 2,670,831 -TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR March 2, 1954 H, G.
HYDRAULIC MOTION PRINTING MACHINES AND OTHER PURPOSES 10 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed DeG. l0
BARRETT ET AL -TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR INES AND OTHER PURPOSES March 2, 1954 Q HYDRAULIC MOTION PRINTING MACH l0 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed DeC. 1G
l 3 8 0, 7 6 2, F SS ME S mw mw MRP TMR H EMT lo TT TTD ET N RWA RNS AE Amm Bmw Smm H.O G Mm CT um UR AD.. R D V.. H
March 2, 1954 l0 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Dec. lO, 1949 BARRETT ET AL -TRANSMI March 2, 1954 H, Q 2,670,831
` HYDRAULIC MOTION TTING MECHANISMS FOR PRINTING MACHINES AND OTHER PURPOSES Filed Deo. 1G, 1949 l0 Sheets-Sheet '7 BARRETT ET AL 2,670,831 -TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR INEs ANO @II-IRR PURPOSES March 2, 1954 H- Q HYDRAULIC MOTION PRINTING MACH 10 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed Dec. l0, 1949 March 2, 1954 G BARRETT E1' AL 2,670,831
H. HYDRAULIC MOTION-TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR PRINTING MACHINES AND OTHER PURPOSES Filed Dec. 10, 1949 10 Sheets-Sheet 9 March 2, 1954 H. G. BARRETT E'r AL 2,670,831
HYDRAULIC MOTION-TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR PRINTING MACHINES AND OTHER PURPOSES Filed Dec. 10,' 1949 10 Sheets-Sheet lO jizz/Wing Patented Mar. 2, 1954 HYDRAULIC MOTION- TRANSMITTING MECHANISMS FOR PRINTING MA- CHINES AND OTHER PURPOSES Harold G. Barrett and Godfrey E. Thomson, Chicago, Ill., assignors to R Chicago, Ill.,
eynolds Printasig'n Co., a corporation of Illinois Application December 10, 1949, Serial No. 132,382 33 Claims. (Cl. 197-2) This invention relates generally to hydraulic motion-transmitting mechanisms and particularly hydraulic precision feed devices. More particularly the invention relates to an improved hydraulic or fluid pressure' feed mechanism designed primarily for use in conjunction with printing machines of a cert-ain type hereinafter identified.
A sign and card printing machine such, for example, as that illustrated and described in S. Letters Patent No. 2,115,692, granted to Robert J. Thorn on April 26, 1938, necessarily includes feed mechanism which automatically shift the card laterally, following the printing of each letter or other character, except the final letter or character of each line; and such a feed mechanism must be capable of moving the card, in each instance, to an extent which will afford precisely the correct interval between consecutive letters or characters. If the required spacings were identical, irrespective of the paired letters or characters, as in the case of a conventional typewriter, there would be no special problem because uniform spacing can easily be achieved through the use of an escapement mechanism. But uniform spacing will not answer the purpose in a sign printing machine of the kind here dealt with because the type pieces are designedly of different widths, for which reason the spacing which follows each letter or character must be made to harmonize with that particular letter or character. Otherwise, the visual effect would not be satisfactory.
The feed mechanism heretofore employed, such, for example as that shown and described in the above-identified Thorn patent, is capable of affording accurate spacing provided the operator continuously exercises appropriate care to avoid overthrow of the card-carrier; but in their zeal for speed many operators are prone to move the actuating arm so vigorously on the return stroke that overthrow almost inevitably results; and frequently the operators seem unable to overcome that fault without retarding all stages of the operation to a like degree-thereby substantially reducing their output over and above what would normally result from a mere reduction of the speed at which the actuating arm is returned.
One of the principal objects of this invention is to provide a feed mechanism which is suitable for use in conjunction with a printing machine of the kind referred to, and which is both highly accurate and substantially proof against overthrow.
Another important object is to provide a feed 'mechanism of the above-indicated character Fig. 3 is a front elevation, partially in section;
Fig. 4 is a side elevation;
Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the type-case carriage;
Fig. 6 is an enlarged section taken on line 6 6 of Fig. 2;
Fig. 7 is a section taken on line 1-1 of Fig. 6;
Fig. 8 is a plan view, partially in section, showing the inking rollers;
Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the pan in which the inking rollers are mounted;
Fig. 10 is a schematic perspective view designed to clarify certain details which would not otherwise be readily comprehensible;
Fig. 11 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line H-ll of Fig. 7;
Fig. 12 is a lengthwise section of the actuating arm and shows a part of the pushbutton mechanism for opening the duid check valve of the feed mechanism to enable return movement of the card-carrier;
Fig. 13 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line |3--l3 of Fig. 6;
Fig. 14 is a sectional view taken on line |4-I4 of Fig. 13; and
Fig. 15 is an elevation of the lower end portion of the driving cylinder.
General description Referring more especially to Fig. 1, the major components of the sign printing machine therein illustrated are: a rectangular base A to opposite sides of which are rigidly attached two identical opstanding track-supporting members B; two parallel tracks C of channel cross-section xedly secured to the supporting members B; a carriage D mounted on the tracks C and movable therealong in a horizontal plane parallel to the top surface of the base A; a type-case E mormted on the carriage D and movable therealong in a horizontal plane parallel to the top suriace of the base and perpendicularly to the path of movement of the carriage D on tracks C; a bridge F bolted to the track supporting members B and overlying the base; a type-actuating and spacing mechanism identified as a whole by reference letter G and supported by the bridge F; a cardcarrier plate H lying on the top surface of base A and guided for rectilinear movement transversely7 of the base, as indicated by the double-headed arrow; a piston and piston rod J connected to the rear margin of the card-carrier plate H; and a fluid pressure cylinder K in bore of which the piston and rod J are mounted. A blotter 28 is secured, as by adhesive tape, to the top surface ci the plate H and underlies the carriage D and type-case E; and a card o any appropriate size, not shown, upon which the printed matter is to be .impressed is secured, usually by means or adhesive tape, to the upper surface oi the blo-ttor.
The type-case E houses Ia larg-e number of vertical type-bars, each ycarrying a type-face which is soldered or otherwise attached to its lower end and each normally held in an elevated position by means of a biasing spring. The top of the type case is in the form of a plate 2l having a large number of circular apertures 22 each or which is axially aligned with one or" the vertical type-bars therebelow.
The mechanism G .includes a vertical plunger 23 which is disposed above the plate 2i and inovable downwardly in response to manual rotation of an actuating lever arm -24 to enter a selected one of the apertures 22 to engage and depress the type-bar in line therewith and thus impress the corresponding letter or character on the upper surface of the Acard being printed.
The type-case E is movable manually by means of a vhandle .26 to enable the operator -to position any selected one of the apertures 22 in line with the plunger 23.; and after each let-ter or character is printed the card-carrier plate H is automatically shifted the distance necessary to bring about the correct spacing. The means by which the spacing is accomplished accurately, irrespective of -any lack of precaution on Athe par-t of the operator, and whereby the spacing can be variably predetermined, constitutes the principal subject matter -of the present case and rwill be described in detail later.
As will :subsequently Abe shown, the card-.carrier plate H is movable not only 'in the transverse direction to effect the -.required spacing between the letters ci a given line, as indicated by the double-'headed arrow on Fig. l, bult also is movable, together with the blotter 2t and the card thereon, in the direction perpendicular to the double-headed arrow to eii'ect spacing `between consecutive lines, when a .sign or display card is to comprise more 'than a single line. The latter movement is accomplished by turning .a -hand knob L attached to a shaft extending transversely of the base, below the top surface thereof, and equipped with a pinion which engages a rack contnected to and movable with the card-carrier p a e.
4 The base A The base A is fabricated of sheet metal and structural shapes, preferably aluminum, and comp-rises a horizontal top plate 33 and vertical side, front and rear Walls 3| of channel section, Fig. 7, together with a corner moulding 32 of angle section. Ordinarily, the base is mounted on a table or bench and may conveniently be prol vided with four short adjustable legs 33 by means or" which the top surface can be leveled. As most clearly shown in Fig. 10, the top plate 3l) has an elongate slot 34 the forward end of which terminates rearwardly of plunger 23 and through which extends a rectangular metal block 36-see Figs. 6, 7 and 1-0. To the bottom of block 36 is attached, by means of screws 3l, an elongate bar 38 which `serves as a carrier for two rollers 3S spaced apart lengthwise of the bar and closely but movably fitted between the upright flanges of a channel-shaped guide member rli'l the ends of which are connected to the front and rear walls 3i of the base, by means of which they are supported.
Tlhe card-carrier plate H rlhe rectangular card-carrier plate H rests on the top plate 3G of the base A and carries at its rear margin two spaced apart rollers dZ-see Fig. AS--which are positioned between the depending -hanger, of a channel-shaped guide member t3 carried by a supporting plate M. secured by screws 45 to the top side of 'block 355.. Since the rollers 39 and i2 'dt closely within their respective guides 4i) and 43, it will be apparent that the cardcarrier plate E is held vrmly against twisting motion relatively to the top sur-face of the base while still capable of being moved bodily in all directions parallel to said top surface,
A suitable fitting el .attached to the rear gin ci plate H is .xedly connected to the exterior v end oi piston rod J which, .as previously stated, extends into the cylinder .K vand functions as a pieton thereinsee especially Fig. :l0- said cylinder being supported near one end by the block 35 and at the other end by a ii-tting fiS carried by the channel member A3. It will now be evident that if oil or other incompressible fluid under pressure is admitted to cylinder K, the piston :rod J will be .moved proportionately to the volume -of iluid so admitted and that the 'card-carrier will be moved the same distance transversely -of the base. Reverse movement of tlc card-carrier is accomplished manually, and for that purpose a handle 149 is attached to the carrier at the lefthand side thereof, as plainly shown in Eigs. .l and 120.
The track C The two parallel tracks C lare channel-shaped members to the lower .ilanges of which are se cured steel .rai-ls E@ of round -cross-section, as
best shown in Fig. 7. Such rails nt the corre spondingly `grooved wheels 51 of the carriage D and vserve to prevent lateral displacement of the carriage while permitting free movement therealong.
The carriage D member 5c is long enough only to span the distance between members 52 and 53 whereas thel member 55 is made much longer in order to fur-v ther stabilize the carriage against twisting. The wheels 5| are four in number and are rotatable on trunnions rigidly aixed to themembers 53 and 55. The lower flange of member 52 carries a rail 56 of square cross-section while the lower flange of member 53 carries a rail 5l which is of round cross-section. The rails 55 and 51 serve to support the type-case E through the medium of its mounting Wheels 58 and 59see Fig. 6.
The typccase E The type-case E is a rectangular metal box including side and end walls Sil together with a horizontal bottom plate 6| and the previously mentioned top plate 2| in which are drilled the several round apertures 22 for reception of the plunger 23. Also formed in the .top plate 2| are a large number of indentations or notches 63- see Fig. lB-each associated with and situated adjacent one of the apertures 22. These notches are formed in a press by means of a punch of rectangular end conguration which cuts on three sides only to produce, in each case, a shoulder 64 and a sloping surface B5. As will later be made clear the location of each shoulder (it relatively to its individually associated aperture 22 determines the length of the spacing which will follow each operation of the immediately related type-bar. Thus, the spacing to follow each letter or character is predetermined by the location of its related shoulder 84, subject, however, to an additional provision by means of which the spacing can be altered independently.
The bottom plate 6| has square openings. 65 corresponding numerically and in vertical alignment each with one of the round apertures 22 in the top plate 2|; and slidably positioned in each square opening 65 is a type-bar c6 of square cross-section, to the lower end of which is attached a type-face 61. A coil spring 88 encircles each type-bar 66 and presses upwardly against a washer 69 seated in a groove formed in the upper end portion of the type-bar. Thus, each type-bar 65 normally is held in an elevated position by its retracting spring 68, in which circumstance the type-face is well above the card upon which the printed matter is to be impressed. The upper end of each type-bar 5E is turned to form a pilot 58a proportioned to t a recess 23a-see Fig. lli-in the lower end of the plunger 23, which provision insures that the type-bars will maintain their vertical alignment when being depressed.
The ink rollers ly therefrom are six studs 82, below each `oi? which is located a vertically elongated slot 83, each designed to receive one end of arod 84. The rods are suspended on tension springs Bti which is best shown in Fig. 6 have their upper ends anchored to the studs 82. The rods 8d are non-rotatable and serve as supports for inking rollers, which latter are identied by reference numerals 87, 88, 89, 90, 9| and 92-see Fig. 8.
' of limited 61 Each roller comprises a long tubular bushing 93 rotatably mounted on its supporting rod and a rubber covering of circular cross-section. Each bushing 93 lengthwise movement along its supporting rod. The axes of the several rollers are disposed angularly to the path of movement of the type-case relatively to the carriage D, as clearly shown in Fig. 8, and each roller is held by the suspension spring 86 at a level determined by the upper extremities of the slots 83, such that it makes iirm contact with the type-faces 87. It will be observed that the two ink rollers 89 and 90 have rubber coverings which extend completely across the array of type whereas the remaining rollers are of lesser lengthone pair spanning about one-half the array and the other pair about one-third.l The reason for this isv that the largest type, requiring the greatest amount of ink, are grouped on one side of the type-case where they make contact with all six rollers, whereas the intermediate size type are grouped midway of the width of the type-case and make contact with four rollers, while the small type are grouped on the other side of the type-case and make contact with only two rollers. By Virtue of the angular dispositions of the ink rollers, the movements of the type thereover causes them to shift lengthwise of their supporting rods, rst one way and then the other, depending upon the direction of movement of the type-case and, as a consequence, all portions of the roller peripheral areas are brought into contact with the type-faces. The opening 16 serves only to provide clearancev for the actuated typebar. Y
The type-bar actuating mechanism A head casting is bolted to and supported by the central portion of the bridge F and serves as a mounting and housing for numerous mechanical parts including the plunger 23 which, as clearly shown in Fig. 14, is slidably journaled for vertical movement in bushings 96 and 91. A casting 98 secured to plunger 23 has a laterally projecting trunnion 99 which is connected to the lower end of a pitman |88, the upper end of which is pivotally connected at Il, Fig. 14, to a quadrant |82. The latter is keyed to a tubular shaft I3 which is journaled in bushings |84 and |5- see Fig. 11. The actuating arm 24 is keyed or otherwise rmly secured to the outboard end of shaft |83 and is equipped with a laterally pro-v jecting handle 25v at its distal end. It will be apparent that when the handle 25 is moved -downwardly toward the operator, the plunger 23 likewise will move downwardly in response thereto to depress whichever type-bar may at the moment be positioned in registration therewith. A tension spring |01, Fig. "7, counterbalances the weight of the plunger and actuating arm and serves yieldably to retain those parts in their normal elevated positions.
For the purpose of restraining plunger 23 against rotation, the casting 98 is formed to include an arm 98a which carries a spring-pressed plunger |88. The latter which is against the adjacent surface of a plate |89 secured to head casting 95. Such casting also is provided with a trunnion upon which is mounted a roller H8 which likewise bears against the adjacent surface of plate |89. Since the plunger I8 and roller IIB are locatedon opposite sides of lthe plunger 23, it will be evident that ythey operate .conjointly to prevent rotation of casting 98 and plunger 23. Y
is of a length such that it is capable gemaal The previously mentioned hydraulic cylinder K is connected through the medium of a swivel `ioint "i12- see Fig. I0-and va flexible 'hose |13 to a fitting Htl-see Fig. M -which is detachably connected with the lower end of a vertical cylinder |116 by means of a screw cap 11'1. The latter is threaded to vthe lower end of the last-mentioned cylinder.
Cylinder 11S is supported by the head casting S in the manner clearly illustrated in Fig. 14, withits upper portion disposedwithin a -reservoir |18 formed in the casting 95 and designed to contain a substantial quantity of oil or other suitable 'incompressible fluid.
A .driving 'piston 12d is vertically reciprocab'le in the bore of cylinder and is biased upwardly by `a compression spring 'l2-"l which 'bears downwardly against the cap |11 and upwardly against a ila'nge 'at the upper extremity of a sheet 'metal cup 122 which, in turn, .is seated against an annular shoulder inside the piston. A hall .check volve |23 is lightly held against a valve lseat |24 by a spring |25 and is easily displaced to -pass `fluid downwardly through passageway |25 from the `reservoir |13 when the piston ascends-the cup |22 being vapertured .at its lower end to afford communication between the passageway 12B and the bore -o tting l ifi by way of several discharge ports in the form of small orifices 120 drilled through the Wall of cylinder HB at its .lower endsee Fig. l5. Fluid passes between the reservoir |10 and the interior of cylinder 1 'l' through a number ci ports 12S in the cylinder wall and `thence into and out of the bore |30 of lpiston |20 through ports '|31 drilled through the wall of the piston in proximity to Ithe por-:ts 1.29.
In :Eig 14 the piston 123) :is shown in its fully depressed position, and it will readily be seen that if `it is allowed tc rise under Vthe Iimpetus of spring '|11 fluid will pass from reservoir |18 through ports L28 `and |30 .and thence past ball check valve |23 into passageway 125, thus keeping #the line between the driving and driven pistons constantly Ifilled with fluid, feven though the driven piston is not retracted concurrently with the upward stroke of the driving piston.
When the piston 42|) has completed an upward stroke under the :impetus of spring 3121 and is thereafter pressed downwardly, its latter movement will be followed by the driven piston and 4rod J, and the Idisplacement of one piston will correspond precisely with that of the other, except for a possible slight amount :of leakage past the ball check valve |23 which may occur at the beginning of each fdownstroke .of ,piston IZG-which leakage, if any, 'is entirely harmless since it is of constant .magnitude and therefore does not detract from the accuracy of the resultant spacing.
Each downstroke of piston |22 causes the driven piston J and card-carrier H to move transversely of .the base A a distance corresponding to -a predetermined spacing between consecutive letters or characters., which spacing distance is variable by changing rthe stroke of piston |22. The mechanism by which the length oi the piston stroke is automatically controlled consonantly with the spacing requirement for each individual 'letter or character :is described.
When a line Aof printing .has been completed and a second li-ne is to ollow, it generally is necessary :to return :the card-carrier H and the driven piston either to the previous :starting 8 point .or some intermediate point, :according to the layout of vthe sign, and the return movement is effected manually by the operator through the medium of `lzxalsidle #3, But in order to retract the driven piston it is necessary to allow the fluid in the line to move back through the .driven piston into :reservoir "|18, which could not be done with the ball 123 seated; and it 'would .be a slow operation even with the ball '|231unseated if the duid had 'to return through the :constricted orifices 128. .For the purpose oi lunseating ball |23 .as a preliminary to a return movement of the card-carrier, there is provided a rod '|35 which is rsiidably fitted in lan axial bore in piston |20 and rests upon ball 123. The 'upper end :of `rod 135 extends beyond the upper end of 'piston 120 and 'is positioned for rengagencient by a finger 136 which lis rigidly secured to and carried by a shaft .|31 `extending axially through and rotatable within the bore of 'the tubular shaft |03. .A second .finger |38 rigidly secured to shaft |31 located interi-orly `of the actuating arm 2'4, as best 'shown in Figs. 11 and 12, and extends through anarcuate slot in shaft |03 to engage one end of a plunger illu having at its puterend -a pushbutton |41. `The plunger 1'4'0 is normally vretracted tby a spring |42 seated in a recess :in the distal fend .of arm '24 and bearing against the under side of .pnshbu-tton 14|. When the pushbutton is depressed by -the operator while the actuating larm `2li is in its elevated position the resultant movement of plunger Ml) will eiec't through iin-ger 13.3 an Aangular 'movement of shaft |31 which, in turn, will .bring about a downward movement oi linger |35 sucient to depress the rod |135 and thereby unseat ball 12.3. The operator depressies pushbu'tton |41 before attempting to retract the card-carrier and holds the same depressed until the retraction ci the card carrier is completed.
The cap 111 is provided with a number of parallel passageways 1M establishing one-way coinmunicati'on between the bore 145 of fitting |14 and a VWell 146 the 'upper rim of which forms a seat for a ball check valve 1138., which latter functions to 'prevent discharge of fluid from cylinder |116 via passageways |114 lwhile allowing unhindered now therethrough in the opposite direction. Thus, with .ball |23 unseated the `card-carrier can easily be retracted, because the returning i'luid is not impeded by the constriction or small total area of oriiices 1'2-8.
A casting 150 is rigidly connected to the upper end .of piston and vertically reciprocable therewith and has a horizontal 'top .surface 15|, a portion of which functions as a track for a roller 153 on a trunnion 15d that is carried by quadrant |02. When the roller -1-54 moves with quadrant 102 in -a A.clockwise direction from the position which it is shown in Fig. le., it obviously .follows an 'upwardly trending arcuate path, andthe driving piston |23 (which normally is held in its downmost position by roller |53, as depicted in Fig. 14) is consequently allowed to rise under the impetus of its retracting spring |21; and so .far as the opposition of roller 15.13 is concerned, the ,Said A'piston would rise to a iixed `rnaxirxn-mi elevation each time the plunger |23 is brought down in response to .rotation of the actuating farm 24. That, .on its face, would not be permissible because .it would result in large uniform forward strokes of the driving piston and :concomitant large uniform forward movements of `the driven piston and card-carrier and, accordingly, would not afford the variant spacings between consecutive letters or characters which, as we have previously pointed out, must behad. Hence, it is necessary to introduce some medium which will serve to restrict each upstroke of driving piston |25 to a limit corresponding with the desired or predetermined measure `of the spacing next in order; or, viewed broadly from the standpoint of the ultimate objective, some medium capable of correctly predetermining the length of each forward stroke of the driving piston-the latter being the immediate criterion as respects the degree of ad- Vance of the card-carrier.
The casing |50 includes an upstanding ange or rib |52, the rear face of which, as viewed in Fig. 14, lies substantially in the vertical plane of the adjacent face of roller |53 and thus serves to prevent rctationvof casting |50 and piston |25 in response to the movement of the roller along the top surface of the casting.
The spacing control mechanism Referring more especially to Fig. 13, a bellcrank |58 is supported by head casting 95 on a fulcrum |55 and comprises a horizontal arm |55 and a vertical arm |6I. The horizontal arm @t is apertured at its distal end to form a pocket |62 in which is positioned a steel ball |64 resting on the top surface of casting |53; and a long adjusting screw |55 threaded into the bellcrank at |58 has a tapered end |61 bearing against the upper surface of ball |63 and serving to look the same in place. The vouter end of screw |55 carries a knob |68 by which the screw can be rotated manually; and said knob has a graduated scale |15, preferably with numerical indicia, which registers with the adjacent pointed end of a pin |1|, the other end of which has a nipple projecting into an opening in a lug |22 forming an integral part of the bellcrank, and a flange |13 abutting the said lug. The ypin I1! passes loosely through an opening |14 in an adjacent wall of the head casting and a compression spring |15 encircles said pin and presses the same against the bellcrank clockwise, as viewed in Fig. 13. It will now be seen that by rotating screw |65 the ball |54 can be pushed downwardly Vor vice-versa relatively to the distal end of the bellcrank arm |65, thus bringing about a micrometric rotation of the bellcrank in a direction determined by the direction of rotation of the screw, and it will be apparent that the scale aiords a medium by which the operator can gauge the angular adjustment.
Pivotally connected at |1| to the lower end of bellcrank arm |5| is a dog |12, the heel of which normally abuts a stationary stop arm |13-see Fig. lS-against which it is held by the pressure of spring acting on the bellcrankthe stop arm |13 being a long rod anchored at its upper end to the head casting 95 from which it depends. The free end or toe of dog |12 is normally positioned above and clear of the top plate 2| of the type-case and consequently does not interfere with movements of the type-case in the horizontal plane; but when the plunger 23 is brought down to enter one of the type-case apertures 22 as a result of the previously-described rotation of the actuating arm 24 and shaft |03, the piston |25 and casting |50 are elevated by spring |22, thus causing the bellcrank |58 to be rotated in a counterclockwise direction, Fig. 13, about its fulcrum |59. Thereupon `the heel ofv dog |12 moves away'from stop arm |13 andits free endor lug |12, thus biasing the toe drops into contact with the top plate 2|. As previously explained, the top plate 2| has a notch 53 and shoulder G4 in association with each aperture 22 and each of these is located to line up horizontally with the dog |12 when its associated aperture 22 is vertically aligned with the plunger 23. Therefore, as the bellcrank 58 continues its counterclockwise rotation during the descent of the plunger 23, the toe of dog |12 engages the shoulder 64; Aand since the type-case is restrained against lateral displacement by virtue of its interlocking engagement with plunger 25, the rotation of the bellcrank is arrested, and likewise the upward movement of piston l2 and casting |55, because the bellcrank, acting through ball |62, then functions as a stop to limit the upward movement of said piston and casting. rThis does not in any way inhibit further rotation of quadrant ||32 or the downward movement of plunger 23, as will be evident from the fact that roller |53 is free to continue its upward arcuate course irrespective of the discontinuance of upward movement of casting |55. At this juncture it will be apparent that the location of shoulder 64| relatively to its associated aperture 22 determines the degree of rotation of bellcrank and thus, in turn, determines the extent to which the piston |29 will rise. And it will be remembered that the length oi the piston upstroke determines the length of its subsequent downstroke and thus the extent of resultant spacing movement imparted to the card-carrier.
A vertical rod 'i5-see Fig. '-is slidably journaled in a lug |15 on bellcrank arm |6| and is biased downwardly by a spring |11. The lower extremity of rod |15 overlies the dog |12 to one side ci its fulcrum and is thus adapted to bias the dog rotationally in the clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. 7, thus insuring against the possibility of the dog failing to move into engagement with the top plate upon breaking contact with the stop arm |13. Connected to the upper end of rod |15 is a frustro-conically shaped head |78, the lower rim of which overlies a lug |89 forming an integral part of the casting 98. Normally the head |18 rests upon the lug |80, thus relieving the dog |12 from the pressure or" spring |11', as well as the weight of rod |15 and head |18; but as the plunger 23 descends it carries with it the casting 98, thereby allowing Arod |15 to move downwardly and bring pressure to bearagainst the dog. During the subsequent up movement of plunger 23 the lug |30 lifts the rod |15, removing from the dog the pressure of spring |1'i and the weight of rod |15 and head |18 so that when the heel of the dog again makes contact with the stop arm |13 the latter will rotate the dog back to its normal position, Fig. 7, without having to overcome any resistance other than that due to the dog itself.
Mode of operation rihe rst step in a sign or tion is to push the carriage type-case E, to the rear in order to uncover the card-carrier H. Then the operator attaches a blank card to the blctter 25, usually by means of adhesive tape, aligning the same with Van edge of the blotter. Thereafter, ii necessary, the operator moves the card-carrier forward or back by rotating knob L, thereby appropriately positioning the card in one direction with reference to the plunger 23. Following that adjustment the operator moves the card-carrier to the right or left, as need be, to position the card laterally 'with card printing opera- D, together with the reference` to the plunger 2 3.` Thosetvvo adjustF determine theposition Yon the card of the rsjtletter or character to be printed.-
order to nieve the card-carrier to the right theoperatr inust depress and hold down the pusllibutton |4`-| so that fluid can pass the ball valve |23 and thusreturn to the Ireservoir |18. Moveinnt of the card-carrier to the y left usually is done in step-by-step fashion by manipulating the actuating arm M; but it also can be done by holding said arrn down and pulling the carrier leftvvise vtlfiiough the medium oi handle I g.. Ii? this isattez'nptdvvith the actuating arm in. the up position the lnovenie'ntv will be exceed- 1y slvv andy laborious because the piston |20 ri dovvn position, Fig. 14, and the fluid movdownwardly therethrough can escape only the greatly con'strictedlowermost orice [28 near the bottoni end of eylinder I l-the re- "ng orifices being covered by the piston,as leai y shown Fig.. 11i. the contrary, livf the actuating and is heid down the piston Iza u1u 15e ni. ut. position with au the orinesflas ui;-
dl But unless the aggregate area.- of the severa orifices` is arge enough to' aegis a free ivv f: flu-1d therethrough it generally is easier to aifiplish the leftivise adjustment in the br'nnti'oned step-by-step' nianner.
appropriately positioned the card"- ca 1e`r the operator nieves the type-case E to bring. into registration with the plunger i3 the aperture 2i corresponding to the first letter or character to be printed and then grasps the handle 25, pu1ling. downwardly thereon. rfhis rotates the shaft its" and' quadrant rc2 inl e'. hoer;-
dili non, as viewed in' Fig. 14', which friction transmitted through the ptnian Miti it the casting .Q3 and thence to the plunger 23 which descends and, in tui-"mdpresses the type-bar E6, thereby moving the attached type-face into convvitl the card. `C'inoi-'dentally with downward inoveinent of plunger 23 `,t "e' 'nient of roller |53 allows the s'tirig |50 piston |29 to rise under the in 'petiis of spring |2`Tj While that is taking place liic'p-s'se's fro the' reservoir H8 through rjpdfiits" [2 9 'and |3r| and thence past the bali chcl vlv'' |23 iii-t6 the passageway |425, thereby keepin?. tlfi hylaulc i'SI'riSSil lille filled with fluid.
,hatches es shoulders c4' are so located that all spacings are correctly proportioned. in ialhidy With each other, ivfi, regard to the diff widths 'or the various letters 'and' char: and it never is" necessary tcY 'alter the iustient of screw ist even when shifting from one size te another. on the other hand', it :'n. is desirable to depart from what may be regarded' asy standard by either increasing or decreasing the spacing frmula by adding or subtracting a constant. This can be don'e by rotating screw t65" one Way or the other. If the screw is backed o ff so as to `allovv more fjreucm fer the can ist under the ncfmai condition depicted in Fig. 13, the piston |2i will rise toa corresponding extent before the bell'cranl F58' rotating, and. consequently the piston ",tio will be increased, which, of course, means that the spacing is increased. Opposite rotation of ser'eiv (SS Will. give rise to a corresponding deereasa The graduatedv scale makes it pos sible. to vary the spacing at Will and with the itijdstacc'uracy, Within certain practical lirnits. C Iviiipletion ofA a line ofV printed matter entails, additionally, only repetitions of the Steps above l2 described; and each added line. obviously involves a rearward. movement of; the card-carrier, which efiectedby meansof the knob L; and a lateral readjustmentot the carrier which is accomplished as before;
As heretofore indicated, it hasbeen one of the principal objects to devise a feed mechanism which is especially suitable for use in conjunction with a printing machine of the kind herein described and will not overthrow, regardless of how vigorously the operator might return the actuating arm to: its normaler starting position; and this has been accomplished most successfully by the simpley but effective expedient of positioning the orifices |28, Figs. 14 and l5, so that they are progressively closed as the piston |251 descends. As a result, the. piston encounters more and more resistance as it approaches the end of each downward stroke and consequently its rate of travel, and that of the driven piston J, is so reduced that the card-carrier and attached par-ts do not have enough residual momentum to o fsetthe.- irictional drag of the card-carrier on the surface of the-base; and itis impracticab'l-e, if not always physically impossible, for the operator to apply enough force to the actuating arm to counteract the increased resistancev sufficiently to produce overthrow. One of. the arrangements which has been -f ound eminently satisfactory is that depicted in Fig. 15 wherein is shown a series of seven orifices |23 ranging in diam-eter from .0525" at the top to .0241` at the bottom; but thatis only one of several obvious alternatives. Manifestlyiuit would be praoticab-la for example, to make all the orices of one small size, say .024, and provide an increasingly greater number of them at successively higher levels.. it being immaterial hovvthe orices are distributed circumierentially of the cylinder. Ari-d' it would be equally satisfactory `and' effective to substitute a single elongated discharge port in place of; the several orifices |28-, It islv of course; important that` the braking action-be not soexeessively pro'- longed as seriously to diminishv the output of the machina We have foundthatthe forward movement of the driving piston lZ- can be suiiciently checked to prevent overthrow solely as. a result of proh gressive closure of the discharge orices |28, as hereinbefore described or by like progressive closure of a single. discharge port; but,` r-ieverthe` less, We. consider itv desirable, as an extra measure of precaution, so Ito actuatethe driving piston on. itsl forward stroke that the rate at which: it is propelled decreases, progressively, irrespective of the retarding eiiect of *the constrieted, discharge orifices,v and this We have accomplished through the medium of the roller |53 acting on the casting. |50; In. this connection it will be observed that the downward. or forward movementof the driving piston may be represented as a sine functiomthe rate oi change of which continuously decreases consonantly with the firstde'rivative of the sine in the third quadrant. Thus, even it the operator increases the pressure exertedv on the v.af-:tuating lever 24 as it approaches the limit o its upward stroke, the resultant ainplied angular speed o t the lever is more than fully neutralized by' the fact that the roller im.- partsv less and ls's movement to the pis-ton` per degree ot nioveinnt of the rol-ler as the` latter approaches the limit of its c lownuzard.-travell It also i'sworthy of note that themeans which We havechosen to eiriploy for actuating the driving piston |20,L namely, the roller |153 and quadrant I '2, together with the other components which co-operate therewith, is adapted to facilitate ample retractive movement of plunger 23 and the actuated type-bar before any forward movement is imparted to the driving piston. It is necessary that each depressed type-bar be allowed to retract suiciently to clear the card before any spacing movement is imparted to the card. Otherwise, the printed matter would, obviously, be smeared. To preclude such a happening, the mechanism is so designed that the roller |53 in its up position is elevated to such an extent that it is out of contact with casting |50 even when the spacing control stop mechanism is set to produce the maximum spacing. Therefore, there is always enough lost motion clearance between the roller |53 and the casting |50 to allow the actuated type-bar to rise and clear the card before the driving piston commences its downward travel.
Although We have shown and described but one embodiment, it should be self-evident that the subject invention is susceptible of innumerable modifications and, further, that it has many possible adaptations both within and outside the printing art. Accordingly, we do not wish to be limited as to the scope of our invention otherwise than as prescribed by the terms of the appended claims.
We claim:
l. The combination in a hydraulic motiontransmitting system including a driven piston and a driving piston, of a iluid conduit interconnecting said pistons, a huid-holding reservoir connected with said conduit by way of a passageway through the driving piston, a check valve in the driving piston eiective to allow iiuid to pass from the reservoir into the conduit via said passageway and normally effective to prevent passage of fluid in the opposite direction, and means manually operable at will to unseat said check valve whereby to enable i'luid to pass the check valve in said opposite direction.
2. The-combination in a hydraulic motiontransmitting system including a driven piston and a driving piston, of a fluid conduit interconnecting said pistons, a fluid-holding reservoir connected with said conduit via a passageway through the driving piston, a check valve in the driving piston effective to allow fluid to pass from the reservoir into the conduit via said passageway, and normally eiective to prevent passage of iiuid in the opposite direction, means manually operable at will to unseat said check valve whereby to enable fluid to pass the check valve in said opposite direction, and stop means for limiting the retractive stroke of' the driving piston, said stop means being adjustable in order to predetermine the limit of the retractive stroke of the driving piston whereby to X in advance the length of forward travel of the driven piston in response to a full forward stroke of the driving piston.
3. The combination in a hydraulic motiontransmitting system including a driven piston and a driving piston, of a fluid conduit interconnecting said pistons, said driving piston having an axial bore, a Huid-holding reservoir connected with said conduit by way of said bore, a check valve within said bore operative to allow fluid to pass from the reservoir to the conduit and to block passage of fluid in the opposite direction, and a rod slidably mounted in said bore and manually operable at will to unseat said check valve 'whereby to enable iluid to pass from the conduit to the reservoir.
4. The combination in a' hydraulic motiontransmitting system including a driven piston and a driving piston, of a cylinder in which the driving piston is reciprocable, and a iluid conduit interconnecting said driven piston with said cylinder, said cylinder having means forming a discharge port leading from the bore of the cylinder into the conduit, said means being so located and arranged that the port is progressively closed by the driving piston as the driving piston approaches the end of its stroke.
5. The combination in a hydraulic motiontransmitting system including a'driven piston and a driving piston, of a cylinder in which the driving piston is reciprocable, a fluid conduit interconnecting said driven piston with said cylinder, said cylinder having means forming a discharge port leading from the bore of the cylinder into the conduit, said means being so located and arranged that the port is progressively closed by the driving piston as the driving piston approaches the end of its pressure stroke, and a passageway extending between the conduit and the bore of the cylinder. forming a bypass around said port and including a check valve, said check valve being operative to allow fluid to pass through said by-pass only from the conduit to the cylinder bore.
G. The combination in a hydraulic motiontransmitting system including a driven piston and a driving piston, of a cylinder in which the driving piston is reciprocable, a fluid conduit interconnectingsaid driven piston with said cylinder, said cylinder having means forming a discharge port leading from the bore of the cylinder into the conduit,said means being so located and arranged that the port is progressively closed by the driving piston as the driving piston approaches the end of its pressure stroke, a passageway extending between the conduit and the bore of the cylinder forming a by-pass around said port, and including a first check valve, said first check valve being operative to allow fluid to pass through said by-pass only from the conduit to the cylinder bore, a fluid-holding reservoir, a fluid passageway connected at one end with the reservoir and extending axially through the driving piston, a second check valve carried by the driving piston and interposed in said iiuid passageway, said second check valve being normally operative to allow iiuid to pass through the said fluid lpassageway from the reservoir but not in the opposite direction, and means manually operable at will to unseat said second check valve whereby to enable fiuid to pass in the opposite direction.
7. The combination according to claim 6 wherein said manually operable means is a rod slidably mounted in the driving piston and extending axially thereof, one end of said rod bearing against the second check valve and the other projecting out of the driving piston to an exterior point.
8. In combination, a hydraulic cylinder having a bore, a piston reciprocable in said bore, said cylinder having an intake port and a discharge port, said piston having a lengthwise passageway establishing communication between said ports, a check valve carried by said piston Within said passageway and operative to allow iluid to ow therethrough from the intake port to the discharge port and normally operative to prevent iiuid flow in the opposite direction, and a member carried by said piston and reciprocable relatively thereto and manually operable at will to unseat the check 17 lowing each actuation of a type-bar by the said plunger, in the direction eifective to accomplish proper spacing between the letters or characters forming a given line, and spacing control mechanism associated with the system and effective automatically to predetermine the extent of the aforementioned spacing movement of the cardcarrier, following each actuation of a type-bar, in accordance with the location of the shoulder individually associated with the last-actuated typebar, said motion-transmitting system comprising a driven piston drivably connected with the cardcarrier, a rst cylinder in which said piston is reciprocable, a driving piston, a second cylinder in which said driving piston is reciprocable, a iiuid conduit interconnecting said cylinders, a uid-holding reservoir connected with the corrduit through a check valve and operative to feed iiuid to the conduit during each retractive stroke of the driving piston, said check valve being normally eifective tov prevent backilow of fluid to the reservoir, and means controlled by move'- ments of the lever arm for reciprocating the driving piston, said spacing control mechanism comprising a movable stop, the position of which is determined by the shoulder associated with the last-actuated type-bar and which, in turn, determines, in accordance with its position, the limit of the retractive stroke of the driving piston and thus the length of the succeeding forward stroke of said driving piston.
18. A printing machine as set forth in claim 17 wherein the second cylinder of the hydraulic motion-transmitting system is provided with means forming discharge port which leads into the conduit, extends through the cylinder wall and is adapted to be progressively closed by the driving piston as the latter approaches the end of each pressure stroke, so that the discharge greatly retarded before the driving piston reaches the end of its said pressure stroke.
19. A printing machine as set forth in claim 17, wherein the second cylinder of the hydraulic motion-transmitting system is provided with a n plurality of discharge ports leading into the conduit and spaced at intervals lengthwise of the cylinder so that they are closed consecutively by the driving piston as it approaches the end of its pressure stroke, said ports being so proportioned that themovement of thedriving piston is substantially and progressively retarded as it approaches the end of each pressure stroke.
20. A printing machine as set forth in claim 17,
including a rotatable shaft which is connected to be rotated by movements of the lever arm and is operatively associated with both the plunger and the driving piston so that rotation of the `shaft in one direction lowers the plunger and causes re-4 traction of the driving piston and vvice-versa.
21. A'printing machine as set forth in claim 17, including a spring biasing thedriving piston retractively, a shaft connected for rotation bythe lever arm, and means drivably interconnecting.
18 tractive stroke of the driving piston, and a dog pivotally connected to the distal end of the other bellcrank arm and operative to engage that selected one of the said shoulders which is associated with a type-bar in registration with the said plunger, said bellcrank being rotatable in response to a retractive stroke of the driving piston to move said dog into engagement with the selected shoulder, the engagement of the dog with the shoulder being effective to terminate the rotation of the bellcrank and, resultantly, to terminate the retractive stroke of the driving `piston.
23 A printing machine as set forth in claim 22, including an adjusting screw carried by the bellcrank and operative to shift the bellcrank rotationally in relation to the driving piston to alter the stroke of the driving piston independently of the limit determined by the shoulder engaged by the dog.
24. A printing machine as set forth in claim 22, wherein the bellcrank arm has a pocket at its distal end, a ball located in the pocket and positioned thereby, said ball serving as a, stop member for limiting the retractive stroke of the driving piston, and an ladjusting screw carried by the vso .40 of fluid from said second cylinder becomes' bellcrank, one end of said screw forming a backstop for the ball, said screw being operative conjointly with the ball to shift the bellcrank rotaticnally in relation to the driving piston to alter the stroke of the driving piston independently of the limit determined by the shoulder enga-ged by the dog.
25. A printing machine according to claim 22, wherein the bellcrank is fulcrumed for rotation in a vertical plane and is located above the typecase and wherein the bellcrank arm which carries thc dog depends substantially vertically from its fulcrum center, 'and including a backstop for the dog which serves to rotate the dog out of engagement with the -type-case when the dog is retracted.
26. A printing machine according to claim 25, including a vertically slidable rod spring-pressed downwardly and operative to engage the dog and press the same into engagement with the top surface of the type-case, and a member carried by said plunger and operative during the upstroke of the plunger to lift said rod, thereby relieving the dog of the pressure of the rod while the dog is in engagement with its backstop.
27. In a printing machine of the type that comprises a base, a card-carrier mounted on said base and movable thereover in a horizontal plane, a type-case mounted for universal movement in a horizontal plane above said card-carrier, a plurality of vertical type-bars housed within said type-case, each type-bar having a type-face at its lower end and each provided with a biasing spring which normally supports it in an elevated position, and. a, vertically reciprocable plunger disposed above the type-case and normally Yheld in an elevated position, said plunger being movable downwardly to engage and depress said typebars individually and selectively: a hydraulic motion-transmitting mechanism operative to move the card-carrier intermittently for spacing consecutive printed letters or characters, said mechanism including a rst cylinder, a driven piston reciprocable in said iirst cylinder and drivably connected to the card-carrier, a second cylinder, a driving piston reciprocab-le vertically in said second cylinder, a spring biasing said driving piston retractively, `a uid conduit interconnecting said cylinders,.a vcheck valve, a fluidholding reservoir connected'with said conduit emessi through said check'valve, said check -valve being operative to allow .fluid to pass 'rom'the reservoir into 'theconduit during each retractive stroke of .the driving piston and 'topreventbackowloi fluid during 'each forward stroke of thedrving piston,
a member .attached to and carried `by the 4drivingrpiston above the second cylinder and having a horizontal top surface, a horizontal locatedfabove said .member v'and journ'aled LiorLrotation, a lever carried 'by said .shaft ,iur manually rotating the samereciprocahly between twolniiting angular positions, a quadrant rotatable with said shaft, a roller carried by said quadrant and normally `engaging the Vsaid Ltop fsuriace of said member, ylin 'which position Ait 'is yeffective to hold the driving `piston at the limit of its forward 's'trolre'agajinst the opposition of its :biasing spring, Ysaid roller Afleeing movable-upwardly in .an arcuate lpath iin respons'eto a rotation of said shaft away from its normalposture of rest to allow the drivrng fpiston to retract upwardly vunder 'the impetus -of its biasing spring, said Yplunger oeingdrivably connected with said quadrantto'eiiect tdownward movement lof the vplunger concurrently 'with "retractive upward movement of the driving piston, and an 'adjustable stop 'effective "to engage said rneniber and thereby limit the upward stroke of the driving piston, the `arrangement 'being such that the limit of the retracti-ve'stro'lre of the -driving piston is independent of said 4roller and thus capable 'oi' bei-ng varied in harmony `With `each `individual spacing requirement.
I 28. A printing machine according to claim characterized in 'that the kadius'talile stop 'comprises-a lol'lcrank having a horizonte-l arm a vertical dependingarm, the distal end 'of said "horizontal arm overlying the top surface of 'said -rnenfiber and engaged therewith, `said type-case including Ia Jplurality of abutments, each individuaily Vassociated with one of said `type-hars, v"said machine *further including a d'og pivotally connected to the distal end of the depending 'bellcrank arm, said dog being movable with said A`bellcrank response to a retractive movement of the driving piston 4and adapted upon `such movement to engage the l*abutment vcorresponding'to-a selected *type-ban 4the engaged abutment heilig `effective rto block -further movement Aof the dog and bellcrank vand thus to terminate the retract-ive movement of the driving piston.
29. The combination in a hydraulic Imoti-onn transmitting system, 'a drivenp'iston, a rst -cylinder for said driven'piston, -a driving piston, a second cylinder Tor said vdriving piston, a i'luid 'conduit interconnecting said cylinders, said driving `piston vhaving an axial passageway Aconne'cted :at one "end with said conduit, `a fluid source connecte'd with the other 'end of said passageway, a check valve carried by said driving piston `Witn- 'in said passageway, said check valve "being operative to pass fluid from said source 'through said passageway during 4each retractive' 'stroke of the driving piston and normally 'eii'ect'rve "to prevent backflow therethrough, .a `rod 'carried oy the driving piston and slidahle axially thereof, .one end .of ,said 4rod be'ing 'adapted 'to 'engage and unseat 'said check valve upon depression of the .-rod, the .other end 'of the rod projecting outwardly from ,the driving piston, a 'tubular shat extending perpendicularly to the .asis of .the driving piston, .means carried '.by said shaft for actuating said driving piston in response to :rotationrof the shaft, ahar within 'the ocre .of said `tubular shaftfand :extending.'axiswisetliereof ,rotatalc'ile relatively jto the shalt, a jrst finger 20 Acarriedlcy saidfbar and pro'iecting -r'a diaily there# *from and operative upon rotation 2oi' said har one direction to engage and :depress :said :rod whereby :to unseat the `check valve, `a lever carried '-by said shaft `for effecting .manual rotation thereof, a second linger carried by said bar :and projecting radially :therefrom `adj acent lsaid leyer, 'andia plunger carriedby said levercand extending lengthwise thereof, one end of isaidplungcr 'being positioned 'to engage said :second dinger and thereby rotate `said shaft in the direction to unseat said check valve im 'response to a .'de- 'pression o'f lsaid g'lunger.,
B0. -The /combinanion according `to `claim .2-9 including -a spring im' retracting the driving piston, :and an aelement actuated by said shaft -for propelling the :driving :piston fiorwardiy fagainst the :opposition 'el :said spring -ln response `to.a*rotationof the :shaft in onedirectien.
31. 'l'lie sccmoination in -a .hydraulic motion- -t1#airismittiitug system, loi 1a first cylinder, a .driven pieton l@reciprrocable in said f1-rst a sec- Ecyiiinlei; sa driving piston recprocas-le in .said second cylinder, fa -fl-uid conduit including said `cylinders interconnecting ,said pistons, 4said second cylinder having a 'discharge port arranged to the progressively covered by the `.driving ,piston .as the latter :approaches the lim-it of its iorward stroke, and manually operable means ier actuating the :driving piston, .said .means comprising a manually rotatable ,shaft `and ,mechanism `driven Joy sai-d 'shaft and operative, in turn, to propel the driving piston iOrWardly., said .mechanism being effective to transmit orward motion -to the driving piston ,at .a progressively decreasing :speed in Arespmose to rotation .of said :shaft at -a uniform speed.
32. The combi-nation `according to claim '3l wherein the specified memanism comprises a rotary cam designed to `transmit 'forward motion toltneldrivi-ng pistonata progressively decreasing rate.
,33. In a .printing machine of ,the type that -comprisesa hase, .a card-carrier mounted on said ,base and `.movable theneover step-'.by-,step lin a .rectilinear Ipath .to Teiiect spacing 'between iconv-se'cutive ,'printed letters, .a type-,case mounted above the carrier `and movable thereover jin a Vl-iorizontal plane, .a lplurality `of vertical `typehars -yvithinsaid case, each having `a type-face 44at :its lower end, and -Aa nertical `plunger .operative lupon downward Lmovement ,to engage .and depress ssaid `type-bars individually and selectively, a :hydraulic 7motion-transrnitting system operative :to move the gard-,carrier a pnedeter- :mined distance `duri-ng each upward .movement `of the plunger, :said :mechanism including .a piston A.connected to :the carrier, .a first cylinder :in which T.the driven pmton 'is ,reciprocable, ra 1driving' piston, sa second cylinder `:in which :the driving misten is geciprocable, a Lduid vconduit @interconnecting said "cylinders, -a 'reservoir `connected with 'said luid onduit through :a check Avalve which normally Loperat'rve to inrevent 'backflow of from the .conduit 'to the reservoir, vand a 'manually Aoperable meelranisrn foractuating both said plunger and said vdriving piston, lsaid. mechanism including 'an element operative to 'propel the driving piston "forwar'rliy during each upstroke of 'the plunger, 'thereloe'ing .a lost-.motion separation between said element `and 'the 'driving riis'tonw'nen ythe `'plunger is in its .downmost position, 'which 'lost-motion lseparation `is Veffective to allow the 'plunger to rise fa
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2873013A (en) * 1957-02-08 1959-02-10 Reynolds Pen Company Printing machine
US3215245A (en) * 1962-08-15 1965-11-02 Carl G Thiene Printing machine with means to compensate for different areas of different characters
US3228507A (en) * 1961-11-06 1966-01-11 Sam H Young Hand operated printer with translatable keyboard
DE1272311B (en) * 1962-08-15 1968-07-11 Reynolds Printasign Co Switching device for switching the paper cart of a manual printing device
US4029191A (en) * 1975-05-01 1977-06-14 Angelina M. Klem Variable spacing printing apparatus

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US2161304A (en) * 1937-09-27 1939-06-06 Hydraulic Brake Co Fluid pressure braking system
US2254084A (en) * 1940-03-04 1941-08-26 George H Ische Fluid pump
US2294351A (en) * 1938-06-03 1942-08-25 Bendix Prod Corp Fluid pressure creating device
US2340113A (en) * 1941-10-17 1944-01-25 Adiel Y Dodge Master cylinder and piston construction
US2341318A (en) * 1942-02-16 1944-02-08 Kelsey Hayes Wheel Co Master cylinder
US2384824A (en) * 1944-07-10 1945-09-18 George R Eitner Lubricating device

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US833457A (en) * 1903-08-11 1906-10-16 James W Nelson Pump for hydraulic jacks and other purposes.
US1344711A (en) * 1919-05-15 1920-06-29 Paoli Arthur Hydraulic jack
US1430746A (en) * 1920-12-17 1922-10-03 Four Wheel Hydraulic Brake Com Braking apparatus
US1574772A (en) * 1924-01-25 1926-03-02 Walker Rudolf Fuel-feed pump for internal-combustion engines
US1673528A (en) * 1926-03-04 1928-06-12 Cie Internat Des Freins Automa Brake mechanism
US1899398A (en) * 1927-08-17 1933-02-28 Samuel W Rushmore Hydraulic brake
US1998821A (en) * 1932-05-02 1935-04-23 Hugh M Rockwell Fluid pressure control cylinder for vehicles and the like
US2079588A (en) * 1932-12-22 1937-05-11 S F Arbuckle Corp Brake mechanism
US2115692A (en) * 1937-04-08 1938-04-26 Reynolds Appliances Corp Printing apparatus
US2161304A (en) * 1937-09-27 1939-06-06 Hydraulic Brake Co Fluid pressure braking system
US2294351A (en) * 1938-06-03 1942-08-25 Bendix Prod Corp Fluid pressure creating device
US2254084A (en) * 1940-03-04 1941-08-26 George H Ische Fluid pump
US2340113A (en) * 1941-10-17 1944-01-25 Adiel Y Dodge Master cylinder and piston construction
US2341318A (en) * 1942-02-16 1944-02-08 Kelsey Hayes Wheel Co Master cylinder
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2873013A (en) * 1957-02-08 1959-02-10 Reynolds Pen Company Printing machine
US3228507A (en) * 1961-11-06 1966-01-11 Sam H Young Hand operated printer with translatable keyboard
US3215245A (en) * 1962-08-15 1965-11-02 Carl G Thiene Printing machine with means to compensate for different areas of different characters
DE1272311B (en) * 1962-08-15 1968-07-11 Reynolds Printasign Co Switching device for switching the paper cart of a manual printing device
US4029191A (en) * 1975-05-01 1977-06-14 Angelina M. Klem Variable spacing printing apparatus

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