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Shock absorbing shoe heel

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US2669038A
US2669038A US25706451A US2669038A US 2669038 A US2669038 A US 2669038A US 25706451 A US25706451 A US 25706451A US 2669038 A US2669038 A US 2669038A
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member
heel
inner
bottom
spring
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Werth Robert De
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Werth Robert De
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B21/00Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole
    • A43B21/24Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole characterised by the constructive form
    • A43B21/30Heels with metal springs

Description

Feb. 16, 1954 R DE WERTH SHOCK ABsoRBING 'SHOE HEEL 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Nov. 19, 1951 n ES JNVENToR. I ROBERT DE Wma :ANW/7W Feb. 16, 1954 R DE WERTH SHOCK ABSORBING SHOE HEEL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 19, 1951 INVENTOR ROBERT DE WERTH BY WWE/VEZ Patented Feb. 16, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SHOCK ABSORBIN G SHOE HEEL Robert De Werth, New York, N. Y.

Application November 19, 1951, Serial No. 257,064

5 Claims.

, 1 The present invention relates to new and useful improvements in a shock absorbing shoe heel.

More particularly, the present invention proposes the construction of a shock absorbing shoe heel which is resilient in construction so as to relieve shock and jolting encountered with each step taken during normal walking. It has been determined that many of the annoyances connected with sore and aching feet and legs and back trouble are caused by the shock which the body absorbs with each step taken with shoes equipped with the conventional rubber, leather or the like heels. The principal object of the present invention is the construction of a resilient heel having wear heels attached thereto which will absorb all of the shock and jolt of the heaviest step regardless of whether the wear heels arel constructed of rubber or leather relieving the body of absorbing such shocks and jolts andvsodoing away with the agonies and discomf fort of aching feet and legs and back trouble.

Another object of the present invention proposes constructing the shock absorbing heel to include an outer member for attachment to the shoe and which has an open bottom into which an inner member, mounting ythe wear heel, is slidably mounted in a manner so that the inner member and its attached wear heel may have freedom of movement relative to the outer member.

Still further, the present invention proposes the provision of a plurality of spring connectors interposed between the outer and inner members and have connection with each in a manner to constitute the inner member and integral part of the outer member while at the same time leaving the inner member free for sliding movements relative to the outer member. 1

' The present invention further proposes constructing the spring` connectors to include coil springs which are under normal unbiased extension in a manner to hold the inner member in a normal extended position relative to the outer member when there is no pressure on the heel.

vA further object of the present invention proposes constructing the inner member with a re-l cess in its bottom face within which the wear heel is removably mounted in a manner so that the `wear heels can be quickly and easily replaced when wornout without requiring replacement of the complete heel and without having to take the-shoes to a shoe repair man eliminating the usual delays encountered when heels have to be replaced. t I

Still another object of the present invention proposes constructing the inner member of separate sections arranged one behind the other with the rearmost section having its spring connectors arranged at a downward and rearward inclination in a manner to be substantially at right angles to the floor surface as the back of the heel first strikes the surface during a normal walking step.

Still further, the present invention proposes mounting the wear heel of that rearmost section of the inner member so that its bottom face will be inclined upward and rearward in a manner to be parallel to and strike the iioor surface with the flat of its bottom face as the back of the heel rst strikes the surface during a normalwalking step and thereby eliminate much of the wear and tear on the rearmost section of the heel.

Another object of the present invention proposes constructing the inner member of a plurality of separate laterally extended portions, each of which mounts a separate wear heel portion in a manner so that individual portions of the wear heel which receive the most wear and tear can be removed and replaced Without requiring replacement of the entire wear heel.

Another important feature of those heels of the present construction in which the wear heel is divided into two or more transversely extended sections is that the sections are free so that their respective springs will be compressed progressively less from the rear to the front of the heel as the rear `of the heel rst strikes the ground and the heel is rocked forward as the step is being completed. Still further, the present invention proposes the construction of a shock absorbing heel which is neat in appearance and in which all of the spring connectors are completely enclosed between the outer and inner members eliminating the possibility of dirt and grime collecting on those spring connectors while at the same time protecting the springy connectors against the ravages of mud, rain, snow, ice and the like; particularly, when shoes equipped with the shock absorbing heels of the present invention are worn during inclement weather.

It is a further object of the present invention to construct a shock absorbing heel which is simple and durable, which is completely effective for its intended purposes and which can be manufactured and sold at a reasonable price for use cn new shoes or for attachment to old shoes as a part of the resoling and rebuilding thereof.

" For further comprehension of the invention,

il and or the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

Fig. 1 is an elevational View of the rear portion of a mans shoe equipped with a shock absorbing heel constructed in accordance with the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a bottom elevational view of the heel, per se, shown in Fig. l.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal sectional` View talnenY substantially on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view. taken sub-` stantially on the line :1 -fi of Fig.v 3.

Fig. 5 is a plan view of a portion'of` Fig. 3.

Fig. 6 is an elevational view of the spring, per se, of one of the spring connectors.

Fig. 7 is a plan view of Fig. 6.

Fig., 8 is a perspective View of the spring retainer, per se, of one of the spring connectors.

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 3,but illustrating the shook absorbing heel constructed in accordance with a modication of the present in` Vention.

Fig. 10 is a bottom plan view of Fig. 9.

Fig. 11 is an enlarged detailed View. of the rear portion of Fig. 9..

Fig. 12 is a partial transverse vertical sectional view taken on the line l2-i7i of 1l with thebottom portion thereof broken away to reveal details of the means for mounting the bottom wedge. member in position.

Fig.. 13 is a plan view oi the top wedge mein ber used in the form of the invention shown in Figs. 9 to 12.

Fie. 14 is a plan view of the bottom wedge member used in the form of the invention shown in Figs. 9 to. 12.

Fig'. l5 is another view similar to Fig. 3, but illustrating the shock absorbing heel constructed in accordance with a further modification of the present invention.

Fig. l5 is a bottom plan view ofv Fig.; 15.

Fig. 17 is an enlarged detailed viewof: a p0rtion of Fig. l5. f

Fig. 18 is a partial. transverse verticalsectional iew taken` on the line Iil-lti of Fig. l?.

Fig. 19 is a plan view of the wedge member used in the form of the invention shown in liigs.` to l.

The shock absorbing heel, according to the rst form of the present invention shown in Figs. 1 to 8, wherein the heel is shown attached to the bach of a mans shoe el? andv as including a top or outerinember Si. The outer member 3| is fashioned of a noncorroding metal such as stainless steel and has aV top wall t2 and a depending slfiirt wall all about the top wall v32; Thus, the outer member 3i is completely open at itsI bottom. The top wall 32. is provided with a plurality or spaced threaded holes 3, one of which is shown in Fig.. 3 by which the outer mem bei: 3i can. be attached to the outer sole of the shoe 3i?. The attachment is accomplished by screws, not shown, which are passed through the outer sole and threadedinto the, holes .til with the heads of the screws located beneath the inner sole of the. shoe. However, the manner of at,- taching the outer member 3i to the shoe` is not an essential feature of the present invention and any other feasible method can be. substituted for the. screws and complementary holesd Withdit 'IES

4 out departing from the scope and intent of the present invention.

Extended completely about the outer face of the skirt wall 33 of the outer member 3l, there is a strip of leather 35 which matches in color and texture the leather of the shoe 3G. The strip of leather 35 is secured in position by a thin layer of mucilage 36 interposed between the skirt wall 33 and the strip oi' leather 35. So that the mucilage 3G willhave greater affinity for the surface of the skirt wall 33 the same can be suitably roughened, if desired. While a strip of leather is preferably used for covering the outer faceofthe skirt wall 33, it is appreciated that other materials can be used for that purpose.

Fitted into the open bottom of the outer inember 3l, thereis alower or inner member 3l fashioned of the same material used for making the outer member. The inner member 3l has a bottom wall 38 and an opstanding skirt wall 39. The skirt wall 39 of the inner member 3'! has an outer circumference to be snugly ntted with freedom oi. sliding movement into the skirt wall 33 of the outer member 3l.

The bottom wall 3B of the inner member 31 has arecess Iii! extended in from its bottom face and into which a wear heel di is fitted. The. wear heel 4l has its bottom face extended below the bottom face of the bottom. Wall 33 of they inner member 3l. The wear heel 4l is releasably ren tained in position by several screws 112 passed through complementary holes 43 in the wear heel di and threaded into complementary threaded holes dfi formed in the bottom wall 36 or the inner member 3l.

Welded tothe inner face of the bottom wall 1580i the inner member 3.7.,concentric with each of the threaded holesli, there` are small internally threaded collars` 42W. The innerA ends ci", the screws. d2. after passing, through the holes 4G arethreaded into the collars 152e. Thus, the collars i2a function as nutsy in the assembled heelv to securely anchor the screws Q2` in position. Thev use o the collars @2.a is particularly importa-nt in cases where the bottom wall 33 is particularly thin` providing very little anchorage for the inner ends of the screws.

By removing. the screws t2, the wear heel 4l can be-lifted ont and replaced by a new one with out requiring replacement of the complete heel or engaging the services of a professional shoe repair man.` OntheY drawings, the wear heel illustrated` as being formedof rubber; however, that is yby way of illustration only asthe wear heel can be made of leather or one of the synthetic resinous materials, ii desired.

Spring connectors d5 are provided forr connecty ing together the outer member di and the inner memberil to malte an integral. assembly of the heel parts. Each ei the spring connectors #35 is comprised or a coil spring".itI and spring retainers- 4'11 atv the ends thereof. The coil springs dir are shaped from a piece of relatively stii wire biased to maximum. exten-sion, as shown in Fig. At their ends, the coil springs it have enlarged endmost convolutieais.y t8 a purpose which will become clear as this specincation proceeds and smaller intermediate convolutions im between the enlarged endmost convolutions 48.'

The spring retainers All are shaped of a noncorrosive metalr and are substantially eupshaped in formation with open sides directed away from each other and with inwardly directed ilanges 59 opposite their open sides.. Internally, the spring retainers 4l are of a diameter just slightlysmaller 'than the external diameter of the enlarged end- .most convolutions 48 of the coil springs 46. Those lendmost convolutions 48 of the springs 46 are fitted into the spring retainers 41 with slight compression so as to frictionally grip and maintain vthe spring retainers 41 in a xed position with relation to the coil springs 46. As shown in Figs. 4 and 8, the flanges 50 of the spring retainers 41 are formed with cutouts 5| in one side thereof through which the springs 46 extend to the exterior of the` spring retainers 41.

Extending from the outwardly facing open sides of the spring retainers 41, there are spaced lugs 52 which are projected through complementary holes 53 formed in the top wall 32 of the outer member 3| and in the bottom wall 38 of the inner member 31. are bent over against the outer faces of the walls 32 and 38 securing the spring retainers 41 xedly in position. -To assemble the inner and outer members by means of the spring retainers 41, the

retainers at one end of each of the spring connec-V tors 45 are first connected with one of the walls 32 or 38. The retainers 41 at the other ends of the spring connectors 45 are then all rotated to the desired position in which the lugs 52 will be in proper alignment with the holes 53 of the other vplate 32 or 38. The other plate is then slipped that they will be compressed to approximately` one-half their maximum extension under the force exerted during a normal walking step by the person wearing the shoes equipped with the shock absorbing heels. That tension will, of course, vary in accordance with the weight of different persons. It is known that people of certain heights have weights falling Within certain extremes and wear shoes of a certain size. Shoes of diilerent sizes are equipped with heels of different sizes, so that in manufacturing the heels they will be equipped with coil springs 46 possessing a tension in accordance with the size of the heel into which they are fitted resulting in springs of the proper tension being attached to proper shoes in accordance with the weight of the person who will eventually wear the shoes.

In the modication of the invention shown in Figs. 9 to 14, the inner member 31 is divided into a front portion 31a and a rear portion 31b'each of` which is pr-ovided with a separate wear heel por-'- tion 4I and 4| b respectively. The wear heel portion 4|b of the rearmost portion 31b of the inner member 31 has a ilat bottom face extended parallel to'the flat bottom face'of the wear heel portion 4|. However, the spring connectors 45 of the rearmost portion 31b are positioned at a down-i Wardly and rearwardly inclined angle, as shown in Fig. 9. AThose spring connectors 45a are mounted between wedge members 55 and 56 having parallel downwardly and forwardly inclined faces engaged by the spring retainers 41 of the spring connectors 45a.

The topmost Wedge member 55 is secured in.r

position betweenl the sides of the skirt wall 330i* the outer member and against the inner face of: its top Wall-32 by screws 51 passed through holes formed in the skirt Wall 33 andthe top wall 32 i and threaded' into complementaryA threaded re'- The free ends of the lugs 52-` cesses 58 formed in the wedge member 55. In this form of the invention it is the Wedge member 55 and 56 which are formed with the holes 53E, see Figs. 11, 13 and 14, which are engaged by the lugs 52 of the spring connectors 45a of the rear portion 31b of the inner member 31.

The bottommost wedge member 56 is secured to the bottom Wall 38 of the rear portion 31b of the inner'member 31 by several screws 59, one of which is shown in Fig. 12, which are passed through holes 60, see Fig. 14, in the ends of the wedge member 56 and threaded into complementary threaded recesses 6| formed in the bottom wall 38.

Regarding the screws 51 and 59, in certain instances it may be desirable to eliminate the use of those screws and secure the wedge members 55 and 56 in position by Welding or similar means. The use of welding is particularly desirable in those instances where the material of the inner member 31 and the outer member 3| is s'o thin as to provide a very insecure anchorage for the head ends of the screws.

Along its front edge, the topmost wedge member 55 is formed with a depending transversely extending wall 62 which is disposed between the portions 31a and 31h of the inner member 31 and which holds those portions separated for individual sliding movement relative to the outer member 3| and to each other. The spring connectors 45a are arranged at .a downward and rearward extended angle to be substantially at right angles to the iioor surface when the rear end of the heel first strikes the iioor surface during a normal walking step. That arrangement leaves the spring connectors 45EL freev so that their springs 46 will be compressed only in a direction parallel to their axis when Vthe heel rst strikes the floor surface so that all of the force will be exerted to compress the spring in a direction parallel to its axis without being absorbed by the heel portions in some direction other than the direction of compression and to be eventually absorbed by the Wearers foot.

In all other respects, the form of the invention shown in Figs. 9 to 14 is similar to that described and illustrated in connection Iwith Figs. 1 to 8 and like reference numerals are used to identify like parts throughout.

The modication of the invention shown in Figs. 15 to 19 is similar to that described in connection with Figs. 9 to 14 distinguishing only in the arrangement and sliding positioning of the rear portion 31b of the inner member 31. In this form of the invention, a block 65 is fitted into the rear of the outer member 3| behind the front portion 31a ofthe inner member 31. Thev block 65 is secured in position byA several screws 66 which are passed through complementary holes formed in the skirt wall 33 of the outer member 3| and threaded into complementary threaded recesses 61 formed about the outer periphery of the block 65. The bottom face of the block 65 is hollowed out to slidably receive the rear portion 31o for sliding movements extended parallel to the downward and rearward inclination of the spring connectors 45h of that rear portion 31h. The rear portion 31h is shaped to have its bottom wall 38 extend downward and forward at right angles to the axis of sliding of the rear portion andso as to mount the respective rear portion 4151 of the wear heel 4| sc that its bottom face will be extended downward and forward at an inclination. Thus, the bottom face of the rear portion I 'lthi'of the wearhee'l' 41| willl be in: ay position' to strike the floor surface substantially fiat' as the rearY of the heel is brought down on` the Floor 'surfacel during a norma-1' Walking step.

is in the case of the wedgemembers and of the form oi the invention illustratedin; Figs. 9ft'o. 14, it may be desirable to weld the block t5 imposition within the rear of the outer member 3l rather than to secure. it in position using' the screws 65; can be" substituted for the screws. t6 Without depai-'tii-rg.l fromv the scope and intent of the present invention.

The top wall of the block 55 is shaped to' provide:y an internal' wedge memberl 55e having the holes 53e engaged by the lugs 52 ci the topmost spring retainer The bottom wall. 33 of the rear portion t'e'b or the inner' member 3T being inclined, as shown in Figs. l5l and i7, there is no need for abottom wed-ge member the previous form of thev invention. rihereiore, the bottom spring retainer el' oi thel springcon,n nector 1511 is secured directly to Athatbottorn wa'lfl-` byhaving its lugs 52' passed. through the holes 5-3, as shown in Fig. 17.

im all other respects, the form of the invention shown in Figs. i5 tov i9` is similar to that describedin connection withv Figs. 9 to 1.4 and like reference numerals identify like parts throughout the several views.

Each oi; the modiiications of the invention has: been characterizedby the use of eleven spring connectors and while that is the preferred arrangement, the sameV is by of illustration only as the number of spring connectors can be increased or decreased asrdesired without departing from the scope and. intent' of the pres ent invention. The eleven spring. connectors are shown arranged in. three transversely extending row-s1 of three eachi and one row at the rear. of the: heel which has only two spring con,- nectors. That, too, is by way of illustration only, particularly as regards the rear row of spring connectors Wherev more than two con nectors can be used if desired. However, best results-'are obtained: if not less than two connectors are used in that rear row.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understoodv that I do not limity myself tothe precise constructions herein disclosedand right reserved te aliY changes and modiiications com-ing within the scope of the invention as dened in the appendedclaims.

Having thusV described my'invention, what I claim as new, and desire toVv secure by United States. Letters Patent`- is:

l. A shock absorbing shoe heel, comprising an outer member for attachment to a shoe and having an open bottom, an inner member having an open top slide-bly fitted into said outei` member, spring connectors between. said mem.- bers. joining them together so that said inner member can move relative to said` outer member, said. inner. member having a recess in its bottom face, and a wear heelmounted in said recess and depended from the bottom face of said inner member, said inner member being divided into a iront portion and a rear portion, said wear heel being divided into separate portions one for each of said portions of said inner member.

2. A Shock absorbing shoe heel, comprising an outer member for attachment to a shoe and havingan open bottom, an inner.l member having an open top slida'blv fitted into said outermember',

It being appreciated that welding spring `connestors between; said members joining them together' so that said inner member.A can move relative to said outer menfiber"y said inner member-having a recessv in its bottom face, and a wear heel mounted. in said. recessv and depended from. the bottom face of said inner member, said innerv member being divided into a iront portion anda rear portion, said' wear heel being divided into separate portions one for each ofsad portions cf said inner member, said rear. portion of said inner member having its spring connectors arranged at a downwardand; rearward inclination with the bottom face of the rear portion of saidl wear heel arranged on: the same plane with the bottom face of the front portion: of said wear wheel.

3'. A shock absorbingv shoe heel, comprising an cuter member for attachment. to a shoe and hav'- ing an open bottom, an inner member having an open: tcp slidabl'y -tted into said outer member, spring connectors between saidv members joining them together so that-said inner. member can mover relative to said outer member, said inner memberhaving a recess in its bottom: face, and a wear heel mountedin said recess and depended irom the bottom face of said inner member, said inner member being divided into a iront` portion and a rear portion, said wearv heel' being divided into separate portions one for each of,` Said portions of said inner member, said rear portion oi said inner member having, its spring connectors arranged at a downward and rearward inclination with. the bottom face of the rear portion of saidwear heel arranged at. adownward and forward inclination.

e. A shock absorbing shoe heel, comprising. an outer member for attachment to a shoe. have ing an open. bottom, an inner member having an open top slidably fitted into said outer. member, spring connectors` between said members joining them. together so that saidv inner member can move relative to said outer member, said inner member having a recess in its bottom face, and a wear heel mounted in said recess and depended from the bottom face of. said inner mem.- ber', saidinner member being divided into ay front portion and a rear portion, said wear heelbeing divided into separate portions one for each@ of said portions of said. inner member, said rear portion of saidinner member having its spring connectorsarranged at a downward and. rearward` inclination with theV bottom face. of. the rear portion of saidv wear heel arranged on the same. plane-with the bottom face of the iront portion ofl said wear` heel said springy connectors being supported at the downward and rearward inclination by being mounted lbetween. wedge members fixedly mounted within said outer member and the" rear portion of said inner member.

5. A shock absorbing shoe heel', con'iprising an outer member for attachment to a shoe and. having an openv bottom',` an inner member having an open top slidably fitted into said outer" meinber, spring connectors between said members joining them together so that said inner member can move relative to said outer member, said inner member having a recess in its bottom face, and a wear heel mounted in said recess and depended from the bottom face of said inner member, said inner member being divided into a iront portion and a rear portion, said wear heel being divided into separate portions' one for eachl of said portions of. said inner member, said rearportionof said inner member having/its spring connectors arranged at a. downward and rearward inclination with the bottom face of the rear portion of said wear heel arranged at a downward and forward inclination, said rear portion being mounted for sliding movements 5 parallel to the inclination of said spring connectors within a hollowed block member xedly mounted within said outer member behind the front portion of said inner member.

ROBERT DE WERTH.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Scruggs May 23, 1911 Jenoi & Kruchio Apr. 21, 1914 Karacsonyi June 9, 1914 Dutchak Oct. 9, 1923

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