US2663999A - Household refrigerator - Google Patents

Household refrigerator Download PDF

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US2663999A
US2663999A US272056A US27205652A US2663999A US 2663999 A US2663999 A US 2663999A US 272056 A US272056 A US 272056A US 27205652 A US27205652 A US 27205652A US 2663999 A US2663999 A US 2663999A
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coils
refrigerant
evaporator
compressor
freezing
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US272056A
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Carl F Alsing
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Seeger Refrigerator Co
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Seeger Refrigerator Co
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F25D11/00Self-contained movable devices, e.g. domestic refrigerators
    • F25D11/02Self-contained movable devices, e.g. domestic refrigerators with cooling compartments at different temperatures

Description

Dec. 29, 1953 c. F. ALSING 3,9
HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR Filed Feb. 18, 1952 5 Sheets-Sheet l go 1 y 35.- D I 37- t i I N V EN TOR. Carl 1452'] B Y WX M Dec. 29, 1953 c. F. ALSING HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed. Feb. 18, 1952 m T .N 1 IV W Carl F 14151739 BY MM 42 50; rzqy Dec. 29, 1953 c. F. ALSING HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR I5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 18, 1952 Dzlsc/zar 6 Line INVENTOR. Carl 1 /115215) Ice flrealrz dwzparflrzelzi :EEEEEiEc Patented Dec. 29, 1953 HOUSEHOLD REFRIGERATOR Carl F. Alsing, Evansville, Ind; assignor to Seeger Refrigerator Company, St. Paul, Mimn, a corporation of Mlnneso Application February 18, 1952, Serial No. 272,056
13 Claims. (Cl. 62-11735) The present invention relates to household refrigerators, and is particularly concerned with household refrigerators of the type utilizing an evaporator enclosure for freezing ice cubes and for storage of frozen food, and utilizing the exterior of the evaporator enclosure for cooling a higher temperature food storage space.
One of the difllculties encountered in the cooling of a food storage space by means of a freezing evaporator lies in the fact that the ambient temperature under which the household refrigerator operates may vary greatly. The operation of the motor compressor is controlled by a thermostatic switch which is responsive to temperature conditions at some part of the evaporator. If the size of the evaporator and cooling area for the food storage space are properly proportioned for high temperature ambients, it is found that the food storage space will become too cold under the low temperature ambients.
One of the objects of the present invention is the provision of an improved refrigeration system in which the amount of effective cooling area of the evaporator which is available for cooling the food storage space is automatically varied by the operation of the system in such manner that the freezing en losure of the evaporator is always kept at a l w temperature below freezing; but the food stoiage space is always kept at a suitable temperature above freezing, even though the ambient temperature under which the household refrigerator operates may vary greatly, as it does, when the same refrigerator is intended to be used in extremely cold climates and extremely hot climates.
Another object of the invention is the provision of an improved household refrigerator utilizing an evaporator enclosure for freezing ice and storing frozen food, and utilizing the exterior of the evaporator enclosure for cooling the food storage space, in which the frozen food space is always maintained at a suitable temperature below freezing, while the food storage space is always maintained at a suitable temperature above freezing, without the necessity for employing any complicated controls other than a simple thermostatic switch for the compressor circuit, which is operated responsive to the temperature of some part of the evaporator.
Another object of the invention is the provision of an improved refrigeration system which takes advantage of the characteristic of oil of absorbing different amounts of refrigerant, such as Freon, depending upon the temperature and pressure of the mineral oil which is employed for this 2 purpose and for lubricating the compressor, to reduce the effective amount of refrigerant available under different ambient temperatures. The refrigerant employed, commercially known as Freon or F12, is technically known as dichlorodifluormethane.
Another object of the invention is the provision of an improved household refrigerator, the evaporator of which is provided with a supercold ice cream compartment which is always maintained at a temperature suitable for the storage of ice cream in preference to refrigerating the other parts of the evaporator or the food storage space, which is external to the evaporator.
Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and the accompanying drawings, in which similar characters of reference indicate similar parts throughout the several views. I
Referring to the drawings, of which there are three sheets,
Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of a household refrigerator embodying the invention, shown with its door open;
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view, taken on the plane of the line 22 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows, with the door closed;
Fig. 3 is a view in perspective of an improved form of evaporator provided with a special ice cream compartment;
Fig. 4 is a sectional view showing another form of evaporator without the ice cream compartment;
Fig. 5 is a diagrammatic view showing the refrigeration system which is employed.
The present household refrigerator preferably includes a cabinet having an outer metal shell l0 and an inner metal liner II spaced from each other} land insulated by means of suitable insulalOIl The shell l0 and liner II are joined about the door opening by a suitable breaker strip 13; and the front opening is closed by a door [4, comprising an outer metal door shell I5, an inner door panel [6, joined together at the upper inner corner H, where the door carries a suitable seal I8, engaging the face of the cabinet shell l0 around the door opening.
The insulating door panel It may be provided with a suitable depression is for receiving the door shelves 20 and the space between the inner and outer panel and shell of the door is filled with a suitable insulation 2|. The inside space in the liner'is divided into a lower food storage aeeaace space 22 and an upper evaporator housing space 23 by a suitable molded plastic drawer 24, which is slidably mounted upon guides carried by the liner walls, and which serves as a storage space at a temperature intermediate between that inside the evaporator and that which is present in the food storage space 22.
The guides 25 for the plastic drawer 24 have air circulation passages through them so that the air may circulate upward along both of the side walls 26, 21 of the liner ID. The guides 25 also support integral trunnions 28 carried by the pivotally mounted evaporator door 29, which may swing from an upper vertical position to a lower vertical position so that it can never be damaged by closing of the door.
The sliding drawer 24 is spaced from the back wall 30 of the liner, leaving an air circulation space at 3| for the circulation of air passing from the food storage space 22 to the space 23 around the evaporator.
In a similar manner the front edge of the sliding drawer 24 is spaced from the door, leaving an air circulation space 32; and the door shelves 2!) may have through holes or an air circulation space at 33 between the shelves and the inner door panel 16.
In the lower part of the food storage space 22 there may be provided a molded plastic sliding drawer 34 slidably mounted upon guides 35 carried by the liner walls 26 and 21 and covered with a glass cover 36 carried by said guides. The guides 35 again have air circulation apertures for permitting the air to circulate down into the space 31 surrounding the sliding drawer 34; and the glass cover 36 may terminate short of the back wall 30 of the liner and short of the inner door panel IQ for air circulation.
A plurality of wire shelves 38, 39, 40 may be adjustably mounted on the side walls 26 and 21 by having their front and back wire frame members 4| project laterally into rubber or plastic grommets 42 mounted in apertures in the side walls 26, 21 of the liner.
The cabinet is cooled by a suitable evaporator 43, which may be supported from. the front part of the top wall 44 of the liner by angle brackets 45 and from the rear wall 30 of the liner by angle brackets 46.
The evaporator 43 may be either of the types shown in Figs. 3 or 4. For example, the evaporator of Fig. 3 comprises a substantially U-shaped sheet metal member 41 having a vertical side wall 48, a horizontal bottom 49, and a vertical side wall 53, these walls being joined by easy bends 59 and being made of suitable metal, such as sheet aluminum.
The side walls 48 and 50 carry a horizontal shelf 5|, comprising a rectangular sheet metal aluminum member having downwardly extending attaching flanges 52 which are riveted to the side walls 48 and 50; and the back of the evaporator is closed by means of a rectangular sheet metal back wall 53 of aluminum, which extends from the bottom to the top of the evaporator and issecured by having attaching flanges 54 riveted to the side walls.
The top of the evaporator is closed by engagement of its upper edges with the top wall 44 of the liner; and the front of the evaporator is closed by means of the plastic door 29 rotatably supported upon its trunnions 28 on the guides 25.
A vertical partition 55 is located close to the side wall 50 to form a rectangular ice cream compartment; and this partition may be riveted to the horizontal shelf 5| by means of an attaching flange 56 and to the bottom 49 by means of an attaching flange 51'.
The shelf 5! is preferably spaced from the upper edges of the evaporator by an amount suitable to permit the insertion of ice trays of any depth which may be used, or the spacing may be made suitable to receive frozen food packages, in addition to the ice trays.
The evaporator is preferably provided on one of the walls with a refrigerant receiver or boiler 60, comprising a tubularmetal member of aluminum, which is substantially cylindrical, but which has both of its tapered end portions 61 and 62 spun into a tapered or rounded smaller tubular formation. These end portions serve as inlets and outlets for the boiler, which is primarily intended to separate the liquid from the vapor, and which preferably has its suction outlet 63 extending in the tubular end portion 6i and turned upward, as indicated at 64.
The inlet tube 65 extends into the opposite end portion 62 and discharges mixed vapor and liquid under certain conditions into the receiver 60. Due to the upwardly turned end 64 at the outlet, only vapor is drawn from the receiver by the pump, the liquid accumulating on the bottom portion of the receiver 60.
The receiver 50 is preferably supported in an elongated aperture 66 in the wall and has integral attaching fins 61 above and below the receiver, which are riveted to the wall, with the receiver projecting through the aperture 66, but having its major portion on the outside of the aperture 66.
In the evaporator of Fig. 3, indicated at 43. the receiver is preferably placed on the back wall 53; and the evaporator is provided with sinuous aluminum cooling coils which are welded to the bottom of the shelf and to the sides and bottom of the evaporator for intimate heat conducting contact with these parts. The sinuous coils are preferably arranged as follows:
The inlet to the evaporator coils from the capillary tube as indicated at 68, at the right rear wall corner. The tubes are then arranged sinuously on the right wall 53, covering that portion of the right wall and the bottom 49, which forms a part of the ice cream compartment 69. Thus the sinuous coils 10 extend downward across the right side of the ice cream compartment 69 and under the ice cream compartment, where they are bent backwardly across the bottom and up the side again in regular sinuous portions, as shown, to cover the side and bottom of the ice cream compartment. The last upwardly extending tubular portion H on the icecream compartment wall passes through the wall and extends backwardly on the bottom of the shelf 51 and is formed into sinuous portions 12, extending back and forth under the shelf, and cooling the top of the ice cream compartment 69.
From the top of the ice cream compartment the coils extend backwardly at 13 under the shelf and are brought to the left, with a portion 14 extending over adjacent the left wall 48. The frozen food compartment 15 is located below this portion of the shelf 51; and the shelf is provided with laterally extending sinuous portions 16 covering it from front to back on its lower side and terminating in a backwardly extending portion 11. I
The backwardly extending portion 11 communicates with the sinuous coils 18, which extend downward on the left side 48 of the evaporator, across the bottom of the frozen food compartment I5, and sinuously back and forth until compartment and the entire left side of the evaporator are substantially covered with coils. Thereafter the coils extend upward at "and across the left side of the evaporator wall ad- 'jacent the top at 88 and communicate with the receiver 69 at the portion 85. i
Various ways of arranging the coils sinuously on these parts may be employed; but the coils are preferably arranged in such a'mannenthat the ice cream compartment is cooled first, theice freezing shelf is cooled next, and the rest of the evaporator is cooled last. i
According to the present invention, the amount of refrigerant available is carefully proportioned so that the ice cream compartment is always the left side and the bottom of the frozen food cooled to a suitable temperature below freezing,
to high pressure liquid, purple lining to low pressure gas, and blue lining to low pressure liquid.
In the refrigeration system, I80 indicates the motor-compressor housing. which is of the sealed type, having an oil sump IOI and an upper motor chamber I02. The compressor is located in the signal" and has its inlet at M and its outlet a From the compressor outlet its a refrigerant tube Ill extends to a condenser section I01, which may include one or two or more sinuous coils for pro-cooling the refrigerant immediately upon its discharge from the compressor. From the precooling coils I81 of the condenser I88, a conduit I89 extends backto the inlet H0 of the compressor motor housing I02.
The high pressure gas enters this housing I02 and is discharged from the top of the housing at III, the entrained oil H2 dropping to the oil sump Ill.
From the outlet I ll of the motor housing I92 a conduit Ill extends to the main condenser coils III, which are also arranged sinuously; and all forward and top edges are folded backward and outward, as indicated at 84, to provide a smooth blunt edge. The back wall is terminated at 85 with a backwardly extending flange 86 slightly above the shelf 81, and serves as a stop for engaging the ice trays, but permits the circulation of air into the ice tray space.
The inlet for refrigerant from the capillary tube 68 is at the right rear of the shelf, from which the tube extends forwardly at 88, and thereafter sinuously from left to right on the bottom of the shelf, as indicated at 89. The tube emerges through a hole in the back wall at 90 and thereafter extends downwardly on the right wall at 9|, across'the bottom wall. at 92, up the left side wall at 93, across the left side wall adjacent the top at 94, downwardly on the left side wall at 95.-
Thereafter the tube is arranged sinuously back.
and forth across the bottom and up both side walls, as indicated at 96. On the left side wall the bends are located adjacent the shelf level; and on the right side wall the bends are located below the shelf in order to permit the sinuous portions 96 to communicate with the sinuous portion 91, which leads to the forward end of the receiver 60a. The opposite end of the receiver has the same suction pipe 64, which turns upwardly into the receiver 69a.
Thus the shelf of this evaporator is cooled first with available refrigerant, and thereafter the remaining refrigerant is available for cooling the side walls and bottom of the evaporator.
Referring to Fig. 5, this is a schematic diagram of the refrigeration system, showing the various portions of the system and the condition of the refrigeration system at low ambient temperature. The parts of the drawing are lined to illustrate by color the condition of the refrigerant; and the ac-' companying color code is located below the figure. The color code corresponds to that employed in the Patent Oflice Rules relating to trade-mark drawings; and as indicated, yellow lining in the code corresponds to high pressure gas. red lining .of the coils I01 and I ll of the condenser are in heat conducting contact with a multiplicity of thin sheet metal fins H5.
The pre-cooling section I01 of the condenser has its coils preferably arranged above the main condenser coils H4, receiving the hotter air, which has already passed the main condenser coil, but which is still able to cool the pre-cooler section III! because of the higher temperature of the refrigerant in the precooler section.
From the outlet H6 of the main condenser section, a conduit extends to a refrigerant drier ll'l, consisting of a tubular metal member, and having a pair of screens H8 located near its reduced ends, and having a drying powdered chemical, such as silica gel, arranged between the screens to absorb waterj or water vapor which may be present in the refrigerant.
A capillary tube H9 extends from the opposite end of the drier and is located in heat conducting contact at I20 with the suction tube I21, which extends from the accumulator I22 to the comprssor inlet I94. The capillary tube I20 acts as ..-:ja,;restrictor and heat exchanger and is soldered the suction tube over the major available The capillary tube communicates with the inlet to the evaporator at 68 and carries the refrigerant to the sinuous coils 10-12, which are located on the top, sides, and bottom of the ice cream compartment in the case of Fig. 3, or the shelf coils 89 of Fig. 4.
From the ice cream compartment coils I2 a conduit 13 extends to the sinuous coils 16 on the shelf, and thence to the sinuous coils 18, which are located on the outside of the body of the evaporator on the bottom and side wall.
The coils I8 communicate at 65 with the accumulator I22, which is equivalent to that illustrated at 60 and 69a in Figs. 3 and 4. The suction line I leads from the accumulator I22 to the compressor inlet I04, as previously stated. The sizes of the conduits illustrated are, of course, proportionate for the purpose for which they are employed; and all of the respective conduits are welded or brazed to each other and located suitably in the cabinet or on the outside thereof, as the case may be with the condenser.
The present system is. applicable both to high aeeaeee side and low side compressor units; but is of the most importance in the high side compressor units because oil absorption of refrigerant increases greatly with increased pressure and with drop in temperature. A high side compressor unit has been selected to illustrate the invention because the effects of oil absorption are most advantageous and pronounced in such a unit.
The amount of refrigerant charge and amount of lubricant are proportioned so that the refrigeration system operates as follows: The oil sump is provided with a supply of mineral oil; which substantially fills it, submerging the compressor; and the charge is sufficient so that under high room temperature, with the compressor running, the evaporator is uniformly refrigerated because there is sufficient liquid refrigerant distributed throughout the evaporator. The ice cream compartment is generally cooled by liquid refrigerant, which maintains the same low temperature as long as there is liquid refrigerant in the coils; but the rest of the evaporator may-be cooled by gas, which may b'eat a higher temperature.
Refrigerant is absorbed by the mineral oil in the oil sump fill in an amount which depends upon the room temperature and the pressure of the refrigerant in the shell above the oil. Under room temperatures there is less refrigerant in the mineral oil; but under low room temperature conditions there is quite a high percentage of refrigerant absorbed by the mineral oil.
Thus, when the unit is operating under a low temperature ambient, the cooling effect of the body of the evaporator is proportionally diminished and the food storage zone is not cooled to freezing, but is maintained at a suitable temperature for preserving the food at above-freezing temperatures.
The present system and structure accomplishes the provision of low temperature frozen food storage without excessive refrigeration in the main body of the cabinet; and this is accomplished with a minimum amount of outside baffling or extra controls. The motor compressor is controlled by a single thermostatic switch, which has its bulb attached to the side of the evaporator, preferably adjacent the shelf, which is also a part of the ice cream compartment.
The present system is not limited to any particular volume or size of the spaces for gas and oil, but depends upon the proper proportion of these volumes and the proper proportion of refrigerant charge and oil charge.
For example, the volumes involved in the present system may be approximately as follows in one size of refrigerator:
Gas volume in compressor 1230 051 volume in compressor 400 Condenser volume 260 Evaporator volumes, shelf tubing or ice cream compartment only 52 Remainder of evaporator tubing 118 Header or receiver volume 145 per square inch, while the temperature of the motor compressor housing was 206 degrees F.
Under these conditions it was calculated that there were 2 ounces of F12 ("Freon) in the mineral oil; 3.5 ounces of refrigerant vapor in the motor compressor housing and condenser: 4 ounces of refrigerant in the freezing shelf tubes or ice cream compartment tubes; 2.5 ounces of refrigerant in the rest of theevaporator tubing; and 6 ounces of refrigerant in the header or receiver of the evaporator.
Thus, at an extremely warm ambient or room temperature, there is relatively little refrigerant absorbed in the oil; and the entire evaporator is uniformly refrigerated.
At degrees F., ambient or room temperature, with the cold control thermostat adjusted to its warmest position at the cut-in of the thermostat, the suction pressure was 28 pounds per square inch, while the head pressure was 73 pounds per square inch; and the temperature of the motor compressor housing was degrees F.
Under these conditions, it was calculated that there were seven ounces of refrigerant absorbed in the oil, 2 ounces of refrigerant in the motor compressor housing and condenser combined, 3 ounces of refrigerant in the freezing shelf or ice cream compartment tubing, and 6 ounces of refrigerant in the header. The total refrigerant charge being about 18 ounces, the exterior evaporator tubing which cools the food storage space was substantially dry.
It will be noted that a much larger proportion of the refrigerant is absorbed in the oil in the cooler 70 degree F. room as compared with the degree F. room. .The absorbed refrigerant has increased from 2 to 7 ounces. The most important point is that the freezing part of the evaporator is still supplied with refrigerant, while the external part of the evaporator, which cools the food storage space, is starved as to refrigerant.
When the door is closed and there is no special increased load, and the room ambient is low, the running time of the motor compressor is short and the oil is cold, the Freon absorption by the oil is great; and the evaporator has a minimum area refrigerated, which, however, is sufficient to maintain the freezing compartment or ice cream compartment at a considerably below-freezing temperature, while the rest of the evaporator is starved, but is still sufficiently cool to keep the food storage space at a proper higher tempera ture.
Whenever there is a higher ambient or the door is open or opened often, or there is an ice load or a greater food load, or an increased load for any reason, the running time of the compressor is increased; and this increases the amount of the evaporator which is refrigerated by liquid refrigerant, and brings about more cooling, which is then required in the food storage space.
Under low room temperature conditions a high percentage of the refrigerant is absorbed by the mineral oil; and the unit starts up with the freezing tubes of the evaporator partly dry andthe remainder of the evaporator tubes, which cool the food storage space, relatively dry.
The freezing part of the evaporator may be kept constantly below freezing without overcooling the temperature in the food storage space of the cabinet; but the cooling effect in the food storage space is suitably increased also during high temperature ambient conditions.
It should be noted that it is only the food storage zone 22 in the cabinet that is maintained at above-freezing temperature. while the outer evaporator housing coils I6 or 95 which coolthis zone are maintained at below-freezing temperature. All parts of the cooling evaporator are preferably maintained at a below-freezing temperature to avoid dripping or formation of ice, as distinguished from frost.
Under high room temperature conditions, less refrigerant is absorbed by the oil, thus liberating the refrigerant for use in cooling the food storage space, in addition to maintaining the freezing portion of the evaporator at a considerably belowfreezing temperature.
It will thus be observed that I have invented an improved refrigeration system and refrigerator structure, in which the difficult condition of producing low temperatures for the storage of frozen food without over-cooling the rest of the cabinet has been satisfactorily net. The absorption of the refrigerant by the mineral oil in the motor compressor sump and elsewhere in the system automatically liberates enough refrigerant to cool the food storage space satisfactorily, both under high temperature ambient and low temperature ambient, without any complicated controls and with a minimum amount of baiiiing,
such as that represented by a molded plastic drawer located beneath the evaporator.
The only control required to accomplish this result is a single thermostatic switch having a bulb located close to the freezing shelf or to the ice cream compartment coils.
'While I have illustrated a preferred embodiment of my invention, many modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention, and I do not wish to be limited to the precise details of construction set forth, but desire to avail myself of all changes within the scope of the appended claims.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, is:
1. A refrigerating system comprising a substantially U-shaped sheet metal evaporator having a transversely extending shelf of sheet metal provided with depending attaching flanges secured to the side walls of said evaporator, and having a rear wall substantially closing the space below said shelf at the rear and projecting above said shelf sufiiciently to form a stop for ice trays,
said evaporator having one of its walls formed with an elongated oval aperture having parallel sides and a substantially cylindrical receiver located in said aperture, and having flanges secured to the side wall above and below said aperture, and cooling conduits comprising tubing sinuously arranged on the lower side of said I shelf and secured thereto, and extending from side to side to cover the shelf from rear to front, said conduit thereafter extending to the rear on said shelf and emerging from the evaporator and extending sinuously from the left to the right and upwardly on both-sides of the exterior of said evaporator to cover said evaporator from the front to the rear and thereafter communicating with one end of said receiver, the other end of said receiver being provided with a suction tube connected to the inlet of a refrigerant condensing unit, and a restrictor connected to the outlet of said unit and to the inlet of said evaporator, the said evaporator being supplied with refrigerant in an amount sufficient to cool said shelf under all conditions to a below-freezing temperature, and the remaining refrigerant in the 10 v system being sufficient so thatrefrigerant accumulates in the receiver but the exterior coils on said evaporator are substantially dry of refrigerant at the beginning of the cycle of supplying refrigerant to said evaporator.
2. A refrigerator cabinet comprising a sheet metal shell and a sheet metal liner carried thereby and spaced therefrom, and provided with insulation between the said shell and liner, the shell and liner extending substantially from the bottom of the cabinet to the top and being faced about a door opening by breaker strips, a substantially U -shaped evaporator'located in the upper part of said cabinet and carried by the top of the liner and .the rear wall of the liner, said evaporator having a transversely extending shelf spaced from its upper edges sufliciently to receive ice cube trays, molded plastic sliding guides carried by the side walls of said liner below said evaporator. and a molded plastic insulating drawer slidably mounted in said guides below said evaporator but permitting air circulation past said drawer at the front and at the back of said drawer, a motor compressor carried by said cab-.
inet and a condenser carried by the rear of said cabinet, said motor compressor including a mineral oil sump with a charge of mineral oil adapted to absorb refrigerant in varying amounts, depending upon the temperature of the oil, and a charge of refrigerant in the system which is sufficient to supply the shelf with refrigerant during every operation of the motor compressor, the
refrigerant going first to the shelf coils and thereafter to coils on the, sides and bottom of said evaporator which cool the remainder of the cabinet and the absorption of refrigerant in the mineral oil increasing as the ambient temperature surrounding said cab net drops so that as the ambient t m erature decreases, the coi s on the exterior of said eva orator receive a diminishing amount of refrigerant, and the food storage space exterior to said evaporator in said cabinet is aintain d at a constantly suitable above freezin tem erature. I
3. A re ri erator cabinet comprising a sheet metal shell and a sheet metal liner carried thereby and s a ed therefrom, and provided with insu ation between the said she l and liner, the shell and liner exten ing substantially from the bottom of the cabinet to the top and being faced about a door opening by breaker strips. a substantially U-shaped evaporator located in the upper part of said cabinet and carried by the top of the liner and the rear wall of the liner, said evaporator having a transversely extending shelf spaced from its upper edges sufficiently to receive ice cube trays, molded plastic sliding guides carried by the side walls of said liner below said evaporator and a molded plastic insulating drawer slidably mounted in said guides below said evaporator but permitting air circulation past said drawer at the front and at the back of said drawer, a.
motor compressor carried by said cabinet and a condenser carried by the rear of said cabinet, said motor compressor including a mineral oil sump with a charge of mineral oil adapted to absorb refrigerant in varying amounts, depending upon the temperature of the oil, and acharge of refrigerant in the system which is sufllcient to supply the shelf with refrigerant during every operation of the motor compressor, the refrigerant going first to the shelf coils and thereafter to coils on the sides and bottom of said evaporator which cool the remainder of the cabinet and the aeeacco absorption of refrigerant in the mineral oil increasing as the ambient temperature surrounding said cabinet drops so that as the ambient temperature decreases, the.coils on the exterior of said evaporator receive a diminishing amount of refrigerant, and the food storage space exterior to said evaporator in said cabinet is maintained at a constantly suitable above-freezing temperature, the said guides being provided with hearing apertures and an evaporator door of molded plastic having laterally proiecting trunnions in said apertures and movable from a closed position in front of said evaporator to a fully open position depending from said bearings. I
4. A refrigerator cabinet comprising a sheet metal shell and a sheet metal liner carried thereby and spaced therefrom, and provided with insulation between the said shell and liner, the shell and liner extending substantially from the bottom of ,the cabinet to the top and being faced about a door opening by breaker strips. a substantially U-shaped evaporator located in the upper part of said cabinet and carried by the top of the liner and the rear wall of the liner, said evaporator having a transverse y extending shelf spaced from its upper edges sufficiently to receive ice cube trays, molded plastic sliding guides carried by the side walls of said liner below said eva orator and a molded plastic insulating drawer slidably mounted in said guides below said evaporator but permitting air circulation past said drawer at the front and at the back of said drawer. a motor compressor carried by said cabinet and a condenser carried by the rear of said cabinet, said motor compressor including a mineral oil sump with a charge of mineral oil ada ted to absorb refrigerant in varying amounts, depending upon the temperature of the oil. and a charge of refrigerant in the system which is sufficient to supply the shelf with refrigerant d rin every o eration of the motor compressor. the refrigerant going first to the shelf coils and, thereafter to coils on the sides and bottom of said evaporator which cool the remainder of the cabinet and the absorption of refrigerant in the mineral oil increasing as the ambient temperature surrounding said cabinet dro s so that as the ambient temperature decreases, the coils on the exterior of said evapo ator receive a diminishing amount of refrigerant, and the food storage space exterior to said evaporator in said cabinet is maintained at a constantly suitable above-freezing temperature, the said cabinet being provided at its lowermost end with a slidably mounted vegetable drawer mounted in guides, and the said guides supporting a transparent cover, the air also circulating in front of and in back of said covering about said latter drawer.
5. A refrigeration system comprising an insulated cabinet having a below-freezing zone cooled by first below-freezing coils and a food storage zone cooled by second coils communicatlng without restriction with said first coils in series, to cool said second coils only with refrigerant from said first coils, a motor compressor comprising a motor, a compressor and a housing enclosing the motor and compressor, a condenser and a restrictor connected in this order to said first coils, said second coils communicating with the suction inlet of said compressor-and said compressor having an oil sump, a charge of oil in said sump and a charge of refrigerant of a type miscible with and absorbed by said oil in said system,
. l2 portion being absorbed at lower ambient temperatures, and a lesser portion absorbed at higher ambient temperatures, the volumes of said coils, said oil charge and said refrigerant charge being proportioned so that the amount of refrigerant not absorbed and available for cooling said first coils is sufficient to maintain a below-freezing tempera- 'ture in the below-freezing zone at the highest ama portion of said refrigerant being absorbed in bient contemplated, and the amount of refrigerant available for said second coils is sufficient for cooling the food storage zone at a suitable abovefreezing temperature at ordinary ambients, and is suflicient for increasing proportionately the cooling effect of said second coils at higher ambients due to the release-of absorbed refrigerant from the oil at higher ambients, but decreasing the cooling effect of said second coils proportionately at lower ambients, due to greater absorption of refrigerant at the lower ambients, to avoid overcooling or undercooling the food storage space while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the freezing zone.
6. A refrigeration system comprising an insulated cabinet having a below-freezing zone cooled by first below-freezing coils and a food storage zone cooled by second coils communicating without restriction with said first coils in series, to cool said second coils only with refrigerant from said first coils, a motor compressor comprising a motor, a compressor and a housing enclosing the motor and compressor, a condenser and a restrictor connected in this order to said first coils, said second coils communicating with the suction inlet of said compressor and said compressor having an oil sump, a charge of oil in said sump and a charge of refrigerant of a type miscible with and absorbed by said oil in said system, a portion of said refrigerant being absorbed in said oil at ordinary ambient temperatures, a larger portion being absorbed at lower ambient temperatures, and a lesser portion absorbed at higher ambient temperatures, the volumes of said coils, said oil charge and said refrigerant charge being proportioned so that the amount of refrigerant not absorbed and available for cooling said first coils is suflicient to maintain a below-freezing temperature in the below-freezing zone at the highest ambient contemplated, and the amount of refrigerant available for said second coils is sufiicient for cooling the food storage zone at a suitable above-freezing temperature at ordinary ambients, and is sufficient for increasing proportionately the cooling effect of said second coils at higher ambients due to the release of absorbed refrigerant from the oil at higher ambients, but decreasing the cooling effect of said second coils proportionately at lower ambients, due to greater absorption of refrigerant at the lower ambients, to avoid overcooiing or undereooling the food storage space while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the freezing zone, said system having a receiver interposed in the conduits from said second coils to said compressor inlet, said receiver storing a predetermined amount of refrigerant immediately available to the compressor at the beginning of the compressor operation to supply refrigerant quickly to the first coils.
7. A refrigeration system comprising an insulated cabinet having a below-freezing zone cooled by first below-freezing coils and a food storage zone cooled by second coils communicating without restriction with said first coils in series, to cool said second coils only with refrigerant from said first coils, a motor compressor comprising a motor, a compressor and a housing enclosing the motor and compressor, a condenser and a restrictor connected in this order to said first coils, said second coils communicating with the suction inlet of said compressor and said compressor having an oil sump, a charge of oil in said sump and a charge of refrigerant of a type miscible with and absorbed by said oil in said system, a portion of said refrigerant being absorbed in said oil at ordinary ambient temperatures, a larger portion being absorbed at lower ambient temperatures, and a lesser portion absorbed at higher ambient temperatures, the volumes of said coils. said oil charge and said refrigerant charge being proportioned so that the amount of refrigerant not absorbed and available for cooling said first coils is sufficient to maintain a, below-freezing.
temperature in the below-freezing zone at the highest ambient contemplated, and the amount of refrigerant available for said second coils is suflicient for cooling the food storage zone at a suitable above-freezing temperature at ordinary ambients, and is sufficient for increasing proportionately the cooling effect of said second coils at higher ambients due to the release of absorbed refrigerant from the oil at higher ambients, but decreasing the cooling effect of said second coils proportionately at lower ambients, due to greater absorption of refrigerant at the lower ambients, to avoid overcooling or undercooling the food storage space while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the freezing zone, said condenser including main condenser coils and preliminary cooling coils, the latter coils being connected directly to the compressor outlet and to the top of the motor housing, to remove heated refrigerant immediately from the compressor, to cool and partially condense it and to cool the motor by revaporization as the refrigerant runs down in the motor housing with the oil separating into the sump, said main condenser coils being connected to the top of the motor compressor.
8. A refrigeration system comprising an insulated cabinet having a below-freezingzone cooled by first below-freezing coils and a food storage zone cooled by second coils communicating without restriction with said first coils in series, to
cool said second coils only with refrigerant from said first coils, a motor compressor comprising a motor, a compressor and a housing enclosing the motor and compressor, a condenser and a restrictor connected in this order to said first coils, said second coils communicating with the suction inlet of said compressor and said compressor having an oil sump, a charge of oil in said sump and a charge of refrigerant of a type miscible with and absorbed by said oil in said system, a portion of said refrigerant being absorbed in said oil at ordinary ambient temperatures, a larger portion being absorbed at lower ambient temperatures, and a lesser portion absorbed at higher ambient temperatures, the volumes of said coils, said oil charge and said refrigerant charge being proportioned so that the amount of refrigerant not absorbed and available for cooling said first coils is sufficient to maintain a below-freezing temperature in the below-freezing zone at the highest ambient contemplated, and the amount of refrigerant available for said second coils is sufficient for cooling the food storage zone at a suitable above-freezing temperature at ordinary ambients, and is sufficient for increasing proportionately the cooling effect of said second coils at higher ambients due to the release of absorbed refrigerant from the oil at higher ambients, but decreasing the cooling effect of said second coils proportionately at lower ambients, due to greater absorption of refrigerant at the lower ambients, to avoid overcooling or undercoolingthe food storage space while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the freezing zone, the said coils being carried by upper and lower sheet metal evaporator parts, providing extended heat absorbing surfaces in said zones, in heat conducting relation with said coils.
9. In a refrigeration system, the combination of a motor compressor having an oil sump and a motor housing, the compressor being located in said sump and having a suction inlet and a pressure outlet, a preliminary cooling condenser communicating directly with said compressor outlet, said preliminary condenser communicating with the motor housing to partially condense refrigerant and cool the motor parts therewith, said housing having an upper outlet, a main condenser communicating with said upper outlet, a restrictor leading from said main condenser to an evaporator, said evaporator having a pair of coil sections in series with each other and in unrestricted communication with each other, the first section'of coils cooling a first zone and the second section of coils cooling a second zone, a charge of refrigerant in said system and a charge of oil in said sump, a suction tube leading from the second evaporator coils to the inlet of said compressor, constituting a closed system, the volume of' the spaces in said evaporator coils, said motor housin said condensers and communicating conduits being proportioned relative to the charge of refrigerant and the amount of mineral oil charge in said sump, the first evaporator coils being supplied with refrigerant first for cooling said below-freezing zone, and the second coils of said evaporator being supplied with such refrigerant as is available after passing throu h said first coils, to be used in the second coils for cooling an above-freezing zone, the amount of refrigerant absorbed by the oil increasing as the ambient temperature drops so that the second coils are starved for refrigerant at low ambient temperatures to prevent overcooling of the above-freezing zone, the refrigerant being released from the oil as the ambient temperature increases to increase the amount of refrigerant available for the second coils to re ulate automaticallv the amount of cooling provided by the second coils for the above-freezin zonewhile maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the first zone at all times by means of said first coils.
10. In a refrigeration system, the combination of a motor compressor having an oil sump and a motor housing, the compressor being located in said sump and having a suction inlet and a pressure outlet, a preliminary cooling condenser communicating dire tlv with said compressor outlet, said preliminary condenser communicatin with the motor housing to partiallv condense refrigerant and coolthe motor parts therewith,
said housing havin an upper outlet, 2. main condenser communicating with said upper outlet, a rectrictor leading from said main condenser to an evaporator, said evaporator having'a pair of coil sections in series with each other and in unrestricted communication with each other, the first section of coils cooling a first zone and the second section of coils cooling a second zone, a charge of refrigerant in saidsystem and a charge of oil in said sump, a suction tube leading from the second evaporator coils to the inlet of said compressor, constituting a closed system, the
wolume of the spaces in said evaporator coils, said motor housing, said condensers and communicating conduits being proportioned relative to the charge of refrigerant and the amount of mineral oil charge in said sump, the first evaporator coils being supplied with refrigerant first for cooling said below-freezing zone, and the second coils of said evaporator being supplied with such refrigerant as is available after passing through said first coils, to be used in the second coils for cooling an above-freezing zone, the amount of refrigerant absorbed by the oil increasing as the ambient temperature drops so that the second coils are starved for refrigerant at low ambient temperatures to prevent overcooling of the above-freezing zone, the refrigerant being released from the oil as the ambient temperature increases to increase the amount of refrigerant available for the second coils to regulate automatically the amount of cooling provided by the second coils for the above-freezing zone while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the first zone at all times by means of said first coils, the first coils comprising coils located on an inner partition of the evaporator which has an outer U-shaped housing and the said second coils being located on said outer housing.
. 11. In a refrigeration system. the combination of a motor compressor having an oil sump and a motor housing, the compressor being located in said sump and having a suction inlet and a pressure outlet, a preliminary cooling condenser communicating directly with said compressor outlet, said preliminary condenser communicating with the motor housing to partially condense refrigerant and cool the motor parts therewith, said housing having an upper outlet, a main condenser communicating with said upper outlet, 9. restrictor leading from said main condenser to an evaporator, said evaporator having a pair of coil sections in series with each other and in unrestricted communication with each other, the first section of coils coolin a first zone and the second section of coils cooling a second zone, a
char e of refri erant in said system and a charge of oil in said sump a suction tube leading from the second evaporator coils to the inlet of'said compressor, constituting a closed system, the volume of the spaces in said evaporator coils, said motor housin said condensers and communicating conduits being proportioned relative to the char e of refri erant and the amount of mineral oil char e in said sump, the first evaporator coils being supplied with refrigerant first for cooling said below-freezing zone, and the second coils of said evaporator bein supplied with such refri erant as is available after passing throu h said first coils, to be used in the second coils for cooling an above-freezin zone, the amount of refri erant absorbed by the oil increasing as the ambient temperature drops so that the second coils are starved for refrigerant at low ambient temperatures to prevent overcooling of the above-freezing zone, the refri erant bein released from the oil as the ambient temperature increases to increase the amount of refrigerant available for the second coils to regulate automatically the amount of cooling provided bv the second coils for the above-freezing zone while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the first zone at all times by means of said first coils, the first coils comprising coils located on an inner partition of the evaporator which has an outer U-shaped housing and the said second coils being located on said outer housing, the said evaporator also including a second partition defining a supercold department and having a third section of evaporator coils located on the walls of said ,supercold department and connected in the system to receive the refrigerant first.
12. In a refrigeration system, the combination of a motor compressor having an oil sump and a motor housing, the compressor being located in said sump and having a suction inlet and a pressure outlet, a preliminar cooling condenser communicating directly with said compressor outlet, said preliminary condenser communicating with the motor housing to partially condense refrigerant and cool the motor parts therewith, said housing having an upper outlet, 9, main condenser communicating with said upper outlet, at restrictor leading from said main condenser to an evaporator, said evaporator having a pair of coil sections in series with each other and in unrestricted communication with each other, the first section of coils cooling a first zone and the second section of coils cooling a second zone, a charge of refrigerant in said system and a charge of oil in said sump, a suction tube leading from the second evaporator coils to the inlet of said compressor, constituting a closed system, the volume of the spaces in said evaporator coils, said motor housing, said condensers and communicating conduits being proportioned relative to the charge of re frigerant and the amount of mineral oil charge in said sump, thefirst evaporator coils being supplied with refrigerant first for cooling said belowfreezing zone, and the second coils of said evaporator being supplied with such refrigerant as is available after passing through said first coils, to be used in the second coils for cooling an abovefreezing zone, the amount of refrigerant absorbed by the oil increasing as the ambient temperature drops so that the second coils are starved for refrigerant at low ambient temperatures to prevent overcooling of the above-freezing zone, the refrigerant being released from the oil as the ambient temperature increases to increase the amount of refrigerant available for the second coils to regulate automatically the amount of cooling provided by the second coils for the abovefreezmg zone while maintaining below-freezing temperatures in the first zone at all times by means of said first coils, the said below-freezing zone being located inside a U-shaped evaporator having a partition provided with said first coils and the said above-freezing zone comprising an enclosure outside of said evaporator cooled by said second coils located on the outside of said U-shaped evaporator.
13. A refrigeration system comprising, an insulated cabinet having an outer shell and an inner liner separated by insulation and having a door opening and an insulated door, a motor compressor including a motor housing and a compressor located in an oil sump carried by the motor housing, a preliminary condenser connected directly to the compressor outlet and discharging into the top of the motor housins, a main condenser connected to the top of the motor housing and a restrictor connected to the outlet of said main condenser, an evaporator including an outer sheet metal casing and an inner shelf, coils carried by the outer evaporator casing, coils carried by the shelf and a receiver carried by the upper part of said evaporator, said restrictor being connected to the shelf coils which are connected to the outer coils and thence to the receiver, a suction tube from the receiver to the compressor inlet, and. supply of oil and a charge of refrigerant in said system.
sumcient to cause below-freezing temperatures on said shell and to cool the remainder of the cabinet at temperatures above-freezing by means of said outer coils at ordinary ambient temperatures, the oil absorbing refrigerant at lower ambients and. releasing refrigerant at higher amaeeapoo in the cabinet outside the evaporator while maintaining a below-freezing zone inside the evaporator.
CARL F. ALSING.
References Cited in the tile 01 this patent UNITED STATES PATEN TS Number bient temperatures to regulate automatically the 10 2,410,360
supply of refrigerant to the outer casing coils to maintain a constant aboye-treezing temperature Baler May 1, m1
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US2697916A (en) * 1953-06-03 1954-12-28 Seeger Refrigerator Co Multiple temperature household refrigerator and method of refrigeration
US2724242A (en) * 1952-07-24 1955-11-22 Gen Electric Multiple temperature refrigerator cabinet
US2758448A (en) * 1954-04-16 1956-08-14 Gen Electric Household refrigerator
US2769319A (en) * 1952-02-18 1956-11-06 Whirlpool Seeger Corp Two temperature household refrigerators
US2776549A (en) * 1954-11-24 1957-01-08 Reynolds Metals Co Refrigeration compartment
US2807155A (en) * 1956-02-02 1957-09-24 Gen Motors Corp Working fluids in refrigeration apparatus
US20120079845A1 (en) * 2010-09-30 2012-04-05 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator
US20130047649A1 (en) * 2011-08-26 2013-02-28 Thetford Corporation Absorption refrigerator with temperature control
USD901560S1 (en) * 2018-07-09 2020-11-10 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator
USD909431S1 (en) * 2018-07-09 2021-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator

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US2133948A (en) * 1935-04-06 1938-10-25 Westinghouse Electric & Mfg Co Refrigeration apparatus
US2421773A (en) * 1943-12-29 1947-06-10 Westinghouse Electric Corp Heat exchange apparatus in refrigeration systems
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Cited By (12)

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2769319A (en) * 1952-02-18 1956-11-06 Whirlpool Seeger Corp Two temperature household refrigerators
US2724242A (en) * 1952-07-24 1955-11-22 Gen Electric Multiple temperature refrigerator cabinet
US2697916A (en) * 1953-06-03 1954-12-28 Seeger Refrigerator Co Multiple temperature household refrigerator and method of refrigeration
US2758448A (en) * 1954-04-16 1956-08-14 Gen Electric Household refrigerator
US2776549A (en) * 1954-11-24 1957-01-08 Reynolds Metals Co Refrigeration compartment
US2807155A (en) * 1956-02-02 1957-09-24 Gen Motors Corp Working fluids in refrigeration apparatus
US20120079845A1 (en) * 2010-09-30 2012-04-05 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator
CN102445039A (en) * 2010-09-30 2012-05-09 三星电子株式会社 Refrigerator
US20130047649A1 (en) * 2011-08-26 2013-02-28 Thetford Corporation Absorption refrigerator with temperature control
US9250011B2 (en) * 2011-08-26 2016-02-02 Thetford Corporation Absorption refrigerator with temperature control
USD901560S1 (en) * 2018-07-09 2020-11-10 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator
USD909431S1 (en) * 2018-07-09 2021-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Refrigerator

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