US2663970A - Ambulatory animal toy - Google Patents

Ambulatory animal toy Download PDF

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US2663970A
US2663970A US15881750A US2663970A US 2663970 A US2663970 A US 2663970A US 15881750 A US15881750 A US 15881750A US 2663970 A US2663970 A US 2663970A
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feet
spine
portion
legs
forwardly
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William A Brodrib
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William A Brodrib
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H7/00Toy figures led or propelled by the user
    • A63H7/02Toy figures led or propelled by the user by pushing or drawing

Description

Dec. 29, 1953 w, BRQDRIB 7 2,663,970

AMBULATORY ANIMAL TOY Filed April 28, 1950 INVENTOR WILLIAM 4. 8900918 A T TOR/V5) Patented Dec. 29, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AMBULATORY TOY William A. Brodrib, Hartford, Conn.

Application April 28, 1950, Serial No. 158,817

3 Claims.

The general object of the invention is to provide a toy in the form of a dog or other fourfooted animal and having various parts including a skeleton and feet which cooperate to effect walking movements approximating those of a live animal, the said walking movements of the toy being effected by the application of external force, as for instance by means of a cord attached to the neck portion.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide various features of structure and arrangement for attaining the above-stated more general object.

Other objects of the invention will be apparent from the drawings and from the following description and claims.

In the drawings I have shown in detail one embodiment of the invention, but it will be understood that various changes may be made from the construction shown, and that the drawings are not to be construed as defining or limiting the scope of the invention, the claims forming a part of this specification being relied upon for that purpose.

Of the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of an ambulatory animal toy embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the skeleton of the toy.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of a one of the feet.

Figs. 4 to '7 are schematic views showing representative motions.

Referring to the drawings, 10 represents generally the skeleton of an ambulatory animal toy embodying the invention, the skeleton being preferably formed entirely from metallic parts. The skeleton includes a longitudinal spine l2, two similar front legs 14 and I6 and two similar rear legs I 8 and 20. The upper ends of the several legs are rigidly secured to the spine l2. The two front legs are transversely spaced throughout their lengths and are symmetrically located with respect to a vertical longitudinal plane through the spine and the said front legs include means for fixedly connecting their upper portions with each other and with thespine. The two rear legs are also transversely spaced throughout their lengths and are symmetrically located with respect to the said plane and the said rear legs also include means for fixedly con necting their upper portions with each other and with the spine. Relatively heavy front feet 22 and 24 are secured to the bottoms of the front legs l4 and I6 and similar relatively heavy rear feet 26 and 28 are secured to the bottoms of the rear legs l8 and 20. The several parts of the skeleton have predetermined relative positions of repose, as shown in Figs. positions the bottoms of the four legs and the four feet are in a predetermined relationship. Preferably the two legs and feet of each pair are transversely opposite each other when in the said relative positions of repose.

The spine has a forwardly extending neck portion 39 and preferably has a rearwardly extending tail portion 32. The neck portion 30 is preferably integral with the main portion of the spine, but the tail portion 32 is preferablya separate member which is smaller and is resiliently movable with respect to the main portion.

The skeleton as generally described above is provided with a suitable covering to simulate an animal as shown in Fig. 1. A dog is illustrated but it willv be understood that the invention is not so limited. The covering for the skeleton includes a skin 34 formed from a suitable fabric and also includes suitable stuffing to hold the skin inthe required shape. The bottom of the leg portions of the skin are suitably connected with the several feet. It will be understood that the skin and the stuffing are readily flexible to the extent necessary to permit free relative movements of the parts of the skeleton as hereinafter described. A head 36 is carried by the neck portion 30 of the spline and a tall 38 may be carried by the tail portion 32 of the spine.

The skeleton It has resilient portions which permit certain of the legs and feet to move out of their before-mentioned relative positions of repose forwardly and rearwardly with respect to the spine and with respect to other legs and feet. The said resilient portions of the skeleton tend to return the legs and feet to their said positions of repose after forward or rearward movement.

therefrom. As to the location of the resilient portions of the skeleton there may be a variation, but as shown in Figs. 1 to '7, the spine I2 is constructed to resist vertical or transverse flexing but is preferably torsionally resilient, As shown the spine comprises a tightly coiled wire. The convolutions of the coil are in firm engagement with each other this making the spine substantially rigid as concerns vertical or transverse stresses but making it slightly resilient as concerns torsional stresses. The several legs are shown as having specially provided resilient portions therein near the spine. Specifically and as shown, each leg is formed of spring wire and is provided near the upper end thereof and.

l, 2 and 4, in which i closely adjacent the spine with a resilient coiled portion 40. The length of the coiled portion 40 is only a small fraction of the total length of the leg. The resilient coiled portion 40 of each leg permits the leg to resiliently move, particularly forwardly and rearwardly, and, the said resilient coiled portion tends after each movement to return the leg to its normal position of repose.

As shown, the two front legs M and I6 are formed from a single piece of wire which is connected by welding or otherwise to the front portion of the spine 12. Similarly, the two rear legs l8 and 29 are formed from a single piece of wire which is connected by welding or otherwise to the rear portion of the spine 42.

Each of the feet 22, 2d, 25 and 28 includes an outer floor engagin covering or portion formed of a material serving to provide substantial frictional resistance to sliding movement of the foot with respect to the floor. This covering is preferably rubber or an equivalent material. It will be understood that the term rubber is herein used in a generic sense and is intended to include not only natural rubber but also various rubber substitutes. In order to insure firm engagement of the feet with the floor and to thus enable the rubber portion to efiectively resist sliding movement, the said feet are relatively heavy. Preferably each foot is provided with an individual weight.

As to the exact structure of the feet there may be wide variation, but each of the feet may advantageously be formed as shown in Fig. 3. A relatively heavy weight 42, formed preferably of lead, is cast in place around the lower end portion of the leg and a body 44 of rubber is molded in place around the weight and around the portion of the leg adjacent the weight. As shown the rubber body 44 has a groove 46 for use in connectin the skin 34 with the foot. The portion of the skin constituting the leg surrounds the upper portion of the foot and is pressed into the groove 46 by a wire ring 48.

The legs are preferably so shaped that the floor engaging portion of each foot is spaced forwardly to a slight extent from a transverse vertical plane through the upper portion of the corresponding leg. More specifically each foot is spaced forwardly to a slight extent from a transverse vertical plane through the corresponding resilient leg portion 4%]. The several legs are all spaced forwardly to substantially equal extents. The forward spacing will be readily apparent from Fig. 4. wherein the floor engaging portions of the front feet are shown as spaced forwardly from the transverse vertical plane a-a through the upper ends of the front resilient portions 40, 40 and wherein the floor engaging portions of the rear feet are shown as spaced forwardly from the transverse vertical plane b-b through the upper ends of the rear resilient portions 40, 40.

Means is provided for connecting a cord such as 59 with the front portion of the spine I2, preferably at the neck 3!]. As shown, a collar 52 surrounds the stuffed neck and the cord 50 is connectedto the collar.

The manner of operation is illustrated generally in Figs. 4 to '7, but it will be understood that the action shown is intended to be representative and not necessarily actual. The toy moves approximately in the manner shown and to be described and the reasons for the movement will be explained so far as now understood.

The predetermined positions of relative repose are shown in Fig. 4, the cord 50 being slack. To

start the movement of the toy the cord 50 is pulled in a forward and upward direction as shown in Fig. 5. The forward component of the cord tension moves the toy forwardly, it being understood that the user moves forwardly while maintaining the tension of the cord. The angle of the cord and the amount of tension therein must be correctly maintained within certain limits as determined by the skill of the user. If the cord is insufiiciently inclined forwardly, the forward component of the tension is insufficient to move the toy forwardly and if the cord tension is increased in an effort to obtain forward movement the result is that the front feet are bodily lifted from the floor. On the other hand, if the cord is inclined too far forwardly, the toy pivots about the front feet and the rear feet are bodily lifted from the floor. The cord must be maintained at an intermediate angle to avoid either of the aforesaid results.

With the cord St at the proper angle and at the proper tension, the horizontal component of the cord tension moves the spine forwardly to the relative position shown in Fig. 5. The spine moves relatively to the feet which resist forward Sliding movement by reason of their engagement with the floor. The resilient portions of the skeleton and more particularly the coils at 40, 4B are distorted and tensioned and the relative positions are such that the floor engaging portions of the feet are approximately at the lines a-a and bb. As forward movement of the spine I 2 continues to the position shown in Fig. 6, the forces exerted by the respective coils 46, 48 overcome the resistances to forward movement at one or more of the feet and the last said feet snap or suddenly move forwardly to substantial extents to new floor engaging positions as shown in the said Fig. 6. The forward movement of each foot is caused by the tension previously established in the corresponding resilient portion 40. It will be understood that as each foot is snapped or suddenly moved forwardly it swings upwardly to a. slight extent and momentarily disengages the floor, being thus momentarily free from frictional resistance. By reason of momentum each foot moves forwardly beyond its relative position of repose and the resilient portion then tends to return the foot relatively rearwardly to the said position of repose, but such relative return movement is retarded by the renewed engagement of the foot with the fioor. As shown, it is the feet 22 and 26 that have moved forwardly, but this is merely illustrative.

The two front feet move alternately and not simultaneously and the two rear feet move alternately and not simultaneously. The resistances to forward movement at the two feet of each pair are not exactly uniform and one of them therefore moves before the other. As one foot of a pair moves forwardly it also swings upwardly to a small extent and thus increased weight is thrown on the other foot of the pair and the forward movement of the said other foot is therefore slightly delayed.

Continued forward movement of the spine by the cord to the position shown in Fig. 7 causes the second foot of each pair to snap forwardly, the first foot of the pair remaining in momentary engagement with the floor. Assuming that the feet 22 and 2B of the respective pairs have moved. 'first to the relative positions shown in Fig. 6, the

other feet 24 and 28 of the respective pairs move subsequently to the relative positions shown in Fig. '7;

The described actions are repeated alternately with probably a slight torsional movement of the spine corresponding to the alternate slight lifting of the feet. The net result is that the feet of each pair move alternately forwardly, and thereby effect a walking movement approximating the walking movement of a live animal. There may be a lack of complete synchronism in the movements of the feet of'the two pairs and this gives a somewhat erratic walking movement which is interesting and amusing.

The described walking action may be augmented and varied to a considerable extent by rapidly varying the tension in the cord 50 and by changing the angle of the cord within certain narrow limits.

The invention claimed is: I 1. In an ambulatory animal toy, the combina tion of a skeleton comprising a single torsionally resilient longitudinal central spine and two downwardly extending front legs of equal lengths and transversely spaced throughout their said lengths and including means for fixedly connecting their upper portions with each other and with the said torsionally resilient central spine and two downwardly extending rear legs of equal lengths and transversely spaced throughout their said lengths and including means for fixedly connecting their upper portions with each other and with the said torsionally resilient central spine, the said skeleton having resiliency therein enabling each of the legs to independently move rearwardly or forwardly out of an initial relative position of repose which resiliency tends to return each leg to its said position of repose, and four feet secured respectively to the bottoms of the said legs and each foot being relatively heavy and including a floor engaging portion having frictional characteristics whereby it serves to provide substantial frictional resistance to sliding movement of the foot along the floor, the said floor engaging portions of all of the feet initially being respectively spaced forwardly to slight substantially equal extents from vertical transverse planes through the upper portions of the corresponding legs, whereby force applied to the forward portion of the spine in a forwardly and upwardly inclined direction serves not only to move the spine forwardly but also serves during spine movement to cause the several front and rear legs and feet to independently and successively snap relatively forwardly after the said feet have been individually held momentarily stationary by reason of their frictional engagement with the floor.

2. In an ambulatory animal toy, the combination of a skeleton comprising a single torsionally resilient longitudinal central spine constructed to resist vertical or transverse flexing and two downwardly extending front legs of equal lengths and transversely spaced throughout their said lengths and including means for fixedly connecting their upper portions with each other and with the said torsionally resilient central spine and two downwardly extending rear legs of equal lengths and transversely spaced throughout their said lengths and including means for fixedly connecting their upper portions with each other and with the said torsionally resilient central spine, each of the said legs of the skeleton having a resilient portion near the spine which enables the leg to move out of a predetermined relative position of repose andforwardly or rearwardly with respect to the spine and with respect to each other leg and which resilient portion tends to return the leg to its said position of repose, and four feet secured respectively to the bottoms of the said legs and each foot being relatively heavy and including a floor engaging portion having frictional characteristics whereby it serves to provide substantial frictional resistance to sliding movement of the foot along the floor, the said floor engaging portions of all of the feet initially being respectively spaced forwardly to slight substantially equal extents from vertical transverse planes through the said resilient portions of the corresponding legs, whereby force applied to the forward portion of the spine in a forwardly and upwardly inclined direction serves not only to move the spine forwardly but also serves during spine movement to cause the several front and rear legs and feet to independently and successively snap relatively forwardly after the said feet have been individually held momentarily stationary by reason of their frictional engagement with the floor.

3. An ambulatory animal toy as set forth in claim 1, wherein each leg comprises a single wire extending from the spine to the corresponding foot and having a helically coiled portion closely adjacent the spine, the vertical extent of which coiled portion being only a small fraction of the total length of the leg.

WILLIAM A. BRODRIB.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 224,375 Alexander Feb. 10, 1880 1,272,629 Criest July 16, 1918 1,423,382 Zaiden July 18, 1922 1,438,198 Gund Dec. 5, 1922 1,676,884 Belden July 19, 1928 1,822,437 Fleming Sept. 8, 1931 2,044,949 Levy et al June 23, 1936 2,636,317 Candee Apr. 28, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 6,594/32 Australia Oct. 27, 1932 792,065 France Dec. 21, 1935 525,332 Great Britain Aug. 27, 1940

US2663970A 1950-04-28 1950-04-28 Ambulatory animal toy Expired - Lifetime US2663970A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2824409A (en) * 1956-02-20 1958-02-25 William A Brodrib Leaping animal toy
US2853831A (en) * 1956-06-04 1958-09-30 Gustav H Bischoff Toy worm
US2903819A (en) * 1958-12-15 1959-09-15 Michael F Barber Artificial bird
US3190035A (en) * 1962-08-31 1965-06-22 Lloyd F Sneed Ambulatory animal toys
US3200537A (en) * 1963-02-25 1965-08-17 Marvin Glass & Associates Toy walking dog
US3740781A (en) * 1971-11-03 1973-06-26 D Lau Racing dragon boat
US4816002A (en) * 1987-07-01 1989-03-28 Brodrib William A Ambulatory animal toy
WO1997018876A1 (en) 1995-11-20 1997-05-29 Cap Toys, Inc. Walking toy animal
US20040126506A1 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-07-01 Margaret Weiser Novelty with spring attached appendages
US20120312248A1 (en) * 2011-03-09 2012-12-13 Robert Alves Pest deterrent apparatus

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US224375A (en) * 1880-02-10 alexander
US1272629A (en) * 1918-04-05 1918-07-16 Frank Criest Walking toy.
US1423382A (en) * 1920-12-14 1922-07-18 Zaiden David Walking doll
US1438108A (en) * 1921-01-25 1922-12-05 Gund Adolf Toy animal
US1676884A (en) * 1923-04-05 1928-07-10 Belden Kathryne Ivy Toy
US1822437A (en) * 1929-10-24 1931-09-08 Janet G Fleming Doll
FR792065A (en) * 1935-07-05 1935-12-21 Toy
US2044949A (en) * 1935-08-12 1936-06-23 Jack E Levy Method of making animal figures from tuft yarn balls
GB525332A (en) * 1939-02-16 1940-08-27 Fryer And Company Nelson Ltd Improvements in walking toys
US2636317A (en) * 1949-07-19 1953-04-28 Cornclius F Candee Toy animal figure

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US224375A (en) * 1880-02-10 alexander
US1272629A (en) * 1918-04-05 1918-07-16 Frank Criest Walking toy.
US1423382A (en) * 1920-12-14 1922-07-18 Zaiden David Walking doll
US1438108A (en) * 1921-01-25 1922-12-05 Gund Adolf Toy animal
US1676884A (en) * 1923-04-05 1928-07-10 Belden Kathryne Ivy Toy
US1822437A (en) * 1929-10-24 1931-09-08 Janet G Fleming Doll
FR792065A (en) * 1935-07-05 1935-12-21 Toy
US2044949A (en) * 1935-08-12 1936-06-23 Jack E Levy Method of making animal figures from tuft yarn balls
GB525332A (en) * 1939-02-16 1940-08-27 Fryer And Company Nelson Ltd Improvements in walking toys
US2636317A (en) * 1949-07-19 1953-04-28 Cornclius F Candee Toy animal figure

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2824409A (en) * 1956-02-20 1958-02-25 William A Brodrib Leaping animal toy
US2853831A (en) * 1956-06-04 1958-09-30 Gustav H Bischoff Toy worm
US2903819A (en) * 1958-12-15 1959-09-15 Michael F Barber Artificial bird
US3190035A (en) * 1962-08-31 1965-06-22 Lloyd F Sneed Ambulatory animal toys
US3200537A (en) * 1963-02-25 1965-08-17 Marvin Glass & Associates Toy walking dog
US3740781A (en) * 1971-11-03 1973-06-26 D Lau Racing dragon boat
US4816002A (en) * 1987-07-01 1989-03-28 Brodrib William A Ambulatory animal toy
WO1997018876A1 (en) 1995-11-20 1997-05-29 Cap Toys, Inc. Walking toy animal
US5713780A (en) * 1995-11-20 1998-02-03 Cap Toys, Inc. Walking toy animal
US20040126506A1 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-07-01 Margaret Weiser Novelty with spring attached appendages
US6773768B2 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-08-10 Exhart Environmental Systems, Inc. Novelty with spring attached appendages
US20120312248A1 (en) * 2011-03-09 2012-12-13 Robert Alves Pest deterrent apparatus

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