New! View global litigation for patent families

US2661150A - Centrifuge - Google Patents

Centrifuge Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2661150A
US2661150A US79230147A US2661150A US 2661150 A US2661150 A US 2661150A US 79230147 A US79230147 A US 79230147A US 2661150 A US2661150 A US 2661150A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
diaphragm
liquid
container
discharge
centrifuge
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Jr William G Abbott
Original Assignee
Jr William G Abbott
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B04CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS OR MACHINES FOR CARRYING-OUT PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES
    • B04BCENTRIFUGES
    • B04B11/00Feeding, charging, or discharging bowls
    • B04B11/04Periodical feeding or discharging; Control arrangements therefor
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B04CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS OR MACHINES FOR CARRYING-OUT PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL PROCESSES
    • B04BCENTRIFUGES
    • B04B7/00Elements of centrifuges
    • B04B7/08Rotary bowls

Description

Dec. 1, 1953 W. G. ABBOTT, JR

CENTRIFUGE' 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed 1360.1 17, 1947 Dec. 1, 1953 W. G. ABBOTT, JR

CENTRIFUGE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 17, 1947 hveflzar MZZZ'Qm Dec. 1, 1953 w. G. ABBOTT, JR

CENTRIFUGE 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 17, 1947 Patented Dec. 1, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CENTRIFUGE William G. Abbott, J13, IMilfOl'd, N. .H.

Application December 17, 1947, Serial No. 792,301

12 Claims. 1

This invention relates to centrifuges and particularly to improvements in the centrifuges for substantially continuously separating the dirt from wool-scouring liquors and thereafter effecting a discharge of the dirt from the centrifuge.

Heretofore in such machines as have been available the charging and discharging openings have been provided with valves to prevent escape of the liquid being centrifuged and. when a sufficient separation of the liquid from the dirt had been eirected, certain of these valves were opened to allow discharge and then others were opened to admit a new charge of liquor. The sticky nature of the wool grease and fat quickly fouled the valves so that they became inoperable and the abrasive character of the dirt wore the valves out rapidly even when made of the hardest steels, with the result that at frequent intervals costly repairs had to be made. In such machines the discharge .of the dirt or sludge after it had accumulated therein was accomplished by screws or plungers disposed within the centrifuge arranged to plow the sludge from the walls, but due to the fluidity of the sludge a considerable amount ran back along the threads of the screw or through the clearance between the plunger and the wall and was not discharged.

Objects of this invention are to provide a machine in which no valves are required for controlling the charging and discharging of the liquor to be centrifuged and in which complete discharge or" the sludge may be effected. Other objects of the invention are to provide a centrifuge in which the liquor separated from the sludge may be discharged substantially continuously and may closely be controlled, and in which the sludge which accumulates adjacent to the wall of the centrifuge may be expelled while the centrifuge is in operation so that the liquor may substantially continuously be introduced thereto without having to stop the machine for cleaning. Still other objects are to provide a machine which is economical to operate, comparatively simple to construct and maintain in :good working order, is eificient and durable.

In its broadest aspects the centrifuge comprises a rotatable container :a portion of which is adapted to receive a quantity of the liquid from which dirt :and other heavy matter is to be separated :and item which the liquid may be discharged in a (continuous manner leaving the sludge at the bottom thereof. :In this liquid receiving portion there located a flexible die phragm which .is substantially coextensive therewith, the diaphragm being movable relative to the liquid receiving portion to effect discharge of the sludge from the container after it has a0 cumulatcd to a sufiicient extent to interfere with further separation. The diaphragm is moved inwardly toward the axes of rotation of the container to efiectthe aforesaid discharge of the sludge and while this may be an overall inward movement of the enteire diaphragm, preferably a portion of the diaphragm is moved radially inward at one end and then succeeding portions are moved inwardly proceeding from that end to the other so that the entire diaphragm is ultinately displaced. Thi progressive displacement of the diaphragm creates a centrifugal dinerential that tailsm flow of the accumulated sludge adiacent the diaphragm-from one end toward the other or from the displaced portion toward an undisplaced portion. To insure a progres sive inward displacement of the diaphragm, in one term of the invention finite sections are established .as herein illustrated by inwardly directed annular ribs formed on the inside of the container over which the diaphragm lies. These ribs form hinge points about ivhiclsi the diaphragm will bend and are of such a character that one section will be substantially completely displaced inwardly before the next section begins to move inwardly.- To bring about displacement of the diaphragm in an efiicient, simple and inexpensi-ye manner, a passage is formed in the wall of the container, one end of which terminates behind the diaphragm and there is means for delivering a liquid usually water to the passage'and hence between the wall and the diaphragm. Each ridge serves a dam blocking the passage of water between the diphragm and the wall between sections until the particular section has been substantially completely displaced. A plurality of such passages may be employed, one tor eachsection of the diaphragm as .dividedby the aforesaid ridges and the means for'introducing theliquid thereto may be adjust. able selectively. to introduce the liquid to algiven section thus providing means for flexing .a given section independently of the others necessary to displace sludge therefrom. Each section may have an independent drain orifice therein so that by controlling .the amount of water delivered .to a section the diaphragm covering that section may alternately be displaced and :allowed to return to its normal position.

While both the liquid and the sludge :may be discharged through the same discharge openings,

preferably there are relatively small openings for discharge of the liquid to afford a closer control of the discharge by minimizing the depths of flow and hence the turbulence during discharge. To rid the centrifuge of the sludge however as rapidly as possible larger openings are provided, and these are necessarily situated radially inward of the smaller openings. To prevent fouling of the small openings during ejection of the sludge, the diaphragm is arranged when displaced to cover the smaller openings and hence to seal the same against admission of the sludge.

More specifically the centrifuge as illustrated in one form comprises a pair of semicylindrical liquid receiving sections joined at their ends for rotation about a common horizontal axis with' intervening spaces extending longitudinally thereon. The intervening spaces afford .discharge openings along the entire length of the centrifuge through which the sludge may be ejected rapidly and also access to the interior of the centrifuge in the event the mechanical means must be employed to dislodge adhering sludge. While the liquid component could be discharged through the intervenin side opening for the reason assigned above, a relatively small discharge passage is formed at one end of each section for this purpose. A diaphragm or flexible lining member is situated in each section which may be moved initially to effect discharge of the liquid component through the end opening and finally to cover the latter and to effect discharge of the sludge through the longitudinal intervening spaces.

The centrifuge container, however, may be completely closed along the sides having the discharge openings in an end. Hence in an alternative form the container is a substantially closed cylinder in which there is disposed a substantially continuous flexible diaphragm or lining, the opposite ends of which are secured to the wall thereof and the intermediate portion of which is free. The container has openings in its ends for the discharge and for the introduction of both the liquid to be centrifuged and the liquid to displace the diaphragm. As illustrated the discharge openings are a plurality of'circular openings arranged concentrically with respect to the axes of rotation of the container at one end through which the liquid component of the centrifuge liquid may be discharged. While only one set of discharge openings are employed herein, separate openings may be provided for effecting discharge of the sludge. As herein illustrated the discharge holes are neither too large to spoil the control of the discharge nor too small to prevent rapid discharge of the sludge. The liquid to be centrifuged is introduced at the opposite end of the container through a centrally located passage extending through that end wall and the liquid for displacing the diaphragm is introduced through a suitable radial passage, one end of which terminates behind the diaphragm. In this form of the centrifuge there are annular ridges on the inside peripheral wall to divide the diaphragm into a plurality of sections for the reasons assigned above.

In a modification of the closed centrifuge, each of the sections of the diaphragm is supplied separately with liquid as by a passage terminating behind the diaphragm at each section so that each section may selectively be moved inwardly. As illustrated this centrifuge comprises a cylinder, one end of which is closed by a plate having two sets of discharge openings therein and the other end of which has formed integral with it a hub through which there is a comparatively large central opening. The liquid to be centrifuged is introduced through this central opening. Within this opening there are a plurality of annular grooves each of which is connected to one of the aforesaid passages. Water is delivered to a given section behind the diaphragm by an adjustable conduit which enters through the opening and by movement therein may be brought into registration with a given one of the grooves.

The invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a vertical section taken longitudinally through a form of the centrifuge wherein there are a plurality of liquid receiving sections separated by intervening spaces;

Fig. 2 is a vertical section taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. '1 considerably reduced in size showing the shape of the liquid receiving sections and their disposition; Fig. 3 is a vertical section taken longitudinally through a modified form of centrifuge of the closed cylinder type embodying substantially the same principles of separation as shown in Fig. l; v Fig. 4 is a vertical section taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3 considerably reduced in size;

Fig. 5 is a vertical section taken longitudinally through a modified form of the centrifuge shown in Fig. 3; and

Fig. 6 is a vertical section taken on the line 66 of Fi 5.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2 there is shown an open type centrifuge l0 comprising a receptacle I2 having hubs or journals l4 and 16 at opposite ends thereof for supporting it for rotation about a horizontal axis. A pulley P fixed tothe hub l6 affords means by which the necessary rotation may be imparted to the centrifuge. The hubs l4 and 16 pass through ball-bearing assemblies I8 and 20, the latter being housed in recesses 22 and 24 formed in the upper ends of posts 26 and 28 which support the centrifuge at a convenient height from the floor. The receptacle 12 as shown is a casting comprised of two cylindrical sections 30, Fig. 2, which are held in spaced relation substantially diametrically opposite to each other and equidistant from the axis of rotation by spaced struts or webs 38 which extend across spaces or openings 35 between the sections. Disks or end plates 32 and 3:": are fastened to the opposite ends of the sections 30 forming closures therefor. The hubs M and K6 are formed integral with the end plates.

. Within each of the semi-cylindrical sections 30 there is situated a flexible diaphragm or lining 49, the ends and edges 42 of which are secured to the ends and edges of the section by overlying fiat metal straps 45 while the portion intermediate the ends and edges is left free to move relative tothe peripheral :wall of the section. The diaphragm or lining is preferably a sheet of impervious waterproof material such as rubber, plastic or a waterproofed textile fabric.

The liquid to be centrifuged is introduced into the centrifuge, as will appear hereinafter, and occupies each of the cylindrical sections 30, overlying and being contained by the diaphragms. The liquid component is discharged continuously from the section through openings which will be referred to hereinafter. In order to discharge the sludge which accumulates adjacent to the wall means is provided for moving the diaphragms 40 inwardly toward the axis of rotation of the centrifuge. To bring about inward movea ainst ment of the flexible .di'aphragms, passages 86 are formed in the ends of "the section iiflwhich terminate at one end at E8 behind the diaphragm. The opposite ends of the passages are connected *by radial passages formed in the end plate 34 to an axial passage iii formed in and extending along the hub It. The outer end of the axial passage 54 "intersects a radial passage which extends "radially through the side of "the hub and this latter "passage is -in communi-cat'ion with an "annular "chamber "56 formed in a ring 38 surrounding the hub f6 and rotatably hel'd thereon by key rings 60. Conduits B2 and will connect the chamber 56 the formerbeingscrewed into an opening in the ringand the latter bein secured to the discharge of a pump "86 supportedrrom the floor on legs 68. By means of the pump 66 a liquid, usually Water, mayhe'supplied to the ring t8 andhence through the passages to and "413 to the *back side of "the diaphragm it. In order .to avoid confusionbe'tween the liquid being centrifuged and the employed 'to displace the diaphragm, the latter will hereafter he referred to as water although it is to be understood that other liquids than water may be employed f or "this purpose. As the water enters between the diaphragm 4-0 and'the wahof *a section 30, it is forced inwardly *and,'b vary- 'ing the-quantity of water introduced partial 'or "total displacement of the "diaphragm may be 'ef- 'fected. Apertures H! are formed in the walls 'of the sections to allow a constant discharge or" water introduced between the diaphragms and the Walls of the sections into an annular "housing T2 surrounding the centrifuge and within which it rotates. These apertures afford means for emptying water from *between' the aiaphragms an'd 'the-walls so that the diaphragms may return to lie against the walls after the-sludgehas been discharged. The housing -12 has at the bottom a conduit H which is connected-tea sump T6, and. the'latt'er is connected by conduit 18 to thepump "66. Incrder'to vary the'amoun't-of-water supplied to'the-sections and hence-the position ofthe diaphragmsto bri-ng aboutdischargaa bypass 8B is 7 connected 'betweenthe conduits 6d and H and this-bypass there is interposed a va'lve 82. At

beginn'mg of the process the valve 8 2 is in a wide-open position, hence most of the'waterdel-i-veredbythe pump 66 merely circulates from the discharge side of the pump to' the suction side livered into the housing 12 so that' it does not accumulate and push-the diaphragms awayirom the walls. When it is desired to-discharge the "sludge, the va-lve 82 is rotated partially *to 'lose the bypass-8U, whereupon more water-is delivered to the sections than can be "discharged through the apertures ffl and hence "the diaphragm "is moved inwardly. "By properly positioning "the valve 82 a given volume of water-may be introduced and maintained between the diaphragms and the walks of the section. It is to he'under- *s'tood that "while apump is disclosed for introducing the water, any means for creatinga sufiicient pressure head to cause the waterto flow-into the space 'between the diaphragm and the wall is 1 suitable.

While the liquid component -maybe discharged through the longitudinalopenings "36 at opposite sides-of the centrifuge, acloser control of the dis- 6. tively small openings for discharge of the 'lii n'iid component. The smaller openings have the advantage that the flow "is of less depth and hence there is less turbulence "and tendency to cause intermingling of the liquid with the sludge. For this reason separate discharge passages 8 are formed inthe end-plate M at the ends of the sections. The passages B4 open into a chamber 138 concentric with and surrounding ithe-end pla te 3%. The loottom of the chamber 38 is provided with a drain passage 90 through which the discharged components may be drawn-01f.

The sludge "is discharged through the longitudinal openings 35 "since these are much larger and permit a much more rapid discharge. This is accomplished by movement of the diaphragm W to the dotted-dine position shown at the bottom oi Fig. 1. A suitable housing 13 surrounding the container will receive the sludge. If desired the housing '12 may be om-itted and the water allowed to discharge into the housing '13 together with the sludge. This would have the efiect #of keeping the discharged sludge fluid and preventing it from sticking to thewallof'the housing. this is done the return :conduit 14, sump LB, bypass 80 and valve 82 may be omitted and the amount :of water retained between the diaphragm and wall controlled iby therspeed of ithe pump.

It is to be observed ztfhatzin thissf-ully extended "position'the diaphragm will :cover :th'erinner open ends of the discharge passagesi8'4 ,rising above the sides of :the sections Zhence preventing the .sludgeirom fouling orchocking up the openings 5 3 which aresmall infliameter and'would nnicldy :be blocked by .dirt :and ether viscous :matter.

The liquid :to he centrifuged is introduced to the centrifuge through the hub 44 rby way .of can axial chamber 19.2 formed therein which =termihates at its inner endtin radial passages 94 located in positions @to deliver the liquid into the sections 3.0.

A centrifuge "as described above may .be :operated substantiaflly -.continuously since the liquid to be centrifuged may :be introduced and the separated liquid component "free :of solid matter may be discharged while the centrifuge .is :in

operation and for the further reason that after the sludge or foreign matter :hasaccumulated to such an extent as to interfere with further separation, it may he removed without stopping 'the machine. .Since the accumulation .aof the :sludge :is relatively slow, the centrifuge may he operated .ror alongtimeswithoutxinterrupting the flow of liquor to In operation the centrifuge :is :driven at a given-speed depending :upon the liquid to be centrifuged and-the liquor dsrsupl lied in a continuousstream toithezcon'tainer through the chamber .92 insufficient quantitycto .fil'l the sections it and continuously to the discharge throu h the openings 384 separated :from the sludge. Therdiaphragms A3 arerat :this time contact with xthe'zperipherad'wa'lls of the sections 313 and the valve 52 is adjusted to :its. open position so that mostof :the *water "delivered by the pump '66 is bypassediand the :small amount of water delivered to the sections is discharged through the apertures til :in the walls thereof. The process in continued until Fthesludge :accumula-tes within the sections to a point Where it will begin to discharge *with the separatedlliquid whereupon the introduction ofzliquor is stopped. .Atithis point the valve-2 m rotated toa partially closed position whereupon the v:d-iaphrag-m is displaced inwardly and the sludge is ejeoted through "charge may be obtained by providing-complain th p ning fl. As soon gas ithe sludge all been discharged the valve 82 is rotated to its fully open position whereupon the diaphragms return to their initial positions against the walls of the sections and the introduction of liquid is resumed.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, there is shown a somewhat modified form of centrifuge in which a substantially closed cylindrical container 96 is employed, the opposite ends of which are closed by disks or end plates 98 and I00. The centrifuge is supported for rotation about a horizontal axis by means of hubs or journals I02 and I04 formed integrally with the aforesaid ends 98 and'I00 and which pass through ball-bearing assemblies I06 and I08. The latter are housed in recesses H and H2 formed in the upper ends of posts H4 and H6 which support the centrifuge at a convenient height from the fioor. Rotation of the centrifuge may be effected by way of a pulley P fixed to the hub I04. Within the cylindrical container 96 there is disposed a substantially continuous flexible diaphragm or lining I It the end portions I20 of which are fastened to the peripheral wall adjacent to the end plates 98 and I00 by the spring rings I22 and the intermediate portion of which is free. This diaphragm or lining, as in the previously described centrifuge, is adapted to be moved inwardly to effect discharge of the liquid component through discharge openings I24 formed in the end plate 98 and arranged concentrically with respect to the axis of rotation, Fig. 4. As herein illustrated there is only one set of openings for discharge of the liquid component. The size of these opening is carefully chosen so that they are not large enough to spoil the control of discharge by eddying and yet are large enough to permit rapid discharge of the sludge. Two sets of discharge openings could be employed if desired. The discharge openings I24 permit discharge of the liquid component into an annular chamber I26 situated at the end of the receptacle and surrounding a short annular flan e I38 formed on the end plate 98. The lower side of the chamber I26 has a drain passage I32 through which the liquid component which accumulates therein may be drawn off. Surrounding the chamber I26 is a second chamber I28 the purpose of which will be described hereinafter.

The liquid to be centrifuged is introduced through the end plate I00 by way of a passage I34 formed longitudinally of the hub I04, the former entering the container through the center of the end plate I00 behind a baffle plate I36 the latter serving to spread the liquid radially and to prevent splashing and disturbing the separation of the liquid from the sludge.

To bring about movement of the diaphragm toward the axis of rotation of the centrifuge, one or more passages I38 are formed in the peripheral wall of the container, end portion I40 of which terminate behind the diaphragm I I8. The passages I38 are connected to radial passages I42 formed in the end plate I00 and the latter are in communication with a chamber I46 formed in a ring I44 surrounding the hub I04 and rotatably retained thereon by means of key rings I45. One end of a conduit I48 is threaded into the ring and the opposite end connected to the discharge side of a pump I50. Apertures I52 are found in the container wall through which water introduced between the diaphragm and the wall of the container may pass into a chamber I54 surrounding the centrifuge and within which it ,The lower: portion of this chamber is connected by a conduit I56 to .asump. 1.56am the Pump draws the water therefrom throughLa return pipe I60. Priorto discharge of the'sludge, the water delivered by the pump I50 circulates from the discharge side of the pump to the suction side through a bypass I62 which is connected between the conduits I48 and I56 and in which there is interposed a valve I64. To bring about displacement of the diaphragm, the valve I64 is partially closed so that more water is delivered to the container than can pass through the apertures I52 and hence water accumulates between the wall of the container and the diaphragm, pushing it inwardly. By adjusting the delivery of the water to the container, the diaphragm may be pushed inwardly sufficiently to eject all of the sludge through the discharge openings I24.

It has been found that when the water is introduced between the wall of the container and the diaphragm to displace the latter inwardly, there is a tendency for the sludge and heavy matter next to the diaphragm to accumulate at separated points along the container resisting uniform displacement of the diaphragm with the result that pockets are formed which retain the sludge preventing free flow toward the discharge opening at the end of the container. To prevent this, a progressive movement of the diaphragm inwardly from one end to the other, that is, toward the discharge end, is preferable. By progressively displacing the diaphragm inwardly from one end toward the other, a centrifugal differential is set up between the inwardly displaced portion and the undisturbed portion causing a flow of the sludge and other dirt from the inwardly displaced portion toward the undisturbed portions. Thus the sludge is moved toward the discharge end and there will be no pockets of accumulated sludge at various points within the centrifuge which cannot be displaced. To accomplish this, annular ridges I66 are formed on the inner surface of the wall of the centrifuge at spaced points to divide the container and hence the diaphragm into a plurality of adjacent but separated sections I68. As is illustrated. when water is introduced to the section most remote from the discharge end, it will separate the diaphragm in that section from the wall, Fig. 3, but, since the ridge I66 acts as a dam, the water will be held more or less confined to that section until the diaphragm is substantially completely displaced, the diaphragm hinging at the ridge separating this section from the next section. Thus the sludge accumulated on the diaphragm in the section is pushed or caused to flow toward the next section. When the first section becomes completely filled with water, the addition of more water will cause it to rise above the dam and'flow over into the second section separating the diaphragm from the second section, and so on progressively to the last section, thereby moving the sludge toward the discharge end. When it is desirable finally to discharge the sludge which has accumulated at the discharge end, the chamber I26 is moved longitudinally to the dotted-line position so as to withdraw it from the chamber I28 and the sludge is allowed to discharge into this latter chamber.

The operation of the centrifuge described above is similar in most respects to the operation of a centrifuge illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2 and hence will not be recounted in detail herein. In one respect it differs, however, in that positive means,

namely the ridges, are provided to effect displace- 9 mentoi the. diaphragm. wa-rdly in a. progressive manner from: one end toward the other,. that. is, toward the discharge end so as to cause; a continuous flow of the sludge adjacent. to the diaphragm-r. toward. the discharge end..

In stilt another form of the invention, asshown in Figs. 5 and 6, the centrifuge comprises a. sub:- stantiallycylindrical container H which com prises a hollow cylindrical casting having formed integral with one end thereof a hollow hub I12. There is fastened to the oppositeopenend; of the. casting a. disk or plate I14 having formed integral therewith a hub H6. Thehubs H2 and H6 pass. through ball bearing assemblies H8. and 80... the latter occupying recesses.- Hi2 and [-84 in the. top of posts I86 and H38: which support the centrifuge at a convenient. height for rotation about;- a longitudinal. axis; As in the previous centrifuges, there is a flexible diaphragm or lining I190 disposed Within the. container withits endportions s2 secured tothe peripheral inner wall. adjacent to the ends. by means of spring rings [:94. A plurality of annular ridges l 96- are formed on the inner wall of the container which separate the container and hence the diaphragm into a plurality of spaced. sections I98; As. con:- structed, water may be introduced behind that portion of the diaphragm in each of these sec.- tions through independent passages 200.. As illustrated, the passages 20.0. are formed in the peripheral wall of the container and extend from the various sections longitudinally to one end of the 'oontainerwhere each is. connected to. a radial passage 202 the latterin. turn: being connected to. annular grooves 20.4 formed on the inside surface. of the. hollow hub H2. An. adjustable con.- d-uit 206 is arranged to be moved axially within the hubv H2- to bring its inner end, into: registration. with. any given one of the grooves 2104-sothat a liquid may be introduced to any given one: of the. sections H8. The adjustable conduit 206 is connected in any suitable manner, for example by a telescoping joint, to a conduit 2:08,, the latter being connected to the discharge. side.- of a pump 2L0. Apertures 212 are formed through the wall of the. container at each section through: which the liquid may drain from between: the diaphragm and the wall into a housing 214. surrounding the container and within. which. it rotates. Hence any liquid which may leak from a displaced: section to an adjacent undisplaced sec.- tion will run out of the latter through. its aperture 2I.-2- without causing displacement. thereof and liquid thatv is properly introduced may drain out. Theliquid from the-housing 21-4 is; returned to the pump by way of a. conduit 216 and asump M8; the latter being connected: to the pump by azpipe22fl; Normally a bypass 222 divertsmost of the liquid delivered. by the. pump to the sump 21 8 without its passing through the container. A valve 224 interposed in the bypass, however, may be adjusted to cause an excess of liquid to be delivered to the container and hence. to' separate the diaphragm. from the wall of the container. The selective feature included this centrifuge, that is, the provision of means. for separating. any one of' the. sections. of the. diaphragm, makes it possible. to. dislodge. stubborn or heavy coatings of sludge which will. not flow readily toward the discharge end of the centrifugeand to eliminate pockets formed along. the diaphragm. By manipulation. of the adjustable cond'uit 206 an undulating. or wave-like motion. may

be imparted to. the wallet the diaphragm to push 75 the sludge toward the-discharge end of the con .tainen.

The liquid component. is normally discharged through: oneor more. passages 226- formed in the end plate [r141 as the. diaphragm. is moved inwardly, which turn delivers the liquid: to an annular chamber aze surrounding the hub I16 and: having a drain 22.92 Thepassages226 are of small cross-sectional area and hence would be readilyfouled: or clogged by the sludge. next to the diaphragm and hencelarger openings 230: are provided for discharging the sludge,v these openings being, in communication with an annular chamber surrounding the.- end of the container. To prevent.- access of the sludge to the passages 226 after the. liquid components. have been. discharged and the sludge is being discharged; the inner ends thereof are arrangedso that. they wilt be covered by the. diaphragm. as assumes its: inwardly displaced position, as

shown by the dottedlines.

The liquid. to be centrifuged is; delivered. to the container through an axially arranged: pipe .2-3t textending through the-hollow hub H2 having at its inner end within the container a radial .noz-zle. 236 which delivers. the liquid. close to the wall of the container hence minimizing disturbance ot the liquid therein.

'Eheoperation of. the centrifuge justv described -is similar to that of. the; previously described centrituges with. the additional: feature that by introducing liquid. between the: diaphragmand the Wall! of. the: container at. different.- points pockets tormedi during the discharge of the sludge be; elimhiated: and the diaphragm. may ac;-

tuallg besgiven an undula-ting'or wave-like-motion to; promote: movement of the sludge and to prevent. adhesion thereof tothe diaphragm. I Lt is: to: be understood, that in any of. the forms oi; the centri-tuge as. described above, the displace.- ;men-t. of. the diaphragm may be employed to. eiiect a. discharge. of the liquid. component. of. the liquid .being centrifuged as well as the sludge.

It should be understood that the. present disclosure is for. the purpose of illustration only and .thatthis invention includes all modifications. and equivalents which. ialla within the scope of. the 'app.ended. claims.

L claim:

1. A centrifuge comprising a rotatable con.- tainer having an elongate portion adapted to; re.- cei-ve: a liquid to be separated into. components of diitercnt specific; gravity and separate discharge openings at diitterent. radii through which, separated components of the centrifuged liquid may be; discharged from. said liquid receiving portion, an impervious; diaphragm coextensive with. the wall of said liquid receiving portion, said phragm beingmovable relative to. said wall to displace the components from; the liquid receivportion through said openings and. by movement to a. given position to cover certain of the discharge openings while leaving others. uncov cred. and. means for efiecin'ng movement of said diaphragm.

2.. A. centriiuge comprising a rotatable container having an. elongate portion adapted to re- .ceivea liquid to: be" separated into components of difierent. specific,- gravity and. separate dis' charge openings.- atdifierent radii through which separated. components oi the centrifuged; liquid may; be. discharged, certain ofv the openings being of small cross-sectional. area through which the liquid component be discharged and.- others being. of. larger area. through which the sludge may be emptied, an impervious diaphragm coextensive with the wall of said cylindrical portion, and the diaphragm being movable radially inward to discharge the liquid component through the openings of small area and thereafter being movable further to an extreme position to cover said small openings and to discharge sludge through the larger openings, and fluid passages communicating with the other side of the diaphragm for effecting such movement thereof.

3. A centrifuge comprising a container, rotatable about an axis, having an elongate cylindrical portion adapted to receive a liquid from which solid matter is to be separated, a flexible impervious diaphragm coextensive with the wall of said portion within which the liquid is introduced, a discharge opening, and means for displacing successive portions of the diaphragm successively radially inward to a smaller radius than the adjoining as yet undisplaced portion of the diaphragm, to cause the centrifugal action of the rotating container to effect flow of the dirt, deposited on the diaphragm, along the diaphragm from such displaced portion toward such undisplaced portion.

4. A centrifuge comprising a rotatable container having a portion adapted to receive a liquid from which solid matter is to be separated, a flexible inpervious diaphragm coextensive with the said portion within which the liquid to be centrifuged is introduced, discharge openings, means for introducing a liquid between the diaphragm and the wall of said cylindrical portion to displace the diaphragm radially inward, and dams spaced along said wall dividing the cylindrical portion into a plurality of sections, the diaphragm bearing radially outwardly by centrifugal force against the dams in an outer running position of the diaphragm but being disengageable from said dams by inward displacement, said dams preventing flow of liquid from one section to the next between the diaphragm and wall until the one section is fully displaced by the liquid introduced thereto.

5. A centrifuge comprising a rotatable closed container, a flexible impervious diaphragm coextensive with the peripheral wall of the container the ends of which diaphragm are fastened to the wall of the container and the intermediate portion of which is free to be moved inwardly, spaced annular ridges on the inner peripheral wall dividing the container into sections, the free intermediate portion of the diaphragm bearing radially outwardly by centrifugal force against said ridges in an outer running portion of the diaphragm but being disengageable from said ridges by inward displacement, said ridges forming hinge lines along which one section of the diaphragm may be displaced relative to the next, and means for introducing a liquid between the diaphragm and the wall to cause successive sections of the diaphragm to be displaced successively radially inward.

6. A centrifuge comprising a rotatable closed container, a flexible impervious lining diaphragm coextensive with the peripheral wall of the container the ends of which diaphragm are fastened to the wall of the container and the intermediate portion of which is free to be moved inwardly, said peripheral wall having a passage therein an end of which terminates behind the lining through which a liquid may beintroduced to displace the lining, spaced annular ridges on the inner peripheral wall dividing the container and the overlying diaphragm into sections the ing radially outwardly by centrifugal force against said ridges in an outer running portion of the diaphragm but being disengageable from said ridges by inward displacement, said ridges forming dams to restrain the flow of liquid between sections until preceding sections are filled, and means for introducing the liquid through the passage. f

7. A centrifuge comprising a rotatable container a portion of which is adapted to receive a liquid from which solid matter is to be separated, an impervious flexible diaphragm within and coextensive with the liquid-receiving portion of the container and secured to the container at both ends, a discharge opening in the container through which the liquid component free from solid matter is adapted to be discharged from the container and independent fluid passages communicating, respectively, at difierent distances along the container with the outside of respective portions of the diaphragm for admission of fluid behind given portions of the diaphragm.

8. A centrifuge comprising a substantially closed container rotatable about a longitudinal axis having in one end a discharge opening, a charging opening, a flexible impervious lining member coextensive with the peripheral wall of the container the ends of which are fastened to the wall of the container and the intermediate portion of which is free to be moved inwardly, independent passages in the wall of the container having ends which terminate at longitudinally spaced points behind the lining and respectively corresponding opposite ends which terminate in the vicinity of the charging opening, a conduit for introducing a liquid to be centrifuged through the charging opening into the container and an adjustable conduit for deliver-'- ing a liquid to any selected one of said opposite ends of said passages. 9. A centrifuge comprising a substantially closed container rotatable about a longitudinal axis having in one end a discharge opening, and having a centrally located charging opening in the opposite end, said opening having in its inner surface a plurality of annular grooves, a conduit passing through the charging opening for delivering liquid to be centrifuged to the container, a flexible lining member coextensive with the peripheral wall of the container the ends of which are fastened thereto and the intermediate portion of which is free to be moved inwardly, spaced annular ridges on the inner peripheral wall dividing the container and the overlying lining into sections, passages in the wall of the container having ends one of which terminates in each section behind the lining and opposite ends one of which terminates in each of said annular grooves, a conduit adjustable axially of the container for movement into registration with a given one of the grooves, and means for delivering a liquid to the conduit. f

10. A centrifuge comprising a rotatable container, an impervious. flexible diaphragm constituting a liner for the container wall and subject to the outward force of the material under centrifugal treatment, and separate fluid conduits communicating separately with the outer side of said impervious diaphragm at respective points spaced longitudinally of the container. said separate conduits extending inward of the container to smaller radii than those of their points of communication with the diaphragm,

13 to supply fluid under centrifugal pressure be tween the diaphragm and container wall, Whereby by supplying fluid to said conduits in succession the diaphragm can be caused to undulate in opposition to the centrifugal force of the material. under treatment.

11. A centrifuge comprising a container rotatable about a longitudinal axis, a flexible impervious lining member within and coextensive with the peripheral wall of the container, the lining member secured to the container at its ends and the intermediate portion of the lining member being free to be moved inwardly, independent passages in the wall of the container having ends which terminate at longitudinally spaced points and 80111 nunicating separately with the outer side of the lining member, the container having at one end a portion or" smaller radii having an inner surface formed in a plurality of annular grooves, said. passages being connected respec- I tively to said grooves, and means for delivering a liquid to said grooves in succession.

12. A centrifuge comprising a container rotatable about a longitudinal axis, a flexible impervious lining member within and coextensive with the peripheral wall of the container, the lining member being secured to the container at its ends and the intermediate portion of the lining member being free to be moved inwardly, independent passages in the wall of the container having ends which terminate at longitudinally 14 spaced points and communicating separately with the outer side of the lining member, the container having at one end a portion of smaller radii having an inner surface formed in a plurality of annular grooves, said passages being connected respectively to said grooves, and a conduit adjustable axially of the container for delivering a liquid to said grooves in succession.

WILLIAM G. ABBOTT, JR.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 807,055 Berrigan Dec. 12, 1905 1,257,235 Howell Feb. 19, 1918 1,473,421 Eccleston Nov. 6, 1923 1,519,419 Peck Dec. 16, 1924 2,138,468 Ayres Nov. 29, 1938 2,161,476 Leja June 6, 1939 2,184,598 Jahn Dec. 26, 1939 2,186,836 McGlaughlin Jan. 9, 1940 2,261,394 Lindgren Nov. 4, 1941 2,308,559 Winkler Jan. 19, 1943 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 2,656 Sweden July 23, 1889 394,811 Great Britain June 6, 1933 33,151 Holland July 16, 1934

US2661150A 1947-12-17 1947-12-17 Centrifuge Expired - Lifetime US2661150A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2661150A US2661150A (en) 1947-12-17 1947-12-17 Centrifuge

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US2661150A US2661150A (en) 1947-12-17 1947-12-17 Centrifuge

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2661150A true US2661150A (en) 1953-12-01

Family

ID=25156424

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US2661150A Expired - Lifetime US2661150A (en) 1947-12-17 1947-12-17 Centrifuge

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2661150A (en)

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3012710A (en) * 1957-10-30 1961-12-12 Westfalia Separator Ag Centrifugal separator having lining of elastomer material
US3105045A (en) * 1962-01-04 1963-09-24 Sharples Corp Centrifuge discharge means
US3145173A (en) * 1962-11-26 1964-08-18 Pennsalt Chemicals Corp Centrifuge having forced solids discharge
US3244363A (en) * 1959-06-24 1966-04-05 George N Hein Centrifuge apparatus and bag therefor
US3249295A (en) * 1966-05-03 Method for separating liquid mixtures
US3305169A (en) * 1964-09-11 1967-02-21 Silver Harold High speed hollow drum
US3350002A (en) * 1963-03-14 1967-10-31 Beckman Instruments Inc Centrifuge apparatus
US3398888A (en) * 1966-08-18 1968-08-27 Ethyl Corp Centrifuge with improved discharge assembly
US3399828A (en) * 1966-11-25 1968-09-03 Bird Machine Co Centrifuge solids discharge receiving compartment
US3679128A (en) * 1969-08-11 1972-07-25 Aga Ab Centrifuge
US3684160A (en) * 1969-08-11 1972-08-15 Aga Ab Centrifuge having a rotation-sensitive pumping device
US3724747A (en) * 1971-03-15 1973-04-03 Aga Ab Centrifuge apparatus with means for moving material
US3771715A (en) * 1970-11-24 1973-11-13 Escher Wyss Ag Self-cleaning centrifugal separator
US4044944A (en) * 1975-04-24 1977-08-30 Fa. Moebus Kg. Centrifuge
WO1991000148A1 (en) * 1989-07-03 1991-01-10 Knelson Benjamin V Centrifugal separator
US5257968A (en) * 1991-06-06 1993-11-02 Alfa Laval Separation Inc. Inflatable dam for a decanter centrifuge
US6074335A (en) * 1994-10-13 2000-06-13 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Rotor with elastic diaphragm defining a liquid separating chamber of varying volume
US6102883A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-08-15 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Blood collection and separation process
US6123655A (en) * 1996-04-24 2000-09-26 Fell; Claude Cell separation system with variable size chamber for the processing of biological fluids
US6296602B1 (en) 1999-03-17 2001-10-02 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Method for collecting platelets and other blood components from whole blood
US6632191B1 (en) 1994-10-13 2003-10-14 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for separating blood components
US20040147865A1 (en) * 1994-10-13 2004-07-29 Cianci James P. System and method for processing blood
US6824506B1 (en) 2000-12-08 2004-11-30 Haemonetics Corporation Shaped diaphragm for a centrifuge system rotor
US20060240964A1 (en) * 2005-04-21 2006-10-26 Fresenius Hemocare Deutschland Gmbh Method and apparatus for separation of particles suspended in a fluid
US20070213191A1 (en) * 2006-03-07 2007-09-13 Jacques Chammas Rotor defining a fluid separation chamber of varying volume
US8454548B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2013-06-04 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for plasma reduced platelet collection
US8628489B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2014-01-14 Haemonetics Corporation Three-line apheresis system and method
US8647289B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2014-02-11 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for optimized apheresis draw and return
US8808978B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2014-08-19 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for automated platelet wash
US8834402B2 (en) 2009-03-12 2014-09-16 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for the re-anticoagulation of platelet rich plasma
US9302042B2 (en) 2010-12-30 2016-04-05 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for collecting platelets and anticipating plasma return

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
NL33151C (en) *
US807055A (en) * 1904-03-01 1905-12-12 Francis J Arend Centrifugal separator.
US1257235A (en) * 1917-12-13 1918-02-19 William G Howell Centrifugal liquid-purifier.
US1473421A (en) * 1919-04-05 1923-11-06 Centrifugal Nat Concentrator C Centrifugal separator
US1519419A (en) * 1922-03-02 1924-12-16 Wilbur H Peck Centrifugal separator
GB394811A (en) * 1931-07-30 1933-07-06 Gustav Ter Meer Improvements in or relating to overflow centrifuges for the purification of paper pulp, crude starch and similar substances
US2138468A (en) * 1936-03-17 1938-11-29 Sharples Specialty Co Centrifugal separator
US2161476A (en) * 1938-01-26 1939-06-06 Smith Corp A O Ore concentrator
US2184598A (en) * 1939-12-26 G jahn
US2186836A (en) * 1937-07-10 1940-01-09 John P Mcglaughlin Process and apparatus for treating materials in centrifugals
US2261394A (en) * 1937-05-29 1941-11-04 Separator Nobel Ab Centrifuge for the dewaxing of oils
US2308559A (en) * 1940-03-12 1943-01-19 Frederick W Winkler Solid bowl type of centrifuging apparatus

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
NL33151C (en) *
US2184598A (en) * 1939-12-26 G jahn
US807055A (en) * 1904-03-01 1905-12-12 Francis J Arend Centrifugal separator.
US1257235A (en) * 1917-12-13 1918-02-19 William G Howell Centrifugal liquid-purifier.
US1473421A (en) * 1919-04-05 1923-11-06 Centrifugal Nat Concentrator C Centrifugal separator
US1519419A (en) * 1922-03-02 1924-12-16 Wilbur H Peck Centrifugal separator
GB394811A (en) * 1931-07-30 1933-07-06 Gustav Ter Meer Improvements in or relating to overflow centrifuges for the purification of paper pulp, crude starch and similar substances
US2138468A (en) * 1936-03-17 1938-11-29 Sharples Specialty Co Centrifugal separator
US2261394A (en) * 1937-05-29 1941-11-04 Separator Nobel Ab Centrifuge for the dewaxing of oils
US2186836A (en) * 1937-07-10 1940-01-09 John P Mcglaughlin Process and apparatus for treating materials in centrifugals
US2161476A (en) * 1938-01-26 1939-06-06 Smith Corp A O Ore concentrator
US2308559A (en) * 1940-03-12 1943-01-19 Frederick W Winkler Solid bowl type of centrifuging apparatus

Cited By (47)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3249295A (en) * 1966-05-03 Method for separating liquid mixtures
US3012710A (en) * 1957-10-30 1961-12-12 Westfalia Separator Ag Centrifugal separator having lining of elastomer material
US3244363A (en) * 1959-06-24 1966-04-05 George N Hein Centrifuge apparatus and bag therefor
US3105045A (en) * 1962-01-04 1963-09-24 Sharples Corp Centrifuge discharge means
US3145173A (en) * 1962-11-26 1964-08-18 Pennsalt Chemicals Corp Centrifuge having forced solids discharge
US3350002A (en) * 1963-03-14 1967-10-31 Beckman Instruments Inc Centrifuge apparatus
US3305169A (en) * 1964-09-11 1967-02-21 Silver Harold High speed hollow drum
US3398888A (en) * 1966-08-18 1968-08-27 Ethyl Corp Centrifuge with improved discharge assembly
US3399828A (en) * 1966-11-25 1968-09-03 Bird Machine Co Centrifuge solids discharge receiving compartment
US3679128A (en) * 1969-08-11 1972-07-25 Aga Ab Centrifuge
US3684160A (en) * 1969-08-11 1972-08-15 Aga Ab Centrifuge having a rotation-sensitive pumping device
US3771715A (en) * 1970-11-24 1973-11-13 Escher Wyss Ag Self-cleaning centrifugal separator
US3724747A (en) * 1971-03-15 1973-04-03 Aga Ab Centrifuge apparatus with means for moving material
US4044944A (en) * 1975-04-24 1977-08-30 Fa. Moebus Kg. Centrifuge
WO1991000148A1 (en) * 1989-07-03 1991-01-10 Knelson Benjamin V Centrifugal separator
US5257968A (en) * 1991-06-06 1993-11-02 Alfa Laval Separation Inc. Inflatable dam for a decanter centrifuge
US20040147865A1 (en) * 1994-10-13 2004-07-29 Cianci James P. System and method for processing blood
US6074335A (en) * 1994-10-13 2000-06-13 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Rotor with elastic diaphragm defining a liquid separating chamber of varying volume
US6632191B1 (en) 1994-10-13 2003-10-14 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for separating blood components
US7452322B2 (en) 1994-10-13 2008-11-18 Haemonetics Corporation Rotor with elastic diaphragm for liquid-separation system
US6379322B1 (en) 1994-10-13 2002-04-30 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Blood collection and separation system
US7332125B2 (en) 1994-10-13 2008-02-19 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for processing blood
US6602179B1 (en) 1994-10-13 2003-08-05 Haemonetics Corporation Rotor with elastic diaphragm defining a liquid separating chamber of varying volume
US6102883A (en) * 1995-06-07 2000-08-15 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Blood collection and separation process
US6641552B1 (en) 1995-06-07 2003-11-04 Haemonetics Corporation Blood collection and separation system
US6123655A (en) * 1996-04-24 2000-09-26 Fell; Claude Cell separation system with variable size chamber for the processing of biological fluids
US6558307B2 (en) 1999-03-17 2003-05-06 Haemonetics Corporation Method for collecting platelets and other blood components from whole blood
US6296602B1 (en) 1999-03-17 2001-10-02 Transfusion Technologies Corporation Method for collecting platelets and other blood components from whole blood
US6824506B1 (en) 2000-12-08 2004-11-30 Haemonetics Corporation Shaped diaphragm for a centrifuge system rotor
US20060240964A1 (en) * 2005-04-21 2006-10-26 Fresenius Hemocare Deutschland Gmbh Method and apparatus for separation of particles suspended in a fluid
US7473216B2 (en) * 2005-04-21 2009-01-06 Fresenius Hemocare Deutschland Gmbh Apparatus for separation of a fluid with a separation channel having a mixer component
US20070213191A1 (en) * 2006-03-07 2007-09-13 Jacques Chammas Rotor defining a fluid separation chamber of varying volume
US7998052B2 (en) 2006-03-07 2011-08-16 Jacques Chammas Rotor defining a fluid separation chamber of varying volume
US20110237418A1 (en) * 2006-03-07 2011-09-29 Jacques Chammas Rotor defining a fluid separation chamber of varying volume
US9095665B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2015-08-04 Haemonetics Corporation Three-line apheresis system and method
US8628489B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2014-01-14 Haemonetics Corporation Three-line apheresis system and method
US8454548B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2013-06-04 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for plasma reduced platelet collection
US8702637B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2014-04-22 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for optimized apheresis draw and return
US9364600B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2016-06-14 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for optimized apheresis draw and return
US8808217B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2014-08-19 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for plasma reduced platelet collection
US8647289B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2014-02-11 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for optimized apheresis draw and return
US8834402B2 (en) 2009-03-12 2014-09-16 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for the re-anticoagulation of platelet rich plasma
US9248227B2 (en) 2009-03-12 2016-02-02 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for the re-anticoagulation of platelet rich plasma
US9789243B2 (en) 2009-03-12 2017-10-17 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for the re-anticoagulation of platelet rich plasma
US8808978B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2014-08-19 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for automated platelet wash
US9833794B2 (en) 2010-11-05 2017-12-05 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for automated platelet wash
US9302042B2 (en) 2010-12-30 2016-04-05 Haemonetics Corporation System and method for collecting platelets and anticipating plasma return

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3482771A (en) Sludge centrifuge
US3270529A (en) Laundry equipment
US4836422A (en) Propellantless foam dispenser
US2788008A (en) Method and apparatus for washing discs
US5289799A (en) Automatic pet relief station
US3463316A (en) Centrifugal separating system
US2375635A (en) Domestic appliance
US3727241A (en) Soil pump sewage handling system, method and toilet apparatus adapted therefor
US4850952A (en) Method and device for the separation and isolation of blood or bone marrow components
US2792172A (en) Centrifugal filters
US3086379A (en) Additive dispensing means for a cleaning machine
US6550292B1 (en) Dynamic balancer for an automatic washer
US5462513A (en) Continuous discharge centrifuge
US2463801A (en) Clothes-washing machine
US2909872A (en) Cleaning machines
US2539533A (en) Laundry machine
US6352499B1 (en) Process for operating a blood centrifugation unit
US5104541A (en) Oil-water separator
US5137424A (en) Pump unit
US5730805A (en) Dishwasher filter back-wash system independent from lower wash arm
US2706899A (en) Laundry machines
US5160310A (en) Centrifugal separator
US3084701A (en) Pumping mechanism and pump inlet cover for use therein
US4009967A (en) Road roller vehicle with water applicator
US1932246A (en) Laundry machine