US2660746A - Power-driven cleaning brush - Google Patents

Power-driven cleaning brush Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2660746A
US2660746A US36755A US3675548A US2660746A US 2660746 A US2660746 A US 2660746A US 36755 A US36755 A US 36755A US 3675548 A US3675548 A US 3675548A US 2660746 A US2660746 A US 2660746A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
cleaning
shaft
brush
engaging
fingers
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US36755A
Inventor
Ward Arthur
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
INTERNAT PAINT Co Inc
INTERNATIONAL PAINT COMPANY Inc
Original Assignee
INTERNAT PAINT Co Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by INTERNAT PAINT Co Inc filed Critical INTERNAT PAINT Co Inc
Priority to US36755A priority Critical patent/US2660746A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2660746A publication Critical patent/US2660746A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A46BRUSHWARE
    • A46BBRUSHES
    • A46B13/00Brushes with driven brush bodies or carriers
    • A46B13/02Brushes with driven brush bodies or carriers power-driven carriers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63BSHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
    • B63B59/00Hull protection specially adapted for vessels; Cleaning devices specially adapted for vessels
    • B63B59/06Cleaning devices for hulls

Description

Dec. 1, 1953 WARD 2,660,746
POWER-DRIVEN CLEANING BRUSH FiIed July 2, 1948 AETHU 1444.90
PARKER &- WALSH.
anamegs Patented Dec. 1, 1953 UNITED STATES OFFICE POWER-DRIVEN CLEANING BRUSH Application July 2, 1948, Serial N 0. 36,755
6 Claims.
This invention relates to a power driven cleaning brush, and more particularly to a brush for use on ships bottoms for removing fouling and rust, and under some conditions for removing paint and hard scale.
It has been proposed to employ power driven brushes, particularly for the specific purpose referred to, wherein the brushing elements are either in the form of pivoted striking elements or spring steel wires. Both types of such device have been found unsatisfactory in use because of their failure to last over substantial periods of the rather hard usage to which they are subjected. In the case of resilient fingers, such as spring wires, it has been found that the cleaning elements crystallize and break due to the constant flexing and releasing of the elements. This fault does not occur in those types of brushes which utilize pivoted fingers, but such devices are unsatisfactory because of the rapid wearing of the pivot elements.
An important object of the present invention is to provide a novel power driven brush of the character referred to wherein the cleaning elements employed utilize all of the advantages of the prior structures referred to without their disadvantages, the cleaning elements possessing flexibility in operation without any danger of breakage from crystallization.
A further object is to provide cleaning fingers made up of hard cleaning elements and highly resilient fingers for supporting said elements, the resilient fingers providing the desired degree of flexibility in operation and the rotary action of the brush serving to cause the cleaning elements to remain in their outer circumference of operation by centrifugal force to strike against the surface to be cleaned.
A further object is to provide such a device which may be wholly lacking in any pivotal connection of the cleaning units to the brush and which does not involve the use of any parts subject to crystallization, whereby the device may be subjected to hard usage over substantial periods of time without appreciable wear.
A further object is to provide a novel combination of flexible cleaning units of the character referred to with adjustable regulating plates to predetermine the striking action of the cleaning elements against the surface being cleaned.
Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent during the course of the following description.
In the drawing I have shown one embodiment of the invention. In this showing:
Figure 1 is a face view of the device, parts being broken away, and parts being shown in section,
Figure 2 is an enlarged transverse fragmentary sectional view on line 2-2 of Figure 1,
Figure 3 is a side elevation of the device il-- lustrating its operation against a surface being: cleaned, the handle being'broken away,
Figure 4 is a detail fragmentary sectional view on line 44 of Figure 2, and,
Figure 5 is a detail perspective view of one of the cleaning units.
Referring to Figure 1, the numeral I0 designates the cylindrical body of the device having radial extensions I I at opposite ends provided with edge flanges I2. Over each end of the body I0 and its associated extension II is arranged a casing member I3 having edge flanges I4 seating against the flanges I2, as shown at the right hand side of Figure 1, the extensions II and members I3 thus forming a housing for a purpose to be described. The casing members I3 are secured in position by suitable screws I5.
The body I0 is provided with a suitable handle I6 through which extend lead wires II connected to an electric motor l8 housed within the body It). An electric motor is preferably employed as the source of power, and any other suitable power source may be employed.
The motor I8 is provided with a shaft 20 extending from one end thereof and journaled in a bearing 2| carried by the body I0. The end of this shaft carries a sprocket 22 around which passes a chain 23, as shown at the right hand side of Figure 1. This chain passes around a sprocket 25 carried by a shaft 26 journaled in bearings 21 formed in the extensions I I. Thus. it will be apparent that the shaft 26 is driven. by the motor l8, and the sprockets 22 and 25. may be of any relative sizes to drive the brush; to be referred to at a desirable speed, for example, approximately 2,000 R. P. M.
The shaft 23 has fixed thereon a pair of spaced; discs 30 arranged adjacent the respective bearings 21. Thesediscs support a plurality of transverse parallel rods 31 having their axes equidistantly spaced from the axis of the shaft 26. The golds 3| accordingly will be driven by the discs A plurality of cleaning units 35 is carried by each rod 3|. Each unit comprises a rubber or other elastic finger 36 having its radially inner end looped around the associated rod 3I as at 31 and the end of the finger is riveted to the body thereof as at 38 or fixed thereto in any other suitable manner. To the outer end of each finger or strap 36 is secured a cleaning element 391:).
the form of a section of flat steel spring riveted to the finger 36 as at 40. The fingers 36 associated with each rod 3| are looped around such rod in spaced relation, as shown in detail in Figure 4, and spacing collars 4| are arranged between the loops of the adjacent fingers -or straps 36. Each .strap is preferably somewhat wider than the space between adjacent pairs of straps, and the fingers of adjacent rods 3| are staggered relative to each other, as will be, apparent from,
an examination of Figure 1. In dther'words, the fingers 36 and their associated'cleaningelements 39 at the top of Figurell .are'ofisetirom the corresponding elements of each next adjacent rod, and accordingly all portions of thesurface to be cleaned will be struckby several of the cleaning elements 39 in each rotation of the brush.
. Novel adjustment plates act .in combination with the cleaning units to hold the brush in prop- .er. relation to the work. Each casing member l3 carries a pair of bolts 45 having wing nuts 46,
as shown in Figures 1 and 3. These bolts extend @through slots 41 formed in. distance plates 48,
the operative edge 49 ofwhich is curved in an arc of a circle which .-is concentric with the axis of the shaft 26 in theiusual preferred adjustment of the plates 48,. The working-edges 49 are engageable with the surface Ell-of the work, as indicated in Figures Z'and 3.
OPERATION of: the plates-48 engage the surface of the work.
As stated, the edges 49 will lie radially inwardly .of. the eircles defined hy the. radiallyzouter edges oi the .Gleaning: elements 39, and as the shaft 25 "is r ota ted, the cleaning elements 39 strike smartly against the surface 59 to clean any rust or fouling therefrom. After the initial striking'of each element'39 against the surface 50 such element'will move along the surface-Wand its distance. fromthe axis of the shaft 26 will decrease. This relative radially inward movement of the cleaning elements 39 is compensated for bythefiexing of the fingers or straps 3B. In practice, these straps are formed of soft rubber, but they may be made of any suitable material, such as leather, so long asthey possess a substantial degree of flexibility, without;crystallizing. The rotational speed pf the shaft 26 causes the cleaning elements 39 toflbe maintained by centrifugal forcez-in their normal rotational paths'of movement and the platesdfl hold the brush in proper relationto the work topermit the cleaning elements 39to .perform the most efiicientcleaning action.
In-this connection it is noted that .in'the'absence of the plates 48,-a Workman would be called upon to use asubstantialdegree of judgmentas well. asa reasonable degree of strength tohold 4 which case the elements 39 would strike the Work surface at a much higher point and accordingly at a substantially greater angle, in which case the eficiency of the cleaning action would be greatly reduced. The plates 48 hold the device in fixed relationxto thework without the exercise of physical s'trengthand judgment on the part of the operator so that the cleaning elements strike a glancing blow against the surface to be cleaned atv an acute angle relative thereto.
"In Figure 2, it will be noted that the cleaning .nelementratethe right-side of the figure and above the ;point at-whichgthe plate 48 contacts the work 'is 'just-zahout tostrike the work a glancing blow .at an acute angle. The plates 48 readily may be adjusted by loosening the wing nuts 46 so that the cleaning elements 39 strike the surface at the most effective angle forcleaning.
Thereare nopivots associated withthe cleaning units at which point excessive wear can occur, and there are no hard resilient :elements, such as spring fingers, tending to hold the cleaning elements 33 in their proper operative positions relative to the work. If rubber fingers :36 are used, these fingers will be resilient but they are soft not hard, as is true of springsteel, the use of which hasrbeen found so highly impracticable. These fingers are-completely 'f-reeto fie upon the striking'of each cleaning element against the surface, withoutxany whatever thereto, and the presentdevice has been found to last for substantial periods in the hard usage to which it is subjected.
While the device is primarily intended for cleaning rust and fouling. from ships bottoms, it obviously may be used for cleaning other .sur-
- faces where a sharp hard striking force is .re-
the device inthe proper cleaningposition. Withiquired. At-tention is also invited to the fact that while relatively thin light cleaning/elements 39 are employed in the primary use of thedevice for removing loose rust, fouling matter, pain blis- .ters, etc, from ships hot-toms, substantial-1y heavier cleaning elements "3-9may be usediwherejt is desired to remove sol-id paint and .hard' scale. With the use of lightpleaning elements :39, highly effective cleaningya-ction is providedtbut the device will not remove tightly adheringsolid paint.
I claim:
1. A rotary brushiforcleaning-ships bottoms and the like {comprising a rotaryunit' having shaft means for rotatably mounting same, spaced supporting .members. carriedby said rotary unit and having their axes equidistantlyspaced from the axis of rotation of :saidshaftmeansyanda plurality of cleaning units carriedby each supporting-member, each cleaningunit comprising a hard surface-engaging element spaced outwardly of the associated supporting member wholly independent-ofadjacent elements, and aflflexible element connecting :such -sur-face engaging element to the associatedsupportingmember, said surface-engaging and flexible elements being relatively narrow "measured in a directionlengthwise of. said. supporting members, said flexible elements being formed of-strips ofsoft flexible elasticv material and having'a fiexibili-ty such that they are readily bendable under the influence of radially inwardly applied forces; whereby. such surface-engaging elements are caused to follow normal rotational paths of movement by, centrifugal force and are readily deflectable radially inwardly. ofisuch' paths upon 'striking asurface tobecleaned. ,1
2. A rotary brush for cleaning ships bottoms and the like comprising shaft means, spaced collars carried by said shaft means, a plurality of spaced parallel rods secured at their ends to said collars and circumferentially arranged around said shaft means, and a plurality of cleaning units carried by each rod, each cleaning unit comprising a hard. surface-engaging element spaced outwardly of the associated rod wholly independent of adjacent elements, and a flexible element connecting such surface-engaging element to the associated rod, said surface-engaging and flexible elements being relatively narrow measured in a direction lengthwise of said rods, said flexible elements being formed of strips of soft flexible elastic material and having a flexibility such that they are readily bendable under the influence of radially inwardly applied forces, whereby such surface-engaging elements are caused to follow normal rotational paths of movement by centrifugal force and are readily deflectable radially inwardly of such paths upon striking a surface to be cleaned.
3. A rotary brush of the type set forth in claim 2 wherein each of said flexible elements has its inner end looped around the associated rod to provide overlapping portions secured to each other adjacent the associated rod.
4. A rotary brush for cleaning ships bottoms and the like comprising a rotary unit, and a plurality of cleaning units carried by said rotary unit, each cleaning unit comprising a short section of hard material spaced radially outwardly of said rotary unit and forming a surface engaging element wholly independent of adjacent elements, and a relatively narrow and thin strip of soft flexible material secured respectively at its radially outer and inner ends to said surfaceengaging element and to said rotary unit, said strips having, a flexibility such that they are readily bendable under the influence of radially inwardly applied forces, whereby such surfaceengaging elements are caused to follow normal rotational paths of movement by centrifugal force and are readily deflectable radially inwardly of such paths upon striking a, surface to be cleaned, said cleaning units being arranged in sets extending generally longitudinally of said rotary unit with the cleaning units of each set spaced from each other, the cleaning units of each set being staggered longitudinally of said rotary unit relative to the cleaning units of the adjacent sets with the width of each surface-engaging element at least equal to the space between adjacent pairs of such elements whereby, in the rotation of said cleaning units about the axis of said rotary unit, all portions of the surface being cleaned will be engaged by said surface-engaging elements within the limits of the outermost of such elements.
5. A rotary brush for cleaning ships bottom 6 and the like comprising shaft means, means for rotatably supporting said shaft means, a plurality of independent cleaning units extending radially outwardly from the axis of rotation of said shaft means, said cleaning units comprising hard surface-engaging elements and relatively narrow soft flexible strips connected at their outer ends to said surface-engaging elements and having their inner ends fixed relative to said shaft means, said strips being formed of a relatively narrow and thin flexible extensible material and having a flexibility such that they are readily bendable under the influence of radially inwardly applied forces, whereby said surface-engaging elements are caused to follow normal rotational paths of movement by centrifugal force and are readily deflectable radially inwardly of such paths upon striking a surface to be cleaned, and stationary gauge elements carried by the means for rotatably supporting the shaft means, said stationary gauge elements having edges spaced radially from the axis of said shaft means and curved concentric with said axis for engagement with the surface of the work to predetermine the engagement of said surfaceengaging elements with such surface.
6. A rotary brush of the type set forth in claim 5 including stationary means adjustably securing said gauge elements to determine the distance between said surface-engaging edges and the axis of rotation of such shaft means.
ARTHUR WARD.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 158,511 Norris Jan. 5, 1875 851,072 Crump Apr. 23, 1907 851,702 spietschka Apr. 30, 1907 910,110 Bust Jan. 19, 1909 1,118,080 Uno Nov. 24, 1914 1,535,628 Peterson Apr. 28, 1925 1,599,713 Perlman Sept. 14, 1926 1,648,888 Aurand Nov. 15, 1927 1,663,059 Peterson Mar. 20, 1928 1,694,018 Mudge et al. Dec. 4, 1928 1,816,054 Pelkey July 28, 1931 1,955,122 Consor Apr. 17, 1934 2,064,853 Riebel et al. Dec. 2, 1936 2,064,854 Riebel Dec. 22, 1936 85,202 Sauer June 29, 1937 77 Festini Sept. 2, 1941 1, 1 Hoover Feb. 3, 1942 ,4 23 Wright June 18, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 12,114 Great Britain Sept. 6, 1884 49,372 Denmark Oct. 8, 1934
US36755A 1948-07-02 1948-07-02 Power-driven cleaning brush Expired - Lifetime US2660746A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US36755A US2660746A (en) 1948-07-02 1948-07-02 Power-driven cleaning brush

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US36755A US2660746A (en) 1948-07-02 1948-07-02 Power-driven cleaning brush

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2660746A true US2660746A (en) 1953-12-01

Family

ID=21890447

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US36755A Expired - Lifetime US2660746A (en) 1948-07-02 1948-07-02 Power-driven cleaning brush

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2660746A (en)

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2706301A (en) * 1949-10-24 1955-04-19 Philip A Gango Brushing, cleaning, and scraping machines
US2854681A (en) * 1956-10-29 1958-10-07 William H Wells Hide cleaner
WO1986002612A1 (en) * 1984-10-31 1986-05-09 Boud Van Rompay Scraper for removing growths on flat or arched surfaces
US6041463A (en) * 1997-06-26 2000-03-28 Shindaiwa, Inc. Hand held sweeper
US20100144251A1 (en) * 2008-04-07 2010-06-10 Farrell James T Hand-held buffing apparatus
US8006648B1 (en) * 2008-04-07 2011-08-30 Erich Sourwine Power-actuated paw cleaning device and associated method
CN106608346A (en) * 2016-07-25 2017-05-03 中科新松有限公司 Ship cleaning device used for wall-climbing robot
CN109018245A (en) * 2018-07-12 2018-12-18 王奇光 A kind of underwater cleaning device at yacht ship bottom

Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US158511A (en) * 1875-01-05 Improvement in carpet-sweepers
US851072A (en) * 1906-07-09 1907-04-23 Robert B Crump Ship-cleaning device.
US851702A (en) * 1906-08-13 1907-04-30 Vinzenz Spietschka Rotary dressing device.
US910110A (en) * 1908-01-24 1909-01-19 William B Bust Ship-cleaning apparatus.
US1118080A (en) * 1913-09-30 1914-11-24 Masa Uno Polishing and cleaning device.
US1535628A (en) * 1924-03-07 1925-04-28 John J Peterson Brush
US1599713A (en) * 1926-09-14 Combines scraping and brushing machine
US1648888A (en) * 1926-06-04 1927-11-15 Frank E Aurand Portable surface-cleaning tool
US1663059A (en) * 1922-12-30 1928-03-20 John J Peterson Cleaning and abrasive device
US1694018A (en) * 1927-02-19 1928-12-04 Bay State Fishing Company Rotatable brush
US1816054A (en) * 1927-09-22 1931-07-28 Louis N Pelkey Block cleaning machine
US1955122A (en) * 1932-07-28 1934-04-17 Ind Patents Corp Dehairing machine
US2064853A (en) * 1935-08-02 1936-12-22 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2064854A (en) * 1935-08-02 1936-12-22 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2085202A (en) * 1932-12-27 1937-06-29 Surfacing Wheel Corp Brush
US2254677A (en) * 1938-05-04 1941-09-02 Festini Bortolo Rotary brush
US2271551A (en) * 1938-11-28 1942-02-03 Hoover Co Suction cleaner
US2402223A (en) * 1944-06-26 1946-06-18 B And W Inc Rotary well bore cleaner

Patent Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US158511A (en) * 1875-01-05 Improvement in carpet-sweepers
US1599713A (en) * 1926-09-14 Combines scraping and brushing machine
US851072A (en) * 1906-07-09 1907-04-23 Robert B Crump Ship-cleaning device.
US851702A (en) * 1906-08-13 1907-04-30 Vinzenz Spietschka Rotary dressing device.
US910110A (en) * 1908-01-24 1909-01-19 William B Bust Ship-cleaning apparatus.
US1118080A (en) * 1913-09-30 1914-11-24 Masa Uno Polishing and cleaning device.
US1663059A (en) * 1922-12-30 1928-03-20 John J Peterson Cleaning and abrasive device
US1535628A (en) * 1924-03-07 1925-04-28 John J Peterson Brush
US1648888A (en) * 1926-06-04 1927-11-15 Frank E Aurand Portable surface-cleaning tool
US1694018A (en) * 1927-02-19 1928-12-04 Bay State Fishing Company Rotatable brush
US1816054A (en) * 1927-09-22 1931-07-28 Louis N Pelkey Block cleaning machine
US1955122A (en) * 1932-07-28 1934-04-17 Ind Patents Corp Dehairing machine
US2085202A (en) * 1932-12-27 1937-06-29 Surfacing Wheel Corp Brush
US2064853A (en) * 1935-08-02 1936-12-22 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2064854A (en) * 1935-08-02 1936-12-22 Air Way Electric Appl Corp Vacuum cleaner
US2254677A (en) * 1938-05-04 1941-09-02 Festini Bortolo Rotary brush
US2271551A (en) * 1938-11-28 1942-02-03 Hoover Co Suction cleaner
US2402223A (en) * 1944-06-26 1946-06-18 B And W Inc Rotary well bore cleaner

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2706301A (en) * 1949-10-24 1955-04-19 Philip A Gango Brushing, cleaning, and scraping machines
US2854681A (en) * 1956-10-29 1958-10-07 William H Wells Hide cleaner
WO1986002612A1 (en) * 1984-10-31 1986-05-09 Boud Van Rompay Scraper for removing growths on flat or arched surfaces
EP0181310A1 (en) * 1984-10-31 1986-05-14 Boud Van Rompay Scraper for removing growths on flat or arched surfaces
US6041463A (en) * 1997-06-26 2000-03-28 Shindaiwa, Inc. Hand held sweeper
US20100144251A1 (en) * 2008-04-07 2010-06-10 Farrell James T Hand-held buffing apparatus
US8006648B1 (en) * 2008-04-07 2011-08-30 Erich Sourwine Power-actuated paw cleaning device and associated method
CN106608346A (en) * 2016-07-25 2017-05-03 中科新松有限公司 Ship cleaning device used for wall-climbing robot
CN109018245A (en) * 2018-07-12 2018-12-18 王奇光 A kind of underwater cleaning device at yacht ship bottom

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2242743A (en) Toothbrush
US5109976A (en) Cleaner
US1588785A (en) Toothbrush
US1928328A (en) Toothbrush
US2628377A (en) Mechanical toothbrush
US3258805A (en) Tooth brush
US28398A (en) Henry l
US2882544A (en) Tooth brush
US4097950A (en) Device for scrubbing surfaces
US2685703A (en) Toothbrush
KR880002460B1 (en) Conveyor belt cleaner
WO2014094152A1 (en) Brush head for an electric toothbrush
US1988193A (en) Floor treating machine
DK200600173U3 (en) Apparatus, preferably for grinding a floor surface
US3139975A (en) Device for cleaning endless conveyors
US2083864A (en) Conveyer cleaner
US3958294A (en) Rotary scraper
US2476537A (en) Suction cleaner and rotary agitator therefor
US4356582A (en) Pool sweep brush
US2929088A (en) Roll for cleaning continuous strip material
US3983888A (en) Method and apparatus for cleaning conveyor belts, with inclined flexible fingers
US2277444A (en) Cleaning implement for venetian blinds and the like
US2845649A (en) Brush
US1958658A (en) Apparatus for brushing, polishing, and the like
US5127123A (en) Rotary cloth roll assembly