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Toy flying saucer

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Publication number
US2659178A
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US
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
bowl
floor
disk
saucer
toy
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Expired - Lifetime
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Carroll H Van Hartesveldt
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Carroll H Van Hartesveldt
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H27/00Toy aircraft; Other flying toys ; Starting or launching devices therefor
    • A63H27/12Helicopters ; Flying tops

Description

Nov.'17, 1953 c. H. VAN HARTESVELD'T 2,659,178

TOY FLYING SAUCER Filed Dec. 50, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet l "luv rm 1% I CarroZZ H. IimHarteqveldf Nov. 17, 1953 c. H. VAN HARTESVELDT ,659,178

TOY FLYING SAUCER Filed Dec. 50, 1950 I 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ETFE'ZTZLUT Patented Nov. 17, 1953 UNI ED Tor LY AUC B I Y C rtain;{vaiijn tesveiae Cleveland; Ohio Application December 30, 1950, Serial No. 203,735 U l t This invention relates to aircraft ofithe ,rotating wing type, and particularly deals with. atoy having a rotatable disk and a cooperatingnon rotating disk, which coact to produce" an air foil section of goodaerodynam ic shapewhich is capable of gyroscopic stabilized night when the rotatable disk is rotated with'a forwardly applied thrust. I t I .1"

v in one embodiment of this invention, the toy aircraft is composed of a circular radially flanged inverted bowl-shaped wing member and a floor disk of inverted cone shape spanning the op n bottom of the bowl and equipped with a tail rudder to hold the floor disk against rotation when the bowl is spinning in flight. Inthis form, the toy is operated by'flinging it into the air with a forward spinning motion that will rotate the bowl. As the bowl advances in the air, the air stream flowing past the tail will hold the floor against rotation. The bowl and conical floor cooperate to provide a good aerodynamic shape which will lift the toy into the air. In addition, the conical shape of the floor provides stability in flight in a manneranalogous to the dihedral angle in airplane wings.- This stability is significant when gyroscopic stability decreases as. the rota tion of' the bowl slows down. A N

If desired, the toy can be equipped with asim lated bomb or parachute that will'be automaticah 1y releasedthrough the floor upon rotation of the bowl through a predetermined numbero'f revolutions. The floor may also be equipped with a simulated pilot station ndthe like. 7

In another embodiment of the invention, bowl is equipped with a removable compressed air cartridge discharging tangentiallyto effect high speed rotation of the bowl. The floor, in this form of the invention, is equipped with a removable compressed gas cartridge discharging toward the rear of the toy for creating a forward thrust. The two cartridges are easily mounted in clips or other carriages respectively provided on the floor and in the bowl. 1 r r I If desired, the floor member can be equipped witha radial flange projecting beyond the'bowl and the bowl can then be stationary in flight while the floor rotates. In this form, a simulated pilot stationand the like can besuspended from the non-rotating 'bowl.

The toy of this invention can be made of metal, plastic, pressed cardboard, or the like lightweight rigidsheet material,

To permit access to the'interior of the toy, the

relatively rotating floor and bowl members are preferably easily separated. A wing nut and bolt assembly affords a convenient demountable conlSJCIaims. (01. 46- 76) 2 .nectionmember holding thebowl and floor in detachable relat'ivelyiro't'atingrelation. w 1" It is, then, an object of'this invention to pro?- ,vide a toy flying saucer. "j Anotherobject of the invention is to provide a toy rotary ring aircraft composedof a hollow domed top disk and. a second relatively rotatable disk spanning the hollow" dome and connected therewith wherein the twodisksjcoop'erate toipro; vide an airfoil sectionfhaving 'goodaerodynaniic lift to provide prolonged stabilized flight whenthe circular domedmemb'er is rotated under-"forward thrust.

Another object of the inventionis tofp'rovide'ja toy flying saucer composed'of' a circular inv'erted bowl and a disk spanning the open bottom oflthe bowl in relatively rotatable relation with the bowl. v Aspecificobject of this invention is to provide a toy flying saucer composed of an inverted circular bowl, a frusto conical floor spanning the open bottom ofthe bowl, and a spindle rotatably carrying the floorand detachably anchored in the top of. the bowl. l Another specific object of the invention is to provide a toy flying'saucer composed of a circular inverted bowl with a flat radial rim flange, a substantially flat domed top, and an aerodynamic'ally shaped lift surface between the flange andtop together with an inverted frusto-conical" floor disk having a peripheryflush with the rirnflan'g'e and a central hub at a level beneathlthe rim flange receiving a spindle assembly carried by the top of the bowl to connect the bowl and jfloorfin relatively rotatable relation. 1 .T Other and further objects of the invention, will be apparent .to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of the annexed sheets of drawings which, by way of preferred examples, illustrate three embodiments of the invention. g On the drawings: V Figure 1 is a top plan view of oneform of flying saucer according to this invention. 1 3

Figure 2 is a diametric vertical cross-sectional view taken along the line II-II of Figure Figure 3 is a. fragmentary view similar to Figure 2 illustrating another'position of the bombrelease mechanism. j i I gi Figureiis a top plan view of another formot flying saucer according-to this invention. Figure 5 is a diametric vertical cross-section view takenalong theline V-V of Fi ure 4. Figure 6 is a horizontal cross-sectional" with parts in top VI- VI of Figure 5 ma taken alongithe '1 ne Figure 7 is a view'similar 2 dim 3 showing another embodiment wherein the bowl member is stationary and the floor rotates.

As shown on the drawings:

In Figures 1 to 3, the reference numeral ill designates a toy flying saucer of a type to be manually propelled. The device I is composed of an inverted circular bowl H, an inverted frustoconical floor disk [2, a spindle assembly l3, a bomb and release assembly I4, and a counterbalancing pilot station 15.

The inverted bowl 1 E has a circular flat radially extending rim flange or lip Ha, a substantially flat top dome lib, and an annular bowed side Wall portion llc between the lip and dome. To obtain increased stability in flight the rim flange I la alternately may be flared upward at an angle which will make the flange a section of a cone as in the embodiment of Fig. 7. The angle may be selected to make the rim flange appear to be an extension of the conical floor 12 or even steeper depending upon the degree of flight stability desired. The annular portion He has a good aerodynamic shape. Ports l6 are preferably provided in the section He and these ports are covered with a transparent sheet material H to provide windows for the device. Alternately, the bowl ll may be composed of transparent plastic material which is made translucent or opaque in the rim and dome areas thereof so as to provide a transparent annular portion ducing a continuous window.

The floor 12 has a circular flat cone portion [2a with a periphery substantially flush with the rim flange Ila. The flat cone 12a spans the open bottom of the bowl and has a thickened central boss portion l2b afiording a bearing. The central portion of the floor 12a extends beneath the level of the rim flange Ha to coact with the bowl for producing a good aerodynamic air foil section.

The spindle assembly I3 is composed of a headed bolt 18 having a rounded head 18a and a threaded shank 181), a first nut 19 threaded on the shank 18?) into closely spaced relation with the head 8a, a second nut 20 threaded on the shank l'8b in spaced relation from the first nut, and a wing nut 21 threaded on the end of the shank. The shank [81) projects freely through the boss 12b of the floor 12. The head [8a underlies the boss portion I2b of the floor and the nut l9 overlies this boss portion and is spaced relative to the head so that the floor rotates freely on the bolt.

The central portion of the dome Hb preferably has a thickened boss I Id receiving the shank 18b therethrough. The nut 20 is positioned on the shank lBb so that when it is bottomed against the boss lld, the bolt [8 will hold the floor 12 so that its periphery is flush with the rim flange Ila.

The wing nut 2| is threaded on the shank 1812 on top of the dome llb so that the bolt 18 will be tightly clamped to the bowl.

In operation of the flying saucer H], the bowl rotates to carry the bolt 18 therewith, while the floor 12, being freely rotatable relative to the bolt, will remain in non-rotatable relation. For this purpose, the floor I2 is equipped with a tailpiece 22 which extends under the lip or flange Na in closely spaced relation and has an upturned vertical rudder 22a on the outer end thereof. This rudder lies in the slipstream of the bowl and holds the floor against rotation.

The bomb and release assembly 14 includes a pair of upstanding apertured lugs 23 on top- He pro of the floor 12 between the boss portion HI; and the outer periphery of the floor. A pin 24 is slidably inserted through the apertures in the lugs 23 and spans the space between the lugs. This space between the lugs registers with an aperture l2c in the floor [2. A weight 25 simulating a bomb has an apertured ear 25a on the upper end thereof freely receiving the pin 24 therethrough. The bomb projects between the lugs 23 and through the aperture 120.

The pin 24 has an eye end 24a to which is tied ,a thread or string 26. The other end of the string or thread is tied to the shank I8?) of the bolt l8.

As illustrated in Figure 3, when the bowl H rotates, the thread or string 26 is wound up on the shank Nb and eventually is made taut to pull the pin 24 out of the lugs 23 and ear 25a, whereupon the bomb 25 will be released to drop through the aperture 120.

In order to properly balance the floor l2, a pilot station I5 is provided on the floor in diametric opposed relation relative to the tail assembly 22. The bomb assembly l4 may then be located to provide the best balance of the entire floor assembly around the central boss l2b. This pilot station I5, as shown in Figure 2, may be composed of a pilot seat 26, a figure 21 simulating a pilot, and means 28 simulating a mechanism for guiding the flying saucer.

The wing nut 21 is readily removed from the bolt (8 to separate the floor from the bowl, thereby giving access to the bomb release mechanism for reassembling the same.

The device l0 operates by being manually thrown into the air with a flinging mot-ion causing the bowl II to spin. The air foil defined by the bowl and floor afiords a good lift surface without appreciable drag, since the area lie of the bowl has a good aerodynamic shape while the inverted cone shape of the floor portion 12a coacts therewith to afford good air flow properties. In addition, the frusto-conical shape imparts rigidity to the floor, so that it can be made of relatively light gauge material. As the bowl rotates in flight, the thread 26 is wrapped up on the spindle assembly to release the bomb, and, after the bomb has been released, the light pin 24 can rotate with the spindle. The floor is held against rotation by the slip stream action on the tail rudder 22a and the floor is balanced by the diametrically opposed arrangement of the bomb release and pilot station. If desired, the bomb release could be replaced with a parachuteequipped figure.

In the embodiment shown in Figures 4 to 6, the flying saucer 30 is composed of an inverted bowl 3|, 9, floor disk 32, and a spindle assembly 33 substantially similar to the bowl, floor, and spindle assembly of the flying saucer 10 shown in Figures 1 to 3. Thus the bowl 31 has a flat radial lip or rim flange 3|a, a substantially flat domed top 31b, and an annular bowed portion 3lc affording a lift surface. The floor 32 is in the form of a flat inverted cone and has its outer periphery substantially flush with the flange Ma. The spindle assembly cooperates with the floor and bowl in the same manner described in Figures 1 to 3.

The bowl 3| has a pair of diametrically opposed clips 34 and 35 on the inner face of the lip portion 310 thereof. The clip 34 is adjacent a thickened boss portion 36 on the inner face of this lip portion 310. This boss portion 36 has a passageway 36a there'through which opens tangentially on theouter face of. the lip portion 3|c as'best shown-in Figure 6; The bosspor- 'tion 36 carries a'seal'ring 3l at its inner end. A compressed gas cartridge 38 of thetype commonly used for charged water bottles is conveniently snapped into the clip 34 with its nose 'end sealed against the seal 31 to discharge through the passageway 36. Gasreleased from the cartridge will-be discharged tangentially from the lip surface 3|c thereby causing the-bowl to rotate.

1 The opposed clip 35 is equipped with a weight -39" to counterbalance the weight of thecartridge 33 mat-I w A clip 40 is alsoprovided-on"the-floor-32 to carry a'second compressed gas cartridge 4| which discharges through a tube 42 extending through the floor and facing in a radial direction so that compressed gas discharged therethrough'will'have a forward propelling effect on the assembly. The floor .32 is, preferably equipped with a. thickened portion or counterweight 43 in diametric oppositerelation tothe cartridge 4| to counterbalan'cthe weight of the cartridge.

The flyin saucer 30 of Figures 4 to 6 operates by puncturing the nozzles of the cartridges 38 and 4|, whereuponcompressed gas discharged tangentially throughthe passage 36 will cause the inverted bowl 3|- to rotate, while gas discharged radially through the tube 42 will create a" forward thrust. Since the floor and bowl coact to provide a good'air foil section having a liftefiect on the unit, the device will soarin the air under stable-flight. conditions until the gases from the cartridges are exhausted.

In the embodiment of Figure '7, the toy 40 has a non-rotating inverted bowl 4|, a rotating floor 42, a spindle assembly 43- similar to l3 and 33 connecting the bowl and floor, a rudder 44 on the outside of the bowl 4|, and a pilot and station 45 on the inside of the bowl. The bowl 4| does not have a rim flange, but is equipped with a tail rudder 44 and is otherwise the same as the bowl I I or 3|. The floor 42 is a flat cone like the floor I2 or 32, but underlies the bottom edge 4la of the bowl and projects therebeyond to form a rim flange 42a. The toy 40 operates in the same manner as the toy H), but the floor rotates while the rudder holds the bowl against rotation.

From the above description it will be understood that the invention provides a toy flying saucer or rotating wing aircraft having gyroscopically stabilized flight capacity induced by relatively rotating bowl and floor members.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

l. A toy flying saucer which comprises an inverted bowl having a circular radial rim flange, a substantially flat dome, and a lift surface of aerodynamic shape between the flange and dome, a floor disk flush with the rim flange around the inner periphery of the flange and spanning the open bottom of the bowl, and means connecting the center of the floor disk and the dome of the bowl in relatively rotatable relation.

2. A toy rotary wing aircraft which comprises an inverted bowl, a floor disk spanning the open bottom of the bowl, means connecting the floor disk and bowl in relatively rotatable relation, and said bowl coacting with said floor to provide an 6 air foil sectionadapted to lift theassembly-lwhen propelled while the bowl rotates relative-toth'e floor to stabilize flight of the assembly.

3. A toy flying saucer which comprisesaninverted bowl having a circular rim flange ex tending radiallytherefrom and a'hollow dome portion with a side'face aifording an aerodynamic lift surface, a disk spanning the bottom of the hollowdome, and means detachablyconnecting the disk and dome in relatively rotatable relation. 1 i H i i.-A-toy flying saucer which comprises an in-- verted saucer-shaped circular s'heetmemb'er-hav ing an aerodynamic shape I affording :a lift' surface, a circular disk on the bottom of said member, and means connecting the disk and member in relatively rotatable relation, whereupon the member may rotate relative-to the disk to pro- ,Vide therewith a gyroscopicallystabilized air foil section of aerodynamic shape. a

5. A toy flying saucer whichcompris'es --an' iii"- verted bowl having'a circular periphery, an inverted flat conical disk spanning the open' bot tomof the bowlin substantially flush relation with the periphery of the bowl, saiddisk extending downwardly to a level at the-center thereof belowthe periphery of thebowl'for'coacting with the bowl to form a bottom air-foil surface with low drag characteristics, and means connecting the floor disk-and bowl in relatively rotatable relation. l

6. A toy flying saucerwhich comprisesanimverted circular bowl having a radial lip, an annular bowed portion affording a good lift surface, and a substantially flat dome, said annular lift surface having transparent portions simulating windows, a spindle assembly fixedly carried by the dome, a circular disk rotatably mounted on the spindle assembly and spanning the open bottom of the bowl, and a tail member on said disk having a rudder for holding the disk against rotation.

7. A toy flying saucer comprising an inverted saucer, a disk spanning the open bottom of the saucer, a spindle assembly connecting the saucer and disk in relatively rotatable relation, said spindle assembly adapted to rotate with the bowl, a bomb release mechanism actuated by the rotating spindle assembly, and a rudder member on said floor holding the floor against rotation.

8. A toy flying saucer which comprises an inverted saucer member having a hollow interior, a circular disk spanning the hollow interior of the saucer, bomb support mechanism on said disk, a pilot station on said disk, a spindle assembly rotatably connecting the saucer and disk, mechanism operated by said spindle assembly for releasing the bomb support mechanism, and a rudder on said disk projecting into the slipstream beyond said saucer to hold the disk against rotation.

9. A toy flying saucer which comprises an inverted bowl member, a circular disk spanning the open bottom of the bowl member, a spindle assembly rotatably mounting the disk and bowl, first compressed gas means carried by the bowl for rotating the bowl, second compressed gas means carried by the disk for imparting a forward thrust to the assembly, and detachable means on the spindle assembly for separating the bowl and disk to give access to said compressed gas means.

10. A toy flying saucer comprising a bowl, a disk spanning the bowl mouth and projecting therebeyond said bowl and disk cooperating to provide an aerodynamic airfoil, means rotatably mounting the center of the disk on the bowl, and a rudder on the bowl for holding the bowl against rotation when the disk rotates and the toy scars in the air.

i 11. A toy flying saucer comprising an inverted bowl-shaped member, a floor member spanning the open bottom of the bowl-shaped member, means connecting said members in rotatable relation, and said members coacting to provide an aerodynamic airfoil adapted to soar through the air whereby one member may rotate relative to the other member to gyroscopically stabilize the airfoil as it soars through the air.

12, A toy flying, saucer comprising an inverted bowl-shaped member, a floor member spanning the open bottom of the bowl-shaped member, means connecting said members in rotatable relation, said members coacting to provide an aerodynamic airfoil adapted to soar through the air, and a rudder on one member restraining said one member against rotation as the assembly .soars through the air while the other member rotates to g-yroscopically stabilize the flight.

13. A toy flying saucer comprising an inverted saucer-shaped member, a floor member spanning the open bottom of the saucer-shaped mem-.- ber, means connecting said members in rotatabie relation, said connected members coacting to provide an aerodynamic airfoil with a circular radially extending rim flange and a hollow dome portion with a side face aifording an aerodynamic lift surface, and said rotatably connected members adapted to soar through the air with one of the members rotating about the axis or the other member to gyroscopically stabilize flight.

14. A toy flying saucer comprising an inverted bowl member, a disk spanning the open bottom of the bowl member, means connecting said members in rotatable relation, said members coacting to provide an aerodynamic airfoil adapted to soar through the air, and motor means for rotatin one member about the axis of the other member to gyroscopicall-y stabilize flight of the assembly.

15. A toy flying saucer which comprises an inverted bowl member, a floor member spanning the open bottom of the bowl member, means connecting said members in rotatable relation, said members coacting to provide an aerodynamic airfoil adapted to soar through the air with one member rotating relative to the other member for gyroscopically stabilizing the flight, and a motor means for imparting a forward thrust to the assembly.

CARROLL H. VAN HARTESVELDT.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

US2659178A 1950-12-30 1950-12-30 Toy flying saucer Expired - Lifetime US2659178A (en)

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2835073A (en) * 1956-08-20 1958-05-20 Chester F Dame Rotor-type flying device
US3109256A (en) * 1961-06-05 1963-11-05 James M Dean Flying toy
US3359678A (en) * 1965-11-01 1967-12-26 Wham O Mfg Company Flying saucer
US3518788A (en) * 1967-07-24 1970-07-07 Ufo Corp Flashing light in a flying toy
US4132029A (en) * 1977-05-09 1979-01-02 Positive Pyramids, Inc. Pyramid flyer
US4209936A (en) * 1977-11-10 1980-07-01 Sklar Paul R Flying saucer appendage
US5328333A (en) * 1993-02-25 1994-07-12 Quinn Steven P Rotating thrust-producing apparatus
US5520565A (en) * 1995-03-09 1996-05-28 Ulysse; Clark Toy flying disc
WO1998003239A1 (en) * 1996-07-23 1998-01-29 Mattel, Inc. Flying disc toy
US20070026758A1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2007-02-01 Renforth Jack W Disc-shaped pet toy
US7582003B1 (en) * 2004-11-16 2009-09-01 Trichak Angelique M Illuminatable aerodynamic disc or saucer
US20100062676A1 (en) * 2008-09-08 2010-03-11 Kun Yuan Tong Boomerang flying disc
US20110272529A1 (en) * 2010-04-22 2011-11-10 Terry Wayne Hamilton Hamilton H.N2 laminar flow diskette wing
US8454405B2 (en) * 2008-11-20 2013-06-04 Guy L. Scarborough Flying toy having gyroscopic and gliding components
US20140302739A1 (en) * 2013-02-08 2014-10-09 Cal-Side (Usa) Ltd., Dba Monkey Business Sports Stabilized flying disc toy

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB189407857A (en) * 1894-04-20 1895-02-09 Hugo Fuchs An Improved "Pigeon" or Object to be used as a Moving Target in Shooting Sports and Practice.
FR348617A (en) * 1904-02-15 1905-04-18 Frederic Chaplet airplane
DE424828C (en) * 1926-02-04 Horst Goeldel throw target
US1619689A (en) * 1924-02-06 1927-03-01 Louis V Aronson Spinning toy
US2382347A (en) * 1944-01-06 1945-08-14 John Brayley Toy helicopter

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE424828C (en) * 1926-02-04 Horst Goeldel throw target
GB189407857A (en) * 1894-04-20 1895-02-09 Hugo Fuchs An Improved "Pigeon" or Object to be used as a Moving Target in Shooting Sports and Practice.
FR348617A (en) * 1904-02-15 1905-04-18 Frederic Chaplet airplane
US1619689A (en) * 1924-02-06 1927-03-01 Louis V Aronson Spinning toy
US2382347A (en) * 1944-01-06 1945-08-14 John Brayley Toy helicopter

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2835073A (en) * 1956-08-20 1958-05-20 Chester F Dame Rotor-type flying device
US3109256A (en) * 1961-06-05 1963-11-05 James M Dean Flying toy
US3359678A (en) * 1965-11-01 1967-12-26 Wham O Mfg Company Flying saucer
US3518788A (en) * 1967-07-24 1970-07-07 Ufo Corp Flashing light in a flying toy
US4132029A (en) * 1977-05-09 1979-01-02 Positive Pyramids, Inc. Pyramid flyer
US4209936A (en) * 1977-11-10 1980-07-01 Sklar Paul R Flying saucer appendage
US5328333A (en) * 1993-02-25 1994-07-12 Quinn Steven P Rotating thrust-producing apparatus
WO1994019234A1 (en) * 1993-02-25 1994-09-01 Quinn Steven P Rotating thrust-producing apparatus
US5520565A (en) * 1995-03-09 1996-05-28 Ulysse; Clark Toy flying disc
WO1998003239A1 (en) * 1996-07-23 1998-01-29 Mattel, Inc. Flying disc toy
US7582003B1 (en) * 2004-11-16 2009-09-01 Trichak Angelique M Illuminatable aerodynamic disc or saucer
US20070026758A1 (en) * 2005-07-26 2007-02-01 Renforth Jack W Disc-shaped pet toy
US20100062676A1 (en) * 2008-09-08 2010-03-11 Kun Yuan Tong Boomerang flying disc
US8454405B2 (en) * 2008-11-20 2013-06-04 Guy L. Scarborough Flying toy having gyroscopic and gliding components
US20110272529A1 (en) * 2010-04-22 2011-11-10 Terry Wayne Hamilton Hamilton H.N2 laminar flow diskette wing
US8382040B2 (en) * 2010-04-22 2013-02-26 Terry Wayne Hamilton Hamilton H.N2 laminar flow diskette wing
US20140302739A1 (en) * 2013-02-08 2014-10-09 Cal-Side (Usa) Ltd., Dba Monkey Business Sports Stabilized flying disc toy

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