US2650403A - Hoisting hook with a pivoted closure - Google Patents

Hoisting hook with a pivoted closure Download PDF

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US2650403A
US2650403A US3096A US309648A US2650403A US 2650403 A US2650403 A US 2650403A US 3096 A US3096 A US 3096A US 309648 A US309648 A US 309648A US 2650403 A US2650403 A US 2650403A
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Prior art keywords
hook
load
link
arm
head
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US3096A
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Jr Raymond G Taylor
Arthur B Mcelroy
Roy C Davis
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Guiberson Corp
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Guiberson Corp
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B19/00Handling rods, casings, tubes or the like outside the borehole, e.g. in the derrick; Apparatus for feeding the rods or cables
    • E21B19/02Rod or cable suspensions
    • E21B19/04Hooks
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66CCRANES; LOAD-ENGAGING ELEMENTS OR DEVICES FOR CRANES, CAPSTANS, WINCHES, OR TACKLES
    • B66C1/00Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles
    • B66C1/10Load-engaging elements or devices attached to lifting or lowering gear of cranes or adapted for connection therewith for transmitting lifting forces to articles or groups of articles by mechanical means
    • B66C1/22Rigid members, e.g. L-shaped members, with parts engaging the under surface of the loads; Crane hooks
    • B66C1/34Crane hooks
    • B66C1/36Crane hooks with means, e.g. spring-biased detents, for preventing inadvertent disengagement of loads
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66DCAPSTANS; WINCHES; TACKLES, e.g. PULLEY BLOCKS; HOISTS
    • B66D3/00Portable or mobile lifting or hauling appliances
    • B66D3/04Pulley blocks or like devices in which force is applied to a rope, cable, or chain which passes over one or more pulleys, e.g. to obtain mechanical advantage
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B66HOISTING; LIFTING; HAULING
    • B66DCAPSTANS; WINCHES; TACKLES, e.g. PULLEY BLOCKS; HOISTS
    • B66D2700/00Capstans, winches or hoists
    • B66D2700/02Hoists or accessories for hoists
    • B66D2700/026Pulleys, sheaves, pulley blocks or their mounting
    • B66D2700/028Pulley blocks with multiple sheaves
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/45Separable-fastener or required component thereof [e.g., projection and cavity to complete interlock]
    • Y10T24/45225Separable-fastener or required component thereof [e.g., projection and cavity to complete interlock] including member having distinct formations and mating member selectively interlocking therewith
    • Y10T24/45272Projection passes through cavity then moves toward noninserted portion of its member to complete interlock [e.g., snap hook]
    • Y10T24/45288Hook type projection member

Description

Sept. 1, 1953 R. G. TAYLOR, JR., ET AL HOISTING HOOK WITH A PIVOTED CLOSURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 19, 1948 Jnvcnfiors R. 6. Tay/om/n 4. B. M E/ray Roy Davis Gttomeg Sept. 1, 1953 R. G. TAYLOR, JR.. ET AL 2,650,403
I HOISTING HOOK WITH A PIVOTED CLOSURE Filed Jan. .1 9, 1948 Sheets-Sheet 2 33 A36 ray/013001 A. B. M f/my Roy Dal/is 3nventon (Ittorneg Sept. 1, 1953 R. G. TAYLC/DR, JR., ET AL 2,650,403
HOISTING HOOK WITH A'PIVOTED CLOSURE Filed Jan. .19, 1948 s Sheets-Sheet R.G. Toy/qr, Jr. A.B.M Elroy Roy Davis I Zinmtors Sept. 1, 1953 R G. TAYLOR, JR., ET AL' 2,650,403
HOISTING HOOK WITH A PIVOTED CLOSURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Jan. 19, 1948 Gttorneg Sept. 1, 1953 R. G. TAYLOR, JR.. ET AL HOISTING HOOK WITH A PIVOTED CLOSURE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Jan.' 19, 1 948 V \MIQI inventori Q Patented Sept. 1, 1953 HOISTING HOOK WITH A PIVOTED CLOSURE Raymond G. Taylor, Jr., Arthur B. Mommy, and Roy 0. Davis, Dallas, Tex., assignors to The Guiberson Corporation, Dallas, Tex., acorporation of Delaware i Application January 19, 1948, Serial No. 3,096
4 Claims. 1
This invention has to do with a well tool comprising a unitized block and hook presenting new features of load distribution. The device is rigidly supported through the use of a common load-carrying frame, from which swinging bails, beckets and couplings have been entirely eliminated. This has been done in the interest of safety, and for the purpose of shortening the device, and also toconserve operating space and to afford more efficient use of the short gin pole or A frame mast so commonly used in tubing operations and in shallow well work.
The device is unusually safe, and. exceptionally well guarded. It is specially constructed and so streamlined as to be free from all dangerous projections and hazardous latching arrangements. While there is provided a full-closure housing, it may, nevertheless, be quickly opened to allow immediate and untrammeled reeving and looping of a cable about the sheaves, thus promoting speed and safety and a saving of labor.
The hook" of the tool is so designed and arranged that it is in effect a compound beam. Two arms carried by the frame of the device receive the load which is apportioned and distributed thereto 'in amounts of predetermined relation. Such construction presents a hook of thinner section and less bulk than usual and one which has even greater load-carrying capacity, despite the apparent paradox.
The advantages of this tool over earlier devices in this art will become apparent as this specification is developed.
Among the objects of this invention are these:
(a) A unitized block and hook, the structure of each supplying some necessary part of the structure of the other, and the two being interrelated in .function.
thanconventionahdevices designed :to carry comparable loads.
(d) In a combined block and hook, the elimination of the conventional becket and bail; and the saving ofmater-ial, labor, weight and space over old styled devices.
(6) The combination of a block with a hook .insuch way as to eliminate pivoting and swinging between thesemembers, and result in a single rigid, straight .and compact piece of equipment of greater stability.
) "The provision of acombination block and 2 hook in which all ordinary and dangerous pro- J'ections have been eliminated, so that there are no bolts, nuts, ears, dogs, fingers, hooks, or other projections extending beyond the general con tour lines of the unitary device.
(9) The provision of a block in which there is a protective housing about the sheaves and removable sheave guards so arranged and car.- ried within the housing as to leave only minimum cable openings into the block, thus promoting safety and preventing th cable from jumping out of the housing or away from the sheaves.
(h) The provision of a combined block and hook having a common rigid frame which may be opened on one side so as to allow a cable to be loopedaround the sheaves, instead of having to thread a cable into a hole or opening about or around each sheave, as has been the custom. Thus the block may be reeved, without dismantling it, there being no bars across the bottom of the block or below the sheaves.
(2') In a block the provision of an axle for carrying the sheaves, the axle being so arranged that it doesnot extend through the sheave housing, yet being so constructed as to allow all of the weight carried by such axle to be supported on such housing.
(7) The provisionof a hook which is in effect a compound beam, having a plurality of supports, rather than being an ordinary hook of cantilever design.
(k') The provision of a hook which is a complete mechanical closure, carrying the weight of the load on two arms or sides of the hook, rather than Onthe single arm of the conventional hook.
V-shaped cradle in which the load may be so carried as to distribute the weight therof to both arms in predetermined quantities.
(n) The provision of a vl-shaped cradle in ;a hook provided with a rigid arm and a movable arm, both being so arranged that when ,a load is placed in the cradle the movable arm is kept constantly in such a position as to maintain closure of the hook.
.(o) The provision of a hook having two arms so arranged as to come together to form a cradle for carrying a load, the hook being so constructed that each arm is supported independently of the other.
(p) The provision of a hook in which there is a body extending downwardly and laterally to form a rigid hook, and in which there is a movable arm hung upon a finger extending into the body, such arm likewise extending downwardly and laterally to form a hook.
(q) A hook having two independently supported arms, cooperatively connected, and being capable of supporting greater loads on thinner sections than can be done with the conventional one-armed hook, the latter having to be made thicker and wider and with a greater curve and of greater bulk and weight than is required of the instant device in the carrying of any given load.
(1') The provision of a hook in which the hook body carries a part of the load and in which the hook link carries a part of the load, some of the load carried by the link being transmitted to the body of the hook through the use of a finger inserted therein.
(s) The provision of a hook in which the hook body carries a part of the load and in which the hook link carries a part of the load, some of the load carried'by the link being transmitted to the body of the hook through the use of a finger inserted therein, and some further part of such load being transmitted to the body of the hook through the use of a pivot connection between body and link.
(t) The provision of a hook in which the hook body carries a part of the load and in which the hook link carries a part of the load, some of the load carried by the link being transmitted to the body of the hook through the use of a finger inserted therein, and a further part of such load being so protected by a guard as to prevent its 1 damage or abrasion by any articles being loaded into, carried by or released from the hook.
(12) In a hook with a movable link, a horizontally disposed latch for locking the link in place, thus preventing the unlocking of the hook I by any vertically sustained shocks arising from loads being carried by the hook.
(w) The provision of a lateral latch for locking the movable link of the hook, the latch being carried by and operable from the non-dangerous side of the hook, i. e., the side of the hook opposite the movable link, so that no bails, arms, chains or other heavy members may be allowed to fall out upon the operator when he is unlocking the latch.
(.13) In a combined block and hook, a swivel bolt arranged therebetween, so as to allow the complete rotation of the hook, and the head of the bolt being so enlarged as to be itself employed as a locking member for directly locking the swivel in any desired position without the necessity of employing an extra or third part or member between a swivel housing and a hook housing for effecting a lock.
(y) Spring actuated plunger means for locking the hook swivel at any predetermined place on the periphery of the head of the swivel bolt.
(2) The provision of two streamlined side plates arranged to form a housing about a block, and being so constructed that they will 'come together above the sheaves in complete closure, the side plates being rigidly locked against side thrust by the use of tongued and grooved connections therebetween, and being further united by having a hook rigidly mounted between the lower ends of these plates.
The several advantages of this invention may be incorporated into tools having various sizes, shapes and appearances and employing variants in mechanical construction, because the invention herein is not limited to one particular form.
On the other hand, it may be freely practiced in many forms.
In order to best present a suitable form of device employing the essence of this invention,. there is provided a series of drawings, in which:
Fig. I is a perspective view of a typical unitized'v block and hook.
Fig. II is an exploded view in perspective of the device shown in Fig. I, in which the housing is opened, the guards removed, and the hook dropped from one side of the frame.
Fig. III is a partially sectionalized elevation of a typical rigid block and hook, with part of the casing cut away.
Fig. IV is a plan view of the tool shown in Fig. III, when seen from above, with some of the casing cut away.
Fig. V is a cross-sectional elevation taken through the cap of the housing, showing parts of the load-carrying frame therein.
VI is a sectionalized elevation of a typical hook in compound beam position.
Fig. VII is a strictly schematic diagram intended to indicate the locations of load thrust in this tool.
Fig. VIII is an exploded view in perspective of the swivel collar and its immediately related mechanism.
Fig IX is a sectionalized View of the swivel locking plunger when engaged.
Fig. X is another sectionalized view of the swivel locking plunger when engaged, with the dotted lines showing position when disengaged.
In the drawings the various parts of this device are represented by numerals, and the numeral l indicates a housing, made of two complementary parts, or halves, la and lb. One function of this housing is to cover and protect the sheaves 40, of which there may be several (as desired). It is also intended as a guard to prevent injury to workmen and operators. However, it has another and quite important function.
There are built into the housing certain structural members which are an important part of the load-carrying frame of the entire tool. The chief members of this frame are the posts 22, which may not be seen when the casing of the block is closed. These posts are arranged on the inner faces of the housing I, so as to reoeive and support the axle 21, which carries the sheaves 4B. The load-carrying skeleton of this device, like that of a turtle, is in its shell.
Posts 22 are made somewhat wider than the diameter of the axle, and they extend upwardly above the axle a short distance. However, each post 22 extends downwardly the full length of the housing, and continues beyond to form the series of smaller posts 2.
2,35 OJEOS .Posts :2 may :be rigidly (but :removably) attached :to the rigidcollar will (itself a part or :the frame) through the use of dogs 6.'5 aon.:such collar. These dogs :are also plural :in :number on each rside of "the collar, :and they 31118 arranged to fit :nicely :intoopenings between' the posts 3!, so that .oneconnnon bolt l 29, :known asrthe frame :holt, imay lzause the :housing :and :its inner-drama and the exposed posts to be made up into .fiXBd and rigideconnection with the collar 16.0.
.AISO'JIIII continuous rigidemaheup'withrthermembers mentioned immediately :next above, there is the :special fhook 1 D0, "which :is hung lblQW the collar 26.0 on the strong spindle lrbolt -9.9. ThisIhoolcimaymotate,*butiit maystnot swing. The result is that the "entire *un'itary device, from its extra strong :cap .5 down to "and through its unusually =designed ".fhook rillll), is a zcompletely integrated structure presenting :a straight rand compact tool of great stability.
.-In thus making ea gunitizediblock andxhook in- .toron'eroompletelyzintegrated toolit is to .be -10bserved ithat the :result is ":a :much :shorter :dev-ice than "the :usual old .iiashioned and :loosely connected "assemblage made .up .of separate block, becket, .bail and :conventional hook.
:In our device the rhook and :block are made into one complete nstructure vin which (certain parts :necessary ;in the LblOCk are :furnished by the shock and :in -which certain parts necessary in the chock are :furnished ;by the block.
It :"is important to observe .that all aforms riof pivots :and .pivoting usually employed :between a conventional block and .a "conventional hook have.rbeen.eliniinat,ed,;and "especially is it important to remember that the .ordinary becket (usuallyfound ebelow a.:conv.entional block) and the ordinary bail (usually :foundabove the con- .venti-onal shook) .are Eboth eliminated :because they are xaltogethernseless in the .device :employing our invention.
The :designand: construction :arrdrarrangement of this device completely :prevents the usual and highly undesirable :pivoting and swinging :and swaying .and general uncertainty found in the loosely coupled :and non-integrated .block and hook used in the past. These old fashioneddevices have resulted zin'the crippling ofmany men and :the damaging aof *much material-and thei'loss of imuch property. They :are unpredictable in their movements, especially when suddenly Tree'd of loads. Their .very :looseness 'favors the acc'idental .loss of loads being carried :onthe hook; and, even svhen latched, the swinging hook :allows lloadsrtorhethrown onithezlatch and open it. Theseaold devices are particularly dangerous.
.Heretofore, some forms of blocks :have been made upof'aseries of flat plates of steel. Plates were .usually placed outside of and between each pulley or sheave, so that with several sheaves in ablocko'f that character there was formed a rather bulky assortment *of rectangular plates arranged in spaced relation. A loose swing'ing becketiwas usually .put :belowithese plates and attached -totwo or more of them. The loose bail of the hook was introduced through the becket and a conventional one-armed hook was suspended therebelow. The loosely hung parts of such contrivance .represented nothing more nearly than the links in an uncertain chain, :any one :of'twhich .couldget out oflineinstantly, and usually didso.
Now, when ggreat :loads were thrown on one side of such :a serpentine -contri-vance (even momentarily) they usually "caused "a shifting in :the plates. There was lateral thrust, ".accented .:byl1leverage. ".This resulted :in a "shearing stress ".upon :the axle :carrying the pulleys. 'It alsotresultedin shearing stress falling upon every bolt and rivet and ;pin that 'heldthe: device together. 'II here was i'frequently no straight or regular "up and down wpull. -On the other :hand, there was :a .lateral or deflecting force :felt throughout the block, and especially the :plates thereof. They would shift and get "loose.
All such troubles :have beeneliminated :in our rigid unitary .device which :has been provided with :an extra-strong internal 'frame arranged inan unusuallyinarrow casing. To make rigidity and stability more certain and prevent internal stress we have provided machined and matched tongue-andegroove surfaces between the two sides la and lb of the housing I. This tongueandegroovearrangem'ent may be disposed wherever convenient between the two :members. It has been shown in'the drawingsherein as tongue 4'! and groove 48; and these members may well take the .form .of an arc :.or curve passing entirely across .face plates 50 of the reinforced cap 5.of thethousing. This stabilizes the housing andsprevents any lateral movements betweenathe two halves thereof. :There is .no shearing move- .ment or lateralthrust within .our housing.
Further reinforcement may be added .170 the members of the housing I as desired; .andwthe plates 50 therein may be made .to extend D1113- wardly to end in the dogs 16. These dogs should have faces which will meet perfectly .so that the bolts 7 may be passed through the dogsiand hold'securely together and .inrperfect alignment the two halves of the housing. .AlSOxI'lbSfil may be :m-ade to :run transversely across the icap :5 for further reinforcing.
Still more firmly and rigidly will the housing be held together when the collar .60 .is fitted .bB- tween the halves of thehousing and bolted up (with frame bolts 20).
Transverse ribs :5! may be provided with cone or 'more notches 8, in which may be inserted teeth ilil -:'of=the sheave :guard :59, :in order :toikeep the guard .members in perfect alignment with one another and with the housing.
The sheave guards 9 :are two in rnumber,..and they meet together at the very base of :the housing vI so as :to efiect complete closure not such housing and to protectively cover and tencase the lower part of the sheaves 40.
"The guard *9 continues upwardly and curves about the contour of housing I Ito apresentca plurality of fingers, of which the outside guard rail l-0 is one :and the inside guard rail l3 may =be:one.
Ball 1 3 may 'be providedwith reinforcing rib 13-11, if :desired.
ilhe :outside zrailssare provided with flange 12 which :not only istrengthens the :guard, but :also helps :to seal the ihousing and :keep the ..:guard in perfect fit between the side walls of the housing.
.Ga-b'le zopenings 1'4 z-are unade between the .rails of the iguard; and these openings are lkept to minimum size, being only sufficient :to allow :the 'cable .ito apass 'ttheretln'ough with satisfactory clearance.
Illransverselyacrosstthe lower :partrof the :guard 9 there may be provided a solid reinforcing boss i318, drilled :with hole I11 to receive the guard bolt I15.
.Tohlosethe housing,:the guard 9 .ismoved linto fitting :position over sheaves "40 and within the side walls of the housing until teeth H come within the notches 8 and the holes I! are lined up with the holes 19, the latter being provided in the recess I8 of the flange in the housing I. The assembly, thus positioned, is held firmly together by the use of bolt and its nut l6. Through this construction it will be seen that there has been effected as complete a closure of the housing over the sheaves as is possible. It is impossible for any tools or machinery, or the workmens hands or fingers to get caught by the sheaves or the cable on either of the flat sides of the block member or the underside thereof. The only openings in the block are in the upper end of the guard, where there are provided the slots I4. With the block suspended above the work, these openings are up out of ordinary operation range and reach of a workman engaged in attaching parts or tools or chains to the hook Hi0, and releasing them therefrom. Safety is an important element of this tool.
It may be desired that this tool be dead-lined to some fixed object, rather than be attached to the top of a mast or pole or derrick. Therefore, the eyelet 4 has been provided through the heavy and strongly reinforced cap 5 of the housing; and above the eyelet 4 there is arranged the ring member 49, so that a rope or cable passed through this eyelet can be used for safe anchorage, the ring being quite sufficient in strength for this purpose.
The axle 21, on which are mounted the sheaves 40, contrary to usual practice, does not extend through the Walls of the housing. There are not any dangerous projections, such as bolts and. nuts, on the outside of the housing. Such projections might injure a workman or cause the fouling of lines, cables and chains. These very common but objectionable features have been eliminated in our tool.
There have been provided within the frame members 22 a pair of recesses or cups 23 to receive the ends of the axle 21; and the axle has been reduced in diameter at each end until it assumes the form of diminished ends 29, which are made to fit into the recesses 23.
There have been provided axle shoulders 28, at the points where the axle is reduced in size; and such shoulders rest against the inner faces of posts 22.
Holes are made through a thin section of the housing I so that they will line up with holes 33 which are provided for a certain limited distance into the ends of the axle 21; and these holes are made to receive axle screws 25. Usually it is advisable to use two or more such screws on each end of the axle. When these screws are made up, we find that the axle is securely set and held in the cups 23; yet the heads of machine screws 25 are within the outer contour of the housing I by being placed within a recess 24 arranged on the outer face of each wall of the housing. This recess also protects the greasefitting 2B, which is usually arranged to pass into the center of each end of the axle 21 to facilitate the fillin of reservoir 3! with lubricants. A cross channel 32 will allow lubricants from the reservoir to pass outwardly to the periphery of the axle and there lubricate the bearing surfaces.
There should be arranged about the axle, and within the hub 43 of the sheaves 40, some suitable bearing; and such a bearing may take any one of many forms. In the form indicated in the drawings the bearing is a roller bearing 35, of which the rollers are shown as at 36 and the housing as at 31.
The sheaves themselves may be almost any pulley having flanges as at 4| and a groove as at 42. A strong yet lightweight sheave may be made to. possess ribs 44 on spokes 45 and have spaces 46 cut out between these spokes, if this is desired.
However, most any conventional sheave or pulley may be used in this tool; and one alone may be mounted therein, or two may be used, or several may be used, as the needs and requirements of the job may dictate. Where additional sheaves are added the body of the housing and related gear must be made sufliciently wide to receive them; and appropriate guard members with suitable openings l4 between the rails thereof must be provided. Otherwise, the multi-sheave device will be constructed as generally indicated herein.
It is not at all desired that this tool be allowed to swing or break in the middle (as a link in a chain) for the reason that such breaking is dangerous and unsatisfactory and always results r in low efiiciency in that it prevents the placecollar 60, which is a part of the rigid framework between the housing I and the hook lllll. The hook may be allowed to rotate in this collar Whenever desired; and it also may be fixed and locked at most any position desired around the circle of its rotation, all as will be made more plain hereinafter.
Swivel collar is an important element of the structure of this device; and it has several functions. It is a part of the rigid frame of the tool, holding the block member above it and the hook member below it, and keeping them fixedly in line.
Collar 60 is also a part of the base of the block member. It is fitted firmly and exactly into the spaces between the posts 2, across the bottom of housing, so as to hold together the side members la and lb and to give strength to the entire block structure. Bolt holes 3 in posts 2 and bolt holes 66 in dogs are put into alignment to receive the frame bolts 20, which pass therethrough and are held therein by the use of nuts 2|. The removal of one such frame bolt will allow the collar to drop downwardly, hinged on the other frame bolt. This will open the bottom of the block housing (guards 9 being removed).
Collar 66 has a continuous circular wall 62 therearound, and is provided with the major vertical opening 6| therethrough. The lower part of this opening is so reduced in diameter as to furnish supporting shoulder 63 in the lower part of wall 62 of the swivel collar.
On supporting shoulder 63 there should be arranged a suitable bearing, as at 81. The one illustrated is a roller bearing, in which 88 indicates the housing and 89 the rollers.
Ball bearings may be used, or any other suitable bearing may be employed. A slight recess 64 may be made within vertical opening 6| (just above shoulder 63) to receive bearing 87. This recess is not necessary, but it may be used.
The heavy spindle bolt90-has1a large head 91. anda. shank: 93, the latter being providedwith threads 94. The head of this spindle bolt comes torest' on. top of:b'earing: 81 and the shank continues. downwardly through. the bearing housing. and extends. below the-lower face of swivel collar 60, where-itis threaded into hole I02 arranged in the uppermost part. of: the: body of: hook: unit I00, the hole having threads I03? therein forthis purpose.
To firmly fix spindlebolt 90. into thebody of. hook I011. (after it. has-been tightly madeup. with the threaded connection indicated), the hole I04 may 'be provided through the wall of. the: body ofthe hook. and. into the shank 93 of: the spindle bolt; and set screw I05 is: then made. up into this hole to prevent the bolt from turning in. the hook.
With the construction indicatediit willsbe seen. that hook I'Ofl, firmly attached tospindle boltfill, is wellsupported in' the framework oficollar member. 60. Thehook. may. not. swing or buckle or.
break laterally or deviate. from the straight'center line running. throughthe' entire tool, which is always maintained in azfixedzalignment. of its:
rigidly structural members;
However, from the construction indicated; it. is
clear that. therhook member lfiflwill rotate freely It. may be operated in such a in: the: collar 60: manner that it will: rotatev in response" to the weight or. tension: 011 any load. being carried. on theihooka. This. will allow strains; kinks, twister torque and thrust. within: the load being. carriedi (pipe,.tubing; rods, chains,.. cables or any other:
load) to adjust themselves and find compensa tion theiree rotation of: the hooln. Frequently this. is; an important; consideration;
.011: numerous. ICcISl0llS,. and: sometimes continuously; it? is desirable-andievennecessary that; the; hook be fixed: and? incapable of rotation. Therefore; at lore-kings. device is provided? for this purpose;
In the past:practicersomeform of extra structure usually has been introduced to hold together the. housing :of ablockian'd the housing. of a hook (they being separate and non-integrated units, loosely: assembled). Thus, a thirdand.additional membera'was. used: to make connection betweenthe two housings: of theseseparate units. Such a structure" is not. very: satisfactory as a means for braking or lockin the hook in" nonarotating" position. There is too much space required for the-extramember; and it addssomewhat to the length oritthe assembly, and becauseof this-length there is some undesirable leverage given to thrusts arisingfrom-normal impulses toward d'eflection or rotation. 'I'he result ot which is that a: rather bulk-y memberwas usually required to spanthe" considerable distance between" blackand hook and keep them in a position of approximate non-rotation.
In our construction it" will be observed that we add-no member between housings. In fact; we
add nomember whatsoever to belock-ed? We simply drill some holes 9-2 in theperipheral side" walls of the:head 9 i of the spindle bolt 91]; This permits us to lock thisspindle bolt firmly; exactly andifixedly at whatever place we desire, so that it. cannot rotate:
We. may lock the. hook. in placeb'ytheuse-of lid desired. They may be put in each one-eighth" part ofth'ecircumierenoe:ofthe head, or in each one-sixteeth, or' at. any other spacing, found: suitable.
In order: to make: simple" the locking of' the spindle bolt 9E and prevent therotation of the hook IM a-springi-loaded' plunger 'i-i may be arranged to be carried within a protective plunger guards 8 7 oflthe sideof the collar 63.
plunger: hole: lei isi made through the side wall of swivel. collar: 66 to receive plunger i1, and especially. the. reducedplunger head '18. The hole ft should bersubstantially the. same size as the holes" 92..
A plunger keeper 58 may be inserted within recess: l t, arrangedz about hole 15, in the outer wall of collarfltil. couple. of. holes 731 may be made at the bottom oiithis recess to line up with holes: his in. the keeper; and screw 12 may be made up in each. two ortheseholes in alignment, untilv the keeper: is. firmly fixed into the wall of the collar.
The-outer face ofzkeeper til should be provided with ai relatively deep transverse locking groove 5 69, and a relatively shallow non-engagement groove 10. A. plunger passage 16 is provided through the keeper*6'8*,lto line up. with the plunger passage in the wall of. the collar.
There is provided. asprin well 19 within the body or. the plunger 11; and this well continues as an opening through the. plunger key 88- and the plunger handle 81. In this well is. carried compression spring 3Z';.whic'h iskept in place by spring. keeper. 83,. held securely by screws 86,
i which. pass throughscrew holes 84 and make up into: screw holes" 85 in. the: collar.
The handlezflzli of the plunger maybe provided with notches 99' whichwillreceive any small tool, such. as. a screwdriver, the handle of pliers or a chisel, or apiece of. small pipe. By using such a tool and forcing it downwardly in one of the notches 9.9, the plunger handle can be rotated slightly. There-are: only two positions which it may'ta-ke. It maybe in a position-in which the key 80 is in looking: groove 69;.01' it may be forced' into the other'position withthe key in the nonengagement groove 10;.
Because of the. difierences in the depth of the grooves fifiiandlfli'it willbefoundthat when the" key is in groove 70 the plunger head 18 doesnot enter hole H ll in. the head of the. spindle bolt. When the. plunger: i in this position of nonengagement, the: spindle bolt may rotate freely along withthe'hook. suspended on it.
Howevenwhen the plunger is placedin a posi- J tion of engagement. by having the key down inthe: deeper groove 6910f the. keeper, then the head 18 of the plunger is firmly driven into one of the-holes. 92in the head: of the spindle bolt, so as toslock." the "latter and: prevent its rotation.
Thevlo'ckingi'device just described is only one of several which may be used. for the same purpose; However; this one is very effective, safe, simpleandi dependable. Itis easily mounted on theside: of collar. and it is so protected that it will always work. It is obvious thatdiflerent forms: ofl'ocking devices may. be made with the sames'goodoperating results; .andlwith safety and dependability.
A matterrof: great import'ance in this invention is the design; construction. and arrangement of the unit known asthehook, and indicated as at I00. Thisis no ordinary hook. In fact, it may lie-more fair ton-say that it is not. a hook at all; If we. consider-whack strictlyto be: a: canin lever device, then this is not a hook for it does not answer such a definition. The old form, of cantilever design, was called a hook, and properly so. Anything taking the place of it, however much improved, will probably continue to be called a hook in all industrial fields where such devices are used. Therefore, the element I60, in this tool, is herein called a hook solely for conventions sake. Notwithstanding the nomenclature involved, our so-called hook is in effect a compound beam, having support in several places.
The head of the hook body is indicated as at I2 I and through this part of the body the spindle bolt 96 is inserted, fixed and carried. The large stock of the head of the body of the hook extends outwardly on both sides of the spindle bolt 96. Its shortest extension forms the laterally disposed fixed arm I22.
The longest arm of the hook is shown as at II) I. It is a fixed member extending downwardly from the head I2I and ending in the transverse member which carries the link pin H6.
The third and only remaining arm of this hook is shown as at H2, and it is sometimes referred to as the link. It is the only movable arm of the hook. When the hook is carrying a load the arm H2 is hung into the short arm I22 through the use of finger I I6, which is made a part of the member H2 and allowed to enter the recess I26 in the head of the hook in such manner as to cause the head to support a considerable part of the weight being carried by the arm H2, all as will be more fully explained hereinafter.
A better understanding of the details of construction of the hook member I90 may be had by referring to Fig. VI, in which it will be seen that the fixed arm IUI not only extends downwardly (from the head I2I of the hook), but it also continues as a downwardly and laterally inclined leg H16, which forms one-half of a V-seat in which the load rests.
Beyond member I06 the arm I6I then continues to form the upwardly inclined leg IN, the extreme end of which is provided with hole I09 therethrough to receive link pin III].
A wide groove i06 bisects the members I66 and IN, so as to receive therein the downwardly inclined leg H3 of link II2, which leg is so arranged as to form one side of the load-receiving V-seat.
Thus, it will be seen that the bifurcated arm IIH receives the lower end of movable arm H2 in the groove or recess H18, and that the link I I2 is so pivoted as to move in such groove. Pivot pin I I is common to both sides of the bifurcated member I67 and also to the lower part of the body of link I I2, and may be kept in place by the use of set screw I I I.
The innermost end of leg II3 (of link member I I2) terminates in the toe I I4. This toe may be locked down in such manner as to prevent the movement of the member I I2 about the pivot I II]. We have indicated a suitable lock I3I, which terminates in a latch lip I35; and this lip falls over the toe IM to lock the link in a position of closure for carrying a load.
An important regulating member H5 is arranged between the toe end (I I4) of movable link I I2, and the transverse base I24 of fixed arm IOI. This device is a so-called seat for regulating and distributing load throughout the several loadcarrying members of the hook generally.
As indicated in the drawings, one usable form (among several) of the seat member I25 is a screw pin fitted into a threaded hole I26 provided through the base member I24. This form of regulating seat I25 may be screwed up through the hole I26 until its upper face comes in contact with the seat H5 of'the link itself. Such adjustment is to be made only when the link I I2 is in full load-carrying position, and while a part of this load may be carried upon the finger I I6.
It is important to know that there is a very definite relation between the load-carrying member H6 and the adjustable seat I25, which is a, load-distributing member.
The adjustable seat I25 should be so arranged and adjusted that it will receive, sustain and carry a certain predetermined amount of the load resting within the V-seat of the hook. (The V-seat is defined by the angles of inclination of the. members I06 and H3, when the hook is in load-carrying formation.) Then the adjustable seat may be welded in place by the use of welding I27. Of course, it may be pinned in place. But in any event, once the adjustment for load distribution in predetermined measure or percentage is made, the member I25 should be kept at the desired adjustment. For this purpose suitable fixing means should be employed, whether it be welding or pins or other.
The finger I I6 may be inserted in hole II'I made through the free end, or upper end, of link H2. The use of a hole, for adjustably locating finger H6 within link H2, so as to determine the measure of extension therebeyond, is simply a convenient means to facilitate the adjustment to the desired degree of extension; but it is a very satisfactory one. Other means may be used.
Such arrangement as is thus indicated obviously must not preclude the thought and. fact that finger I I6 may be made originally as an integral part of the free end of link H2; and then such adjustment as is required, in the measure of extension of such finger from the member H2, may be arrived at by machining or otherwise cutting down the exposed end of the finger.
It is important, however, to realize that this finger member should be made the subject of suitable regulation, so that the final arrangement is such that finger H6 will carry and distribute a certain amount of the load (originally laid upon link II2) to the short fixed arm I22, extending from the head I2I of the body of hook I00.
When hole H1 is used as a method of adjusting finger II6, then, whenever the finger is in exactly the right position for load distribution, a bit of welding, as at II8, may be used to permanently unite the finger and the link. (Again a set screw or other pin or means could be used for keeping the finger in permanent location.)
The walls of the hole I20, in the head of the hook, are therefore arranged to carry a considerable amount of the load originally laid upon the link II2. It is to be noted that this hole is nearer to the center line of the hook assembly than is the link pin IIIJ. It is further to be noted that when a weight is laid upon leg II3 it will cause the latter to move downwardly and will also cause the long arm of link II2 to move upwardly and inwardly, in the progress of partial rotation of these members about the link pin III). Whereupon, the finger enters the hole in the head.
As a result of the movement of the link I I2 about pin I III (when the hook is loaded) there is the distribution of some of the load from link antenna 13 II2 to the head I21, and afurther distribution of some of such load: to. thebase I241.
While the adjustableseat' Ia25E=may bel -well: employed in the form in which. it is disclosed in the drawings, itshould be obvious thatthe same results maybe. had withv a different construc; tion.
For instance, a verticlei hole couldsbe made through the leg I.I3. near. the toe H41: thereof; Through this hole a pin, comparable to the, mem.-. ber I25, could: be inserted. andforced downwardly, using threads, until it: comes to rest firmly on the upper face of base I24. The result would be exactly the sameiaswiththe' form indicated in. the dawings; Either form of construction may be employedsto carry out .theprinciple and eifectat-he objects...herein disclosed.
Likewise, it should be. obvious that a. slight elevation maybe made as. an integral part ofthe base I24, the elevation totake theeform'.and cone tour. of. the exposed part of pin I 2.5; ornot, as desired. Required adjustment could. then be made. by having. the. extension: machined, or. otherwise reduced, until it received exactly the amount of load, or. the percentage of load, desired;
Likewise, a projection: may be-made as an integral part of seat I 15 to .form. adownward ex tension, until. such projection comesinto contact with the upper face of; I24"; Adjustment could be made by machining or filing or-otherwise reducing theextentyo-f the projection unt i1:the.load distribution requiredwas arrived at. Whenneeded, welding could be used to build up any adjusting member found deficient.
In any event, it is proper to remember that there. is...an adjustable load-distributing member. arranged betwcenthe seat IIS and the base I24.
Because, it isimportant that. the surface of the finger smooth, and keptthat way, it is desirable that there shallbe. provided a guard Il9= about the extended finger;
A simple way. to provide this guard is to allow: a thin section of each outer wall of both sides. of the upper endof link II2 to be continued in:
the region ofvthefinger I I6, to formzthewalls II9 of a troughin whichthe. finger is located;
It is recommended alsothat the-hole I 20 bemade perfectly true and accurate and smoothly finished. The fingenl Iii-should fitintothehole I 20:. and against. the. walls. thereof with perfect nicety. So thatthis fitting will;be gradual and perfect, and exact, it is recommended that. the end of the-finger. II6;be tap.ered,. and that the wall, of the recess I 20,-; be, correspondingly: inclined. Thus the finger maybedriven intothe recess I20 so that it will completely impinge the side walls of such recess. Then. the weight carried on the finger will be transferred to these walls. Literally, the link, II2 is v hung into the body of the hook.
A load thrown into the V-seat ofthe hook will close the, structure. Nevertheless, it isdesirable that some form of lock be, placed upon this hook so that, when once it is closed and in load-carrying position, it cannot become unlocked accidentally.
It is considered important that the lockbe put upon the safe side of the hook. The safe side is the side which--does not-open.- It is the side of the fixed arm I01. the lmovable arm I I2 (located-on the -dangerous. side of the hook I.I6. be properly. machined and made- It is opposite from Suppose a load were being carried; on this hook, and further suppose thattheload were setdown. suddenly. Then the: part: of the loadibeing car:- ried through the opening: of: thexhookmay fly upa wardly and outwardly against thelinlc II2; t'enda ing to force it open.
If: the operator is' on the dangerous sideof the hook, he maybe severely injured;uor even: killed, by the falling materialsor. machinery which comestumbling out of. i the. accidentally openedi hook.
Such accidents and losses are provided against by: incorporating in our hook an. automatic dock, which is'arranged on the safe side.
To install look I 3|. there. should be arrangeda protected operating recess. I30, in the backside of the arm IOI. This recessshouldcontinue into a. hole I40; extending horizontally through=member. I011.
Latch body I 34v (which welli may take the form of 1 a. cylindrical or cartridge-like member) .isial lowedito extendibeyond the innerfacelof memben IOI to provide an overhanging lip I35havihga roundedtop.
Through both sidewalls of the tubular mem berv I34. there shouldibe arranged a long horizontal slot. I38; Through this slot shouldbepro videdpin I39.-to.extend .entirely'through the -mov able member I34, and be fixed in-each wall of the arm IOI.
The hollow member; I34 afiords-a spring well I36; and in thiswell is arranged compression spring I31. The spring is -disposedbetween-the cross pin I39 and the solid'head of the member' I34, which solid. head is on; the end: bearing the lip I35. A'handle. I 32.:is=.fixed to the latchbody I34, through the use of latch pin I33.
The lockingxdevice detailed immediately'above allows the handle I32: to be" pulled outwardly from the recess I30iin such manner. as to entirely withdraw the lip I32? Withinthe body of the arm IOI. Thenthe lock is inoperative; and the arm II2. isunlocked, and the free ends of it may belowered l outwardly and downwardly to receive -a= load.
When.a load fallsuponleg II3',=. then-the= =toe' I,I4.ais instantly snappeddownwardly and underthe overhanging lip 1 I 35' of 'the latch I31 There-- aftencand until manually released; the hook-is closed. and locked; andit cannot be opened'by accident.
elongation on the hookby reason of 1 greatweig-hts being carried thereon or becauseofsudden shifts:
ofxsuch weights.
The position of i the foolproof lock whichlwe have. presented; on the:safe side of the hook, istobe contrasted with certain latches-which have been put upon ,theunsafe side of a-hook, Where there. is some form of moving link or closing member. The dangerous pins or latches here--- tofore used have been found on the side of 'the--= movable closing member, where tonsof machi-nery maycome tumbling down-upon a workmanand .kill him, if 'he undertakes to open the latch The safe and dependable lock disclosed-byyus; herein is further free from being opened" ac-- cidentally because the handle I32 thereof'is kept. safely within the recess" I30-by the spring 131;
while the lock is engaged. The handle I32 does not. extend beyond the outer contour of the body. This is important. No rope, cable, clothing or anything else may catch upon the protected lock handle; and therefore accidental opening of the lock from such causes is entirely eliminated.
Much testing and accurate engineering have gone into the making of this hook of plural members carrying loads. An object of great importance in this invention is predetermined load distribution. The several load-carrying members of this hook are so designed and operated as to share in the load being carried; and the extent of such sharing is determined by the proper use of the hanging finger I I6 and the adjusting bridge I25, or their equivalents.
Fixed arm I0! is not a cantilevered device. It is one side of a loaded beam. The member I I2 is the other side of that beam. The loads on both members I01 and H2 are hung upon and ultimately carried by the head I2! of the hook. Distribution of the load between the movable arm I I2 and the fixed arm ifll is effected by the proper use of suitable means of adjustment, including the bridge between leg l3 and base I24.
The result of such design, arrangement and construction is to minimize the thrust of the load on link pin H0 and to make possible a reduction in the cross-sectional area of each of the load-carrying members themselves.
To put it very succinctly: our hook can carry more weight than any device heretofore known to us as having a single conventional hook of cross-sectional area equal to that of our arm [ii i. This is so for the simple reason that the full load carried by our hook is not supported by the single arm lfll alone. Much of it is carried by the arm HZ. All of it is carried by the head of the hook; and such head is loaded on two opposed sides thereof; against the head is impossible.
It must be made plain that the load carried by movable arm H2 is so carried from the very beginning of the loading of the hook. To put it another way: this device in no wise depends upon the distortion, elongation or deformation of any of its members, in order to transmit some of an overload from one member to another member which theretofore carried no load. It would be a very sorry procedure, indeed, to torture one member, by overloading, until it yielded sufficiently to allow some of the load carried by it to slip to another member which had been carrying no load at all. It is of the very essence of poor design to require the setting up of internal stresses in some one member, in order to cause some other member to function. Yet, that is exactly what has been done in certain earlier hooks. The understanding of this fact is necessary to fully appreciate the design of our hook.
In order that the principle incorporated in the design of our hook may be more easily understood, clearly grasped and graphically illustrated, we have provided a strictly diagrammatic representation of this principle, in our Fig. V'II.
In the schematic arrangement of Fig. VII, A represents the fixed arm of the hook, L represents the movable arm of the hook, F represents the load-carrying finger and S represents the adjustable bridge member under compression, which may be thought of as a Seat common to members A and L. W represents the weight or load carried.
The small arrows in the diagram show the locations of the load thrust in this tool. For
and side thrust and leverage i6 instance, in the area e there is a downward thrust from the finger, counted by the resistance of the body or head of the hook.
In the areas a. and b, there is lateral and downward thrust, against the members A and L respectively; and there is corresponding resistance in these members.
Likewise, there is downward thrust in the area 0, because of the load shifted through the seat or bridge.
There is also a side thrust in the area d, toward the link carrying pin, in which there is resistance.
This diagram not only discloses the locations of thrust in the tool, but should make very plain the fact of the distribution of load throughout the tool; and it should also make clear that load distribution can be effected by adjusting the members known as the finger and the seat (or bridge), and especially the latter.
We have presented a very safe block and hook tool of short compass, having a continuous and inflexible frame, a streamlined and projectionfree body, an easily opened and freely reeved housing, a rotatable yet easily fixed hook, the latter being provided with plural load-carrying members, adjusting means for distributing load between such members in predetermined measure, and an accident-proof lock, arranged on the safe side of the body.
We claim:
1. In load-supporting oil field hook equipment, a hook head; an arm rigidly depending from such head, such arm having a downwardly and laterally disposed leg which is further extended upwardly and laterally, said leg being bifurcated; a movable link having a downwardly and laterally disposed extension passing into the recess of said bifurcation; a pin carried in the outer end of the bifurcated leg, whereby the link is pivotally mounted; a frusto-conical finger extending laterally from the upper end of the link; a frusto-conical recess arranged in the head to receive the finger; a latch arranged within the arm and provided with a lip extendable into the recess of the bifurcation, whereby the said extension of the link may be releasably secured within such recess; and an adjustable bridge carried in the base of the rigid arm, whereby the said extension of the link may be supportably engaged.
2. In oil field hook equipment, a hook head; a substantially vertically disposed hook arm rigidly depending from said head; a bifurcated lateral extension from said arm, extending first downwardly and then upwardly; a link member pivotally mounted within the bifurcation, such member having a laterally inclined leg provided with an upper face, such face being above and substantially parallel to the upper face of the said upward extension of the arm when the link is closed, and the downward extension of the arm and the inclined leg together forming a V- shaped load-carrying cradle; a finger extending inwardly from the upper end of the link; a recess arranged within the head to receive the finger; an adjustable bridge arranged within the bifurcation to receive the leg of the link when the latter is closed, the adjustment of the bridge permitting weight suspended from the cradle to be adjustably distributed through the finger and through the arm to the head; and link locking means wholly recessed within the rigid arm, such means having a lip extending within the bifurcation and protected by the side walls thereof.
3. In oil field hook equipment, a hook head, having an opening therein; a substantially vertically disposed hook arm rigidly depending from said head; a bifurcated lateral extension from said arm, extending first downwardly and then upwardly; a link member pivotally mounted within the bifurcation, such member having a laterally inclined leg provided with an upper face, such face being above and substantially parallel to the upper face of the said upward extension of the arm when the link is closed, and the downward extension of the arm and the inclined leg forming a V-shaped load-carrying cradle; a finger extending inwardly from the upper end of the link; a recess arranged within the head to receive the finger; an adjustable bridge arranged within the bifurcation to receive the leg of the link when the latter is closed, the adjustment of the bridge permitting weight suspended from the cradle to be adjustably distributed through the finger and through the arm to the head; link locking means wholly recessed within the rigid arm, such means having a lip extending within the bifurcation and protected by the said walls thereof; a spindle bolt fixedly carried in said opening in the hook head and extending thereabove, such bolt terminating in a bolt head provided with spaced recesses in its peripheral face; a removable collar surrounding the bolt head, whereby it may be rotatably supported; and a releasable latch recessively carried within the collar, the latch being provided with a plunger extendable into any selected recess in the bolt head, whereby the bolt may be locked against rotation.
4. In oil field hook equipment, a hook head, having an opening therein; a substantially vertically disposed hook arm rigidly depending from said head; a bifurcated lateral extension from said arm, extending first downwardly and then upwardly; a link member pivotally mounted within the bifurcation, such member having a laterally inclined leg provided with an upper face, such face being above and substantially parallel to the upper face of the said upward extension of the arm when the link is closed, and the downward extension of the arm and the inclined leg forming a V-shaped load-carrying cradle; a finger extending inwardly from the upper end of the link; a recess arranged within the head to receive the finger; an adjustable bridge arranged within the bifurcation to receive the leg of the link when the latter is closed, the adjustment of the bridge permitting weight suspended from the cradle to be adjustably distributed through the finger and through the arm to the head; link locking means wholly recessed within the rigid arm, such means having a lip extending within the bifurcation and protected by the said Walls thereof; a spindle bolt fixedly carried in said opening in the hook head and extending thereabove, such bolt terminating in a bolt head provided with spaced recesses in its peripheral face; a removable collar surrounding the bolt head, whereby it may be rotatably supported; a releasable latch recessively carried within the collar, the latch being provided with a plunger extendable into any selected recess in the bolt head, whereby the bolt may be locked against rotation; and a thrust bearing supporting the head of the spindle bolt within the collar.
RAYMOND G. TAYLOR, JR. ARTHUR B. MCELROY. ROY C. DAVIS.
References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 294,704 Wall Mar. 4, 1884 377,559 Hitchcock Feb. 7, 1883 479,026 Smeal July 19, 1892 776,558 Sjoberg Dec. 6, 1904 778,776 Eberle Dec. 27, 1904 878,060 Hammond Feb. 4, 1908 1,541,991 Moddy et al June 16, 1925 1,637,699 Lauterbach Aug. 2, 1927 2,100,779 Hertel Nov. 30, 1937 2,271,335 Geiger Jan. 27, 1942 2,272,826 Bardsley Feb. 10, 1942 2,276,628 Quilter Mar. 17, 1942 2,323,326 Hertel July 6, 1943 2,559,999 Regan July 10, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 1,058 Great Britain May 10, 1855
US3096A 1948-01-19 1948-01-19 Hoisting hook with a pivoted closure Expired - Lifetime US2650403A (en)

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US3250516A (en) * 1964-03-05 1966-05-10 American Chain & Cable Co Hoist bottom block
US4017111A (en) * 1976-04-05 1977-04-12 Presco International, Inc. Safety hook
US4676484A (en) * 1986-02-28 1987-06-30 Parco Mast And Substructure, Inc. Helicopter transportable traveling block
US6386516B1 (en) 1998-02-27 2002-05-14 National-Oilwell L.P. Sheave block with retractable sheave guards
US20040183061A1 (en) * 2003-03-13 2004-09-23 Klaus-Jurgen Winter Lower block for a cable actuator
US20050005408A1 (en) * 2003-07-07 2005-01-13 Sievers Jack D. Bullsnap
US20050274936A1 (en) * 2004-06-09 2005-12-15 Lutter Ernest E Field adjustable bridge crane block
US20110067275A1 (en) * 2009-09-22 2011-03-24 Columbia Steel Casting Co., Inc. Dump block with improved assembly features
US20110285157A1 (en) * 2010-05-20 2011-11-24 Boehler Stefan Crane hook assembly having a hook weight arrangement
EP2520535A1 (en) * 2011-05-02 2012-11-07 Manitowoc Crane Group France SAS Separable stop for a crane, in particular a mobile crane
WO2016202792A1 (en) 2015-06-19 2016-12-22 Terex MHPS IP Management GmbH Pulley block having a covering element and method for mounting a covering element on a pulley block
US20180244504A1 (en) * 2017-02-27 2018-08-30 Maxtrax Australia Pty Ltd. Automotive recovery coupler

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