US2642679A - Ice rink resurfacing machine - Google Patents

Ice rink resurfacing machine Download PDF

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US2642679A
US2642679A US9347849A US2642679A US 2642679 A US2642679 A US 2642679A US 9347849 A US9347849 A US 9347849A US 2642679 A US2642679 A US 2642679A
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ice
frame
blade
water
vehicle
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Frank J Zamboni
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Frank J Zamboni
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01HSTREET CLEANING; CLEANING OF PERMANENT WAYS; CLEANING BEACHES; DISPERSING OR PREVENTING FOG IN GENERAL CLEANING STREET OR RAILWAY FURNITURE OR TUNNEL WALLS
    • E01H4/00Working on surfaces of snow or ice in order to make them suitable for traffic or sporting purposes, e.g. by compacting snow
    • E01H4/02Working on surfaces of snow or ice in order to make them suitable for traffic or sporting purposes, e.g. by compacting snow for sporting purposes, e.g. preparation of ski trails; Construction of artificial surfacings for snow or ice sports ; Trails specially adapted for on-the-snow vehicles, e.g. devices adapted for ski-trails
    • E01H4/023Maintaining surfaces for ice sports, e.g. of skating rinks
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E01CONSTRUCTION OF ROADS, RAILWAYS, OR BRIDGES
    • E01HSTREET CLEANING; CLEANING OF PERMANENT WAYS; CLEANING BEACHES; DISPERSING OR PREVENTING FOG IN GENERAL CLEANING STREET OR RAILWAY FURNITURE OR TUNNEL WALLS
    • E01H5/00Removing snow or ice from roads or like surfaces; Grading or roughening snow or ice
    • E01H5/04Apparatus propelled by animal or engine power; Apparatus propelled by hand with driven dislodging or conveying levelling elements, conveying pneumatically for the dislodged material
    • E01H5/06Apparatus propelled by animal or engine power; Apparatus propelled by hand with driven dislodging or conveying levelling elements, conveying pneumatically for the dislodged material dislodging essentially by non-driven elements, e.g. scraper blades, snow-plough blades, scoop blades
    • E01H5/07Apparatus propelled by animal or engine power; Apparatus propelled by hand with driven dislodging or conveying levelling elements, conveying pneumatically for the dislodged material dislodging essentially by non-driven elements, e.g. scraper blades, snow-plough blades, scoop blades and conveying dislodged material by driven or pneumatic means

Description

June 23, 1953 F. J. zAMBoNl ICE Rmx RESURFACING MACHINE;

arrow/Eff F. J. ZAMBONI ICE RINK RESURFACING MACHINE .I une 23, 1953 4 Sheets-Sheet x2 Filed May 16, 1949 June Z3, 1953 F. J. zAMBoNl ICE RINK RESURFACING MACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 16, 1949 IGS Lexo June 23, 1953 F. J. zAMBoNl 2,642,6.79

ICE RINK RESURFACING MACHINE Filed May 16, 1949 4 sheets-sheet 4 265- M265 i." 26| 2G' 'r1- ze ggf ,f EG. 10.

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275 INVENTOR zeo 275 Patented June 23, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT* OFFICE i 2,642,679 f A ICE RINK RESURFACING MACHINE Y Frank J. Zamboni, Hynes, Calif.v

- Application May I6, 1949, Serial N0. 937,478

The present invention relates to ice rink resurfacing machines for smoothing and renewing the surface lof the ice in a skating rink after the same has been out up and roughenedby skaters, and its primary purpose is to provi-de a machine that is capable of renishing the ice toa smooth, unblemished' surface in the very minimum of time and Iwith a minimum of labor.

The maintenance of a satisfactorily smooth surface on the ice is one of the major problems in connection with the operation of a skating rink, and after several hours of use, it is necessary to clear the i-ce of skaters to resurface the ice by scraping or shaving the same lightly, removing the shaved ice, and then spreading a vthin iilm of water over the surface of the ice to iill in cracks or other depressions. Within a short time the water freezes, leaving the surface-of the ice quite smooth and unblemished, 'and skating can then be resumed.

Heretofore, the usual method of cleaning off and smoothing the surface of the ice has been to send attendants out onto the ice to sweep olf the cut ice with scrapers or sweeps that are pushed ahead of them; while in other instances, the ice is scraped vclean by scraper bladesmounted on 14 Claims.

. I 2 the operating efliciency of the refrigerating system, yand lbecause of the tendency of the ice to melt on its surface, leaving puddles of water which cause'much discomfort and inconvenience to the skaters. Both of these undesirable eiects result from the fact that ice is a relatively poor conductor of heat, and therefore as the ice becomes thicker, the refrigerant must be maintained at a lower temperature in order to transfer heat at the required rate from the surface of the ice to the refrigerant. The present invention overcomes this diiiiculty by shaving away a thin layer of ice of substantially the same thickness as the layer of new ice which isi built up when the newly added water is frozen.

Another object of the invention, therefore, is to provide an ice. resurfacing machine which leaves the'ice with a completely smooth surface,

towed sleds or on automotive vehicles such as the small, four-wheel drive vehicles formerly used in the military services and known popularly as the jeep In either case, after the surface of the ice has 'been scraped clean, a thin lm of water is spread over the ice to ll in the cracks and low spots, and surplus water is then squeegeed away, usually by a number of attendants on skates, pushing the squeegees ahead of them. v

Among the disadvantages of these prior methods of resurfacing the ice are lthe excessive length of time required to complete the operation, the relatively large amount of human labor involved, and the tendency of the ice to develop objectionable rough-surfaced areas where the newly added water mixes with'shaved or cut ice missed by the Scrapers to form a coarse-grained slush that freezes hard before the arrival of the attendants with squeegees. The squeegees have no effect on the hard-frozen rough ice, and the ice therefore remains rough 'until the next time that it is scraped.

Another undesirable result of 4prior resurfacing methods is ya tendency of the ice to build up ice. This increasing thickness of the ice is obje'ctionable because of the adverse effect it has on free of any rough areas, and which removes approximately the 'same quantity lof ice Vas is added in the form of water, so that the thickness of the ice remains substantially const-ant. f

Another object of the invention is to provide a self-propelled vehicle that can be operated by one man, and which functions automatically to shave the ice, convey the shaved ice to a large receptacle attached to the vehicle, Iand then squeegee a thin film `of water over the surface of the ice so as to provide a like-new surface when the water has frozen.

A further object of the invention in one of its aspects is to provide an attach-ment which can be mounted on the chassis of a jeep or `other automotive vehicle Ito provide a self-propelled ice rink resurfacing machine at the minimum cost. The advantage' of this feature is that the majorl ity of skating rinks already possess one of more facing machine embodying the `principles of my invention;

Figure 2 is a transverse vertical section through the same, taken substantially along Ithe line 2--2 in Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a partially cut away top plan view j of the rear end of the machine;

Figure 4 is a side elevational View of the rear Figure?? is a vertical section through the blade and worm screw conveyor, taken at 1-1 in Figure 2;

Figure 8 is a sectional view through the blade'v adjusting mechanism, taken at 8 8 in Figure 2;v

Y into the ends of the blade.

l1| extends upwardly through a hole in the topv flangejof the cross member 60 at that end of the Figure 9 is a side elevational view of another embodiment of thev invention, showing a modi-v Y fied form of the apparatus mounted-n a jeep;

and 1 Figure 10 is a transverse *Ln'ertical section through the same, takenat ||J-|in Figure 9.-'

The embodiment shown in Figures 1 to 8, inclusive, of thedrawing's will beedescribed first. In this form of theinvention, the machine is seen to comprise van automotive vehicle Comprisingv a chassis made up of two laterally spaced,

fore and aft extending frame angle irons 2| and i 22 which are'joined together at the front end by an inverted channel member |9, and at the rear end by a box beam 23. Mounted on the chassisA in any suitable manner is an internal combustion engine 24 which isy connected to a transmission gear box 25. The'transmission 25 is of the fourwheel drive type, and includes a driving connection through a forwardly extending propeller, shaft 26 to' a diiferential mechanism 39 on the front axle of-the vehicle, by means of` which the front wheels 3| are driven'.` lThe rear wheels 32 of the machineare 'driven byra' rearwardly extending-drive shaft 33 which is connected at its frontend tothe transmission and at its rear end to ay differential gear mechanism contained within a-housing 315.` The front wheels Blare steerable, and are turned by means of steering gear 35 which is controlled by a wheel 36 at the rear end of a steering column 31. The column 31 is supported at its rear end by a post 4| which is fixed to and extends upwardly from the right hand frame member 22. AThe frame member 22 extends rearwardly beyond the steering wheel 35, and mounted on its rear end is a bucket seat 42 in which the operator rides. Suitable driving controls (not shown)A are provided, whereby the operator can start and stopthe engine, shiftv gears, apply thebrakes on the wheels, etc.

Mounted on the frame -members 2|, 22 and extending upwardly therefrom at the front end, midsection, and rear end ofthe machine are vertical posts 45, 46 and 4,1 which support a large, open-topped receptacle, orsnow box 50 above the chassis of the vehicle. The sides of the receptacle 50 project llaterally beyond the frame members 2 22 and are braced by diagonally extending members 5|. the chassis of the machine between the front Also mounted on either side of 4 gauge the depth of cut taken by the blade. Intermediate their ends, the angle irons 51 and 59 are additionally connected together by fore-andaft extending members 6|, 62, 63, and 34.

The blade is designated by the reference nu- :neral 10 and extends transverse to the direction of forward travel, with its sharp cutting edge inclined downwardly to take a shaving cut on the ice. The blade 1|) is supported at itsends by hangers 1| having hooks 12 at their lower ends which are engaged through eye bolts 13 screwed EachV of the hangers frame, and its upper portion is threaded at 14' and received within an adjusting screw member 15. .The adjusting screw members 15 are preferably in the form of internally threaded sleeves, thebottom ends of which rest on top o? the endl members |30 around the margins of the holes through which the hangers-1| are passed. y

Each of the two adjusting screws 15 at opposite ends of the Vframe 56 is reduced in diameter and has a housing 16 journalled thereon which is connected to another housing 1B by a horizontallygdisposed pivot pin 19. AA shaft 63 is journalled at vone end in the housing 18 and extends upwardly and inwardly therefrom to a point within convenient reach of the operator sitting in the bucket seat 42. ed to the top ends of theshaft 83 to provide handies, by means of which the operator is enabled to turn the shaft. Shafts 83 are supported near their inner ends by posts 85 and'SS; the former being welded at its lower end'to the backside of the rear frame member 58, and the latter being welded to the top of the fore-and-af-t extending frame member 62. Fixed to thel adjacent ends of the shaft 83 and screw member 15within the housings 18 and 16, respectively, are intermeshing torque-transmission members (not shown in detail herein) which provide a flexible driving connection between the shaft and the screw member, whereby the latter is turned by the shaft.

e. Since the hanger 1| is constrained against rotation by its engagement with the eye-bolt 13, it

and rear wheels thereof are water tanks 55 which as sled runners to support the weight of the mechanismcarried on the-frame 56', and also vServe 1,70

will be evident that rotation of the screw member 15 causes the hanger 1| to be raised or lowered, depending upon the direction of rotation.`

I respect to the surface of the ice is controlled fby means of an adjusting wheel which is xed to the top end o-f-a screw shaft 9|. The shaft 9| passes downwardly through a trunnion block at 92 and is journaled for rotation therein, but constrained against axial movement with respect thereto. The trunnion block 92 has pintles 93 which extend laterally from opposite sides thereof, said pintles being journaled in bearing blocks 94 mounted on a transversely extending plate 95 which isvsupported at its endsl onthe rear extremities of the frame members 62Y and 63. The screw shaft 9| projects downwardly from the trunnion block 92 through a hole in plate 95, and its lower end is screw threaded through another trunnion block at 96 havingpintles 91 which are journaled in bearing blocks 98 on the rear end of an armr 99 extending rearwardly from the blade 10 at the midpoint thereof. Thus, it will be Seen that rotation of the screw shaft 9| causes Cross pieces 84 are weldmasacre the trunnion block '38 to move up or down the shaft, thereby increasing or decreasing the angle of incidence of the blade 'l0 with respect to the surface of the ice. Encircling the screw shaft 9| and bearing 'at its bottom end against the trunnion block 92 -is a compression coil spring |00, the top end of which bears against a washer and nut assembly |0| and exerts a spring pressure on the shaft 9| to take up the clearances between the shaft and the trunnion block 92. This has a vibration damping effect, eliminating any tendency on the part of the blade l0 to chatter.

The blade is pressed downwardly against the ice by two laterally spaced, relatively heavy compression coil springs I 05, only one of which is to be seen in the drawings; said springs being engaged at their lower ends by spring seats |06 on the blade. The upper ends of the springs |05 are held by retainers |01 that are provided on screws |08; said screws passing upwardly through. holes in the horizontal flanges of members 6| and 64, respectively, and being secured thereto by nuts |09.

The blade is propelled forwardly with the machine by means of two laterally spaced, vertically disposed rods 0 which are held at their upper ends within sleeves welded to the back side of the rear frame member 58 directly behind the members 6| and 64, respectively. The rods |||l extend downwardly from 'their respective sleeves and pass through holes I2 in bracket members H3 projecting rearwardly from the underside of the blade '|0. The rods ||0 are freely slidable through the holes H2 to accommodate vertical adjustment of the blade by means of the screw members at oppos-ite ends ther-cof; and sufcient clearance is also provided by the holes 2 to permit angular adjustment of the blade by means of the adjusting screw shaft 3|.

The draft connection between the frame 56 and the vehicle 2Q is likewise comprised of a pair of laterally spaced, vertically disposed rods ||4 which are welded at their top ends to the meme, bers 2|, 22 and pro-ject downwardly therefrom directly behind the rear frame member 58.

When the machine is in operation, the rods ||4 push forwardly against the frame member 50 and thereby propel the fram-e 56 over the ice. The rods I4 are confined from the rear by metal straps l5 which are welded at their ends to the backside of the member 58 to form horizontally elongated loops. This arrangement of the rods ||4 passing down `through the loops formed by straps l5 permits the frame 5B to be raised and lowered with respect to the chassis of the vehicle 20, and also allows the frame 56 to slide laterally outward with respect to the vehicle when the same is turned at the corners of the rink. In this way, the mechanism carried on the frame 56 is enabled to reach somewhat farther into the corners than would be possible if the frame were fixed in lateral position behind the vehicle.

The shaved ice or snow as it is usually called, is removed from in front of the blade 'I0 and carried in toward the longitudinal center line of the machine by means of a worm .screw conveyor extending transverse to theline or forward travel of the machine, directly in front of the blade. The conveyor |20 is comprised of a shaft |2| which is rotatably supported at lts ends in bearings |22 that are attached by brackets' |23 to the end plates 60. Fixed to the shaft, |2| on opposite sides of the midpoint thereof are oppositely directed helical blades |24 and |25; the said blades being wrapped in such direction affixed the-reto at equally spaced intervals along its length. The conveyor chain |30 and paddles |3| pass upwardly from the sprocket |26 through a. long, rectangular housing |32 to the top rear corner of the snow box 50, where the chain is trained around another sprocket |33 mounted on a shaft |534. The shaft |34v is journaled in bear-- ings |35'on oppositesides of .the housing |32, and one end 'ofv theshaft. projects beyond its bearing and' has another sprocket |36 mounted thereon, over which a driving chain |40 is trained.

From sprocket |33, the conveyor chain |30 andpaddles |3| extend forwardly through an opening in the front side ofthe housing |32 and pass Iabove the open top of theysnow box to the front end thereof. At the fro-nt end of 'the machine, the chain |30 passes over a sprocket |4| which is mounted on 'a shaft' |42' journaled in bearings |43. The bearings |43 are mounted on the front side of a. vertically disposed, rearwardly facing channel member |44 which extends down the front of the receptacle 50 and is attached to the lower front corner thereof by an angle bracket |45. The channel member |44 is also attached by another angle bracket |46 to the front transverse beam |9 off the chassis, and rotatably supported at the bottom end of the member in bearings |50 is a sprocket |5I, around which the chain I 30 passes and then travels rearwardly beneath the vehicle to sprocket |25.

In passing under the sprocket |26, the paddles |3| sweep close to the surface of the ice, scooping up some of the snow that has been carried in towards the 'centero'f the machine by the conveyor blades |24 and |25. The load of snow carried by each paddle is then elevated through the housing, |32, and upon passing over the top sprocket |33, is dumped onto a downwardly and forwardly inclined apron |52, from which the snow falls into the interior of the box 50. The apron |52 is fixed to the housing |32 along the bottom edge of the opening through which the conveyor leaves the housing.

. The advantage of having the conveyor chain |30 travel forwardly across the open top of the box 50 from the back end thereof to the front, is that when the wet snow has piled up at the back end of the box to the level of the conveyor. the paddles |3| merely'push their load of snow over the top ofthe pile to the front edge thereof, where the snow falls away from the paddles to build the pile forwardly until the box is 4entirely full. By virtue of this arrangement, the box 50 can be lled from end to end without any attention on the part of the operator, whereas if the conveyor merely dumped. its load of snow on the apron |52 in passing over the sprocket |33, and then passed directly down to the lower sprocket |25, the snow would pile up to the apron and would thereafter prevent the conveyor from discharging its load of snow. This would necessitate stopping the machine and shoveling the snow-out from under the discharge end of the conveyor, or else require the provision of other means for spreading the snow out over the entire area of the box.

7 "The conveyor chain |30 and worm screw conveyor |20 are driven by the chain |40 which, as mentioned earlier, is trained over a sprocket |36 at the top end of the housing |32. The drive chain |40 passes downwardly from sprocket |36,l

around a small idler |53 which is rotatably supported by a bracket |54 mounted on the side of housing |32, and at its bottom end passes around a sprocket |55 which is fixed to a shaft |56'projecting laterally from a gear box |60. The gear box |60 is mounted on the front side of the housing |32 and is operatively connected by a drive shaft |62 and universal joints |63, |611 to a power vtakeoff shaft |6| projecting rearwardly from the transmission housing 25. 'I'he power` takeoi shaft |6| is drivenfrom the engine 24 through a clutch and transmission system independent of4 the clutch and transmission used to drive the vehicle, and the conveyors |20 and |30 can therefore be stopped whenever desired by merely disengaging the power takeoff clutch.

The housing |32 is'supported at its lower end on the frame 56 and is attached thereto by means of a transversely extending pivot pin |65 and by bolts |66. The pivot pin |65 extends horizontally across the front of the housing |32 and. is attached at its ends to brackets projecting upwardly from the frame members 62j; 63.. Other brackets |1| project forwardly from the front side of the housing |32 and are drilled to provide holes through which the pivot pin |65 passes. The bolts |66 are disposed on either side of the housing |32 and are spaced rearwardly from. the pivot bolt |65. The bolts |66 pass downwardly through angle brackets |12 which are fixed to the sides ofthe housing V32, and through the horizontal flanges of frame members 62 and 63, respectively. When the frame 56 is resting on the ice, the brackets |12 are raisedslightly from the members 62, 63, and the bolts |66 thus provide a loose connection between them. This arrangement provides a limited amount of looseness between the transversely extending frame 56 and the upwardly extending housing |32, so that any swinging movement of the latter in the fore-and-aft direction due to jerky movement of the driving or conveyor chains |40 and |30, or to inertia forces, has no effect on the frame 56. g

The housing |32 is attached at its top end to the front member |44 by means of a tic rod |15, said tie rod being connected by a pivot pin |16 to a bracket |11 which is welded or otherwise fixed to the top end of member |44. The rear end of the tie rod is connected by a turnbuckle |80 to a block |8| which is pivoted at |82 to a bracket |83 on the top end of housing |32. The pivotal connection of the ends of tie rod |15 with member |44 and housing |32 permits the latter to be raised from the working position shown in Figure 1, to the transport position shown in Figure 4, while at the same time maintaining the housing |32 in a vertical position. l

spaced rearwardly from the frame 56 and extending generally transverse to the direction of forward travel is a water distributing device |85 comprising a plate 06 having two parallel strips |81 and |68 of hard felt or other resilient material attached to the underside thereof. The strips |81, |88 extend lengthwise of the plate |66 and are spaced apart in the fore-and-aft direction to form a channel |90 which is closed at its ends. Elbow pipe fittings |9| and |92 are connected to the plate |86 in communication withA 8 A the channel |90,` and these are vconnected by lengths of flexible hose |93 and 94 to a T-tting |95. The T-iitting |95 is connected, in turn, by sections of exible rubber hose |96, |91, and valve |98 to the water tank |55 on the vehicle chassis. The valve |98 is located within convenient reach of the operator on the seat 42, and when the valve is opened the water in the tank flows by gravity to the water distributing device |65, where it fills the channel |80 and spreads transversely over the surface of the ice. Since the channel |90 is closed on all sides, the water is confined therein and is prevented from escaping laterallyover the surface of the ice. Thus, the water fills up any cracks or depressions in the ice as the distributor |85 passes over the same, while the rear strip |88 acts as a squeegee to scrape up the surplus water and leave only a Y thin lm of water on the ice behind the machine.

'Attached perpendicularly to the front edge of the plate |66 is a plate 200, the bottom. edge of which scrapes on the surface of the ice to sweep up and carry along any shaved ice that might pass over the top of the blade 10 or otherwise be missed thereby. Vertically disposed side wings 20|"are fixed to the ends of the plate 200 and extend forwardly therefrom to keep any shaved ice or surplus water from escaping around the ends of the water distributor. The water distributing device |35 is towed along behind the machineby two draft chains 202, each of which is connected at its rear end to the plate 200 and at its front end to one of the end members 60 of the frame 56.

The frame 56, with its blade 10, worm screw conveyor |20, and elevator housing |62, together with the water distributing device |65 is adapted to be raised'from the working position shown in Figure 1 to the transport position shown in Figure 4, by means of a hydraulic lift in the form of a cylinder 203. The cylinder'203 is pivotally 'connected at its bottom end by a pin 264 to a bracket 205 mounted on the underside of the box beam 23 and extending rearwardly therefrom. The cylinder extends upwardly from its pivot support, and projecting from the top end thereof is a piston rod 206 which is connected by a pin 201 to an arm 206 extending forwardly and upwardly from a transverse shaft 209.

The shaft 209 is journaled in bearings i0 mounted on the back side of the vertical boxsupporting posts 41, and xed to the extreme ends of the shaft are rearwardly extending arms 2 i I. Lift chains 2|2 are attached to the outer ends of the arms 21| and hang downwardly therefrom; the Ybottom ends of the chains being attached to lever arms 2|3 intermediate the ends thereof. The front ends of the lever arms 213 are connected by pins 2 I4 to brackets 2| 5 on the front frame member 51, and the lever arms extend rearwardly from the brackets 2|5 between two laterally spaced, vertically extending bars 2|6 which are bridged at their top ends by aV bolt 220. The bolt 220 serves as a limit stop to limit the upward swinging movement of the lever arm 2|3', while at the same time permitting a certain amount of lost motion of the arm.

When both the frame 56 and water distributing device are resting on the ice, the lever arms' 2-|3 are substantially horizontal, and the limit stop bolt 220 is spaced several inches above the top edge of the levervarm. As the lift chain 252 is pulled upwardly by the arm 2| the lever arm 2|3 is raised, lifting vthe water spreading device |85 clear of the ice without raising the frame 56,

l1 320 isanotherpipe 32| having a .valve 322 connected into the line so that the operator can con- `trol the flow of water from the tanks. The bottom end of the pipe 32| is connected by a flexible hose 323 to a pipe line 323' which carries water to both ends of a channel in the underside of the distributor 3|5.

The distributor 3|5 is connected at its ends by two draft chains 324 to the frame 266; and is also connected to the seat support member 305 by a lift chain 325. It will also be noted at this point that the frame 266 is connected to the jeep 425|) by draft chains 326 which extend forwardly from points of attachment with the frame members 210 to brackets 330 onthe side frame `members I. vThe ends of the frame 266 are also connected to the bottom rear corners of the box 260 by lift chains 33|.V Y

The box 26|) with its Aattached equipment is adapted to be rocked about'the supporting pivot 256 by means of av hydraulic lift cylinder 332 1. An `ice .rink resurfacingmachine comprisd ing a vehicle having a receptacle attached thereel to, a sharp-edged blade arranged generally transversse to the direction of vforward travel and disposed to take a light; accurately controlled shaving cut on the ice, saidblade being mounted on and positioned with respect to the surface of the ice'by a supporting frame resting directly on the surface` of theice and floating with respect to said vehicle, said blade being attached at its ends to saidsupporting frame,

spring means on said frame Aengaging said blade intermediate its ends and pressing the saine down against the ice,qand means for collecting the shaved ice Vproduced-by` said blade and de which is pvotally supported at 333 on a bracket 334 at the rear-'end of the jeep body. The piston rod of the cylinderis connected by a pin 335 to a bracket 336 on the underside of the box 260 near the rear end thereof. Fluid pressure for operating the lift cylinder is derived from a hydraulic pump 340 which is preferably belt-driven from a power take-"off shaft on the jeep. Fluid pressure from the Vpump 346 is transmitted through one or the other of two lines 34 342 which connect into the opposite ends of the cylinder 332. A selector valve (not shown) with a control handle located adjacent the operators station, enables the opereator to direct iiuid pressure intothe bottom or top end ofthe cylinder 332, tol raise or lower the rear end of the box 260. When the box 260 is thus 'tilted forwardly, the frame266 is lifted by the chain 33|, while the water distributor 3|5 is lifted by Vchain 325.; The front end wall of the box 266 may be hinged, if desired, to facilitate discharging the shaved ice from the box; in which case, the box would preferablyv be rocked about th'e pivot 256 so that itsHfront endris inclinedV downwardly.

The many adva'ntxgecus4 features'of the pres;- ent invention are believed to be self-evident to thoseskilled in the art. While I have shown in considerable detailwhat IV believe to be .the preferred forms off myY invention, it will be understood that various changes may be made in the shape and arrangement of the several Aparts thereof withoutdeparting from the .principles of" the invention. For example, it isl contemplated that the apparatus of the invention mightbe mounted on a sled and towed behind a vehicle, in-

stead of being mountedl directly on or attached .l thereto. Furthermore, the conveyor mechanism need not `necessarily be driven by the vehiclev motor, but mightbe driven, instead, by a separate auxiliary motor. f

It is alsocontemplated that means mightbe positing the samel in said receptacle'.

2.'An ice rink .resurfacing machine compris= ing a motor-driven vehicle having'a receptacle attached thereto, a frame connected` to said ve' hicle toV be towed thereby; said frame resting directly on the ice when said machine is'in operation, a sharp-edged blademounted on said frame generally transverse tov the.' direction of forward travel and disposed tortake a light,

accurately controlled shaving cut on the'ice, and

conveyer means driven'by the vehicle motor for clearing away 'the shavedpice from in front of said blade and depositing the same inv said re ceptacle. y

3. An ice rink resurfacing machine comprising a motor-driven vehicle having a receptacle and a water tank attached thereto, a sharp-edged blade at the rear end. of said vehicle arranged t generally transverse to the direction of forward travel and disposed to take 'a light shaving cut on the ice to remove shallow scratches and surface roughness caused by 'skate blades, conveyer means driven by the vehicle motor for removing shaved ice from in front of said blade and depositing the same in said receptacle, and' means.Y for distributing the water in said tank in a thin lm over the surface of the ice behind said blade so as to .fill up deep scratches and cavities ex tending below the cutting edgeof the blade, and to restore tosaid ice a 'volume of water approximately equal to the volume of ice removed by said blade, whereby the' thickness of the ice after resurfacingV is Vsubstantially the same as 4. An ice rink resurfacing machinecomprising a motor-driven vehicle, a frame attached to said vehicle by a draft connection. permitting free vertical movement of the frame relative tol the vehicle between transport and working positions, said frame sliding on the ice and being solely supported thereby when in said working position, a sharp-edged blade mounted onsaid provided for melting the shaved ice thatV is removed from in front 'of the blade, filtering the Water thus obtained, `and then returning the Water to the surface'of the ice through the Water removed. These and oher changes which will 5 occur to those skilled inthe art are considered to Mme Ywithin the broad scope of the invention as l fined in the apperidedfflme Y frame generally transverse to the direction of forward travel and disposed to take a light shaven ing cut on the ice, areceptacle, means for colv lecting .the shaved4 ice produced by said bladeV and depositing the same .in said receptacle, and' power-driven means for raising or loweringsaid framefrom one of said positions tothe other.

5. An ice-rink resurfacingjnachine comprising; a motor-driven vehicle, a frame attached to said p vehicleby a draft connection permitting free vertical movement of the frame relative tothe A vehicle between transport and working positions,

said frame sliding onthe vice and being solely-fv supported thereby when in said working position,

a sharp-edged blade mounted on said frame gen#l erally 'transverse to the .direction vof `vforward, Atraveleand disposed to.' takes.' lightA'shaving cutj assegnata )on the ice, a receptacle, means for collecting the shaved ice produced by said blade'and depositing the same in said receptacle, a hydraulic pump driven by said vehicle motor, a hydraulic lift mounted on said vehicle and connected to said frame to raise or lower the same from one of said positions to the other, and means operatively connecting said pump to said lift, including a valve controllable by the operator.

6. An ice ring resurfacing machine comprsin a motor-driven vehicle having a receptacle and a water tank mounted thereon, a frame attached to said vehicle at the rear end thereof to slide on the ice, a sharp-edged blade mounted on said frame generally transverse to the direction of forward travel and disposed to take a light shaving cut on the ice to remove shallow scratches and surface roughness caused by said blades, conveyer means mounted on said frame and driven by the vehicle motor for removing shaved ice from in front of said blade and depositing the same in said receptacle, and water distributing means mounted on said frame to the rear of said blade and connected with said tank for distributing the water therein uniformly over the surface of the ice so as to nll up deep scratches and cavities extending below the cutting edge of the blade, and to restore to said ice a volume of water approximately equal to the volume of ice removed by said blade, whereby the thiol;- ness of the ice after resurfacing is substantially the same as before. Y f

7. An ice rink resurfacing machine comprising a motor-driven vehicle having a receptacle' and a water tank mounted thereon, a frame mounted on said vehicle at the rear end thereof, a sharpedged blade mounted on said frame generally transverse to the direction of forward travel and disposed t take a light shaving cut on the ice to .remove shallow scratches and surface roughness caused byv skate blades, conveyer means mounted on said frame and driven by the vehicle motor for removing shaved. ice from in front of said blade and depositing the same in said receptacle, tranversely disposed water distributing means mounted on said frame to the rear of said blade and connected with said tank for spreading the water therein uniformly over the surface' of the ice so as to fill up deep scratches and cavities extending below the cutting edge of the blade, and to restore to said ice a volume of water approximately equal to the volume of ice removed by said blade, whereby the thickness ofthe ice after resurfacing is substantially the same as before, said water distributing means being movable vertically with respect to said frame,` and metans for raising said water distributing means clear of the ice. e

8. An ice rink resurfacing machine comprising a motor-driven vehicle having a receptacle and a water tank mounted thereon, a frame attached to the rear end of said vehicle for vertical movement with respect thereto between transport and working positions, a sharp-edged blade mounted on said frame generally transverse to the direction of forward travel and disposed to take a light shaving cut on the ice to remove shallow scratches and surface roughness produced by skate blades, conveyor means mounted on said frame and driven by the vehicle motor` for removing shaved ice from in front of said blade and depositing the same in said receptacle, transverselyA means being :operatively connected with said tank for spreading the water therein uniformly over the surface of the ice'so as to ll up deep scratches and cavities extending below the cuti ting edgeof the blade, and to restore to said ice a volume of water approximately equal to the volume of ice removed by said blade, whereby the thickness of the ice after resurfacing is sub-f stantially the same as before, and power lift means driven by the vehicle motor for raising both said frame and said water distributing means.

9. Anijce rink resurfacingmachine comprising a motor-driven vehicle having a 'receptacle and a water tank mounted thereon, a frame mounted on the rear end of. saidL vehicle for vertical moveV` ment with respect thereto between transport and working positions, a sharpie'dged blade mounted on said frame generally transverse to the direction of forward travel anddisposed to take a light shaving cut on the Lice to remove shallow scratches and surface roughness produced by skate blades, a conveyer means mcliuntedA on said frame and drivenv by the vehicle motor for removing shaved` ice from inV front` of said blade ,and depositing the same insaid receptacle, transversely disposed. water distributing means mounted for vertical movement with respect to said frame to the rear'of said` blade, said water distributing means beingv operatively connected with said tankfor spreading the water thereinv uniformly over the surface' of the ice so as to nll-u'pv deep scratches and cavities extending bei low the cuttingedge of the-blade, and tuv restore to said ice a volume of 'water approximately eqal to the volume of ice removed by the blade,- whereby the thickness of they ice after resurfacing' is substantially the Vsame as before', a rocky snai-t journaled'onsaid vehicle and having arms conii nected to both said frame and said water distrib--v uting means, a hydraulic pump driven by said vehicle motor, ahydraulic cylinder mointed on said vehicle and having a piston rod connected to said shaft to rock the same, and means op-i eratively connecting` said pump to said cylinder, including a valve controllable by the operator.v

l0. An ice 'rink resurfacing machine comprise 'ing a'rnotor-d'riven' vehicle having a receptacle and a water tankA mounted thereon, a frame' mounted on the rear end of said vehicle for vesti-'-` cal movement with respect thereto between transport ariel working positionsi a vsharpedgedblade mounted on said frame generallyV transall verse vto the `'cliiectir'in of forward travel and disi y posed totake a light shaving clit on the ic'e to removeY shallow scratches and srface rough# ness produced by skate blades, conveyer means mounted on said frame and driven by the vehicle motor for removing shaved ice fronin front of said blade and; depositingthe same in said re-` ceptacle, tranversely disposed water distributing means mounted for vertical movement with respect to said frame to the rear of said blade, said water distributing means being operatively connected with said tank for spreading the water therein uniformly over the surface of the ice so as to nll up deep scratches and cavities extending below the cutting edge of the blade, and to restore to said ice a volume of water approximately equal to the volume of ice removed by the blade, whereby the thickness of the ice after resurfacing is substantiallythe same as before, a pair of laterally spaced lever `arms pivotally connected to said frames and extending rearwardly therefrom to points directly above said water distributing meansthe rear ends of said ariiis being con-t nected to said water distributing means by lift chains, a transverse rock shaft journaled on said vehicle and having rearwardly extending arms xed thereto directly above said lever arms, said arms on said rock shaftl being connected to said lever arms by lift chains, means on said frame limiting the upward swinging movement of said lever arms, whereby said frame is raised with respect to said vehicle after said water distributing means has been raised a short distance with respect to said frame, and means driven by the vehicle motor for rocking said rock shaft to lift said frame. v

11. An ice ring resurfacing machine comprising a vehicle having a water tank mounted thereon, a frame attached to said vehicle,Y a sharpedged blade mounted on said frame transverse to the direction of forward travel and disposed vto take a light shaving cut on the ice to remove shallow scratches and surface roughness produced by skate blades, anda water spreading device extending generally transverse to the line of travel behind said blade, said devicecomprising a plate having a thickness vof resilient material attached'to the underside thereof which is adapted to rest on and slide over the surface of the ice, said material having a closed-endV channel formed therein which extends from one end of the device to the other, and a pipe line connecting said. tank to said channel so that the water in the tank is conveyed to the channel to ll .the same, thereby spreading a uniform film of; water over the ice to fill in deeper cracks extending below the cutting edge of the blade, .and to restore to said ice a volume of water approximately equal to the volume of ice removed by the blade, whereby the thickness of the ice ,after resurfacing is substantially the same as before.

12. VIn an ice ring resurfacing machine, lthe `combination of avehicle having an operators .stationnprovided thereon, a frame attached to ,said vehicle,v a blade disposed transverse to the .direction of forward travel, said blade being supported at its ends from said frame by vertically adjustablescrews having hooks engaged in eyes ,on the blade, operating means attached to said lscrews and extending toward said operators station so as l,to be operable therefrom, an arm `extending rearwardly from said blade, and adjust- :able screw .means connecting the rear end ofA saidarm withsaid frame, whereby the-angle of incidence ofthe blade with respect to the surface of the-ice can be increased or decreased, said last-named screw means being also operable from said Y,operators station.

13.v kAn ice rink resurfacing machine compris-V ing a self-propelled vehicle having a receptacle attached thereto, a frame connected to said vegenerally transverse to the direction of forward travel'and disposed to take a light shaving cut on the ice, and means for collecting the shaved ice produced by said blade anddepositing the same in said receptacle, said means including a conveyor comprising a pair of laterally spaced vchains having a plurality ofY transverse paddles connected thereto at their ends, said conveyor risingfvertically from a point adjacent said blade,

an enclosure surrounding said vertically rising portion of said conveyor to conne the shaved ice thereto, and `sprockets at the top end of said enclosure over which said chains are trained, said conveyor passing thereof to the other, the shaved ice dropping through the space between saidchains and paddles into said receptacle, said conveyorl building the pile of shavedl ice'in said receptacle upto its own level, after which ice carried by the conveyor is pushed along the top surface of the pile and dropped down the far side thereof, thereby distributing the shaved ice from said one end to the other.

FRANK J. ZAMBON.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 289,331 Apple Nov. 27, 18.83

497,463 Washburn May 16, 1893 587,840 Martin Aug. 10, 1897 1,148,954 Carr Aug. 3, 1915 1,191,489 AWhinery July 18, 1916 1,358,046 Anderson Nov. 9, 1920 1,549,249 Friedman Aug. 11, 1925 1,666,358 Souhigian Apr. 17,1928 1,728,032 Bising Sept. 10, 1929 1,739,331 Sidella,V Dec. 10, 1929 1,764,084 Nelson June 17, 1930 1,851,301 Bunnell Mar. 29, 1932 2,014,149 Stafford Sept. 10, 1935 A 2,057,326 Coates Oct. 13, 1936 2,178,400 Marino Oct. 31, 1939 2,221,386 Smith Nov. 12, `1940 2,353,094 1944 Veneziano July 14,

substantially horizzontally across the top of said receptacle from one end

US2642679A 1949-05-16 1949-05-16 Ice rink resurfacing machine Expired - Lifetime US2642679A (en)

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US2763939A (en) * 1952-10-23 1956-09-25 Frank J Zamboni Ice rink resurfacing machine
US2795870A (en) * 1955-10-20 1957-06-18 Leduc Jean Paul Push cart type ice rink resurfacing machine
US2874549A (en) * 1954-05-19 1959-02-24 Charles R Beltz Portable ice skating rink and method of making the same
US2978883A (en) * 1955-08-31 1961-04-11 Lever Brothers Ltd Apparatus for conveying products over a frozen surface
US3044193A (en) * 1960-05-04 1962-07-17 Frank J Zamboni & Co Ice resurfacing machine
US3072391A (en) * 1960-06-21 1963-01-08 James F Mcdarrah Disintegrating machine having cutting and impact action
US3178837A (en) * 1963-01-07 1965-04-20 Capalbo Eugene Vincent Ice resurfacing machine having conveyor to remove scraped material from blade
US3302975A (en) * 1964-06-29 1967-02-07 Boniard I Brown Ice resurfacing machine
US3475056A (en) * 1967-03-17 1969-10-28 Kenneth R Jones Ice resurfacing machine
WO1994010393A1 (en) * 1992-10-29 1994-05-11 Oy Marexteam Ltd Ice rink resurfacing machine
WO1994010392A1 (en) * 1992-10-29 1994-05-11 Oy Marexteam Ltd. An ice rink resurfacing machine and a method for machining ice tobe used in it
US5365681A (en) * 1991-03-10 1994-11-22 Frederick Miranda Vehicle for removing snow accumulated on roads
US6477794B1 (en) * 1999-06-18 2002-11-12 Toronto Gmbh Planing device mounted on machines for processing ice
WO2004092485A1 (en) 2003-04-17 2004-10-28 Donaldson Steven M Portable ice rink building and resurfacing device
US20060226695A1 (en) * 2003-03-17 2006-10-12 Kalannin Kaspek Oy Ice resurfacing machine as well as system and method for ice maintenance
US20070277402A1 (en) * 2006-06-06 2007-12-06 Demers Alain P Portable ice resurfacing device and method
US20080155864A1 (en) * 2004-11-10 2008-07-03 Scott Hastings Seely Ice skating rink resurfacing apparatus
US20110146111A1 (en) * 2009-12-18 2011-06-23 Holaday-Parks-Fabricators, Inc., dba Holaday-Parks Inc. Ice resurfacing sled
US9353494B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2016-05-31 Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Snow removal device

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2763939A (en) * 1952-10-23 1956-09-25 Frank J Zamboni Ice rink resurfacing machine
US2874549A (en) * 1954-05-19 1959-02-24 Charles R Beltz Portable ice skating rink and method of making the same
US2978883A (en) * 1955-08-31 1961-04-11 Lever Brothers Ltd Apparatus for conveying products over a frozen surface
US2795870A (en) * 1955-10-20 1957-06-18 Leduc Jean Paul Push cart type ice rink resurfacing machine
US3044193A (en) * 1960-05-04 1962-07-17 Frank J Zamboni & Co Ice resurfacing machine
US3072391A (en) * 1960-06-21 1963-01-08 James F Mcdarrah Disintegrating machine having cutting and impact action
US3178837A (en) * 1963-01-07 1965-04-20 Capalbo Eugene Vincent Ice resurfacing machine having conveyor to remove scraped material from blade
US3302975A (en) * 1964-06-29 1967-02-07 Boniard I Brown Ice resurfacing machine
US3475056A (en) * 1967-03-17 1969-10-28 Kenneth R Jones Ice resurfacing machine
US5365681A (en) * 1991-03-10 1994-11-22 Frederick Miranda Vehicle for removing snow accumulated on roads
WO1994010393A1 (en) * 1992-10-29 1994-05-11 Oy Marexteam Ltd Ice rink resurfacing machine
WO1994010392A1 (en) * 1992-10-29 1994-05-11 Oy Marexteam Ltd. An ice rink resurfacing machine and a method for machining ice tobe used in it
US6477794B1 (en) * 1999-06-18 2002-11-12 Toronto Gmbh Planing device mounted on machines for processing ice
US7510247B2 (en) 2003-03-17 2009-03-31 Kalannin Kaspek Oy Ice resurfacing machine as well as system and method for ice maintenance
US20060226695A1 (en) * 2003-03-17 2006-10-12 Kalannin Kaspek Oy Ice resurfacing machine as well as system and method for ice maintenance
US20060272181A1 (en) * 2003-04-17 2006-12-07 Donaldson Steven M Portable ice rink building and resurfacing device
US7380355B2 (en) 2003-04-17 2008-06-03 Donaldson Steven M Portable ice rink building and resurfacing device
WO2004092485A1 (en) 2003-04-17 2004-10-28 Donaldson Steven M Portable ice rink building and resurfacing device
US20080155864A1 (en) * 2004-11-10 2008-07-03 Scott Hastings Seely Ice skating rink resurfacing apparatus
US7698837B2 (en) 2004-11-10 2010-04-20 Edward Wisz Ice skating rink resurfacing apparatus
US20070277402A1 (en) * 2006-06-06 2007-12-06 Demers Alain P Portable ice resurfacing device and method
US7587843B2 (en) 2006-06-06 2009-09-15 Demers Alain P Portable ice resurfacing device and method
US20110146111A1 (en) * 2009-12-18 2011-06-23 Holaday-Parks-Fabricators, Inc., dba Holaday-Parks Inc. Ice resurfacing sled
US8443530B2 (en) 2009-12-18 2013-05-21 Holaday-Parks-Fabricators, Inc. Ice resurfacing sled
US9353494B2 (en) 2012-04-13 2016-05-31 Technische Universiteit Eindhoven Snow removal device

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