US2635606A - Electronic machine for therapeutic purposes - Google Patents

Electronic machine for therapeutic purposes Download PDF

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US2635606A
US2635606A US14047350A US2635606A US 2635606 A US2635606 A US 2635606A US 14047350 A US14047350 A US 14047350A US 2635606 A US2635606 A US 2635606A
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output
secondary
connected
tap
tube
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Paul S Hanway
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Paul S Hanway
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61NELECTROTHERAPY; MAGNETOTHERAPY; RADIATION THERAPY; ULTRASOUND THERAPY
    • A61N1/00Electrotherapy; Circuits therefor
    • A61N1/40Applying electric fields by inductive or capacitive coupling ; Applying radio-frequency signals
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T307/00Electrical transmission or interconnection systems
    • Y10T307/25Plural load circuit systems
    • Y10T307/297Transformer connections
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T307/00Electrical transmission or interconnection systems
    • Y10T307/25Plural load circuit systems
    • Y10T307/406Control of current or power

Description

April 21, 1953 P. s. HANwAY 2,635,606

ELECTRONIC MACHINE FOR THERAPEUTIC PURPOSES Filed Jan. 25, 1950 LINE l L T FIG. l

gm@ M u JNVENToR.

Patented Apr. 21, 1953 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ELECTRONIC MACHINE Fon THERAPEUTIC PURPosEs Paul s. Hanway', Ridgefield Park, N. J.

Application January 25, 1950, Serial No. 140,473

3 Claims. Y1

The present invention pertains to the art of electronics, and it comprises a radio-frequency transmitter. In its practical application, the invention of the present disclosure comprises a therapeutic machine.

The machine of the present invention comprises a radio-frequency transmitter which is adapted to transmit radio waves, and in the practical machine of the disclosure the radio waves are adapted to be transmitted into or through a body. The body may, for example, by a human body or a portion thereof, and the radio waves may be utilized for the treatment of some ailment or injury. v

The transmitter comprises a transmitting circuit which is energized by a generating circuit, the transmitting and generating circuits being constructed to be out of resonance. Applicant has discovered that exceptionally improved healing is accomplished when the transmitting cir'- cuit is out of resonance with the generating circuit thereof. Enhanced benecial results are thereby attained in the treatment of certain ail'- ments or injuries.

Pursuant to the purposes of the present invention, a high voltage step-up transformer is provided, the primary winding thereof being in the generating circuit and the secondary winding in the transmitting circuit. The transmitting circuit is accordingly energized by the generating circuit through the step-up transformer, and the transformer is particularly constructed for the transmitting and generating circuits to be out of resonance.

The step-up transformer is constructed for maximum energy output at some turn of the secondary winding that is betweenthe ends thereof and spaced away from the ends. A tap is provided at or near the turn of maximum energy output, and other taps are provided at spaced intervals along the secondary winding away trom the turn of maximum energy output. This provides several steps of energy output for -selectively controlling the strength or intensity of treatment that may be given by the machine. An additional control is provided for varyingthe degree of softness of the treatment, which is thereby rendered more or less soothing selectively for a given intensity of treatment. n

Thus, the machine of the present invention differs from conventional prior Aart machines in that it lacks the tuning mechanism commonly present to tune the transmitter into resonance. A principal characteristic of importancein the present machine is that it is operated out of resonance.

(Cl. 12S-422) At least one of the electrodes in the machine of the present invention embodies a conductor terminal with a dielectric contacter for engaging the surface of the body, the contractor thus being positioned between the conductor and the body. An ionization tube, with a glass or quartz envelope, is suitable for the purpose, and is employed under preferred practice of the invention.

A more detailed `understanding of the principles of the invention will be derived from the accompanying drawings to which attention is now directed, and which disclose one practical embodiment of the invention. In the drawings:

Fig. l is a wiring diagram of an electrical circuit in a machine embodying the present invention,

Fig. 2 illustrates a form of electrode which may be employed in the machine of Fig. l, and

Fig. 3 illustrates another form of electrode which is also employed vin the machine of Fig. 1.

The machine of the disclosure is a radio-fre quency transmitter lcomprising a transmitting circuit generally illustrated at il in Fig. l, and a generating circuit generally illustrated at l2, the generating circuit serving to energize the transmitting circuit.

A power unit or power pack, such as is rgenerally illustrated at i5, supplies the generator, and the Vpower pack may be `of any suitable and conventional structure. The power pack l5 is supplied from the line i6 which `may be the usual standard which carries 1'15 volts, A. 'C., at 60 cycles.

The rectifier tube Il of the power pack l5, has the plate thereof connected to one terminal of the secondary of the plate transformer i8, and the primary of the plate transformer has one terminal connected directly to the line it, and has its other terminal connected to the movable arm of a potentiometer i9 which has its resistance winding bridged across the line iS. A line switch 20 and a fuse v2| are included in series with one side of the line. The filament of the tube Il is heated by the secondary of the niament transformer 22, the primary of which is connected across the line i6.

The power pack i5 supplies the rad-.iedrequency generator yl2 through two conductors one ofv which is connected to the secondary ci' the plate transformer i8 and the'other ci' which is connected to the center tap 25 in the secondary winding of the filament transformer 22. The power pack is constructed to supply about 250G volts, D. C. Each side of the vline 23 has a radiofrequency choke 25 in series therewith to prevent high-frequencyfeed-back into the power pack l5 from the generator '|2.

The power pack i is housed and enclosed in a casing indicated at 26 which is made of metal or the like electrical conducting material to form a shield. The radio-frequency components i! and l2 are similarly housed together in a like shield casing 2l. Both casings 26 and 2 are preferably housed in a casing 23 which may also be formed of metal or which may be metal lined. Each of the containers 26, 2l and 23 is grounded as indicated, and they function to shield the power pack l5 and the radiofrequency components l I and i2 from each other, and to minimize disturbing radiations to outside equipment.

The generator l2 includes a spark-gap oscillator 36 with adjustable gaps, which may be of any suitable construction and of which there are a number of Well known types available. The spark gap oscillator 36 is bridged across the conductors 23, and in parallel therewith is the primary 3l with condenser 32 in seriestherewith. This primary excites the secondary winding 3d.

The generating or tank circuit l2, which includes the primary 3i and the condenser 32 connected in parallel with the spark gap 3Q and its resistor, may be devised, for any suitable frequency. For the therapeutic machine of the disclosed practical application of the invention, the frequency of the tank circuit i2 should preferably be somewhere within the range between 300 kc. and 2000 kc. and the generating circuit should be constructed accordingly.

The jack 3S is connected to the tap 35 which is at one end of the secondary winding 3&5, the connection being through the movable arm of the three-way switch 3l. The jack 39 is similarly connected to the tap 38 which is at the other end of the secondary winding 34, this connection being through vthe three-way switch d.

The step-up transformer 33 is constructed for the generating and transmitting circuits I2 and Il to be out of resonance. Maximum energy output is derived from less than the total number of turns of the secondary coil of transformer 33. Accordingly, when the jack 36 is supplied from the end tap 35 of the secondary 34, the energy output of the machine is relatively low. Energy output increases progressively with successive turns away from end tap 35 to a turn of maximum output beyond which the energy outputdecreases progressively. In the transmitter of the disclosed embodiment, maximum energy output is about at the turn in the middle of the secondary 36. I have no mid-tap connection at this point. The tap i3 is placed at the turn of the maximum energy output desired. rlhis means that I get a predetermined energy transfer or output which can go no higher than desired, and that when this desired maximum output is being obtained, the two circuits l2 and H cannot resonate with each other.

Taps i3 and 35 thus afford the extremes of energy output of the machine between the maximum and the minimum. As many intermediate steps as are desired may be provided between the maximum and the minimum, and in the disclosed embodiment a single intermediate step is suflicient. The tap l2 is placed for a magnitude of energy output about midway between the maximum and minimum of respective taps i3 and 35, and is therefore placed at the middle turn between the turn of tap i3 and the end tap 35.

The switch 3l' includes three contacts 55, d and 4| which are respectively connected to the taps 43, 132 and 35. 'Ihe switch 31 thus enables the `iack 36 to be selectively connected with the taps d3, e2 and 35 for maximum, intermediate and minimum energy outputs respectively. The rheostat I9 of the power pack i5 affords additional adjustment of energy output, and takes care of the ranges between the several taps d3, d2 and 35. The machine may thus be set universally for any energy output within the range of the machine.

One construction of the step-up transformer that has been used, and which has proven suitable for practice of the invention, embodies the primary 3i of 91/2 turns and the secondary 3a of 330 turns. The primary is wound on a diarneter of 2 inches, and is 3A inch long. The secondary coil 3d is wound on a diameter of 2% inches, and is 5% inches long. The tap 43 of maximum energy output is placed at turns, and the tap i2 of intermediate energy output is at 248 turns. The primary 3i and the secondary 35 are mounted concentrically, with the primary at the end embodying the tap 38. Obviously other specications `will be suitable for the step-up transformer 33, and will come within the scope of the invention.

The jack 39 is connected to the end tap 38 of the step-up transformer 33, and this connection is either directly or alternatively through the modier tubes @9 and 56, which add resistance and modify the Voltage, current, and consequently the power, the tube 56 adding more resistance than the tube 159. The modier tubes 49 and 5t vary the degree of softness of a given treatment.

These modil'ier tubes are merely gaseous discharge tubes, the first of which were devised by Geissler and many types of which have been produced in the intervening time. The modifier tubes referred to herein have combinations of gases therein at predetermined pressures, and they have been found to be very effective in treatments by the machine. These modifier tubes are enclosed within the casing of the device and consequently do not shine on or psychologically have any eiect on the patient.

Certain ailments should be given a more soothing quality of treatment than is satisfactory or desirable with others. One illustrative example is the treatment of burns, for which a soothing quality of treatment is especially desirable. It has been determined that electron discharge tubes containing certain inert gases increase the degree of softness of a given treatment, and improve the soothing qualities accordingly. Neon affords a softer and more soothing treatment than argon, for example, and the modifier tubes i9 and 53' of the disclosed embodiment accordingly contain argon and neon respectively.

In the disclosed construction, the jack 39 is connected with the tap 38 through the switch E for selective control of the soothing qualities of a given treatment. End tap 38 is connected to the contact d5 of switch d@ directly, to contact il through modifier tube 49, and to contact 58 through modier tube 55. It is obvious that the disclosed construction is illustrative, and that other or additional degrees of softness may be provided for without departing from the scope of the invention. Y

The jacks 36 and 39 are outlets to which electrodes are connected, two types of electrodes being illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3 respectively.

The electrode 60 in Fig. 3 is an ionization or electron discharge tube, and it comprises the envelope 6| of glass, quartz or other similar material which contains an inert gas, argon being suitable for the purpose. The tube 6 I is contoured to 'embody a contacter surface 62 which is adapted to engage and contact some portion vof the human body during a treatment. The disclosed contour of the envelope 6l is illustrative, and different contours may be used. Some electrodes 60 are particularly contoured to reach certain organs which are not exposed or near the outer surface of the human body.

The terminal 63 of conductor material extends from the exterior of the envelope 6i to the interior thereof, and it projects to a position within the tube 6I which is away from the contactor 62. Between the contacter 62 which comes in contact with the person being treated and the electrical terminal 63 there is interposed an electrcal insulator which, in the embodiment of the tube type of electrode 60 shown, consists of the material of the envelope 6l and the inert gas contained in the tube 6l.

The tube 6i is seated in the plug 64 of conductor material, and is preferably attached thereto by any suitable cement 65. Attachment of the tube 6l is located where the terminal 63 projects to the outside thereof, and the terminal 63 is connected in electrical contact with the plug 64.

The plug 64 ts the socket 66, and is removably attached thereto by means of the bayonet attachment 61 or other suitable connection. The

spring 68 serves to hold the plug 64 firmly seated in the socket 66 and in good electrical contact therewith. The socket 66 is housed in the tubing 10 of insulating material which affords a convenient handle for the electrode 60. The tubing 10 also contains the standard jack 1i which is electrically connected to the socket 66 by means of the screw 12.

A plurality of cords 13 are provided, each comprising a standard jack plug 14 at each of its opposite ends. The jack plugs 14 t the jack 1|, and also the jacks 36 and 39, Fig. 1, which are of standard construction for the purpose.

An electrode 66 may be plugged into each of the jacks 36 and 39 to complete the set-up of the machine for a treatment. For most treatments, however, and under usual practice, the conductor electrode 15, Fig. 2, is used and plugged into the jack 39. Electrode 15 is adapted to be held in the hand, and comprises a rod of conductor material, which is formed at its one end to embody the jack 16 which fits the jack plug 14. The electrode 15 is thus enabled to be plugged in by means of a cord 13.

To operate the machine of the invention, the hand electrode 15 is plugged into the jack 38, and a suitable tube electrode 60 is plugged into the jack 36. The three-way switch 31 is adjusted to the correct contact 45, 44 or 4I for the energy output that provides the desired intensity of treatment. The rheostat I9 is also adjusted to control the intensity of treatment more closely to what is desired. The switch 40 is adjusted to one of the contacts 46, 41 or 48, depending upon the desired degree of softness of the particular treatment.

The hand electrode is held in the patients hand, and the insulating tubing 10 is held, usually in the other hand of the patient or by the person giving the treatment, to place the contacter 62 of the electrode 60 at or near the injury or ailment that is being treated. The switch is now turned on. The contactor 62 is held stationary in position where it is near or in contact with the injury being treated, or it may be moved over the area of the injury with a slow, even motion.

It should be understood, however, that direct contact with the injured tissue is not essential. Local treatments of one portion or organ of the human body, it has been found, have relieved ailments, or affected them beneficially, which are removed and remote from the place where the contactor 62 is applied. A treatment is continued for a predetermined length of time, after which the switch 20 is opened to discontinue the treatment.

The jack 5l provides a reverse connection which enables a more intense treatment, and this will now be described.

The jack 5l is connected with the tap 43 through the lead 52. For this treatment a tube electrode 60 is plugged into the jack 5I, and a hand electrode 15 is plugged into the jack 36. The switch 31 may now be adjusted to either the contact 44 or the contact 4I, to respectively use the portions of the secondary 34 from tap 43 to tap 42 or from tap 43 to tap 35.

When the switch 31 is adjusted to the contact 44, the power output and intensity of treatment is approximately the same as, or slightly higher than, power output through jacks 36 and 33 when the switch 31 is adjusted to the contact 45 and the portion of the secondary 34 from tap 38 to tap 43 is in the circuit. With the reverse connection of jacks 5| and 36, adjustment of switch 31 to contact 4l provides an energy output about twice as great as, or somewhat more than twice as great as, the energy output through contact 44 with the reverse connection of jacks 5I and 36.

The accompanying disclosure presents one practical application of the invention, which is not limited to the specific disclosure. The scope of the invention is determined by the accompanying claims, to which attention is now directed.

I claim:

l. In a radio-frequency transmitter for therapeutic purposes, a transforner having a primary and a coupled secondary, means connected to said transformer to supply oscillatory energy to said primary, a first output terminal, a connection between one end of said secondary and said output terminal, a second output terminal, variable switching means, a gas filled discharge tube, connections between the other end of said secondary, said switching means and said second output terminal, and other connections between said last end of said secondary, said discharge tube and said switching means, whereby said switching means may be moved to vary the output potential delivered to said terminals and consequently to any electrode connected thereto.

2. In a radio-frequency transmitter for therapeutic purposes, a transformer having a primary and a coupled secondary, means connected to said transformer to supply oscillatory energy to said primary, said secondary having a series of taps from one end inwardly and comprising a variable switching means, connections between the other end of said secondary and said primary, a rst output terminal, said variable switching means being interconnected with said terminal and said taps for selectively connecting the latter to said terminal, a second terminal connected to one contact of said variable switching means and to the innermost tap of said series, a third terminal, a second variable switching means connected to said third terminal, a connection between said other` end of said primary and a contact of said second switching means, a gas filled discharge tube, a second discharge tube having a gas therein of different characteristics from the gas in said rst tube, a connection from another contact of said second switchmeans to said rst gas lled tube and thence to said other end of said secondary, and a connection from still another contact of said second switch means to said second gas lled tube, whereby a large range of cur-rent variations may be: supplied to electrodes which may be selectively connected to any combination of two of said terminals.

3. In a radio-frequency transmitter for therapeutic purposes, a transformer having a primary winding and a coupled secondary winding, means connected to said transformer to supply oscillatory energy to said primary, a first output terminal, a tap on said secondary winding intermediate the ends thereof, a connection between said tap and said terminal, a second tap formed on said secondary between one end thereof and said first tap, a second terminal, a step switch having a movable contact arm and a series of iixed contacts, a connection between said movable arm and said second terminal, individual connections between said taps and said end of said secondary, and said fixed contacts, a third terminal connected to a movable contact arm of a step switch like said first switch, a glow discharge tube, a second glow discharge tube having characteristics different from those of said rst tube, and individual connections between the stationary contacts of said last switch and said tubes and the other end of said Vsecondary winding, whereby electrodes may be selectively connected to any of said terminals, and elements connected to the stationary contacts may be selectively connected in series therewith.

PAUL S. HANWAY.

References Cited in the le 0f this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,376,081 Mooy Apr. 26, 1921 1,598,630 Wengel Sept. 7, 1926 1,655,783 Gallois Jan. 10, 1928 1,794,288 Goebeller Feb. 24, 1931

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7510555B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2009-03-31 Therm Med, Llc Enhanced systems and methods for RF-induced hyperthermia
US7627381B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2009-12-01 Therm Med, Llc Systems and methods for combined RF-induced hyperthermia and radioimmunotherapy
US20090294300A1 (en) * 2006-11-13 2009-12-03 Kc Energy, Llc Rf systems and methods for processing salt water

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1376081A (en) * 1917-08-20 1921-04-26 Mooy Electric Co De High-frequency generator of the transformer type
US1598630A (en) * 1922-06-06 1926-09-07 Arthur M Wengel Electrotherapeutic apparatus
US1655783A (en) * 1925-10-03 1928-01-10 Gallois Robert Electrode for the combined therapeutic application of high-frequency current and of ultra-violet radiation
US1794288A (en) * 1926-06-09 1931-02-24 Goebeler Eberhardt High-frequency apparatus

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1376081A (en) * 1917-08-20 1921-04-26 Mooy Electric Co De High-frequency generator of the transformer type
US1598630A (en) * 1922-06-06 1926-09-07 Arthur M Wengel Electrotherapeutic apparatus
US1655783A (en) * 1925-10-03 1928-01-10 Gallois Robert Electrode for the combined therapeutic application of high-frequency current and of ultra-violet radiation
US1794288A (en) * 1926-06-09 1931-02-24 Goebeler Eberhardt High-frequency apparatus

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7510555B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2009-03-31 Therm Med, Llc Enhanced systems and methods for RF-induced hyperthermia
US7627381B2 (en) 2004-05-07 2009-12-01 Therm Med, Llc Systems and methods for combined RF-induced hyperthermia and radioimmunotherapy
US20090294300A1 (en) * 2006-11-13 2009-12-03 Kc Energy, Llc Rf systems and methods for processing salt water

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