US2622642A - Nut-cracking machine - Google Patents

Nut-cracking machine Download PDF

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US2622642A
US2622642A US739598A US73959847A US2622642A US 2622642 A US2622642 A US 2622642A US 739598 A US739598 A US 739598A US 73959847 A US73959847 A US 73959847A US 2622642 A US2622642 A US 2622642A
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die
nut
cracking
carriage
nuts
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US739598A
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Leo J Meyer
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Leo J Meyer
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A23FOODS OR FOODSTUFFS; THEIR TREATMENT, NOT COVERED BY OTHER CLASSES
    • A23NMACHINES OR APPARATUS FOR TREATING HARVESTED FRUIT, VEGETABLES OR FLOWER BULBS IN BULK, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; PEELING VEGETABLES OR FRUIT IN BULK; APPARATUS FOR PREPARING ANIMAL FEEDING- STUFFS
    • A23N5/00Machines for hulling, husking or cracking nuts

Description

Dec. 23, 1952 J. MEYER NUT CRACKING MACHINE '7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 5, 1947 2 FIG. 3

LEO J. MEYER INVENTOR. aim/3M FIG. 2

AITORNEYS Dec. 23, 1952 .1. MEYER 2,622,542

NUT-CRACKING MACHINE Filed April 5, 1947 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS Dec. 23, 1952 J. MEYER 2,622,642

NUT-CRACKING MACHINE Filed April 5, 1947 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 3 76 1 79 86 3 77 as- A 1.50 J. ME YER l N V EN TOR.

ATTORNEYS Dec. 23, 1952 L. J. MEYER 2,622,642

NUT-CRACKING MACHINE Filed April 5, 1947 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 L so a]. Meyer INVENTOR.

BY w zggwa ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1952 J. MEYER 2,622,642

NUT-CRACKING MACHINE Filed April 5, 1947 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Leo 4/. Meyer INVENTOR.

Y l wi ATTORN EY Dec. 23, 1952 J. MEYER 2,622,542

NUT-CRACKING MACHINE Filed April 5, 1947 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 L e0 Ll. Meyer INVENTOR.

ATTORNEY Dec. 23, 1952 L. J. MEYER NUT-CRACKING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet '7 Filed April 5, 1947 Leo J. Meyer INVENTOR.

BY WL ATTORNEY Patented Dec. 23, 1952 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 4 Claims.

The invention relates to a nut cracking machine, and in particular to a machine which is capable of precision feeding of nuts of varying size to the cracking dies thereof which efiects such variable cracking movement among the different sized nuts as to produce desired cracking without breaking the meats of the nuts.

ihe invention is concerned with a machine for cracking nuts generally, but is of particular utility in connection with the cracking of pecans which are known to vary widely in size, particularly in length. In any event, it is necessary, for machine cracking, either to carefully grade the nuts as to size and then use a cracking machine adjusted for a selected size or grade, or to provide coordinated feeding and cracking mechanisms capable of accurately placing the nuts of varying sizes in cracking position, and thereafter applying the proper amount of compression thereto, regardless of size, so that the cracking action may be complete, but without injuring the meats of the nuts thereby.

The present invention is concerned with the latter method of cracking nuts, and it is therefore an object of the invention to provide novel, coordinated combination of feeding and die elements so that nuts of varying sizes may be elliciently handled in a single machine.

Another object is to provide a feeding mechanism that will place a nut in cracking position for each relative reciprocation of the cracking dies.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a mechanism that will assure that a single nut only is fed to the cracking dies for each reciprocation thereof.

Still another object of the invention is to pro vide a mechanism of the conveyor type that will accomplish the objectives 'just indicated.

Another object is to provide a compensating mechanism or cracking box of improved design that automatically and simply provides desiredtakeup or cracking movement for various sized nuts fed to the machine.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a compensating mechanism or cracking box of simple and rugged construction that will operate efiiciently and "eiTectively throughout along period of use.

The invention also comprehends the provision of cracking mechanism, including a rocker which carries .a locking element movable therewith, :to engage and drive the cracking die aipredetermined distance after such .die has engaged a nut to be cracked.

The foregoing objects together with other objects and advantages of the invention will be more fully apparent from the following description considered in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view showing one form of the invention;

Fig. 2 is an end View of the machine, portions thereof being cut away to more clearly show con structional details;

Fig. 3 is a detail showing the drive construc tion and is a view taken on line 33 of .Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a plan view, partly in section and with parts removed, showing the cracking die assemy;

Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4, but with parts cut away and showing the relative position of parts when the locking element is in engagement with the reciprocating cracking die;

Fig. 6 is a detail view .of the .nut conveyor showing the relative position thereof with relation to the nut hopper and the arrangement whereby nuts are fed singly to the cracking dies;

Fig. 7 is a detail view showing themanner of securing individual :nut carriers upon the chain of the nut conveyor;

Fig. 8 is an exploded view showing the componcnt parts of a nut carrier and .the elements associated therewith for integrating the carrier with the carrier chain;

Fig. 9 is a detail View showing the arrangement of the carrier guides within thejnut hopper;

Fig. 10 is an enlarged detail view showing the arrangement of the rocker in the die assembly and showing the locking and guiding elements which arezmounted on the rocker.

Fig. 11 is an enlarged isometric view of the die assembly;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged, isometric view of the spring holder, the rocker, and the carrier plate, including the spring holder barrel;

Fig. 13 is "an enlarged isometric view of the carriage;

Fi 14 is a pl n viewshowing'the springholder barrel, spring holder, and locking awl, .and also showinga long pecan positioned between movable die andfixed die;

Fig. 15 is a plan view of the-elements shown in Fig. 1-4, a short pecan being shown positioned between ,movableidie and fixeddienrior to crack- Fie- ;16'shows the elements of Fig. '15 in cracking action;

Fig. 17 is a plan view showing die assembly elements, including the rocker, prior to pawl and movable die locking engagement; and

Fig. 18 is a plan view of the elements of Fig. 17 showing pawl and movable die in looking engagement.

The nut cracking machine I embodying the invention, comprises a frame or base 2 upon which is journalled the main shaft 3 driven by a pulley 4 from a suitable prime mover such as the electric motor 5 mounted upon the platform 6 supported upon the base. Pinion It on the inner end of the shaft 3 driveably engages the gear II on shaft I2. This gear carries a wrist pin I3 upon which one end of the connecting rod I4 is mounted while the opposite end of this rod receives the pin I5 which pivotally connects the rod I4 to the carriage 33, such carriage forming part of the die assembly I6. The pin I5 also extends through the abutment 41 which has the tubular abutment 41' connected thereto as a part thereof for a purpose to be hereinbelow described. As such carriage 36 is mounted to slide longitudinally in the channel 43 of the frame 2, it can thus be said to be reciprocatory therein by virtue of its pivotal connection with the connectin rod I4. Thus upon rotation of the gear wheel I I, the die assembly I6 will be driven through-a complete cycle of reciprocation for each revolution of the wheel to effect a nut cracking operation upon a nut I! engaged between the movable die I8 of the die assembly I6 and the stationary die I9 mounted upon the frame 2.

As best seen in Fig. 3, the shaft I2 has a worm 25 thereon, meshing with the worm gear 26 on shaft 21. This shaft 27 extends forwardly into the conveyor housing to drive the lowermost of a pair of sprockets, now shown, upon which the conveyor assembly 28 is mounted. The upward flight 29 of the conveyor assembly moves upwardly within the hopper 39 to elevate nuts in succession, and to place such nuts in the cavities 3| in the carrier elements 32 as they enter the downward flight 33 of the conveyor.

The die assembly I6 comprises a carriage 36 including the base plate 3! having upstanding portions 38, 38, 39 and 39' with the gap 40 intermediate the portions 38 and 38' and the gap 4I intermediate the portions 39 and 39' to admit movement of the rocker 42 longitudinally of the carriage 36 as will be more fully described. The pin I5 is journalled in the upstandin portion 38 of the carriage 36 whereby the complete die assembly I6 is reciprocable within the channel 43 of the frame 2, as has been hereinabove explained.

Attention is directed to the fact that the movable die I8 may comprise a unitary structure although it is shown as including a die tip I8 which is removable so that replacement of the complete structure is unnecessary when wear may require replacement of such die tip.

The rear end of the die I8 is counterbored at 45 as shown in Fig. 5, to receive the compression spring 46 which engages within the tubular abutment 41' whereby the die is resiliently urged forwardly while the stop 48 upstands from the plate 31 for engagement with the shoulder 9 of the die I8 to limit forward motion of the die. A knockout rod 50, anchored to the frame 2, extends axially through the die I8 and terminates proximate the forward end of the die so that upon retraction of the die any portion of the nut or any other foreign matter striking in the die will be removed prior to engagement of the die with a succeeding nut I1. It is also to be noted that the spring 46 is compressed when the die I8 engages a nut I? as the die assembly I6 is moved by the connecting rod I4. Thus a predetermined force is placed upon the nut preliminary to the actual cracking operation.

Slidable longitudinally within the carriage 36 is a carrier plate 5| upon which the rocker 42 is pivoted at 52. The carriage 36 includes the base plate 31 which has the upstanding plate portion III thereon, adjacent to, and. connected to the portion 39. The plunger 54, shown in Fig. 10, ex-- tends from the bore I I2 in the plate portion I I I to bear against the carrier plate 5 I. The closed tube 53 extends from the plate portion I I I and the bore I I2 extends thereinto and for the length thereof to terminate at the tube end I I4. The spring 53" shown in Fig. 5, extends within the bore II2 to urge the plunger 54 against the carrier plate 51. A comparison of Fig. 10 with Figs. 4, 5, and 12, shows that the tube 53 is located directly below the abutments 41 and 41'. The arrow 55, shown in Fig. 5, indicates the oscillatory motion which can be accomplished by the rocker 42 by virtue of its pivotal mounting on the carrier plate 5I. The carriage 36 has the upstandin guide H8 thereon to guide the die I8.

A stabilizing block 60 fits upon the pivot 52 on the upper side of the carrier plate 5| and slidably engages one side of the die member I8. The locking block or pawl element BI is mounted upon a pin 62 on the rocker 42 on the opposite side of the die member I9 from the block 60. This looking block or pawl 6| is constantly urged by the indicated spring means 63 in the spring holder barrel 64, as shown in Fig. 5, such barrel 64 being connected to, or part of, the carrier plate 5 I. The spring means 63 is contained in a spring holder means comprising the pin 59 at one end of the spring means and the head 94 at the other end thereof. When motion of the head 94 is arrested, as will be hereinbelow explained, as the spring means 63 presses against the inner end of the pin 59, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5, the head 59' of the pin 59 will slidably engage the forward face of the pawl BI. In this manner the rocker 42 is normally held in engagement with the stop 65 on the carrier plate 5| at which time the teeth 61 on the locking element or pawl 6| are spaced sidewardly from the complementary teeth 68 on the die member IT, as shown in Fig. 4.

It is to be noted that the tooth or serrated face 61 of the locking element or pawl BI is tapered or inclined slightly to the line of travel of the die I8 and is, therefore, in confronting parallel relation with the complementary teeth 68 on the die since such complementary teeth are formed upon a face included inwardly along the side surface of the die. This is an important feature of the invention inasmuch as it facilitates a desired mode of operation that will more fully appear hereinbelow.

The conveyor assembly 28 comprises the chain I5 which may be of conventional design, the nut carriers 32 being constructed and attached thereto in a manner now to be described. As shown in Fig. 8, each carrier comprises a pair of blocks I6 having transverse openings TI spaced a distance equal to that between successive pins in the chain. A special link comprises side plates I8 and pins "I9 of sufficient length to pass entirely through the chain and the blocks whereby the blocks are made an integral part of the chain.

The carrier body and the blocks I6 may comprise an integral structure, but I prefer that these parts be made separate in order to facilitate assembly-and replacement. As shown, the body "89 has a pair of :holes '8l thereinto receive screws a cavity 31 thereinopen at its ends so that the die lfimay enter and'move a nut along thecav-ity and into engagement with the stationary die 49. The cavity'is also open at one side to enable entrance of a nut -thereto.

Extending sidewardly from the nut carrier 32 is a projection 85 whic'h'ihas a nut receiving depression '86 therein. As best .seen in 'Fig. 2, the depression 86 faces upwardly in the upward fiight .29 or "the conveyor and hence is adapted to rece'iveone or more nuts as itmoves upwardly from below and within the hopper '39.

.As a nut carrier reverses direction from the upward flight 29 to the downward flight '3'2, itis intended that the nut carried thereby shall be 4 dropped under gravity into the cavity -3| of the next preceding carrier as clearly shown in the upper portion of Fig. 2. It is also important that a single nut only be deposited in each of the cavities 31 of the nut carriers preliminary to the cracking operation. To this end each body 39 also has'a fin 87 which extends transversely of the projection "35. As the carrier tilts in its movement inlthe upward flight '29 toward the downward flight 33, this fin tiltsoutwardly, as shown in Fig. 2, and serves to remove excess nuts from position "upon the next succeeding carrier. In this manner there .is-assurance that a single nut only willbe deposited ineach of the cavities 31 as itmoves toward cracking position.

A knockout 9fi is also provided for the stationary die l9, such knockout including a rod normally ispring pressed, by conventional spring means,.not shown, to move to the right as shown in Figs. .4 and :5, .but urged to the left by the projection 91 on the die assembly when a nut cracking operationiis carried out.

The broad principle of the operation of thedisclosed embodiment of the invention is believed apparent from'the foregoing description. By way of reiteration and by way of further and more detailed explanation it is pointed out that a quantity of nuts are placed within the hopper 30, such nuts being restrained from passing through the lower portion thereof by virtue-of the tongue 92 in the bottom of the hopper, this tongue being adapted to slidably pass through the slot 93 in the projection 85 on each of the nut carriers. As the individual carriers move upwardly, as indicatedinF-ig. .2, one or more nuts are elevated by each of the projections 55 in succession, the tint? .of each carrier removing excess nuts upon the succeeding carrier as it moves toward the downward :fiight As each carrier moves,-its associated nut inalignment with the dies wand 19, the die assembly moves, in accordance with theabove general description, and with the detailed description to he set forth hereinbelow, to engage and crack the nut, whereupon the carrier moves downwardly andaway from the 'die assembly, and the cracked nut falls, by gravityin'to a receptacle, not shown.

A consideration of Patent No. 2,264,394, issued December 2, 1'941,t0 Leo J. Meyer for Nut Cracking Machine, when compared with the general stands from the rocker 42.

teeth 68 of the present invention are tapered.

whereas in the prior patent such corresponding teeth extend in parallel alignment with the longitudinal axis of'the die and die assembly. The benefits obtained by this feature will be apparent when Figs. 4, 5, and 10 are con'sid'eredin conening of the set screw H4 shown in Fig. 11 can thus lock the adjustable stop .95 in a pre-determined position.

As the gear I I rotatesa point is reached whereby the connecting rod 14 begins to urge the die assembly I 6 forwardly. Thus 'the carriage 36, die 1'8, carrier 'plate 5|, and rocker 42 all move together until the head 94 contacts: the stop 95. This stops further *forward :motion of the carrier plate 51, including the "barrel 64, and .of the rocker 42 mounted on the carrier platewhile the carriage '39 and die l-8 continue to move forward.

Then the die 18 contacts thenut I], as the conveyor 28 is coordinated, through the transmission driving it from the same prime mover that drives'the gear I I, to deliver the nut into position to be engaged'by the die 'IBassuch die approaches the fixed die l9.

From'this point the spring '46 undergoes .compression as the nut .between the dies resists further forward motion of the die 18 whereas the tubular-abutment 41' and the "abutment 41 connected thereto, through which extends "the pin 15, continue to move forward with the carriage '36 to bear against the .rear'end of the spring 46.

Then the portion 38, which iupstands fromthe carriage base plate 31, comes in 'contact with the roller or block element '57. Such roller or block 51 is pivotal upon the pin 58 which up- The portion 38 forces forwardly against the'element '51, as shown'most clearly in Figs. 17 and 18, the rocker 42 pivots about the pin 52, and the pawl 9| slidably'for'ces forwardly against the head 59 "of the pin 59 to compress the spring means 63. Such'motion continues until as shown :inFig. 18, the pawl teeth 61 engage the die teeth 68.

At this point, which maybe termed interlockage, the die rs, carriage :36, carrier plate 5;|,'an'd rocker 42 'arealllocked together whereastheihea'd 94 bears againstthe stop 95. Stoppage 'could now occur, but for the provision of a means to permit the head 94 'toremain stationary 'while permitting the carrier p'late .barr'el 64,

which receives such head 94, to 'move forward.

:Such ,provls'ionis made by providing the pin 199' in the barrel 64 and by providing .in the head 94'the hole NH through which the spin "IDfl extends. As shown in .Fig. 5,.suchho'le I9! "is of a greater width in the direction of die assembly travel than the diameter of the pin l9fl,.so that, while the head 94.remains stationary, theremaining parts of the die assembly may move forward to further compress the spring means '53. It is thus the spring .means B3 which exerts the nut cracking pressure, while the spring 45, which originally'urges the die ?I 8 forwardly, remains in static condition after inter-lockage.

The end of cracking is set to occur whenthe connecting rodil'4 is just above the"dead :center position'whichisreached when the center of the gear H, the center of the wrist pin [3, and the center of the connecting rod pin l are in alignment. It can thus be seen that the ultimate forward position of the die assembly I3 is determined by the position of the stop 95 while the angular travel of the connecting rod during cracking is determined by the position of the movable die I 8 at the instant that inter-lockage occurs.

The fact that the teeth 51, 68 are tapered or extended at an angle to the direction of the die assembly travel insures that such inter-lockage of die, carriage, carrier plate, and rocker will occur at an earlier stage of die assembly travel when a long nut I! is between the fixed die 9 and the movable die l8, than when a short nut is between these dies. This is shown most clearly in Figs. 14-16 inclusive, where it can be seen that the movable die l8 in Fig. 14 is spaced further from the fixed die l9 at the point where inter-lockage occurs, than such movable die I8 is spaced from the fixed die in Fig. 15. Consequently, the pawl Bl engages the die l8 nearer the shoulder 9 in Fig. 14 than in Fig 15, where a short nut I1 is shown.

It follows that a longer nut is under cracking pressure during a longer time since the connecting rod [4 goes through a longer angular travel in the cracking of a long nut than in the cracking of a short nut. However, as the resiliency of nuts vary in some proportion to length, the longer nuts can withstand the pressure of the movable die l8 for a longer period of travel before actual rupture of the nut takes place. Thus it follows that the degree of a rupture or cracking accomplished for both long and short nuts is substantially the same by virtue of the provision of the tapered teeth 61 and 6B.

When the cracking operation has been completed as described, the die assembly moves outwardly to release the cracked nut which can then fall downwardly from the machine for the subsequent hulling operation. It is to be understood, of course, that as the die assembly is retracted, the knockouts 50 and 90 will operate to remove any foreign matter from within the dies [8 and I9.

It should be further noted that the spring means 63, which is compressed during the movement of the rocker 42 to effect inter-lockage, will continue to exert a pressure which maintains this inter-lockage until the connecting rod l4 passes dead center position in the direction of rotation indicated in Fig. 11. Return movement of the carriage 36 results in the compressed spring means 63 accomplishing a snap action in the return of the parts to the relative positions in Fig. 4, as it becomes free at this stage .to strongly exert the force which acts against the pin 59 to pivot the rocker 42 rearwardly. This. action, together with the composite movement effected by the rocking of the rocker 42 as indicated by the arrow 55, are instrumental in minimizing wear of the serrations on the teeth 61, 68, whereby long life and interlocking accuracy are attained. Q

It can also be seen that, upon the return stroke of the connecting rod I4, which begins after it passes "dead center position, the spring 46 can elongate as the carriage assembly of carriage 35 and abutments 41, 41' move rearwardly.

Broadly this invention considers a nut cracking machine having an improved conveyor system, and an arrangement of the die assembly which automatically accommodates the difference in amount of resiliency between long and short nuts by providing a longer cracking travel for the more resilient, longer nuts, thereby insuring that substantially the same degree of final rupturing occurs for both long and short nuts.

The invention claimed is:

1. In a nut cracking machine, a conveyor movable in a closed path in a vertical plane, said conveyor including a series of spaced nut carriers each having a nut receiving cavity therein open at opposite ends to receive reciprocatory nut cracking dies during movement of the conveyor, there being a side opening to each of said cavities on the upper side of the carriers as they move downwardly with the conveyor, each of said carriers having a nut elevating projection thereon proximate but facing opposite said cavity, said projections being adapted to lift nuts in succession during their upward travel and to discharge the nuts by gravity into the cavities of the next preceding carriers respectively as the carriers move successively from upward travel to downward travel.

2. For installation at spaced apart intervals on a chain conveyor adapted to move in a closed path in a vertical plane, the combination of, a nut carrier comprising, a body, means on said body for attaching the body to said conveyor chain, there being a cavity in the body open at its ends to receive reciprocatory nut cracking dies during movement of the conveyor, and open on one side thereof, a nut lifting projection extending outwardly from said body proximate but opposite said cavity, said projection havin a nut receiving depression therein opposite said cavity and being adapted to lift the nut and to discharge the nut by gravity into the cavity of the next preceding carrier.

3. In combination with a conveyor adapted to convey nuts singly into position to be cracked, a frame, a die fixed to said frame and adapted to receive therein an end of a nut to be cracked, a carriage assembly slidably mounted on said frame, said carriage assembly including a carriage and an abutment means, a drive wheel means, means connecting said wheel means to reciprocate said carriage in said frame upon each revolution of said. wheel means, a movable die slidably mounted on said carriage and adapted to receive in the forward end thereof the other end of said nut to be cracked, a spring bearing rearwardly against said abutment means and for wardly urging said movable die toward said fixed die, said movable die having a row of teeth therein extending outwardly and forwardly at an angle to the direction of travel of said carriage, a pawl having a row of teeth therein shorter than said die row and adapted to mesh with said die teeth, mounting means slidable upon said carriage and adapted to support said pawl for movement away from, and into tooth engagement with said movable die, a stop, a head to contact said stop, spring means to bear forwardly against said head and to urge rearwardly against forward movement of said pawl,. said mounting means including means adapted to receive said head and said spring means therein, the forward motion of said carriage assembly first bringing said head against said stop so that said spring means urges against forward progress of said mounting means, said drive wheel means being adapted to drive said conveyor to deliver said nut into die grasped position as further forward movement of said carriage assembly brings said movable die against said nut to arrest further movement of said movable die so that further forward carriage assembly movement compresses said spring, said spring means also being compressed as said stop bears against said head causing said mounting means to slide to position said pawl teeth in locked engagement with said die teeth, and final forward movement of said carriage assembly with said mounting means interlocked therewith resulting in further compression of said spring means between said head and said pawl as said movable die moves further forward to crack said nut.

4. In combination with a conveyor adapted to convey nuts singly into position to be cracked, a frame, a die fixed to said frame and adapted to receive therein an end of a nut to be cracked, a carriage assembly slidably mounted on said frame, said carriage assembly including a carriage and an abutment means, a drive wheel means, means connecting said drive wheel means to reciprocate said carriage means in said frame upon each revolution of said wheel means, a movable die slidably mounted on said carriage and adapted to receive in the forward end thereof the other end of said nut to be cracked, a spring bearing rearwardly against said abutment means and forwardly urging said movable die toward said fixed die, said movable die having a row of teeth therein extending outwardly and forwardly at an angle to the direction of travel of said carriage, a pawl having a row of teeth therein shorter than said die row and adapted to mesh with said die teeth, a carrier plate slidable with relation to said carriage, a rocker pivotally mounted on said carrier plate and adapted to pivotally support said pawl, a stop, a head to contact said stop, a pin, spring means to bear forwardly against said head and to urge rearwardly against said pin to force said pin against said pawl, said carrier plate providing means to receive said head, said spring means, and said pin therein, said carrier plate being slidable upon said carriage and adapted to support said pawl for movement away from, and into tooth en- 10 gagement with said movable die, and adapted to receive said head and said spring means therein, the forward motion of said carriage assembly first bringing said head against said stop so that said spring means urges against forward progress of said pawl, said rocker, and said carrier plate, said drive wheel means being adapted to drive said conveyor to deliver said nut into die grasped position as further forward movement of said carriage assembly brings said movable die against said nut to arrest further movement of said movable die so that further forward carriage assembly movement compresses said spring, said spring means also being compressed as said stop bears against said head causing said rocker to rotate, said rotation moving said pawl teeth into engagement with said die teeth, and final forward movement of said carriage assembly with said teeth in engagement resulting in further compression of said spring means between said head and said pawl as said movable die moves further forward to crack said nut.

LEO J. MEYER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,165,107 Lund et al Dec. 21, 1915 1,273,974 Woodson July 30, 1918 1,457,562 Thomas June 5, 1923 1,596,656 Haver Aug. 17, 1926 2,128,874 Meyer Aug. 30, 1938 2,196,444 Meyer Apr. 9, 1940 2,209,606 Meyer July 30, 1940 2,212,213 Rothenberger et al. Aug. 20, 1940 2,264,394 Meyer Dec. 2, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 48,296 Austria June 10, 1911

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5711213A (en) * 1996-03-29 1998-01-27 Thomson; Kirk Nut cracker

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AT48296B (en) * 1910-02-28 1911-06-10 Josef Stork Bucket elevator for Kartoffellegmaschinen.
US1165107A (en) * 1915-04-07 1915-12-21 Robert Lund Nut bursting or cracking machine.
US1273974A (en) * 1916-06-22 1918-07-30 Robert E Woodson Nut-cracking machine.
US1457562A (en) * 1921-12-21 1923-06-05 Wion P Thomas Fruit elevator
US1596656A (en) * 1925-08-07 1926-08-17 Haver William Pecan-cracking machine
US2128874A (en) * 1935-10-21 1938-08-30 John A Schuler Nut-cracking machine
US2196444A (en) * 1937-12-31 1940-04-09 Champion Pecan Machine Company Nut-cracking machine
US2209606A (en) * 1938-12-27 1940-07-30 Champion Pecan Machine Company Nut-cracking machine
US2212213A (en) * 1938-03-29 1940-08-20 Rothenberger Gmbh Co Means for shelling nuts
US2264394A (en) * 1939-10-23 1941-12-02 Champion Pecan Machine Company Nut cracking machine

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AT48296B (en) * 1910-02-28 1911-06-10 Josef Stork Bucket elevator for Kartoffellegmaschinen.
US1165107A (en) * 1915-04-07 1915-12-21 Robert Lund Nut bursting or cracking machine.
US1273974A (en) * 1916-06-22 1918-07-30 Robert E Woodson Nut-cracking machine.
US1457562A (en) * 1921-12-21 1923-06-05 Wion P Thomas Fruit elevator
US1596656A (en) * 1925-08-07 1926-08-17 Haver William Pecan-cracking machine
US2128874A (en) * 1935-10-21 1938-08-30 John A Schuler Nut-cracking machine
US2196444A (en) * 1937-12-31 1940-04-09 Champion Pecan Machine Company Nut-cracking machine
US2212213A (en) * 1938-03-29 1940-08-20 Rothenberger Gmbh Co Means for shelling nuts
US2209606A (en) * 1938-12-27 1940-07-30 Champion Pecan Machine Company Nut-cracking machine
US2264394A (en) * 1939-10-23 1941-12-02 Champion Pecan Machine Company Nut cracking machine

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5711213A (en) * 1996-03-29 1998-01-27 Thomson; Kirk Nut cracker

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