US261854A - Combined iron and concrete fence-post - Google Patents

Combined iron and concrete fence-post Download PDF

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US261854A
US261854A US261854DA US261854A US 261854 A US261854 A US 261854A US 261854D A US261854D A US 261854DA US 261854 A US261854 A US 261854A
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post
posts
fence
concrete
base
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02DFOUNDATIONS; EXCAVATIONS; EMBANKMENTS; UNDERGROUND OR UNDERWATER STRUCTURES
    • E02D5/00Bulkheads, piles, or other structural elements specially adapted to foundation engineering
    • E02D5/74Means for anchoring structural elements or bulkheads
    • E02D5/80Ground anchors

Description

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28 IIVVE/VTORJ Afforney Patented Aug. 1, 1882.
L S. KINGS BURY-fiv G. W. PEOK. COMBINED 13011 AND CONCRETE FENCE POST.
WITNESSES (No'ModeL) UNITED ST TES PATENT OFFICE.
IRA S. KINGSBURY AND GEORGE WV. PEUK, OF MONTIGELLO, INDIANA.
COMBINED IRON AND CONCRETE FENCE-POST.
SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 261,854, dated August 1, 1882.
Application filed March 31, 1882. (No model.)
Ourinvention relates to an improvement in 7 combined iron and concrete fence-posts, the object of the same being to provide a fence that will be strong and durablein structure and of comparatively small initial cost; and with these ends in view our invention consists in certain details of construction and combinations of parts, as will be more fully explained, and pointed out in the claims.
1n the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is a side view, showing a section of our new fence; and Fig. 2 is a perspective View of afenc'e-post.
A represents the wrought angle-iron fencepost, and B the concrete base in which the iron post is secured'after or before the said base is placed in position in the ground. The iron post can be of any suitable size, and is provided with the slots at and the holes b, placed at suitable intervals apart throughout the entire length of the post, for the reception and retention of the wires 0. These wires, barbed or plain, rest in the holes b in the post A, and can, if desired, be stretched throughout the entire length of the fence before they are locked in the posts; or they can be locked in the respective posts as they are placed in position by simply bringing the oppositejaws of the slot a, into close contact by means of a hammer.
The concrete base or feet of the posts B are made of Portland or other suitable cement, sand, and gravel, combined in suitable proportions with water, and mixed and tamped in suitable molds. A hole sufficiently large for the reception and retention of the post is formed in the upper face of the base during the process of molding, in which the lower end of the post is secured in the usual way with cement, lead, or sulphur.
If desired, we can secure the postto the base during the process of molding; but the post secured as before described answers all the necessary purposes.
A metallic band or collar, D, is embedded around the top of the base-B, which prevents the said base from splitting. This collarD can also be secured in position to the base during the operation of molding the same, or it can i about six inches at the point d, and then tapering inward from that point to the bottom of the posts, where they are about two inches square. The taper from the top to the point 61 is to enable the base to better resist the tendency of frost to more it upward, as the ground freezes first at the surface, and is consequently the hardest at that point. The longer these improved bases are in the ground the harder they become.
Any suitable number of barbed or plain wires are strung on the post, and are secured therein in the manner before described.
The posts can be set from four to five rods apart, and the wires between the posts are strengthened and held in position by the staystrip E. These stay-stripsE are made from com mon stake-iron, with holes and slots punched therein at suitable intervals apart, into which the wires are put and secured against displacement.
To further strengthen the fence, and to pro vide means for equalizing the pressure on the posts, we have placed diagonal braces 1 be tween the corner-posts and the posts on the opposite sides thereof. The first braces, or the braces between one corner-post and the two posts on the opposite sides thereof, are connected to the corner-post just above the base and extend diagonally upward, and are connected to the tops of the adjacent posts, while the next braces are connected to the second posts, near the bottoms thereof, and extend diagonally upward and are connected to the top of the third posts. These braces can, if desired, stop here, or they can be continued throughout the'entire lengthof the fencing, and they can be secured to the wires in the passage from one post to another, or be free therefrom.
If desired, our improved concrete bases can be used with wooden posts; but we prefer to make the fence entirely of metal and concrete, as all danger of its taking fire is obviated.
Our improvement is simple in construction, can be manufactured and placed in position ata comparatively small initial cost, and is more durable than the ordinary wood fence, or the combined wood and iron fences now generally used.
Having fully described our invention, what we claim as new, and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is-
The combination, with the metallic post A, of the concrete base B, made outwardly tapering from its upper end downward and from its lower end upward, the tapering portion at the upper end serving to prevent the vertical displacement of the base, substantially as set forth.
In testimony whereof we have signed this specification in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.
IRA S. KINGSBURY. GEORGE W. PEGK.
Witnesses:
DANL. D. DALE, J. BREORLEY.
US261854D Combined iron and concrete fence-post Expired - Lifetime US261854A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3763610A (en) * 1971-05-20 1973-10-09 J Ballew Earth anchor and apparatus for applying
US4801128A (en) * 1987-03-06 1989-01-31 Lawrence Taylor Ground imbedded support system

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3763610A (en) * 1971-05-20 1973-10-09 J Ballew Earth anchor and apparatus for applying
US4801128A (en) * 1987-03-06 1989-01-31 Lawrence Taylor Ground imbedded support system

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