US2612110A - Pump and motor - Google Patents

Pump and motor Download PDF

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Publication number
US2612110A
US2612110A US72153447A US2612110A US 2612110 A US2612110 A US 2612110A US 72153447 A US72153447 A US 72153447A US 2612110 A US2612110 A US 2612110A
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Prior art keywords
fluid
port
clearance space
rotor
pump
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Carl J Delegard
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Carl J Delegard
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C14/00Control of, monitoring of, or safety arrangements for, machines, pumps or pumping installations
    • F04C14/10Control of, monitoring of, or safety arrangements for, machines, pumps or pumping installations characterised by changing the positions of the inlet or outlet openings with respect to the working chamber
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01BMACHINES OR ENGINES, IN GENERAL OR OF POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT TYPE, e.g. STEAM ENGINES
    • F01B1/00Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by number or relative disposition of cylinders or by being built-up from separate cylinder-crankcase elements
    • F01B1/06Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by number or relative disposition of cylinders or by being built-up from separate cylinder-crankcase elements with cylinders in star or fan arrangement
    • F01B1/0641Details, component parts specially adapted for such machines
    • F01B1/0644Pistons
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01BMACHINES OR ENGINES, IN GENERAL OR OF POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT TYPE, e.g. STEAM ENGINES
    • F01B1/00Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by number or relative disposition of cylinders or by being built-up from separate cylinder-crankcase elements
    • F01B1/06Reciprocating-piston machines or engines characterised by number or relative disposition of cylinders or by being built-up from separate cylinder-crankcase elements with cylinders in star or fan arrangement
    • F01B1/0675Controlling
    • F01B1/0696Controlling by changing the phase relationship between the actuating or actuated cam and the distributing means
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01BMACHINES OR ENGINES, IN GENERAL OR OF POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT TYPE, e.g. STEAM ENGINES
    • F01B13/00Reciprocating-piston machines or engines with rotating cylinders in order to obtain the reciprocating-piston motion
    • F01B13/04Reciprocating-piston machines or engines with rotating cylinders in order to obtain the reciprocating-piston motion with more than one cylinder
    • F01B13/06Reciprocating-piston machines or engines with rotating cylinders in order to obtain the reciprocating-piston motion with more than one cylinder in star arrangement
    • F01B13/061Reciprocating-piston machines or engines with rotating cylinders in order to obtain the reciprocating-piston motion with more than one cylinder in star arrangement the connection of the pistons with the actuated or actuating element being at the outer ends of the cylinders
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01CROTARY-PISTON OR OSCILLATING-PISTON MACHINES OR ENGINES
    • F01C21/00Component parts, details or accessories not provided for in groups F01C1/00 - F01C20/00
    • F01C21/08Rotary pistons
    • F01C21/0809Construction of vanes or vane holders

Description

C. J. DELEGARD Sept. 30, 1952 v INVENTOR- 2 SHEETS-SHEET 1 I V V v Filed Jan. 11, 1947 Sgpt. 30, 1952 c. J. DELEGARD PUMP AND MOTOR 2 SHEETSSHEET 2 Filed Jan. 11, 1947 1 INVENTOR.

Patented Sept. 30, 1952 v UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE v 2,612,110 I PUMP AND MOTOR Carl J.- Delegard, Chicago,- Ill,

Applicationlanuary'll, 1947",*S erfal Nd. 7-211534' v Claims. 1

My invention relates to amechanism for transfer-ring energy from solids to fluids, or vice versa. In the case of a substantially incompressible fluid, such as most liquids, such a'de-vie'e'is referred to as a pump when the energy is transferred to the fluid, and as a motor when it is derived from the fluid. The device is also suitable for acting on compressible fluids such asair and other gases; in which case it would commonly be thought'oi-a's amotor if the'energy' is taken from the fluid, and as a compressor ii the energy is delivered to the fluid. I In my co-pen'ding application filed in the United States Patent Ofilce on September 10, 1945', Serial Number 615 451,- for a Pump or 'Motor, I have discloseda novel construction 01'- such a device. The present invention constitutes an improvement on the device described in the abovementioned application and has as its principal object the prevention of deterioration due to friction and a minimizin'g of the energy loss incidental to moving the fluid at high speed through restricted passages. Further objects and advantages will become apparent as the description proceeds.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure l is an end elevation ofadevice according to the invention with certain of the per and passages indicated in dotted lines Figure 2 is a side elevation partly in section a's-o'n'line 2--2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a central section on: line 3-4 of Figure 2'; H

Figure 4 is an'elevationof the end-casting on a larger scale Figure 5 is a section on line 5-5 of'Figure'4;

Figure 6 is a plan view of a cradle constituting aportion of a'pistonillustrated in Figure 3; and

Figure 7 is an-isome'tric view of the cradle of Figure 6.

In the embodiment of the invention'selected for illustration, the stationary ring housing In is provided with a conventional pedestal I2 for mounting it on a suitable support. The inner'surface oi -the ring III is 'a-true circleabout the axis of rotation of the drive: shaft 14. Rotatablyslidable inthe ring I 0 is the cam'rin'g is having a circular outer contour and an inner contour of minimum radius at diametrically opposite points 18 and 20, and maximum radius at 22 and 24, which latter points are spaced midway between'the points of minimum radius. The ring i=6 thus provides a smooth peripheral wall defining a variable clearance space' around the rotor 26, againstwhi'c'h wall the pistons are held bycentrifugal force when the rotor is running;

The rotor, indicated as a whole by-the reier ence: character 26, isa spider having a hub'ke'yed to the shaft l4 and has ten'i-dentical radial proj'ections 3U uniformly spaced and defining-large outer pockets 32 to receive sealing pistons 34 Each large pocket 32 isconnected by passages toa close-in-axi'ally' extendingaperture 38. r

Each of the pistons 34' consists ofa cradle"3 9 and a roller 4|. The constructior-i oi the cradle 39 is more fully illustrated-iii Figures'd and 7. The cr'adle 39 consistsofasubstantiallyrectangu lar'blockl cf,- for example,- steel 'h'aving a round. bore '43- extending from endto end.=- Thecentr of the bore 43 1ssufficiently'closets-the edge cf the. block So'th'at the block is open on oneof thelong-faces thereof, the b'ore 43 in thebloclt thus formingia cradle in which thecro'ss-sectional con tour is that of: a major ortionof a circle. In the bottom of the 'cradl'e' thus formed, through the opposite: face of the block, and extending? the major portion of the: lengthds a slot 45. The cylindrical roller M is'insert'ed within the bore 43 and. hasra diameter sumciently smaller-than that of the bore lils'o" that it mayrotate-freely therein," yet lee-firmly guided, without asubstan tialz leakage path for liquid;- Both the'roller's 4*] and the cradles39 are-oia material such-as steel' having a. specific? gravity greater than that of-the driving or driven fluid;- so that centrirugal force maintains" the rollers: 4 l in contact with the cam ring: I6

Upon reference to Figure 31 itwill b'e apparent that as the piston opposite poiht2ll 'mo'v'es tip-to the point: 22: the clearance 'b'etween the "rotor and the canrring l6 i's increased. And during thenext quarter." revolution the clearance" will be" decreased untillat v point l8 it is back to the samemini'mum as atvpoint z'u;

A11 thet parts 'so far'described, except pedestall2; are cylinders generated byelementsparallelto: the "axis of" shaft 1'4; And they all' terminate at both" ends in common transverse lanes where they-'abut end closures in the" nature-or cover plates-40 and 42; wh-i'cli'cov-er'plates areidentical construction but are diiierently 'positi'cned; Referring more particularly to Figures i -and 5}. each cover plate is a circular disc havingaperiphena'l flange apertured :at 44' toreceivetension bolts-=31 to clamp the parts together either with or witliout the conventional sealing gasketilfi indicated in" Figure" 5; The central li-ossfdide fines an'annularch amber 5t communicating with the terminal opening 52'; Tha -chamber 50; over two diametrically opposite sectors; debouclies-I. into=-clbse ln'- innerports' iii "and each inner-port.

3 communicates through a. fan-shaped passageway 56 with an outer peripheral port 58 subtending the same angle as the inner port 54.

Referring now to Figures 1, 2 and 3, and assuming that the rotation of the rotor is clockwise in Figure 3, the end plate 40 constitutes th inlt and its ports subtend the upper left hand and lower right hand quadrants in Figure 3 and do not show in that figure because the view is taken looking toward the outlet 42. The ports 54 and 58 of the'cover .plate 42 are shown in Figure 3, occupying the upper right hand and lower left hand quadrants. Referring to the piston 34 at point 22 in Figure 3, it will be apparent that movement of the parts to the right will carry the corresponding aperture 38 over the inner outlet port 54 as the piston 34 is forced into the pocket 32 and that the outer outlet port 58 already stands open waiting to receive the fluid in the outer clearance space between the adjoining pistons as the continued movement of the parts decreases the clearance; and just at the end of the movement as the roller approaches the point I8 the inner outlet port 54 will be left behind and the clearance space is cut off from outer outlet port 58. Thus ample opening is available at all times for movement of displaced fluid at relatively low velocity because of the large passageways available.

I The housing 10 is provided with an arcuate slot 60 long. enough to permit a stud 62, rigidly mounted into the ring I6, ninety degrees movement around the shaft l4. Considering the device as a pump, it will be apparent that movement of the stud 52 forty-five degrees clockwise with respect to the position of Figure 3 will cause the net delivery of the pump to become zero. And in this condition there will be practically no movement of fluid through the pump. Continued movement for another forty-five degrees will position the former inlet ports opposite the positions of decreasing clearance so that they become outlet ports, and vice versa, and the pump is functioning at full capacity in the opposite direction. And it will be apparent that the same reversability and variability is equally available when the device functions as a motor.

I It will readily be seen that the novel construction of the piston 34, illustrated in the drawing and described above, is highly advantageous in. the prevention of leak-age between adjoining: clearance spaces. The admission of fluid to the inner surface of the roller 4! through the slot 45 prevents the building up of a vacuum or pressure between the roller 4| and the cradle 39,.

which otherwise results in increased friction, thus causing deterioration with use. The rollers 41 have relatively short outside guiding contact with the cradles, while the inside contact is longer throughout, and at the ends it is complete. However, during operation at speed, the force between roller and cradle is always holding the roller against the inside surfaces. The cradles never bottom in the slots 32 and there are nospaces anywhere that close completely and open from closed condition to take in fluid.

Referring to Figure 3 and more particularly to the space between the rotor and the ring 18 immediately adjacent the handle 62 it will be noted that the lower, or following roller, has just closed the outlet 58. And the symmetrically located inlet will be ina corresponding position with respect to the upper or leading roller, so-

that thisparticular space is completely-closed.

sl-W lli? 2 a least a mi f s s n r.

4 two or three degrees of rotation and will be wide open soon after. During the short time that it is completely closed, the decrease in its volume due to the inward displacement of the following roller will be exactly equal to the increase in its volume due to the outward movement of the leading roller. Accordingly, no water hammer or straining of the metal parts will occur. It will also be noted that the inner passage 38 is still completely over theinner outlet 54for free discharge of the small amount of fluid that will be expelled by the time that roller reaches dead center. The passage 38 will move out of register with the outlet 54 about two degrees before the roller reaches dead center, and the inlet passage will be uncovered about two degrees after the roller reaches dead center. Such timing of the ports is relatively immaterial when the fluid is compressible, but with all incompressible fluids the port timing and the arrangement of the cradles so that they do not bottom achieves substantially complete freedom from the heavy energy losses due to high fluid velocity encountered in many pumps of this type.

This application is a continuation in part of my co-pending application, Serial Number 615,451, filed September 10, 1945, now abandoned.

Others may readily adapt the invention for use under various conditions of service by employing one or more of the novel features involved, or equivalents thereof. As at present advised with respect to the apparent scope of my invention, I desire to claim the following subject matter;

l. A fluid pump or motor comprising, in combination: a rotor having radial slots; pistons movable in said slots toward and away from the rotor axis; enclosing means including a smooth peripheral wall defining a peripheral clearance space around said rotor; said clearance space being defined internally by said rotor and externally by said wall; all portions of said wall lying parallel to the rotor axis; the radial distance from the rotor axis to said wallbeing variable, whereby circumferential movement of said rotor and pistons causes a pumping action on the fluid in said clearance space; end closures cooperating with said peripheral wall to complete said enclosing means; said end closures fitting the ends of said rotor; said end closures-having peripheral inlet and outlet ports therein; each end port opening axially directly into said clearance space; and means for circumferentially shifting the relative positions of said ports and clearance spacesinto various positions; said positions including a maximum volumetric capacity position, having a port at one end registering entirely with a decreasing clearance space and functioning as an outlet, and a port at the other end registering entirely with an increasing clearance space and functioning as an inlet; and a plurality of partial capacity positions with said outlet port registers .ing with progressively reduced portions of said decreasing clearance space and-simultaneously with progressively increasing adjacent portions of clearance space of increasing radial dimension; whereby a portion of the fluid expressed into said outlet. port from said decreasing clearance space can move across in said outletport into the adjacent increasing clearance space with minimum actual displacement, and with said inlet port at the otherend simultaneously shifting into register with progressively changing portions of said increasing and decreasing clearance spaces in corresponding ntw rebvsaiq inle nd outlet ports in all positions permit the same amount of reverse circulation and reduced volumetric capacity. a

2. A fluid pump or motor comprising, in combination: a rotor having radiating slots; pistons movable in said slots toward and away from the rotor axis; enclosing means including a smooth peripheral wall defining a peripheral clearance space around said rotor; said clearance space being defined internally by said rotor and externally by said wall; the radial distance from the rotor axis to said wall being variable, whereby circumferential movement of said rotor and pistons causes a pumping action on the fluid in said clearance space; end closures cooperating with said peripheral wall to complete said enclosing means; said end closures having peripheral inlet and outlet ports therein; each end port opening axially directly into said clearance space; and means for circumferentially shifting the relative positions of said ports and clearance spaces into various positions; said positions including a position of maximum volumetric capacity, having a port at one end registering entirely with a decreasing clearance space and function ing as an outlet, and a port at the other end resis tering entirely with an increasing clearance space and functioning as an inlet; and a plurality of partial capacity positions with said outlet port registering with progressively reduced portions of said decreasing clearance space and simultaneously with progressively increasing adjacent portions of clearance space of increasingradial dimension, whereby a portion of the fluid expressed into said outlet port from said decreasing clearance space can move across in said outlet port into an adjacent increasing clearance space with minimum actual displacement, and with said inlet port at the other end simultaneously shifting into register with progressively changing portions of said increasing and decreasing clearance spaces in corresponding amounts, whereby said inlet and outlet ports in all positions permit the same amount of reverse circulation and reduced volumetric capacity.

3. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 2, in which each end closure is provided with two diametrically opposite ports, each port having a peripheral dimension suflicient to maintain effective communication with substantially onefourth of the peripheral extent of said variable clearance space.

4. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 2, in which said ports are stationary and said peripheral wall is circumferentially movable.

5. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 4, in which said peripheral wall is the inner surface of a movable liner; said liner having an irregular inner surface and a circular outer surface; said enclosing means including a stationary peripheral ring outside said liner to support and guide said liner. 7

6. A fluid pump or motor acoording to claim 5, in which said stationary peripheral ring has axially facing annular end surfaces; said end closures being aflixed to ends of said stationary peripheral ring. i

7. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 2, in which said slots are radial with plane parallel sides; and each piston is a cage having plane faces in sliding contact with said slot sides and a roller rotatably housed in said cage and projecting radially beyond the same to engage said peripheral wall. v

8. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 2, in which said pistons are of greater density than the fluid to be pumped and float freely in said slots, being held against said peripheral wall by centrifugal force during active periods.

9. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 2, in which said rotor is provided with close-in passages communicating with the bottom of each slot below the piston and debouching axially through both ends of said rotor; said end closures each having a close-in port positioned at the same radial distance as said close-in passages and in radial alignment with an outer peripheral port registering with said peripheral clearance space; whereby the radial movement of said pistons pumps an additional supplementary volume of fluid into and out of the slot bottoms.

10. A fluid pump or motor according to claim 9, in which eachclose-in port is directly connected with the corresponding peripheral port, whereby the fluid pumped in the slot bottoms is merged with that pumped in the peripheral clearance space into a single stream.

CARL J. DELEGARD.

, REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date Re. 23,086 I-Ioll Feb. 22, 19 9 559,324 Dyer Apr. 28, 1896 1,136,756 Baker et al Apr. 20, 1915 1,482,807 Newberg Feb. 5, 1924 1,749,121 Barlow Mar. 4, 1930 2,166,423 Clark July 18, 1939 2,221,308 Dischert Nov. 12, 1940 2,426,491 Dillon Aug. 26, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 136,681 Great Britain Dec. 24, 1919 147,224 Switzerland j Aug. 1, 1931 186,271' Great Britain Sept. 28,1922 404,134 Germany Oct. 18, 1924 415,425 Germany June 19, 1925, 421,374

' Germany NOV. 11, 1925

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Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2710581A (en) * 1951-10-26 1955-06-14 New York Air Brake Co Rotary pump
US2790391A (en) * 1954-11-19 1957-04-30 James W F Holl Two stage variable delivery vane-type pump
US2797643A (en) * 1953-12-07 1957-07-02 Motor Products Corp Hydraulic pump structure
US2861517A (en) * 1952-07-26 1958-11-25 American Brake Shoe Co Vane pump
US2862455A (en) * 1954-09-03 1958-12-02 Oilgear Co Hydrodynamic machine
US2880677A (en) * 1956-01-23 1959-04-07 James L Grupen Variable volume vane pump
US2945451A (en) * 1953-04-20 1960-07-19 David E Griswold Hydraulic motor and/or pump
US2972311A (en) * 1956-12-19 1961-02-21 Gen Motors Corp Pump or motor
US3008419A (en) * 1958-11-13 1961-11-14 Constantinos H Vlachos Combined motor and pump
US3043232A (en) * 1958-01-22 1962-07-10 Edward H Rose Opposed rotor radial piston pumps
US3091230A (en) * 1961-05-04 1963-05-28 Cav Ltd Liquid fuel pumps for internal combustion engines
US3103893A (en) * 1960-06-30 1963-09-17 New York Air Brake Co Variable displacement engine
US3162141A (en) * 1962-10-04 1964-12-22 Constantinos H Vlachos Fluid flow device
US3165068A (en) * 1960-06-27 1965-01-12 American Brake Shoe Co Fluid power apparatus
US3589841A (en) * 1970-01-28 1971-06-29 Gen Electric Contaminant separation from a rotary vane pump
US3619089A (en) * 1970-03-13 1971-11-09 Automatic Radio Mfg Co Fluid-pressure device
DE2157770A1 (en) * 1970-11-25 1972-06-08
US3699848A (en) * 1968-05-23 1972-10-24 Cam Rotors Ltd Radial piston fluid pressure motor
US3824045A (en) * 1971-02-22 1974-07-16 Ct Techniki Okretowej Przed Pa Variable-capacity sliding-vane pump
US3884124A (en) * 1973-04-19 1975-05-20 Reliance Electric Co Hydraulic device
US4177024A (en) * 1976-05-14 1979-12-04 Kaltenbach & Voigt Gmbh & Co. Vane air motor with eccentric adjustment ring and bearing ring for vane ends
US4316706A (en) * 1978-06-01 1982-02-23 Crooke Michael D Variable displacement vane pump with non-fluctuating flow
WO2000020760A1 (en) * 1998-10-07 2000-04-13 Ker-Train Holdings, Ltd. Rotary pump
US20040050246A1 (en) * 2000-09-04 2004-03-18 Tsutomu Takahashi Rotary fluid machine

Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US559324A (en) * 1896-04-28 I t dyer
US1136756A (en) * 1913-12-23 1915-04-20 Baker Hansen Mfg Company Rotary pump.
GB136681A (en) * 1919-01-13 1919-12-24 Herbert Edward Peacock Improvements in or relating to Hydraulic Transmission Mechanism.
GB186271A (en) * 1921-11-23 1922-09-28 John Alexander Mair Improvements in rotary pumps
US1482807A (en) * 1921-08-31 1924-02-05 Westinghouse Electric & Mfg Co Regulator for rotary pumps and motors
DE404134C (en) * 1923-01-09 1924-10-18 Erwin Sturm Pump or engine with rotating pistons
DE415425C (en) * 1922-07-01 1925-06-19 Erwin Sturm Fluessigkeitsgetriebe
DE421374C (en) * 1923-01-09 1925-11-11 Erwin Sturm Piston seal for pumps or engines with rotary forcibly implemented and during their radial movement relieved piston
US1749121A (en) * 1928-02-16 1930-03-04 Lester P Barlow Rotary pump
CH147224A *
US2166423A (en) * 1936-05-04 1939-07-18 Max J Clark Hydraulic device
US2221308A (en) * 1937-10-18 1940-11-12 George J Dischert Hydraulic power transmission mechanism
US2426491A (en) * 1944-04-01 1947-08-26 Irving W Dillon Variable delivery movable vane pump for a fluid transmission mechanism
USRE23086E (en) * 1949-02-22 Variable delivery rotary pump

Patent Citations (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US559324A (en) * 1896-04-28 I t dyer
CH147224A *
USRE23086E (en) * 1949-02-22 Variable delivery rotary pump
US1136756A (en) * 1913-12-23 1915-04-20 Baker Hansen Mfg Company Rotary pump.
GB136681A (en) * 1919-01-13 1919-12-24 Herbert Edward Peacock Improvements in or relating to Hydraulic Transmission Mechanism.
US1482807A (en) * 1921-08-31 1924-02-05 Westinghouse Electric & Mfg Co Regulator for rotary pumps and motors
GB186271A (en) * 1921-11-23 1922-09-28 John Alexander Mair Improvements in rotary pumps
DE415425C (en) * 1922-07-01 1925-06-19 Erwin Sturm Fluessigkeitsgetriebe
DE404134C (en) * 1923-01-09 1924-10-18 Erwin Sturm Pump or engine with rotating pistons
DE421374C (en) * 1923-01-09 1925-11-11 Erwin Sturm Piston seal for pumps or engines with rotary forcibly implemented and during their radial movement relieved piston
US1749121A (en) * 1928-02-16 1930-03-04 Lester P Barlow Rotary pump
US2166423A (en) * 1936-05-04 1939-07-18 Max J Clark Hydraulic device
US2221308A (en) * 1937-10-18 1940-11-12 George J Dischert Hydraulic power transmission mechanism
US2426491A (en) * 1944-04-01 1947-08-26 Irving W Dillon Variable delivery movable vane pump for a fluid transmission mechanism

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2710581A (en) * 1951-10-26 1955-06-14 New York Air Brake Co Rotary pump
US2861517A (en) * 1952-07-26 1958-11-25 American Brake Shoe Co Vane pump
US2945451A (en) * 1953-04-20 1960-07-19 David E Griswold Hydraulic motor and/or pump
US2797643A (en) * 1953-12-07 1957-07-02 Motor Products Corp Hydraulic pump structure
US2862455A (en) * 1954-09-03 1958-12-02 Oilgear Co Hydrodynamic machine
US2790391A (en) * 1954-11-19 1957-04-30 James W F Holl Two stage variable delivery vane-type pump
US2880677A (en) * 1956-01-23 1959-04-07 James L Grupen Variable volume vane pump
US2972311A (en) * 1956-12-19 1961-02-21 Gen Motors Corp Pump or motor
US3043232A (en) * 1958-01-22 1962-07-10 Edward H Rose Opposed rotor radial piston pumps
US3008419A (en) * 1958-11-13 1961-11-14 Constantinos H Vlachos Combined motor and pump
US3165068A (en) * 1960-06-27 1965-01-12 American Brake Shoe Co Fluid power apparatus
US3103893A (en) * 1960-06-30 1963-09-17 New York Air Brake Co Variable displacement engine
US3091230A (en) * 1961-05-04 1963-05-28 Cav Ltd Liquid fuel pumps for internal combustion engines
US3162141A (en) * 1962-10-04 1964-12-22 Constantinos H Vlachos Fluid flow device
US3699848A (en) * 1968-05-23 1972-10-24 Cam Rotors Ltd Radial piston fluid pressure motor
US3589841A (en) * 1970-01-28 1971-06-29 Gen Electric Contaminant separation from a rotary vane pump
US3619089A (en) * 1970-03-13 1971-11-09 Automatic Radio Mfg Co Fluid-pressure device
DE2157770A1 (en) * 1970-11-25 1972-06-08
US3717423A (en) * 1970-11-25 1973-02-20 Sperry Rand Corp Power transmission
US3824045A (en) * 1971-02-22 1974-07-16 Ct Techniki Okretowej Przed Pa Variable-capacity sliding-vane pump
US3884124A (en) * 1973-04-19 1975-05-20 Reliance Electric Co Hydraulic device
US4177024A (en) * 1976-05-14 1979-12-04 Kaltenbach & Voigt Gmbh & Co. Vane air motor with eccentric adjustment ring and bearing ring for vane ends
US4316706A (en) * 1978-06-01 1982-02-23 Crooke Michael D Variable displacement vane pump with non-fluctuating flow
WO2000020760A1 (en) * 1998-10-07 2000-04-13 Ker-Train Holdings, Ltd. Rotary pump
US6637313B1 (en) * 1998-10-07 2003-10-28 Ker-Train Holdings Ltd. Rotary pump
US20040050246A1 (en) * 2000-09-04 2004-03-18 Tsutomu Takahashi Rotary fluid machine
US6846163B2 (en) * 2000-09-04 2005-01-25 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Rotary fluid machine having rotor segments on the outer periphery of a rotor core

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