US2610652A - Pile fabric loom - Google Patents

Pile fabric loom Download PDF

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US2610652A
US2610652A US193575A US19357550A US2610652A US 2610652 A US2610652 A US 2610652A US 193575 A US193575 A US 193575A US 19357550 A US19357550 A US 19357550A US 2610652 A US2610652 A US 2610652A
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pile
hooks
bar
yarns
uprights
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US193575A
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Samuel P Parker
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Callaway Mills Co
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Callaway Mills Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D03WEAVING
    • D03DWOVEN FABRICS; METHODS OF WEAVING; LOOMS
    • D03D27/00Woven pile fabrics
    • D03D27/02Woven pile fabrics wherein the pile is formed by warp or weft
    • D03D27/06Warp pile fabrics
    • D03D27/08Terry fabrics

Description

Sept. 1'6, 1952 s. P. PARKER PILE FABRIC LOOM 5 Shoots-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 2. 1950 46' *544, 43 d6 La* O A fm JW M QM W u a, ao 7\H Jaw o J\, w W W Sept. 16, 1952 s. P. PARKER PILE FABRIC LOOII 5 Shoots- Sheet 2 Filed NOV. 2, 1950 Sept. 16, 1952 s. P. PARKER PILE FABRIC LOOM 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. ,2, 1950 @ya 50a l Patented Sept. 16, 1952 PILE EABRIC Loon I SamuelP. Parker, La Grange, Ga.. assiznor to' Callaway Mills Company, La Grange, Ga., a corporation of Georgia Application November 2, 195o, semi No. 193,515
4 claims. (criss-ss) This invention relates to pile fabric looms provided with means for periodically engaging and drawing out pile yarns from the shed to form loops, which are bound in place, as the weaving continues, to form a pile. lSuch looms are ordinarily employed in the weaving of fabrics having a pile of loops of such length, thatthey cannot be made on pile fabric loomshaving wires over which the pile yarns are raised to form pile loops. More particularly, the invention is concerned with a .loom having a novel pile forming mechanism of the type described, which is superior to those heretofore devised, in that the shedding and shuttle motions of the loom may be operated continuously and need not be stopped during the drawing out of the pile loops.
The new pile loop mechanism issimilarin some respects to that disclosed in myco-pending application, Ser. No. 151,370, filed March 23, 1950, and includes a bar carrying hooks and mounted for periodic swinging movement back and forward with the lay. During the movement of the bar, it is rocked about an axis extending lengthwise of the bar and, upon its backward movement, the hooks carried by the bar pass between the pile warp yarns in the upper line of the shed. The reed is then shifted lengthwise on the lay to cause the yarns to be caught by the hooks, so that loops of the yarns are drawn out by the hooks, as the bar moves forward. The new mechanism is an improvement over that of Athe co-pending application in that the means for supporting and actuating the hook bar are of simpler construction. Also the hook bar is of novel construction and can carryy more hooks than the prior bar, so that the fabric produced has a denser pile. In addition, the hooks of the new bar may engage the pile warp yarns in such manner as y to produce shorterloops than those, whichcan be made by the .mechanism of vthe co-pending application.
For a better understanding of the invention, reference may be made to the accompanying drawing in which:
Fig. 1 is a vertical longitudinal section through the new loom with parts omitted;
Fig. y2 is a sectional viewon .they line vl---Z of Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a fragmentary plan view on the line 3--3 of Fig. 4 showing the vhook bar and the operating means therefor; n
Figs. 4 and 5 are fragmentary vertical longitudinal sectional views .showing theoperation of the hook bar;
Fig. .6 is an exploded perspective view showing the operating means for the hook bar;
Fig. 'I is a fragmentary horizontal 'sectional view showing the reed shifted to cause the hooks to engage the pile warp yarns;
Fig. .8 isa view similar to Fig. .7 showing the reed restored to its original position; f
Figs. '9 and 1-0 are fragmentary planand front elevational views, respectively, of one form of the hook bar; and
Figs. 1,1 kand l2 are fragmentary plan and front elevational views, respectively, of another form of the hook bar.
The loomillustrated in the drawings comprises the usual sides I5 connected at one end by a breast beam I8, .over which the woven fabric vI1 (shown as plain goods, for convenience) passes to the take-up roll I8. The ground warp yarns I8 'are supplied .from a beam 20 mounted in the loom sides and vpass from the beam over a whip roll 2| and thence vto a pair of conventional harness frames 22, 23. The pile warp yarns 24 are drawn from a. supply (not shown) and pass beneath a guide roller 25, over a rubber-covered friction roller 26, and .beneath abar 21 mounted in the .ends of arms 21a, the other ends of which are pivoted von the shaft 26a of roller 26. From i the bar 21, the pile warp yarns pass to a harness rframe 28, which is actuated to raise the pile warp yarns higher than the ground warp yarns I 9a in the upper line of the shed. The picks of filling are inserted into the sheds during the weaving operation by a shuttle S operated by the usual shuttle motion.
The loom kis provided with the usual lay 29, including swords pivotally mounted on a shaft 3| `extending between the loom sides. The lay is swung back and forward in the usual way by a connecting rod 32, driven by a crank on the loom crank shaft (not shown). `The lay carries a reed A33 made up of a base bar 34 mounted for sliding movement in Aa channel in the top of the lay, a .top bar 35 mounted for sliding movement in the reed cap 36 attached to the lay, and the usual dents 31 extending between the bars 34, 35. The base bar 34 carries a pin 38 projecting to the rear through an opening inthe wall of the channel, in which bar 34 is mounted, and the pinlies .in a slot in the end .of one arm of a bell crank 39 pivoted on the lay. The other arm of the crank is .attached to a rod 40, which is connected through-a. bell Acrank 4I and a rod 42 to a lever 43 carrying a roller L41| engaging a cam 45 on the .loompick shaft 46. As the shaft rotates, the cam acts through the connections described to shift therreed to the right on thelay, as viewed from :the front. Thismovement of the reed is opposed by a spring 41 connected at one end Vto one of the bars 48 vsupporting the reed cap 36 on the lay and, at the other end, to a bar 49 extending between the top and base bars of the reed. Thespring tends to restore vthe reed to its norm4a5l position, after .it has been shifted by carri 50, and, outwardly from each block 52, an arm 53 is mounted loosely on shaft 5|. Each arm 53 has an arcuate slot 54 through which extends a bolt 55, rigidly mounted in the adjacent block 52.
By tightening the nut 56 on the outer end of the bolt, the arm may be clamped against the block and held against angular movement relativerto the shaft. The slot in each'arm permits the angular position of the shaft relative to the arm to be varied as desired.
A hook bar assembly is mounted on shaft between uprights 50, andthe assembly includes an angle iron 51 having one flange 51a substantially horizontal and attached to a pair ofblocks 58 fast on shaft 5|. A hook bar is mounted on top of fiange 51a and the bar comprises a plurality of sections 59, each of which is provided with a plurality of wire hooks'B projecting outwardly from the bar. As shown in Figs. 9-12 inc., each hook has a straight shank lilla and a reversely bent free end 60h. The Shanks of all the hooks of the sections of the hook bar lie in a plane, and the free ends of all the hooks are offset at the same side of their respective Shanks.
Preferably, the curved end 60h of each hook lies l in a plane through its shank and each such plane lies at an angle to the lcommon plane through all the shanks. Preferably, the free ends of the hooks are turned downwardly at an angle,
as shown in Figs. l andv 12, so that, although the free end of each hook is spaced a 4substantial distance from its shank, there is a space between the free end of each hook and the shank of the adjacent hook. 4 i
Each arm 53 extends toward the front of the loom and carries a roller 6| at its free end, which runs within a guideway provided by a stationary guide 62 mounted on a bracket attached to breast beam I5. As uprights are swung back from the breast beam, the engagement of rollers 5| in the guideways causes shaft 5| to be rocked clockwise and, as uprights 50 move forward toward the breast beam, the engagement of the rollers with the guidewaysl causes the shaft to be rocked counter-clockwise.
A double-ended hook 53 is pivotally mounted on each upright 50 near the upper end thereof and the hook is connected by a rod 64 to one arm of a bell crank 65 pivoted on the upright near its lower end. The other arm of bell crank 65 is connected by a rod 66 and a second bell crank 51 to a rod E8, which i`s operated at suitable intervals during the weaving cycle by a control device (not shown) such as a dobby mechanism, a jacquard, etc. When the uprights 5D arevin their forward positions adjacent the breast beam, as shown in Fig. 1, one end of each hook 63 is engaged with a catch 69 on the'breast beam and the uprights lie in contact with rubber blocks 1U mounted on the rear face of the breast beam. The lay 29 is provided with catches 'H engageable by the rear ends of hooks 63 and also carries rubber blocks 12 engageable by uprights 50.
In the operation of the loom, the pile and ground warp yarns are formed into successive sheds in the usual way, and a pick of filling is laid in each shed by the shuttle AS and is then beaten up by the lay. 'During these operations, the uprights 50 are held'against blocks 'l0 on the breast beam by engagement of the front ends of hooks 63 with catches 69 on the breast beam. When a row of pile loops is to be formed, the lay is at its extreme forward position, and the control mechanism operates to rock hooks 63, so that their front ends are disengaged from catches 69, and the back ends of the hooks engage catches 1| on the lay, so that the uprights are connected to the lay. As the lay moves to the rear, uprights 50 move with it and carry the hook bar assembly to the rear. Also, the harness carrying pile warp yarns 24 is raised to its highest position, so that the pile hooks 60 pass between the raised pile warp yarns in' the extreme rear position of the lay, and a pick of filling is inserted. As soon as the pile hooks have passed between the pile warp yarns, the reed is shifted on the lay by cam 45 acting through the connections described, and this movement of the reed causes the pile Warp yarns to be engaged with the hooks as shown in Fig. 7. As the lay now moves forward, the uprights 53 are engaged by blocks 12 on the lay and are moved forward, and this movement of the uprights and the hook bar assembly carried thereby causes the pile hooks to draw out loops 24a of pile yarns. When uprights 5D have come into contact with blocks 10 on the breast beam, the hooks 63 on the uprights are actuated by rods 64 to engage catches 69 and the uprights are then held in the forward position adjacent the breast beam, while the weaving proceeds until another row of pile loops is to be formed.
The length of the pile loops in the fabric may be varied by adjusting the angular position of shaft 5| relative to arms 53. The formation of guides E2 is such that, as the hook bar assembly and uprights 50 move to the rear, the assembly is rocked clockwise, so that the free ends of the hooks 60 rise slightly. For longer loops, the shaft 5| and the hook bar assembly are rocked clockwise in uprights 50, so that bolts 55 lie toward the end of slots 54 adjacent the breast beam, while, for shorter loops, the assembly and shaft are swung so that bolts 55 lie at the ends of slots 54 remote from the breast beam.
When the pile hooks have drawn the pile warp yarns out of the shed to make pile loops, the uprights 50 remain at rest adjacent the breast beam for any desired number of pairs of picks. When another row of loops is to be formed, hooks 63 are actuated to secure the uprights 50 to the lay, as above described. When the pile hooks have moved forward and the weaving is proceeding, the reed is restored to its initial position on the lay, as shown in Fig. 8, and the loops may automatically free themselves from the hooks.
With the hooks made of wire and mounted so that the plane through the free end of each hook and its shank lies at an angle to the common plane through the Shanks of all the hooks, the free end of each hook preferably lying below the shank of its hook, the hooks may be brought close to the reed at the time the hooks are passed between the Warp yarns. Also, a large number of hooks may be mounted in a row on the hook bar and, at the same time, sufllcient space may be provided between the free end of each hook and the shank of the adjacent hook to permit the pile warp yarns to pass between the hooks in position to be caught thereby. The use of the new pile hook mechanism thus makes it possible to produce a dense pile made upof loops lying close together, and the pile may be shorter than those which can ordinarily be produced on a pile hook loom.
In the operation of the loom provided with the new pile hookV mechanism, the weaving proceeds e without interruption, since the pile hooks move back with the lay to engage the pile hook yarns and move forward with the lay to draw out the Y of the hook bar in sections simpliflesmaintenance of the loom, since, if a hook becomes bent or otherwise damaged' to the extent that it requires replacement, the section of the hook bar containing that hook may be readily removed and another substituted for it.
I claim:
1. In a loom having separate means for supplying pile and ground warp yarns, means for forming the warp yarns into sheds, said means raising the pile yarns higher than the ground yarns in the upper line of the Shed, means for insertingl a weft yarn into each shed, and a lay mounted to swing about an axis and carrying a reed for beating up the inserted weft yarns, the reed being mounted on the lay for endwise movement transl versely of the warp yarns, the combination of a pair of uprights pivoted below the warp yarns for swinging movement parallel to the yarns, a bar extending across and above the warp yarns and carrying a row of hooks projecting toward Jthe rear of the loom, means for mounting the bar on the uprights for pivotal movement, means for intermittently swinging the uprights backand forth with the lay to cause the hooks to pass between the raised pile warp yarns on the back movement of the uprights, means for shifting the reed endwise, when the hooks lie between the yarns, to cause the yarns to be caught by the hooks, and means acting on the mounting means to rock the bar, as the uprights move back and forward, said rocking means including an arm secured to the mounting means and a guide engaging and swinging the arm.
2. In a loom having separate means for supplying pile and ground warp yarns, means for forming the warp yarns into sheds, said means raising the pile yarns higher than the ground yarns in the upper line of the shed, means for inserting a weft yarn into each shed, and a lay mounted to swing about an axis and carrying a reed for beating up the inserted weft yarns, the reed being mounted on the lay for endwise movement trans'- versely of the warp yarns, the combination of a pair of uprights pivoted below the warp yarns for swinging movement parallel to the yarns, a bar extending across and above the warp yarns and carrying a row of hooks projecting toward the rear of the loom, a pivotal mounting for supporting the bar on the uprights for rocking movement on an axis extending lengthwise of the bar, meansffor intermittently swinging the uprights back and forth With the lay to cause the hooks to pass between the raised pile warp yarns on the back movement of the uprights, means for shifting the reed endwise, when the hooks lie between the yarns, to cause the yarns to be caught bythe hooks, an arm operatively connected to the bar, and a stationary guide engaging the arm and swinging it to rock the bar on said axis extending lengthwise of the bar, as the uprights and bar move back and forward.
3. In a loom having separate means for supplying pile and ground warp yarns, means for forming the warp yarns into sheds, said means raising the pile yarns higher than the ground yarns in the upper line of the shed, means for inserting a weft yarn into each shed, and a lay mounted to swing about an axis and carrying a reed for beating up the inserted weft yarns, the reed being mounted on the lay for endwise movement transversely of the warp yarns, the combination of a pair of uprights pivoted below the warp yarnsk for swinging movement parallel to the yarns, a bar extending across and above the warp yarns and carrying a row of hooks projecting toward the rear of the loom, a shaft mounted for rocking movement in the uprights, means for securing the bar to the shaft, means for intermittently swinging the uprightsback and forth with the lay to cause the hooks to pass between the raised pile warp yarns on the back movement of the uprights, means for shifting the reed endwise, when the hooks lie between the yarns, to cause the yarns to be caught by the hooksan arm fast on the shaft, and a stationary guide engaging the arm and swinging it to rock the shaft and bar, as the bar moves back and forth with the uprights.
4. In a loom having separate means for supplying pile and ground warp yarns, means for forming the warp yarns into sheds, said means raising the pile yarns higher than the ground yarns in the upper 'line of the shed, means for inserting a weft yarn into each shed, and a lay mounted to swing about an axis and carrying a reed for beating up the inserted weft yarns, the reed being mounted on the lay for endwise movement tra-nsversely of the warp yarns, the combination of a pair of uprights pivoted below the warp yarns for swinging movement parallel to the yarns, a bar extending across and above the warp yarns and .carrying a row of hooks projecting toward the rear of the loom, a shaft mounted for rocking movement in the uprights, means for securing the bar to the shaft,r means Iorintermittently swinging the uprights back and forth with the lay to cause the hooks to pass between the raised pile warp yarns on the back movement of the uprights, means for shifting the reed endwise,
whenthe hooks lie between the yarns, to cause the yarns to be caught by the hooks, an arm connected to the shaft for angular adjustment relative thereto, and a stationary guide engaging the arm and swinging it to rock the shaft and bar, as the bar moves back and forth with the uprights.
. SAMUEL P. PARKER.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 608,226 Sargent et al Aug. 2, 1898 1,463,886 Grosvenor et al Aug. 7, 1923' 2,353,968 Pedrazzo July 18, 1944 2,574,108 Kahn Nov. 6, 1951 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 2,689 Great Britain of 1863 273,059 Great Britain June 30, 1927
US193575A 1950-11-02 1950-11-02 Pile fabric loom Expired - Lifetime US2610652A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2750964A (en) * 1954-04-16 1956-06-19 Masland C H & Sons Weaving with hook engagement of selected pile ends
US2760520A (en) * 1955-05-02 1956-08-28 Firth Carpet Company Inc Pile yarn attachment for carpet looms
US2834806A (en) * 1953-05-04 1958-05-13 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Manufacture of pile carpets
EP0310847A1 (en) * 1987-10-09 1989-04-12 Fillattice S.P.A. Reed for looms

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US608226A (en) * 1898-08-02 Min walker
US1463886A (en) * 1923-08-07 Minster
GB273059A (en) * 1926-05-12 1927-06-30 Francis Herbert Oldroyd Improvements in means for producing the pile of woven pile fabrics
US2353968A (en) * 1941-04-09 1944-07-18 Emil R Pedrazzo Loom
US2574108A (en) * 1949-10-26 1951-11-06 Kahn Benjamin Machine for making looped or tufted fabrics

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US608226A (en) * 1898-08-02 Min walker
US1463886A (en) * 1923-08-07 Minster
GB273059A (en) * 1926-05-12 1927-06-30 Francis Herbert Oldroyd Improvements in means for producing the pile of woven pile fabrics
US2353968A (en) * 1941-04-09 1944-07-18 Emil R Pedrazzo Loom
US2574108A (en) * 1949-10-26 1951-11-06 Kahn Benjamin Machine for making looped or tufted fabrics

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2834806A (en) * 1953-05-04 1958-05-13 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Manufacture of pile carpets
US2750964A (en) * 1954-04-16 1956-06-19 Masland C H & Sons Weaving with hook engagement of selected pile ends
US2760520A (en) * 1955-05-02 1956-08-28 Firth Carpet Company Inc Pile yarn attachment for carpet looms
EP0310847A1 (en) * 1987-10-09 1989-04-12 Fillattice S.P.A. Reed for looms

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