US2597390A - Multiple grain scalper - Google Patents

Multiple grain scalper Download PDF

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US2597390A
US2597390A US601491A US60149145A US2597390A US 2597390 A US2597390 A US 2597390A US 601491 A US601491 A US 601491A US 60149145 A US60149145 A US 60149145A US 2597390 A US2597390 A US 2597390A
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grain
screen
screens
scalper
pair
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US601491A
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Shepardson Anthony Hill
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HAAKY Manufacturing Co
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HAAKY Manufacturing Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B02CRUSHING, PULVERISING, OR DISINTEGRATING; PREPARATORY TREATMENT OF GRAIN FOR MILLING
    • B02BPREPARING GRAIN FOR MILLING; REFINING GRANULAR FRUIT TO COMMERCIAL PRODUCTS BY WORKING THE SURFACE
    • B02B3/00Hulling; Husking; Decorticating; Polishing; Removing the awns; Degerming
    • B02B3/04Hulling; Husking; Decorticating; Polishing; Removing the awns; Degerming by means of rollers

Description

May 20, 1952 A. H. SHEPARDSON MULTIPLE GRAIN SCALPER 2 sl-EETs sl'lE-ET 1 Filed June 25, 1945 N NE Q N [NVENTOR 121% 556300244022 m fan:

ATTO El y 20, 1952 A. H. SHEPARDSON 2,597,390

MULTIPLE GRAIN SCALPER Filed June 25, 1945 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 ATTORNEY Patented May 20, 1.952

MULTIPLE GRAIN SCALPER Anthony Hill Shepardson,' Minneapolis, Minn., assignor to Haaky Manufacturing Company, St. Raul, Minn a corporation of Minnesota Application-lune 2 1945, Serial Nj 01149 1 Claim. (or. 209285) invention relates to in improvement in multiple scalper, wherein it is desired to provide a scalper which combines a multiplicity of scalp ing screens.

I have found that in the use of scalpers of the horizontal cylindrical screen type difilculty is experienced in obtaining the necessary volume in a small area with a single screen. By varying the length of the screen the capacity of such a scalper can be increased. However, difiiculty is experienced in properly spreading the grain to utilize the entire screen length and other features of difiiculty are also involved in the use of an elongated horizontal screen. In order to overcome these previous difficulties, I have devised a. scalper using a multiplicity of horizontal scalp-ing screens which are designed to receive grain from a common source of supply.

Anobiect, of the present invention is to provide a scalper which comprises a pair of cylindrical screens mounted on horizontal axes and travelling in opposite directions. These screens are preferably mounted on substantially parallel axes. support onto which grain is fed from a suitable source of supply. This grain is brought into contact with the surface of the screen cylinder in such a way that the grain passes through the apertures of the screen while impurities are carried over the top of the screen and deposited in a suitable receptacle or chute.

A feature of the present invention resides in the use of a single grain support forsupplying grain to. a pair of oppositely rotatingscalper screens. As a result the screens may be-relative- 1y short in length while providing a screen sure face equal to that of a screen more than twice the length of either single screen.

I have found that difliculty. has been experienced in feeding grain equally to a horizontal scalper screen throughout the length of the screen. Thus in the use of an elongated screen it is often found that a part of the length of the screen is not operating at its greatest efiiciency. By providing a pair of parallel cylindrical screens of relatively short length operating in opposite directions, the use of the entire screen area at it utmost effectiveness is insured, thus increasing the efliciency of the apparatus.

A further feature of the present invention resides in forcing a draft of air through the grain Between the screens is provided a grain ing the grain into the scalper.

dust and other impurities. are thus removed before the grain is scalped thus decreasing the vol; ume of material actually passing over the scalping screens.

A further feature of the present invention ree sides in the provision of an aspirating means in combination with a double scalping unit. The velocityof the air passing through the grain is dependent upon the area of the passage through which the grain and air travel. For a given volume of grain it would be necessary to use a screen of more than twice the length in order to produce the scalped volume of the double unit I have produced. As a result it would be necessary to doublethe. width of the inlet passage feeding grain to a single cylindrical unit. The doubling of the size of the passage would greatly increase the amount of air necessary to properly aspirate the grain. Thus by producing a double scalping unit I greatly reduce the volume of air which must be forced through the scalper to aspirate the grain.

A further feature of the present invention resides in providing an air inlet on one side of the grain discharging hopper and providing an air outlet on the other side. of this hopper. As a result the air travel through the scalper is extremely short and as a result very effective.

- A further feature of the present invention lies in the provision of an automatic hopper for feed- This automatic hopper closes when no grain is being fed and opens an amount proportional to the weight of grain in the hopper inlet. Thus if a large supply of grain is available the hopper will open wider to allow more grain to drop. Similarly if there is a small amount of grain in the inlet the hopper will partially close. This arrangement is particularly desirable in combination with the air aspirator feature as it, insures the spreading of the grain in a curtain of a thickness dependent upon the amount of grain in the hopper inlet,

These and other objects and novel features of my invention will be, more clearly and fully set forth in the following specification and claim.

Inthe drawings forming a part of my specification:

Figure 1 is a vertical Section through the scalper showing the arrangement of the screens.

Figure 2 is a vertical section taken on a plane at right angles to that of Figure 1 The multiple scalper A. illustrated in the drawings. includes a rectangular base frame iii of angle iron or the 11KB designed to rest, upon the floor of the mill. Angle iron corner posts tween these separate sheets are not illustrated,

the drawing indicating merely the outline shape of the parts. This lower portion of the housing I3 is provided with an outwardly extending flange [4 about its upper extremity which rests upon the frame l2 and is supported thereby. The housing includes opposed side walls l5 and I6 which are connected by inclined wall portions l1 and |9 defining a hopper and having a center opening 29 at the bottom center thereof. This opening 26 leads to a suitable grain duct which may direct grain to any following process.

The lower portion l3 of the casing or housing also includes a pair of tailings chutes 2| and 22 which are connected between the upper ends of the inclined walls l1 and I9 and the adjacent ends of the frame |2.v These tailings chutes 2| and 22 lead to suitable ducts into which the tailings may be discharged.

The upper portion 23 of the housing is provided with an outwardly extending flange 24 encircling the lower edge thereof and which is designed to rest upon the flange l4. Thus the two parts of the housing are shown supported by the frame l2 by means of an outwardly extending circumferential flange on each housing bottom capableof resting upon the frame. Suitable bolts or other means, not illustrated in the drawings, are employed for holding the casing parts in assembled relationship.

The upper portion 23 of the housing includes a pair of opposed parallel side walls 25 and 26 which are connected by a connecting sheet 21. In the form illustrated the upper portion of the housing is flat on its upper surface and is curved at its ends to fit. about the cylindrical screens which will be later described in detail.

A pair of bearings 29 are supported on each of the two opposite sides of the frame I2 and supporting parallel screen shafts 30 and 3|. These shafts are driven by any suitable means such as by the beveled gears 32 and 33 which engage .cooperating bevel gears 34 and 35 on a longitudinally extending drive shaft 36. The drive shaft 36 is supported by'suitable bearings 31 projecting from the sides of the housing or from the frame I2, and the bevel gears 34 and 35 are so arranged as to drive the shafts 36 and 3| in opposite directions. A pulley 39 is provided on the shaft 36 by means of which the shaft 36 may be rotated by any suitable source of power supply.

A pair of spaced spiders 46 are mounted on the shaft 39 to support a cylindrical screen 4| therebetween. A similar pair of spiders 42 are mounted upon the shaft 3| to support a cylindrical screen 43. The screens 4| and 43 are perforated with apertures of the proper shape and size to permit separation between the desired type of grain and foreign materials. Obviously the larger the apertures in the screen the larger size of particles will pass therethrough. Inspection doors 44 are provided at each end of the housing portion 23 to close inspection apertures 45 therein.

In order to provide a seal between the cylindrical screen and the tailings chutes, baflle members 46 and 41 are secured to the upper ends of the chutes 2| and 22 respectively. Flexible seals 49 are mounted on these bafiles 46 and 41 to seal against the surface of the screen and to direct the tailings into the tailings chutes 2| and 22.

Between the screens 4| and 43 I provide a platform 50 which acts as a grain support and which has a central divider 5| thereupon. The divider 5| directs grain toward one or the other of the screens and always urges the grain into position to bank up against the screen. Flexible seals 52 are supported by the edges of the platform 56 so as to prevent the leakage of grain or foreign'particles between the platform and the screen.

A pair'of baffies 53 and 54 encircle the circumference of the green cylinders 4| and 43 to confine the grain between the ends of the cylindrical screens. The baffles 53 and 54 extend from the connecting member 21 toward the periphery of the screen terminating in spaced relation to the surface of the screens. Cooperable ring shaped angles 55 and 56 are provided on the screens 4| and 43 adjacent opposite ends thereof, one webof these angles extending outwardly from the surface of the screen. A pair of semicircular clamping plates 51 and 59 are secured to each bafile 53 and 54, these clamping plates extending on opposite sides of the angles 55 and 56. These clamping plates 51 and 59 overlap with the outwardly extending flange of L the angle rings 55 and 56 so that grain can not pass over the ends of the cylindrical screens 4| and 43. Sealing pads 60 of felt or any other suitable means may be secured to the inner faces of the clamping rings 51 and 59 so as to form a tight seal between the rings 55 and 56' in registry with an aperture 6| in this connecting member 21 I provide an inlet conduit 62' having an outwardly tapered lower extremity- 63. The upper end of the inlet conduit 62 is flanged at 64 to permit the same to be secured to an adjoining conduit portion or the like. An aperture 65 in the lower tapered portion 63 is open to the atmosphere, while an opposite'aperture66 in the opposite tapered wall 61 is connected to a suction conduit 69. The suction conduit 69 is connected to the intake of a fan or blower 16 which is driven by a pulley 1| secured to the fan or blower shaft 12.

A pair of parallel shafts13 and 14 extend through the inlet conduit 62 above the level of theapertures 65 and 66 and the outwardly flared lower end 63. Upon these shafts are mounted a pair of gates or baffles 15 and 16. These baffles tend to restrict the entrance of grain into the scalper and are normally held in closed position by the weight mechanism which will now be described.

Externally of the inlet conduit 62 an arm 11 is mounted upon the shaft 13 and a second arm 19 is secured intermediate its ends to the shaft 14. One end of the arm 19 overlaps an end of the arm 11. The arm 19 is slotted to receive a bolt or pivot slptted at '80 to supporta bolt or the inlet conduit 62 from a suitable source of supply. This grain falls upon the gates or bafiies '15 and 16. The weight of this grain tends to pivot the gates 75 and i6 apart. This action raises the weight 82 to some extent. As the weight of the grain in the inlet increases the gates 75 and 16 will be spread farther apart. Should the supply of grain diminish the gates 75 and 16 move together. Thus the grain is prevented from falling in large quantities and intermittently into the scalper, the gates acting to feed the grain gradually into the scalper in accordance with the weight of grain in the inlet.

The fan or suction blower in acts to draw air through the aperture 65, below the gates and "I6 and through the conduit 69. Thus the grain is spread into a thin dropping film by the gates and the air passing through this film picks up any light particles, such as dust, chaff, straw, and the like and separates this light material from the grain and larger impurities. In other words, the grain is spread into a thin film and aspirated as it drops into the scalper. The dropping grain falls on the divider 5| and is directed thereby toward the perforated surfaces of the screens 4| and 42. These screens are travelling in opposite directions, the screen 4| travelling in a counter-clockwise direction while the screen 43 travels in a clockwise direction as viewed in Figure 1. The larger impurities are carried by movement of the screen over the top surface of the screen. These impurities are dropped into the tailings chutes 2| and 22. The grain and small heavy particles drop through the perforated screen into the interior thereof. The grain on the interior of the screen may either again pass out through the screen or may fall out through the open portions of the-spiders forming the cylindrical ends. In either event the grain falls into the hopper formed by the lower portion 13 of the housing and into the aperture from where it is conducted to the next step of cleaning or separating.

During its engagement with the screens the grain is confined within the ends of the screen by the bafiies 53 and 54. The entire housing is preferably substantially air tight so that the air withdrawn from the housing must enter through the inlet 65 and thus pass directly through the layer of grain dropping between the gates 15 and 16.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my multiple scalper, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiments thereof, I desire to have it understood that ob vious changes may be made within the scope of the following claim without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

A grain scalper comprising a pair of parallel cylindrical screens mounted upon parallel horizontal shafts, said screens having apertures therethrough of proper size to permit grain to pass therethrough, a grain support between the screens and confronting said screens at approximately the level of said shafts,' said support having an upstanding divider thereon with sloping side walls for urging the grain toward said screens, means spaced substantially above said support for directing grain onto 'said support throughout the length of said support at the locus of said divider, and means for rotating said screens in a direction so as toimove the portions thereof adjacent said support upwardly with respect to said support.

ANTHONY HILL SHEPARDSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 369,768 Booker Sept. 13, 1887 457,923 Morse Aug. 18, 1891 547,600 Engelmayer Oct. 8, 1895 650,034 Carkeek May 22, 1900 750,092 Cornwall Jan. 19, 1904 815,070 Culver Mar. 13, 1906 1,212,179 Borcherdt Jan. 16, 1917 1,214,189 Laumeister Jan. 30, 1917 1,524,909 Buchan Feb. 3, 1925 1,685,512 Varusky Sept. 25, 1928 1,840,505 Gray Jan. 12, 1932 1,920,190 Dunkin Aug. 1, 1933 1,947,035 Covington Feb, 13, 1934 2,134,216 Sutter Oct. 25, 1938 2,183,511 Bookwalter Dec. 12, 1939 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 2,374 Great Britain Feb. 2, 1899

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Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US369768A (en) * 1887-09-13 booker
US457923A (en) * 1891-08-18 moese
US547600A (en) * 1895-10-08 Shots from dissolved cellulose
GB189902374A (en) * 1899-02-02 1899-03-25 John Corry Fell Improvements in Grain Separators.
US650034A (en) * 1899-11-10 1900-05-22 John Carkeek Screening device.
US750092A (en) * 1904-01-19 Feeder for grain-separators
US815070A (en) * 1905-01-09 1906-03-13 William W Culver Grain-separator.
US1212179A (en) * 1916-01-07 1917-01-16 New Jersey Zinc Co Revolving screen and method of screening.
US1214189A (en) * 1916-03-02 1917-01-30 Anton Laumeister Separator.
US1524909A (en) * 1923-04-18 1925-02-03 William P Buchan Grain separator
US1685512A (en) * 1927-08-17 1928-09-25 Carter Mayhew Mfg Co Scalper
US1840505A (en) * 1927-11-17 1932-01-12 Carl C Gray Grain cleaning machine
US1920190A (en) * 1929-03-30 1933-08-01 Damon D Dunkin Apparatus for grading material
US1947035A (en) * 1931-08-01 1934-02-13 General L Covington Gold-saving apparatus
US2134216A (en) * 1936-08-22 1938-10-25 Sutter Ole Seed grading and cleaning apparatus
US2183511A (en) * 1938-12-17 1939-12-12 Frank L Bookwalter Rotary seed cleaner

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US369768A (en) * 1887-09-13 booker
US457923A (en) * 1891-08-18 moese
US547600A (en) * 1895-10-08 Shots from dissolved cellulose
US750092A (en) * 1904-01-19 Feeder for grain-separators
GB189902374A (en) * 1899-02-02 1899-03-25 John Corry Fell Improvements in Grain Separators.
US650034A (en) * 1899-11-10 1900-05-22 John Carkeek Screening device.
US815070A (en) * 1905-01-09 1906-03-13 William W Culver Grain-separator.
US1212179A (en) * 1916-01-07 1917-01-16 New Jersey Zinc Co Revolving screen and method of screening.
US1214189A (en) * 1916-03-02 1917-01-30 Anton Laumeister Separator.
US1524909A (en) * 1923-04-18 1925-02-03 William P Buchan Grain separator
US1685512A (en) * 1927-08-17 1928-09-25 Carter Mayhew Mfg Co Scalper
US1840505A (en) * 1927-11-17 1932-01-12 Carl C Gray Grain cleaning machine
US1920190A (en) * 1929-03-30 1933-08-01 Damon D Dunkin Apparatus for grading material
US1947035A (en) * 1931-08-01 1934-02-13 General L Covington Gold-saving apparatus
US2134216A (en) * 1936-08-22 1938-10-25 Sutter Ole Seed grading and cleaning apparatus
US2183511A (en) * 1938-12-17 1939-12-12 Frank L Bookwalter Rotary seed cleaner

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