US2589146A - Submersible deepwater drilling apparatus - Google Patents

Submersible deepwater drilling apparatus Download PDF

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US2589146A
US2589146A US119791A US11979149A US2589146A US 2589146 A US2589146 A US 2589146A US 119791 A US119791 A US 119791A US 11979149 A US11979149 A US 11979149A US 2589146 A US2589146 A US 2589146A
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ground
anchor
water
column
platform
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US119791A
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Charles T Samuelson
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Charles T Samuelson
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B17/04Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction
    • E02B17/06Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction for immobilising, e.g. using wedges or clamping rings
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B17/02Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor placed by lowering the supporting construction to the bottom, e.g. with subsequent fixing thereto
    • E02B17/021Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor placed by lowering the supporting construction to the bottom, e.g. with subsequent fixing thereto with relative movement between supporting construction and platform
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B17/04Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction
    • E02B17/08Equipment specially adapted for raising, lowering, or immobilising the working platform relative to the supporting construction for raising or lowering
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B2017/0056Platforms with supporting legs
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E02HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING; FOUNDATIONS; SOIL SHIFTING
    • E02BHYDRAULIC ENGINEERING
    • E02B17/00Artificial islands mounted on piles or like supports, e.g. platforms on raisable legs or offshore constructions; Construction methods therefor
    • E02B2017/0056Platforms with supporting legs
    • E02B2017/0073Details of sea bottom engaging footing
    • E02B2017/0086Large footings connecting several legs or serving as a reservoir for the storage of oil or gas

Description

March 11, 1952 c. T. SAMUELSON 2,589,146
SUBMERSIBLE DEEPWATER DRILLING APPARATUS Filed Oct. 6, 1949 5 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR C HARLES TI SAMUELSON ATTORNEYS March 11, 1952 c. 'r. SAMUELSON SUBMERSIBLE DEEPWATER DRILLING APPARATUS 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR CHARLES T. SAMUELSON Filed Oct. 6. 1949 ATTORNEYS March 11, 1952 C. T. SAMUELSON SUBMERSIBLE DEEPWATER DRILLING APPARATUS Filed 001:. 6, 19 9 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR CHARLES T. SAMUELSON ATTORNEE March 11, 1952 c. T. SAMUELSON 2,589,146
SUBMERSIBLE DEEPWATER DRILLING APPARATUS Filed 001;. 6, 1949 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 'l i 4 9 I 4 F 3o INVENTOR CHARLES T. SAMUELSON ATTORNEYS 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I I l INVENTOR CHARLES T. SAMUELSON BY MM ATTORNEYS l l I I I II C. T. SAMUELSON SUBMERSIBLE DEEPWATER DRILLING APPARATUS March 11, 1952 Filed Oct. 6, 1949 Patented Mar. 11, 1952 OFFICE SUBMERSIBLE DEEPWATER DRILLING APPARATUS Charles T. Samuelson, Houston, Tex.
Application October 6, 1949, Serial No. 119,791
11 Claims.
The present invention relates to marine vessels such as floating barges for use in sub-aqueous operations and, more particularly, to new and improved submersible means for supporting the operating equipment firmly in position above the surface of the water during oil drilling operations and the like.
An important object is to provide a floating barge with one or more submersible ground anchors having means when the vessel is submerged to rest on the ground below the surface of the water, to provide a strong, durable base or foundation for firmly supporting above the high-wave level of the water, the superstructure such as a derrick and other large and heavy equipment used in deep water oil well drilling and other subaqueous operations.
Devices heretofore used in drilling oil wells in shallow water have not been found practical or efficient for drilling wells indeep water. At present, the drilling of oil wells under deep water is usually accomplished by driving a number of costly and extra long, thin pilings up to about thirty feet above the normal water surface and mounting on these pilings a suitable operation platform. If after the cost of such aconstruction, it is found that the well isnon-productive and locationmust be abandoned, a greater cost is incurred in dismantling the parts and removing the costly steel piling so as not to create a hazard or menace to navigation. Moreover, it is extremely difficult to drive such long pilings due to their slenderness and the strong wave action to which they are subjected in deep water.
Accordingly, a further object is to overcome the deficiencies and objectional features found in apparatus previously used for deep water drilling operations, and includes associating with the working platform of a floating barge, a buoyant submersible ground anchor having one or more tubular columns or tanks 'slidably and adjustably connected to the-platform so as to be movable vertically relative thereto. Additionally, spuds or pilings axially movable in the columns are arranged to be forced into the ground below the water surface to assist in maintaining the anchors firmly in a fixed position and prevent lateral swaying or creeping movement due to wave actions or irregularities in the surface of the ground on which the anchor rests. Each ground anchor is of sufficient size and shape so that when resting on the ground below the surface of the water, it provides ample bearing surface and stability for supporting the working platform and the heavy drilling or other equipment carried thereon.
A further object comprehends the provision-of a new and improved submersible hollow ground anchor having a tubular water-tight column or trunk extending upwardly from the bottom there-- of and through its top, and which is of such length as to project above the surfaceof the water so as to support the working platform-and its associated parts above'the water. The bottom of the anchor is provided with 'a :tubular sleeve extending inwardly into the columnand arranged to constitute a guide for a spud orpilingarranged to be forced into the bottom ground to maintain the anchor in a fixed position 'andprevent the same from skidding, particularly on sloping" ground. Additionally, means are provided for conducting water or compressed air through the bottom, sides and tops of the anchor for the purpose of washing off mud, siltandother sediment material that ;might collect on the outer surface of the anchor member and :thusfacilitate the raising of the latter from the ground when such operation is necessary. Furthergin order'to impart additional weight to the submersible ground anchor after the same has been gradually filled with water and lowered on the bottom ground, suction means are provided communicating with the chamber in the anchor for allowing mud, sand, and other heavy material to be pumped into the ground anchor so that .this heavy material will replace the water which may 'be forced out through a suitable pressure valve, and thus impart additional Weight to the ground anchor in order to firmly and securely maintain thesame in engagement with the bottom ground.
Other objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description when taken in conjunctionwith the accompanying claims and drawings.
Referring to the drawings in which, .for the purpose of illustration, are shown several .preferred embodiments the invention may assume:
Figure l isv a side elevational view of. an assembled drilling unit or apparatus constructed in accordance with the present invention.
Figure 2. is afront view of Figure 1 showing thev entire drilling unit in its floating position.
Figure 3 is a view similar toFigure 2 showing the operating or working platform in its floating position and the buoyant ground anchors lowered to engage the bottom ground.
Figure 4 is a view similar tofFigure 3 but showing the operating-platform and its associated parts raised above the water and the anchors resting on the ground and in the position the parts assume during the drilling operation.
Figure 5 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional Figure 9 is a sectional plan view of a modified form of an operating platform showing the slidable guiding connection of the columns therewith.
Figure 10 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the packing box shown in Figure 5 for receiving the spud or piling.
Figure 11 is a detail sectional view of a modifled form of packing box.
Figure 12 is a detail sectional view of a modified form of ground anchor.
Figure 13 is a detail sectional view of a further modification of the ground anchor.
Figure 14 is a side elevation of a modified form of a deep water drilling apparatus.
Figure 15 is a side view of a further modification of drilling apparatus.
Figure 16 shows another form the drilling ap paratus may assume.
Figure 1'7 is a modification of a combined supporting platform and buoyant float which may be associated with the apparatus.
Referring to the drawings in which like numerals indicate like parts in the several views, there is shown, for the purpose of illustration, a floating barge or the like 20 (Fig. 1) constructed in accordance with the present invention and capable of supporting the necessary heavy equipment used for drilling oil wells into the ground under deep bodies of water and other subaqueous operations. The barge 20 includes a combined buoyant float and operating platform 2| of such size and shape as to carry thereon the derrick 22, drill casing 23 and the other equipment required for drilling under deep water. The buoyant operating platform 2| is provided with an elongated slot or bay 24 (Fig. 8) through which loosely extends the drilling tube 23 when the derrick is in operation. Below the platform 2|, as shown in Figures 1 and 2, may be positioned four ground anchor members 25, 26, 21 and 28 (Fig. 8). The ground anchors are preferably formed of metal or other suitable durable material and are hollow so as to form a buoyant compartment or chamber 29 (Fig. 5).
Extending upwardly from the bottom 30 and through the top 3| of each anchor member is one or more tubular columns or trunks 32 which preferably are circular in cross section and may be welded as at 33 to the adjacent inner walls of each of the anchor members.
As shown in Figure l, a pair of tubular columns 32 extend upwardly from each of the anchor may each be in the form of a tubular sleeve or collar having opposed flanges 36 which bear against the adjacent side of the platform 2| and are secured thereto by the bolts 31 (Fig. 1). The upper guide members may likewise be in the form of sleeves having flanges 38 connected by the bolts 39 to a bracket 40 having a base 4| which rests on top of the platform 2| and may be secured thereto by the bolts 42 (Fig. 6). A rack bar 43 may be carried by each of the columns 32 (Fig. 6) and positioned so as to coact with a pawl 44 pivoted as at 45 to a housing 46 mounted on the top of the bracket 40. The pawl 44 at its outer end is preferably provided with a weight 41 so as normally to urge the pawl into engagement with the teeth of the rack bar. Thus, it will be seen that simple and efiicient means are provided for raising and maintaining the operating platform in any desired locked position above the surface of the water.
Instead of the rack bar and pawl safety arrangement shown in Figure 6, other suitable means may be provided for releasably maintaining the working platform and its associated parts in an adjusted and safe position, such as shown in Figure 7. In this figure, a block 48 is slidably mounted in a substantially U-shaped casing 49 which is welded or otherwise suitably connected to the bracket 40. The block 48 at its outer end has teeth 50 which are arranged to to moved into locking engagement with the adjacent teeth of the rack bar 43 so as to maintain the latter in an adjusted vertical position. The inner end of the block 48 is formed with an axially disposed T-shaped slot or recess 5| in which is mounted the head of a. bolt 52 that has an externally threaded portion 53 engaging a' complementary threaded opening 54 in the outer closed end 55 of the casing. The outer exposed end of the bolt 53 is formed with a polygonal portion 56 arranged to be engaged by a suitable tool so as to move the teeth 50 of the block 48 into and out of locking engagement with the rack bar 43.
As shown in Figure 9, the tubular columns 32 that extend upwardly from each of the ground anchors 25, 26, 21 and 28 may be positioned to project through vertical openings 54 formed in the operating platform 2|, instead of having the guide members connected to the sides of the operating platform as previously described.
Water from any suitable source may be introduced into the chamber 29 of each of the ground anchor members through a pipe 55 (Fig. 5) which extends through one side of the tubular column 32 so as to communicate with a main upply pipe 56 and Which is controlled by a valve 51. The pipe 56 may be connected to any suitable pumping means, such as the reversible pump 58 that may be supported by a bracket 59 secured to the inner side of the column 32 and has an inlet pipe 60 for conducting river or sea water to the pipe 56 under pressure. Jet pipes 6| communicate with the supply pipe 56 and extend outwardly through the bottom, sides and top of each of the ground anchor members and are provided at their outer ends with nozzles 6|, for the purpose of washing off mud, silt and other bottom ground sediment that may collect on the outer surface of the anchor member when the latter is submerged to rest on the ground. Valves 62 control the flow of the fluid through the pipe One or more branch pipes 63 communicating with the pipe 56 may extend through the wall of the column 32 above the ground anchor 25 so as to further assist in removalof sediment from the top of the latter. Thechamber 29 is completely cut off from the inside of the column 32 and can be filled with water for lowering and grounding purposes bythe pipe 55 when the valve 51 is opened. Further, water can be removed from the chamber 29 for raising or lifting the anchor member "by any suitable piping or pumping machinery, such asv the reversible pump 51 subsequently to be described. Each tubular column 32 is water-tight and may vary as to its shape and size. Further, the length of the column 32 is such that when its associated anchor 25 rests-on the ground it will extend above the surfaceof the water to provide a firm support ing foundation for the operating platform 2| above the water (Fig. 4)
It is of the utmost importance in deep water drillingoper'ations to obtain a rigid and safe ground anchor condition especially when using the submersible type of ground anchor. For this reason, it is essential that each ground anchor be of sufllcient weight and have a lower center of gravity in order to facilitate the lowering or raising of the same. Accordingly, the inside of each hollowground anchor 25 may have its sides and bottom covered with concrete 64 (Fig. 5) or-other suitable non-shifting heavy material to any suitable height or level above the bottom of the anchor member that will impart sufiicient buoyancy to the anchor. In order to give additional weight to each of the ground anchors after the same has been gradually filled with water and lowered onto the bottom ground, spaced suction pipes-65 may extend through the bottom 30 of each anchor member 25 and communicate through a pipe 66 with a combined suction and pressure pump 61 that connects with a discharge pipe 68 in the chamber 29. Thus, it will be seen that when the reversible pump 6'! functions as a suction pump to draw mud, sand and other ground material into the chamber 29, the water previously introduced into the 'Pump 61 may also operate to withdraw the water from the chamber 29.
Extending axially within the column or trunk 32 is a tubular spud or piling l0 which is preferably formed with a tapered or pointed lower end 1| and is movable vertically within the column 32 by any suitable means not shown. The bottom 30 of each of the anchor members "is formed with an opening 12 and has extending upwardly above the bottom 30 into the chamber or buoyance space 29 and in axial alignment with the spud 10, a sleeve 13 which constitutes a guide for the movable spud and which is formed with a lower annular flange Hi secured to the inner surface of the bottom 30 by the bolts 15. The sleeve 13 may be also formed with an upper. annular flange 16 on which is mounted any suitable packing box structure such as the spaced metal rings 11 between which are positioned the. flexible packing members 18 that are securedtogether by the 'threadedbolts '19 extenda zssaia 6 ing throughthese members and-the flange 16 so as to be clamped into-position by the nuts 80, in order to provide a water-tight seal between the spud 10 andthe sleeve 13.
In Figure 1 1, a modified form of packing box is shown in which the sleeve 13 is provided at its upper end with-a chamber 81 in which-is positioned the flexible packing 83. The upper end of the sleeve 13 'hasan annular flange 82 to which is connected the packing gland 84 by the threaded bolts 85 secured in position by the nuts 86. The gland '84 has a centrally depending annular flange 8-4" which engages the packing 83 so as to'forcethe same in water-tight engagement with the spud 10 when the parts are assembled.
Extending axially within the spud 19 is'a pipe 8'! which at its lower end 88 may be provided with one or more outlets 89 which extend through the tapered lower end H of the spud 10 (Fig. 5). The pipe 81 is for the "purpose of jetting down or jetting up the spud 10 and is movable axially with the spud. A supply of water or compressed air may be introduced into thepipe 81 from any suitable source preferably located in the column 32. The hollow column or trunk 32 is of sufficient size and diameter as to have mounted therein the necessary machinery for operating the various parts, and a workman may be lowered into the column 32 to control the operation of the valves and the pumps The tubular column 32, spud 10 and supply pipe 81 are of extensible length in order to be movable with the anchor members to the underground surface irrespective of the depth of the water in which the barge is operating. By reason of the column 32 being water-tight, the spud or piling 10 can be forced into the bottom ground from any-suitable height or level inside of the column 32. Consequently, the spud 10, if so required, may be forced into the ground from a level below the outside water surface. In other words, by reason of the provision of the hollow water-tight column 32, comparatively short and less expensive spuds or pilings 19 can be forced into the bottom ground at great depths of water. However, if required, long spuds may be forced'into the bottom ground from the top of the column 32 and the spud may be pulled out of the ground from any suitable height or level in the column 32. Instead of jetting the spud upwardly into the column 32 when it is desired to release the anchor members from engagement with the ground, in order to move or float the barge to another location, the spud or piling 10 maybe of such a length that it can be forced below and through the ground anchor bottom by another spud or piling of the same cross section in order to form a water-tight joint with the sleeve 13 adjacent the stufling box.
In order to raise the operating platform 2| above the surface of the water, any suitable means may be provided, and, as shown, such means may be in the form of a beam or truss structure M (Fig. 1') which is mounted on adjacent side pairs of columns 32, and each beam structure has suspended therefrom between the constructed as to have a low center of gravity and with the bottom wall 96 of greater thickness than the side wall 91 and the top 98. A single tubular column or trunk 99 extends upwardly from the inner wall I of the bottom 96 through the closed chamber |0| and is of extensible length so as to extend through and be guided by a buoyant working platform member. Figure 13 shows a buoyant anchor member I02 in which the inner wall of the bottom may be downwardly and centrally inclined as at I03 and the side wall I04 tapered upwardly and connected to the top I through which the tubular column I06 extends. The anchor members may be of any suitable size and shape and formed of any suitable material so as to have a low center of gravity in order to insure full buoyancy being obtained. It will, of course, be appreciated that the size of a floating barge is such as to require the working platform 2| and the submersible ground anchors to be of such size and construction as to be capable of supporting the derrick and other heavy and large equipment carried by the platform 2 I, so that the barge may be conveniently floated and moved from place to place for offshore deep water drilling operations and the like.
In Figure 14, a non-buoyant operating platform I01 has secured thereto one or more depending tubular columns or trunks I00 which are connected at their lower ends to a buoyant and submersible ground anchor I03 having a W center of gravity. The columns I08 are of such length as to extend above the level of the water when the anchors are moved to engage the bottom ground, so as to support and protect the working platform 2| and its associated parts against heavy wave action in stormy weather. Inside each of the ground anchors I09 and columns I08 may be fitted a spud H0 and a piping arrangement similar to what is shown in Figure 5. The single buoyant anchor I09 may be shaped as shown in Figure 1'7 and provided with a slot or bay III. A derrick or other suitable subaqueous operating member H2 may be mounted on a base I I3 supported by the platform I01, and the equipment, after the drilling operation is completed, may be floated and moved to any other suitable point of use.
The form of the invention shown in Figure is substantially similar to that shown in Figure 14, with the exception that instead of a single buoyant anchor, two spaced buoyant anchors I I4 and II 5 are provided which are connected to the non-buoyant operating platform 6 by the spaced tubular columns or trunks 1 that may be substantially similar in construction to the column 32 previously described, and which are provided with the spuds I I 8 arranged to be forced into the ground when the anchors are in the lowermost position. The columns Ill may be stiffened and reinforced by truss members H9 so as to insure the columns being maintained firmly in a fixed and rigid position. A derrick or other suitable subaqueous machine I may have a base |2| arranged to be mounted on the platform H6. The assembled type of drilling units shown in Figures 14 and 15 can be used for deep water drilling operations where the bottom ground is substantially parallel with the normal water level above the same. The grounding and floating operations for the units are substantially similar to the parts previously described with the exception of the omission of the guiding members 34 and 35.
In a unit or combination of units of a floating movable and submersible drilling apparatus for off-shore deep water oil drilling operations, the buoyant member 2| is, of course, of sufiicient size and buoyancy to support one or more ground anchors and in certain instances the ground anchors may be made non-buoyant or of solid and heavy material and provided with one or more hollow columns or trunk members provided with supply pipes and motors for forcing water through drilled openings in the solid ground anchor, in a manner similar to that shown in Figure 5, for the purpose of removing sediment collected on the outer surface of the ground anchor.
Referring particularly to Figures 2, 3 and 4, I22 indicates the approximate water level and I23 the approximate bottom ground level below the deep water surface. In Figure 2, the entire drilling assembly or unit is shown in a floating position and may be moved to any suitable location for drilling of under water ground or for other subaqueous operations. The ground anchors are guided by the members 34 and 35 and the spuds I0, and each may be independently lowered to seek its own ground level. The buoyant platform 2| now coacts with the anchor members 25, 26, 27 and 28 to carry the load on the barge. In Figure 3, the operating platform 2| and its associated parts are in a floating position and the columns 32 and anchor members have been submerged so that the latter are in firm engagement with the bottom ground I23. The lowering operation of the anchor members is accomplished by forcing water into the buoyant chamber 29 of each of these members (Fig. 5) through the pipes 55 to party or fully fill the chamber and in such amount that these members can be safely lowered. In their downward movement the anchors are guided by the slidable connection of the columns 32 with the spaced sleeves or sockets 34 and 35. When the ground anchors rest on the bottom ground I23, the spuds I0 are forced into the bottom ground to give additional guide to the ground anchors and prevent the anchors from moving or skidding on sloping ground. When the ground anchors are in this position, it may be useful to force water or compressed air or both through the bottom jet pipes 6| in order to wash away the soft top surface of the bottom ground and thereby facilitate the lowering of the ground anchors onto firmer and more stable ground.
After the ground anchors are moved and firmly maintained in engagement with the ground surface I 23 (Fig. 3), the buoyant platform 2| may be raised slightly in the water so as to impose additional load on the columns 32 andthe ground anchors 25, 26, 21 and 28, so that each ground anchor will thereby be forced deeper into the bottom ground I23 and each anchor will seek its own level depending upon the firmness and level of the harder bottom ground. When the anchors rest on the ground I23, the spuds I0 may be forced into the bottom ground. The platform 2| may now be gradually raised in the water and the ground anchors will automatically obtain .better seating on firmer bottom ground. By the Whenever it is desired to move the drilling apparatus to a new drilling site or for any other purpose, the anchor members may be raised by withdrawing thefluid from the chambers 29 so that the parts are moved from the position as shown in Figures 3 and 4, to that in Figure 2, at. a minimum expenditure of time and effort, and. the apparatus when floated may be moved awayfrom the drilling well casing 23 without disturbing the same. While the ground anchors are preferably made of metal and may be given additional weight by adding concrete or other heavy material, it will be manifest that the anchors may be formed of other suitable materials or combinations of such materials in order to have a low center of gravity and insure full buoyancy when the anchors areassociated with an operating platform for supporting the same.
In the modification shown in Figure 16, a floating apparatus is provided for imparting greater stability to the drilling platform I24 by slidably connecting the latter to the ground anchors I25 by inclined tubular columns or trunks I26 so that a. much wider base can be obtained when the anchors I25 are lowered onto the bottom ground I23. The platform I24 may be connected to the columns I26 by the tubular vertically spaced guide sleeves I2! and I28 and provides a firm support for the derrick or operating equipment I29. The platform I24 may be reinforced by transverse truss members I30. It will be seen that by reason of the downwardly angular spread of the columns I26, much greater stability to the working platform I24 can be obtained as compared to a construction in which the columns extend vertically and at substantially right angles to the ground anchors I25. This type of column construction. may be used as auxiliary stiffening means with the vertical columns 32 previously described, and by reason of the angle spread of the columns I26 and the side bottom spread of the ground anchors I25, provide a firmer and safer drilling condition in rough seas and winds. When so used as auxiliary stiffening means, the columns I23 and the ground anchors I25 are lowered onto the bottom ground after the operating platform 2I has been raised to a desired height above the water, as shown in Figure 4, and when it is required to move the drilling unit from one location to another, this operation is reversed.
Any number of anchor members 25 may be used and may be arranged in spaced longitudinal transverse pairs or groups of suitable size, shape and construction, as the best operating conditions may require. Further, any number of columns 32 may be associated with each of the anchor members and the columns may be hollow or solid. Preferably, the columns are circular in cross section so as to give less resistance to the wave action of the water and less motion to the working platform during the drilling operation. It will be noted that each column 32 is connected to the anchor member to provide a unitary structure and that the column serves as means for affording access into the chamber 29. Each of the spuds I may be clamped or otherwise fastened inside the column 32 and may 'be raised or removed when it is desired to lift the anchor from the ground. The ground anchors and their tubular columns are qually adaptable for use to anchor other types of marine vessels or devices which require an efficient and positive means for firmly maintaining subaqueous supporting members in position.
In the modified forms of the invention shown in Figures 18 and 19, the ground anchor I30 has extending upwardly therefrom a tapered tubular column I3I which is widest at its base or lower end I32. The column I3I is cylindrical or curved in cross sections (Fig. 19) and has extending outwardly from one side thereof the vertically disposed spaced arms I33 that may be welded or otherwise suitably connected to the column, and are provided with laterally disposed flanges I34 which slidably engage-complementary recesses I35 formed by the guide lugs He that are connected as at I3! to the adjacent side of an operating platform I38 of a barge or the like. By tapering the column I3I and having its widest portion adjacent the ground anchor I30, the column is made stronger and more rigid than an evenly shaped one and also has a lower center of gravity. Moreover, by reducing the width of the upper end portion of the column, the wave action thereon will have less rocking effect on the ground anchor I30. While parts of the floating barge are shown bolted or welded together, it will be manifest that they may be connected by other suitable fastening means such as rivets or the like.
It will be understood that the several forms of the invention shown are merely illustrative and that the floating barge may be associated with various types of equipment for subaqueous operations in deep water and with various types of marine vessels without departing from the spirit of the invention and the scope of the following claims.
I claim:
1. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations, a buoyant working platform, a submersible ground anchor below the platform and having 'a buoyant chamber therein, a tubular column extending upwardly from the bottom of said anchor and through said chamber and the top thereof, said platform having guide means through which said column loosely extends, the bottom of said anchor having a guide sleeve projecting upwardly into said column, a spud extending axially through said column and slidably engaging" said sleeve, said spud when the anchor is submerged to rest on the underwater ground arranged to be forced into the ground to retain the anchor in a fixed position, and means for introducing water into the chamber for moving the column and anchor downwardlv relative to the platform.
2. In a floating barge for subaoueous operations as called for in claim 1 including means for forcing fluid under pressure against the outer sides of the anchor when the latter rests on the ground to remove sediment from the anchor in order to facilitate raising or lowering of the same.
3. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations as called for in claim 1 including means for introducing fluid under pressure through the low r end of the spud for jetting down or jetting up the spud.
4. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations as called for in claim 1 having means when the chamber is filled with water for introducin heavy material into the chamber to replace the water. and pressure-operated valve means within the chamber for allowing the water to be withdrawn as the heavy material is being introduced into the chamber.
5. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations as called for in claim 1 having spaced pipes 11 ilLthB bottom of the anchor for introducin heavy ground material into the chamber to replace the water therein, a suction pump communicating with the spaced pipes, pressure operating means in the top of the anchor and extending into said chamber for allowing the water to escape therefrom when the heavy ground material is pumped into the chamber, and means for withdrawing the heavy ground material from the chamber.
6. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations, a working platform, a submersible ground anchor below the platform and having a chamber therein, a tubular water-tight column extending upwardly from the bottom of said anchor and through the top thereof, said platform having guide means through which said column loosely extends, said column being of such length and through the tapered end thereof for jetting down or jetting up the spud, said spud when the anchor is submerged to rest on the underwater ground arranged to be forced into the ground to retain the anchor in a fixed position,
and a supply pipe in said column and communicating with said chamber for introducing 'water'into the chamber to flood the same.
7. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations as called for in claim 6 in which the sides, top and bottom of the anchor and the wall of said column have spaced jet openings, branch pipes communicating with the supply pipe for conducting fluid outwardly through said jet openings to remove sediment from the outer surface of the anchor, an a pump operatively connected to the supply pipe for forcing fluid under pressure through said pipe.
'8. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations, a working platform, a submersible ground anchor below the platform and having a chamber therein, a tubular column extending upwardly from the bottom of said anchor and through said chamber, guide means on said platform through which said column loosely extends,
the bottom of said anchor having a guide sleeve projecting upwardly into said column, a spud extending axially through said column and slidably engaging said sleeve, said spud having a tapered lower end provided with at least one opening, a pipe disposed axially in said spud and communicating with said opening for discharging fluid through the lower end of the spud, said spud when the anchor is submerged to rest on the under-water ground arranged to be forced into the ground to retain the anchor in a fixed position, a main supply pipe mounted in said column, a pump for forcing water through said pipe, a valve control pipe communicating with the main pipe for introducing water into said chamber to fill the same, the sides, top and bottom of said anchor having spaced jet openings, and branch pipes communicating with the main supply pipe and said branch openings for conducting fluid through said openings to remove sediment from the outer surface of the anchor so as to facilitate the raising of the anchor from the ground or lowering the same into the ground.
9. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations, a working platform, spaced submersible ground anchors below the platform and having buoyant chambers therein, each of said anchors having spaced pairs of tubular columns extending upwardly from the bottom and through the chamber and top thereof, said platform having guide means through which said columns loosely extend, the bottom of each anchor having spaced guide sleeves extending upwardly into an adjacent column, a spud axially movable in each of said columns and slidably engagin a guide sleeve therein, the spuds when the anchors are submerged to rest on the underwater ground arranged to be forced into the ground to maintain the anchors in a fixed position, and fluid supply means in each of said columns communicating with its associated chamber for flooding the latter to lower the anchor so as to rest on the underwater ground.
10. In a floating barge as called for in claim 9 in which means mounted on the columns are operatively connected to the platform for raising the latter relative to the anchors and above the surface of the water when the anchors are submerged to engage the under-water ground.
11. In a floating barge for subaqueous operations as called for in claim 9 including means for introducing fluid under pressure through the lower end of the spud for jetting down or jetting up the same.
CHARLES T. SAMUELSON.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS
US119791A 1949-10-06 1949-10-06 Submersible deepwater drilling apparatus Expired - Lifetime US2589146A (en)

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US2667038A (en) * 1952-07-17 1954-01-26 Charles A D Bayley Subaqueous supporting structure for working platforms
US2691272A (en) * 1950-09-23 1954-10-12 Townsend Rex Submersible oil well drilling rig
US2740261A (en) * 1950-11-06 1956-04-03 Alexander D Stark Floating hulls for off shore oil well drilling
US2771747A (en) * 1950-07-19 1956-11-27 Bethlehem Steel Corp Offshore drilling barge
US2775869A (en) * 1952-04-22 1957-01-01 L B De Long Platform construction
US2822670A (en) * 1953-09-02 1958-02-11 Delong Corp Perforated caisson jack assembly
US2846851A (en) * 1955-01-21 1958-08-12 Pelham George Fred Marine apparatus
US2873581A (en) * 1954-08-16 1959-02-17 Raymond Int Inc Marine platform
US2873580A (en) * 1953-09-29 1959-02-17 De Long Corp Releasable gripper and locking assembly for land and marine supporting columns
US2892314A (en) * 1954-12-27 1959-06-30 New York Shipbuilding Corp Method of operating an off-shore working platform
US2897654A (en) * 1949-04-22 1959-08-04 Frederic R Harris Inc Piles for marine structures
US2900794A (en) * 1955-08-26 1959-08-25 John R Sutton Offshore equipment supports and methods for making same
US2909901A (en) * 1954-11-16 1959-10-27 De Long Corp Tank footing members for a combined barge and working platform assembly
US2930200A (en) * 1955-12-12 1960-03-29 Beulah Perkins Portable apparatus for supporting off shore drilling equipment
US2935854A (en) * 1954-06-21 1960-05-10 California Research Corp Offshore drilling platform
US2938353A (en) * 1954-12-27 1960-05-31 Shell Oil Co Submersible drilling barge
US2941369A (en) * 1955-12-13 1960-06-21 Edward J Quirin Drilling structures
US2946566A (en) * 1956-08-31 1960-07-26 Charles T Samuelson Subaqueous drilling apparatus
US2959016A (en) * 1957-10-21 1960-11-08 Jersey Prod Res Co Offshore apparatus and method of installing same
US2960833A (en) * 1955-11-10 1960-11-22 John T Hayward Marine foundation structure
US2963868A (en) * 1954-03-15 1960-12-13 Sun Oil Co Seadrome
US2969648A (en) * 1956-12-27 1961-01-31 Bethlehem Steel Corp Mobile drilling platform and method of operation
US2970447A (en) * 1957-04-01 1961-02-07 Jersey Prod Res Co Marine apparatus and method for raising and lowering same
US2970446A (en) * 1956-05-15 1961-02-07 De Long Corp Deep water mobile marine platform
US2979911A (en) * 1956-04-13 1961-04-18 John R Sutton Offshore equipment supports and methods of operating same
US2984075A (en) * 1956-05-15 1961-05-16 De Long Corp Internal and external jack assembly for telescopic caissons
US3001594A (en) * 1954-05-04 1961-09-26 De Long Corp Off-shore drill rig
US3004612A (en) * 1956-11-05 1961-10-17 Richfield Oil Corp Submerged elevated well head structure
US3013396A (en) * 1959-12-30 1961-12-19 De Long Corp Convertible floating barge and working platform assembly for marine operations
US3029608A (en) * 1956-12-28 1962-04-17 Beulah Perkins Platform for off shore drilling and supporting columns therefor
US3044561A (en) * 1957-06-10 1962-07-17 Shell Oil Co Support structure
US3081600A (en) * 1955-11-08 1963-03-19 Merritt Chapman & Scott Corp Submergible barge structure for off-shore operations
US3091937A (en) * 1954-06-21 1963-06-04 California Research Corp Underwater foundation structure and method therefor
US3104531A (en) * 1959-08-25 1963-09-24 Jersey Prod Res Co Mobile marine drilling foundation
US3107495A (en) * 1959-04-29 1963-10-22 Raymond Int Inc Method of erecting an offshore structure
US3115013A (en) * 1956-09-05 1963-12-24 Joseph H Thornley Artificial island and method of constructing the same
US3120106A (en) * 1959-01-22 1964-02-04 Christopher J Foster Off shore moorings
US3131542A (en) * 1960-11-14 1964-05-05 Koch & Sons Inc H Stabilizer for a floating dock
US3201945A (en) * 1960-04-22 1965-08-24 John R Sutton Offshore equipment supports and method of operation
US3241324A (en) * 1962-12-24 1966-03-22 Bethlehem Steel Corp Mobile marine platform apparatus
US3246476A (en) * 1963-12-05 1966-04-19 Kerr Mc Gee Oil Ind Inc Submersible vessel for submarine operations
US3277653A (en) * 1963-11-26 1966-10-11 Christopher J Foster Offshore platforms and method of installing same
US3323312A (en) * 1966-03-14 1967-06-06 Mark P Banjavich Diving bell and decompression vessel combination and improved method for handling diving personnel
US3388556A (en) * 1966-10-10 1968-06-18 Mobil Oil Corp Marine storage structure
US4069681A (en) * 1976-02-02 1978-01-24 Texaco Inc. Offshore structure for deltaic substrates
US4109477A (en) * 1974-02-18 1978-08-29 Salzgitter Maschinen Ag Offshore driller rig
DE2913570A1 (en) * 1978-04-04 1979-12-13 Raymond Int Builders OFFSHORE PLATFORM STRUCTURE
EP0024939A2 (en) * 1979-08-29 1981-03-11 Friede And Goldman Limited A system for a jack-up rig unit for offshore use and a method of securing the support legs of such a unit
FR2489393A1 (en) * 1980-08-14 1982-03-05 Hitachi Shipbuilding Eng Co FIXING DEVICE FOR PILOTS OF A PLATFORM MOUNTED ON JACKS, COMPRISING A RACK IN PLUG WITH A DRIVE GEAR MOUNTED ON THE PLATFORM
US4389140A (en) * 1980-06-13 1983-06-21 Marine Structure Consultants (Msc) Bv Locking device for a pile-shaped element
US4445805A (en) * 1982-11-17 1984-05-01 Sonat Offshore Drilling Inc. Jack-up platform variable bearing assembly
US4602894A (en) * 1981-05-01 1986-07-29 Marathon Manufacturing Company Combination offshore drilling rig
USRE32589E (en) * 1979-08-29 1988-02-02 Friede & Goldman, Ltd. Mobile offshore, self-elevating (jack-up) unit leg/hull rigidification system
EP0352204B1 (en) * 1988-07-22 1993-01-13 Henri Poels Method and device for securing landing-stages on piles
NL1004911C2 (en) * 1996-12-30 1998-07-01 Marine Structure Consul Lifting platform with storage tank and method for installing such a lifting platform.
US5915882A (en) * 1997-06-26 1999-06-29 Letourneau, Inc. Jack-up platform locking apparatus and method
US20060051164A1 (en) * 2004-09-07 2006-03-09 Offshore Technology Development Pte Ltd Jackup oil rig and similar platforms
US20070039533A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-02-22 Lockheed Martin Corporation Apparatus for Reconfiguration of a Variable-Draft Vessel
US20070039537A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-02-22 Lockheed Martin Corporation Method and Apparatus for Ballast-Assisted Reconfiguration of a Variable-Draft Vessel

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Cited By (63)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2897654A (en) * 1949-04-22 1959-08-04 Frederic R Harris Inc Piles for marine structures
US2771747A (en) * 1950-07-19 1956-11-27 Bethlehem Steel Corp Offshore drilling barge
US2691272A (en) * 1950-09-23 1954-10-12 Townsend Rex Submersible oil well drilling rig
US2740261A (en) * 1950-11-06 1956-04-03 Alexander D Stark Floating hulls for off shore oil well drilling
US2775869A (en) * 1952-04-22 1957-01-01 L B De Long Platform construction
US2667038A (en) * 1952-07-17 1954-01-26 Charles A D Bayley Subaqueous supporting structure for working platforms
US2822670A (en) * 1953-09-02 1958-02-11 Delong Corp Perforated caisson jack assembly
US2873580A (en) * 1953-09-29 1959-02-17 De Long Corp Releasable gripper and locking assembly for land and marine supporting columns
US2963868A (en) * 1954-03-15 1960-12-13 Sun Oil Co Seadrome
US3001594A (en) * 1954-05-04 1961-09-26 De Long Corp Off-shore drill rig
US3091937A (en) * 1954-06-21 1963-06-04 California Research Corp Underwater foundation structure and method therefor
US2935854A (en) * 1954-06-21 1960-05-10 California Research Corp Offshore drilling platform
US2873581A (en) * 1954-08-16 1959-02-17 Raymond Int Inc Marine platform
US2909901A (en) * 1954-11-16 1959-10-27 De Long Corp Tank footing members for a combined barge and working platform assembly
US2892314A (en) * 1954-12-27 1959-06-30 New York Shipbuilding Corp Method of operating an off-shore working platform
US2938353A (en) * 1954-12-27 1960-05-31 Shell Oil Co Submersible drilling barge
US2846851A (en) * 1955-01-21 1958-08-12 Pelham George Fred Marine apparatus
US2900794A (en) * 1955-08-26 1959-08-25 John R Sutton Offshore equipment supports and methods for making same
US3081600A (en) * 1955-11-08 1963-03-19 Merritt Chapman & Scott Corp Submergible barge structure for off-shore operations
US2960833A (en) * 1955-11-10 1960-11-22 John T Hayward Marine foundation structure
US2930200A (en) * 1955-12-12 1960-03-29 Beulah Perkins Portable apparatus for supporting off shore drilling equipment
US2941369A (en) * 1955-12-13 1960-06-21 Edward J Quirin Drilling structures
US2979911A (en) * 1956-04-13 1961-04-18 John R Sutton Offshore equipment supports and methods of operating same
US2984075A (en) * 1956-05-15 1961-05-16 De Long Corp Internal and external jack assembly for telescopic caissons
US2970446A (en) * 1956-05-15 1961-02-07 De Long Corp Deep water mobile marine platform
US2946566A (en) * 1956-08-31 1960-07-26 Charles T Samuelson Subaqueous drilling apparatus
US3115013A (en) * 1956-09-05 1963-12-24 Joseph H Thornley Artificial island and method of constructing the same
US3004612A (en) * 1956-11-05 1961-10-17 Richfield Oil Corp Submerged elevated well head structure
US2969648A (en) * 1956-12-27 1961-01-31 Bethlehem Steel Corp Mobile drilling platform and method of operation
US3029608A (en) * 1956-12-28 1962-04-17 Beulah Perkins Platform for off shore drilling and supporting columns therefor
US2970447A (en) * 1957-04-01 1961-02-07 Jersey Prod Res Co Marine apparatus and method for raising and lowering same
US3044561A (en) * 1957-06-10 1962-07-17 Shell Oil Co Support structure
US2959016A (en) * 1957-10-21 1960-11-08 Jersey Prod Res Co Offshore apparatus and method of installing same
US3120106A (en) * 1959-01-22 1964-02-04 Christopher J Foster Off shore moorings
US3107495A (en) * 1959-04-29 1963-10-22 Raymond Int Inc Method of erecting an offshore structure
US3104531A (en) * 1959-08-25 1963-09-24 Jersey Prod Res Co Mobile marine drilling foundation
US3013396A (en) * 1959-12-30 1961-12-19 De Long Corp Convertible floating barge and working platform assembly for marine operations
US3201945A (en) * 1960-04-22 1965-08-24 John R Sutton Offshore equipment supports and method of operation
US3131542A (en) * 1960-11-14 1964-05-05 Koch & Sons Inc H Stabilizer for a floating dock
US3241324A (en) * 1962-12-24 1966-03-22 Bethlehem Steel Corp Mobile marine platform apparatus
US3277653A (en) * 1963-11-26 1966-10-11 Christopher J Foster Offshore platforms and method of installing same
US3246476A (en) * 1963-12-05 1966-04-19 Kerr Mc Gee Oil Ind Inc Submersible vessel for submarine operations
US3323312A (en) * 1966-03-14 1967-06-06 Mark P Banjavich Diving bell and decompression vessel combination and improved method for handling diving personnel
US3388556A (en) * 1966-10-10 1968-06-18 Mobil Oil Corp Marine storage structure
US4109477A (en) * 1974-02-18 1978-08-29 Salzgitter Maschinen Ag Offshore driller rig
US4069681A (en) * 1976-02-02 1978-01-24 Texaco Inc. Offshore structure for deltaic substrates
DE2913570A1 (en) * 1978-04-04 1979-12-13 Raymond Int Builders OFFSHORE PLATFORM STRUCTURE
EP0024939A2 (en) * 1979-08-29 1981-03-11 Friede And Goldman Limited A system for a jack-up rig unit for offshore use and a method of securing the support legs of such a unit
EP0024939A3 (en) * 1979-08-29 1981-05-27 Friede And Goldman Limited A jack-up rig for offshore use and a method of making such a unit with its support legs rigid
USRE32589E (en) * 1979-08-29 1988-02-02 Friede & Goldman, Ltd. Mobile offshore, self-elevating (jack-up) unit leg/hull rigidification system
US4389140A (en) * 1980-06-13 1983-06-21 Marine Structure Consultants (Msc) Bv Locking device for a pile-shaped element
FR2489393A1 (en) * 1980-08-14 1982-03-05 Hitachi Shipbuilding Eng Co FIXING DEVICE FOR PILOTS OF A PLATFORM MOUNTED ON JACKS, COMPRISING A RACK IN PLUG WITH A DRIVE GEAR MOUNTED ON THE PLATFORM
US4602894A (en) * 1981-05-01 1986-07-29 Marathon Manufacturing Company Combination offshore drilling rig
US4445805A (en) * 1982-11-17 1984-05-01 Sonat Offshore Drilling Inc. Jack-up platform variable bearing assembly
EP0352204B1 (en) * 1988-07-22 1993-01-13 Henri Poels Method and device for securing landing-stages on piles
NL1004911C2 (en) * 1996-12-30 1998-07-01 Marine Structure Consul Lifting platform with storage tank and method for installing such a lifting platform.
US5915882A (en) * 1997-06-26 1999-06-29 Letourneau, Inc. Jack-up platform locking apparatus and method
US20060051164A1 (en) * 2004-09-07 2006-03-09 Offshore Technology Development Pte Ltd Jackup oil rig and similar platforms
US20070243024A1 (en) * 2004-09-07 2007-10-18 Offshore Technology Development Pte Ltd Jackup Oil Rig And Similar Platforms
US7850398B2 (en) * 2004-09-07 2010-12-14 Offshore Technology Development Pte Ltd Jackup oil rig and similar platforms
US20070039533A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-02-22 Lockheed Martin Corporation Apparatus for Reconfiguration of a Variable-Draft Vessel
US20070039537A1 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-02-22 Lockheed Martin Corporation Method and Apparatus for Ballast-Assisted Reconfiguration of a Variable-Draft Vessel
US7293516B2 (en) * 2005-08-22 2007-11-13 Lockheed Martin Corporation Apparatus for reconfiguration of a variable-draft vessel

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