US2584043A - Method and apparatus for processing filamentary materials - Google Patents

Method and apparatus for processing filamentary materials Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US2584043A
US2584043A US600562A US60056245A US2584043A US 2584043 A US2584043 A US 2584043A US 600562 A US600562 A US 600562A US 60056245 A US60056245 A US 60056245A US 2584043 A US2584043 A US 2584043A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
chamber
tube
fluid
strand
pressure
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US600562A
Inventor
Louis A Oberly
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Akzo Nobel UK PLC
Original Assignee
American Viscose Corp
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by American Viscose Corp filed Critical American Viscose Corp
Priority to US600562A priority Critical patent/US2584043A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US2584043A publication Critical patent/US2584043A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D10/00Physical treatment of artificial filaments or the like during manufacture, i.e. during a continuous production process before the filaments have been collected
    • D01D10/04Supporting filaments or the like during their treatment
    • D01D10/0436Supporting filaments or the like during their treatment while in continuous movement
    • D01D10/0481Supporting filaments or the like during their treatment while in continuous movement the filaments passing through a tube
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D10/00Physical treatment of artificial filaments or the like during manufacture, i.e. during a continuous production process before the filaments have been collected
    • D01D10/02Heat treatment
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S264/00Plastic and nonmetallic article shaping or treating: processes
    • Y10S264/28Stretching filaments in gas or steam

Description

G N I S S E S R PND@ YRMH LOE RFMO. EMZ BTYG OARn .Mmm APN .PEd LAME Anl man LF D O H T E M Jan. 29, 1952 Patented Jan. 29, 1952 METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PROCESS- ING FILAMENTARY MATERIALS Louis A. Oberly, Swarthmore, Pa., assignor to American Viscose Corporation, Wilmington, Del., a corporation of Delaware Application June 20, 1945, Serial No. 600,562
This invention is concerned with improvements in or relating to the treatment of textiles and other materials, and particularly with improvements in processes and apparatus for the treatment of monoiilaments, yarns, and other materials in a closed chamber with iluid media in vapor or liquid condition during their travel from one point to another. The invention is particularly concerned with the utilization of such iluid media for applying heat to such fllamentary material, or for applying heat while simultaneously softening the textile material by virtue of a swelling or solvent action of the vapor or liquid thereupon, and the invention is of special advantage when applied for the purpose of plasticizing or softening the textile materials. especially when in the form of yarn-like bundles when it is desired to stretch such materials in softened condition. For this purpose, the invention is of special advantage when applied to such textile materials as yarn-like bundles of filaments made of cellulose derivatives and resins; examples of cellulose derivates include cellulose acetate, cellulose propionate, cellulose butyrate, cellulose acetate propionate and cellu lose acetate butyrate. include the vinyl resins, such as polyvinyl chloride, copolymers of vinyl chloride with vinyl acetate or with acrylonitrile, after-chlorinated vinyl polymers and copolymers, vinylidene polymers such as polyvinylidene chloride, nylons, polyethylene, andthe like.
Running yarns of such materials have heretofore been subjected to fluids, suchA as steam or hot Water in a closed chamber provided with inlet and outlet orifices at each end thereof` However, it is often desirable to make use of vaporous fluids in saturated or wet conditions at temperatures in excess of their saturation temperature at normal atmospheric pressure, in order to obtain higher temperatures in proximity to the yarn. Likewise it is desired to apply hot water in the liquid condition at temperatures above 100 C., the boiling point under normal atmospheric conditions. When applying such a vvapor or liquid at high pressure to obtain higher saturation temperatures in the case of the vapor at temperatures above the normal boiling point in case of the liquid by introducing it into the chamber through which the yarn is running, the pressure is limited by the presence of the orices through which the vapor or liquid escapes. In addition, the escape through the orifices occurs at extremely high speeds which impart uncontrolled and secondary stretching effects to the 3 Claims. (Cl. 134-15) Examples of the resins yarn as it enters and as it leaves the chamber. It has heretofore been proposed to overcome these difficulties by providing-additional chambers, one in advance of the entrance to the main stretching chamber and one following such chamber, so that air or other cold fluid can be maintained in these auxiliary chambers at a pressure substantially equal to the pressure of the vapor or liquid within the rnainv stretching chamber. This requires additional equipment and controls which makes it an expensive procedure.
The present invention is concerned with that type of treating system in which the fluid is introduced into a treating chamber so that it flows mainly in substantially the same general direction as the filamentary material even when it rst contacts the latter, such as by introducing the fluid and material into the chamber through adjacent openings in the end wall thereof or by any form of injector system, such as those shown in Cole and Lodge U. S. Patent 2,371,579 or by an injector provided with a central channel through which the fllamentary material enters the chamber. When it is attempted to increase 'the pressure within the chamber by increasing the rate of introduction of the fluid and/or restricting the material and vapor exit of the chamber, a considerable stream of the uid ows back out of the chamber through the material entrance channel, which then causes irregular and undesirable stretching effects upon the -material because it opposes the passage of the ma-l terial into and through the chamber. It has been found in general that under the best conditions a maximum pressure of about 25 pounds per square inch gage is all that is obtainable by this procedure when using steam.
It has been found, in accordance with the present invention, that considerably higher pressures can be obtained within the chamber without excessive flow of the fluid out of the chamber through the material entrance channel by providing at least one auxiliary lateral discharge opening for the fluid, preferably near the dis charge end of the chamber. In this manner, it has been found possible to reach pressures of .pounds per square inch gage and sometimes the tube 5.
Figure 3 is an elevation in section of still another modification; and
Figures 4 to 7 are diagrammatic views of other modifications.
As shown in Figure l, the material 2 in the form of a yarn-like bundle which may be composed of continuous artificial filaments of a cellulose ester or of a vinyl resin, passes around a godet or wheel 3 and an associated lap-displacing guide 4 through a relatively narrow chamber or tube 5, preferably of good heat-conducting material, such as iron, steel, copper, brass, and the like, and about another godet or wheel 6 and its associated lap-displacing guide l. A jacket 8 well insulated as at 9 surrounds the chamber 5 and is provided with a supply conduit I con trolled by a valve II for directing the fluid into the annular chamber I2 in the jacket 8 and surrounding the tube 5. A connection I3 is provided for conducting condensate when o. vaporous fluid is used into a trap I4, from which it may be discharged through the conduit I5. A connection I6 is provided between the high pressure side of the trap I4 and there is an injector arrangement at I1 for directing the fiuid into the tube 5 concurrently with the material. A valve I8 is provided for controlling the flow of the fluid into The injector comprises a ltube I9 having a restricted internal diameter for guiding the material into the tube and an annular chamber 20 communicating at 2| with the conduit I6 and having an annular opening surrounding the tube I9 communicating with the entrance end of the tube 5. The tube 5 may be provided with a terminal closure 22 having a restricted material discharge orifice 23. Near the discharge end of the tube 5 (for example, one to three up to fifteen inches from the end of a tube three or more feet in length) it is provided with a side outlet 24 spaced from the bottom of the tube and to which a device 25, such as a cock, a pressure relief valve, a gate valve, a globe valve, or a needle valve, is connected to provide an adjustable fluidescape orifice 26.
In operation of the modification of Figure 1, the fluid, e. g. steam, is introduced by the conduit III at any desired pressure, so that the temperature of the tube can be raised to` any desired extent and the valve IB can be controlled to permit any predetermined portion of the high pressure fiuid to enter the injector I1 and thence the tube 5. Adjacent the point of entrance to tube 5, a reduced pressure is developed within the tube I9 when the fluid passes through the chamber 20 at a considerable velocity because of a high pressure in the chamber I2 and a small amount of outside atmosphere may be drawn into the tube 5 along with the material. However, the effect of this air introduced is relatively negligible, and since the fluid flows concurrently with the material throughout its passage through the tube 5,
'fiuid discharged from the exit end of the tube 5 flows at a. relatively low velocity or high velocity as desired. At the same time, the thread can be maintained at the high temperature substantially throughout its passage through the tube, because of the fact that the steam bled through valve IB into the tube 5 is heated by the steam in the jacket chamber I2. AThe godets may be driven at the same speed, or if stretching is desired asin the preferred case, the godet 6 may be driven at a higher speed than the godet 3. The lateral escape orifice 26 may be adjusted to any size desired to provide a minimum escape of fluid from the material entrance channel I9.
Figure 2 is a modification in which no steam jacket is provided about the tube 5 and a high pressure fiuid such as steam or hot water is admitted into the annular chamber 20 of the injector by the connection 2l controlled by valve 28. An insulating jacket 29 may be provided in this embodiment.
Figure 3 is a modification in which the tube 5 is arranged vertically, a high pressure fluid such as steam or hot water is introduced into the chamber 5 by the connection 21 controlled by valve 28 and opening into the end of the chamber 5 at 21a adjacent the material entrance at the end of channel I9. A separate stream of heating fluid is introduced through conduit I8 into the heating chamber I2 and is discharged through a pipe I3. A cock 22a serves as a material exit from tube 5 and is connected to a bent pipe 30 having a slot 3| and a ridge 32 around the slot to allow direct downward discharge of the material while largely deecting an escaping fluid from the path of the material. A pressure relief valve 33 is connected to the tube 5 by the side opening 24 spaced from the bottom of/I the chamber 5. This relief valve may be set to open a small orifice when the pressure within the tube exceeds a predetermined pressure, say 20 to 25 pounds per square inch gage. Thus the device will function without benefit of a lateral outlet at low pressures but will automatically provide a small orifice at higher pressures when it is needed. A baile plate 34 of semicircular cross-section may be supported by fastenings 35 so that it is spaced from the inside wall of tube 5 facing the side outlet 24 between it and the material 2. The bale 34 serves to minimize side thrust and vibration of the iilamentary material in the vicinity of the lateral outlets 24. 4
Figures 4 to 7 show modified arrangements of the lateral fluid discharge outlets, all being spaced from the bottom of the tube or chamber 5. In Figure 4, two such orifices 24 are shown offset longitudinally of the tube. In Figure 5, two are shown diametrically opposed. In Figure 6, a single outlet is shown extending at an angle from the normal to the tube wall. In Figure 6, two. outlets 24a. are shown which which open into an enlarged discharge end 5a of the tube 5. The openings 24a face the discharge end of the tube. Baliles similar to that of Figure 3 may be provided in any of the embodiments illustrated herein.
The invention thus makes it possible to treat filamentary materials or any form of strand, textile or otherwise, such as wire, with saturated or wet vapors on,j hot liquids under superatmospheric pressure ,las well as superheated vapors at such pressures, without producing secondary irregular stretching effects that would occur because of back flow of the vapor or liquid out of the treating chamber if no lateral outlet were provided near the discharge end of the treating chamber.
While the utilization of the apparatus has been described in connection with steam or hot water specifically, it is to be understood that the invention contemplates the use of other vapors, especially when it is necessary to use them at temperatures higher than their normal saturation temperature, and under saturated or wet conditions, or other liquids when it is necessary to use them at temperatures above their normal boiling point, in order to obtain the particular temperature needed for the particular material treated. To obtain the higher temperature with any particular' vapor, it may be supplied in the superheated condition under negligibly higher pressure than atmospheric, or it may be supplied at high pressures and either saturated or superheated with respect thereto. The treatment fluids thus may be water superheated above its boiling point, other inert liquids superhea'ted above their boiling points, steam itself, vapors of other inert liquids, or even for some purposes, vapors or superheated liquids having a swelling or solvent effect upon the filamentary material being treated. Examples of solvents which may be used are acetone, acetone-water, acetone-vapor-steam, acetone-vapor air mixtures. The apparatus may also be employed for carrying out chemical processes, such as saponication of cellulose acetate, or it may be used to wash ilamentary material. Such other treatments may be performed upon the lamentary material with stretching rollers or without stretching. In the latter case, of course, the godets placed at either end of the chamber are driven at the same speed.
In the claims, the term strand" is intended in a generic sense to include a single monolament, yarns and yarn-like bundles, whether twisted or untwisted, tows, cords, and the like.
While preferred embodiments of the invention have been disclosed, the description is intended to be illustrative only, and it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as dened by the appended claims.
I claim:
1. A process for treating astrand of filamentary material with a vapor under superatmospheric pressure comprising passing the strand through an elongated channel narrowly constricted at both ends but permitting free passage of the strand therethrough, introducing the treating vapor under superatmospheric pressure into the channel near the strand-entrance end in the same direction as theA strand at sufficient velocity to neutralize the differential between the static pressures inside and outside of the channel at the strand-entrance end thereof, and continuously discharging a part of the vapor laterally from the channel through a.
small orice while still in the same phase as when irst introduced into the chamber.
2. In apparatus for treating a strand with a fluid, an elongated pressure chamber havingV small-size strand-inlet and strand-discharge openings at opposite ends thereof, means within the chamber in the vicinity of the strand-inlet for introducing the fluid into the chamber in the form of a jet centered about the strand path and directed toward the strand-discharge end of the chamber, a "second chamber extending around the first-named chamber, means for circulating a heating iluid to and from the second chamber, a lateral duct connected with a zone of the rst chamber and passing laterally through the second chamber, and means for controlling the passage of fluid through the duct.
3. In apparatus for treating a strand with a fluid, an elongated presure chamber having small-size strand-inlet and strand-discharge openings at opposite ends thereof, a second chamber extending around the first chamber, means within the chamber having small-size strand-inlet and strand-discharge opnings at opposite ends thereof and connected to the second chamber to transfer a fluid from the second chamber to the rst chamber in the form of a jet centered around the strand path directed toward the strand-discharge end of the charnber, a lateral duct connected with a zone of the rst chamber at a distance of the order of 3 to 40 per cent of the chamber length from the stranddischarge end thereof and passing laterally through the second chamber, and means for controlling the passage of fluid through the duct.
LOUIS A. OBERLY.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,837,159 Fellows Dec. 15, 1931 2,142,909 Moncrieff Jan. 3, 1939 2,360,352 Lodge Oct. 17, 1944 2,371,579 Cole Mar. 13, 1945 2,398,856 Reel Apr. 23. 1946 2,428,681 Pratt Oct. 7, 1947
US600562A 1945-06-20 1945-06-20 Method and apparatus for processing filamentary materials Expired - Lifetime US2584043A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US600562A US2584043A (en) 1945-06-20 1945-06-20 Method and apparatus for processing filamentary materials

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US600562A US2584043A (en) 1945-06-20 1945-06-20 Method and apparatus for processing filamentary materials

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US2584043A true US2584043A (en) 1952-01-29

Family

ID=24404098

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US600562A Expired - Lifetime US2584043A (en) 1945-06-20 1945-06-20 Method and apparatus for processing filamentary materials

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US2584043A (en)

Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2766099A (en) * 1949-12-22 1956-10-09 British Celanese Production of artificial filaments
US2775046A (en) * 1949-05-31 1956-12-25 Sucker Gmbh Geb Methods and apparatus for the processing of textile materials
US2787152A (en) * 1949-10-20 1957-04-02 American Enka Corp Jet suction device for tube spinning
US2846334A (en) * 1953-03-23 1958-08-05 Lucile H Fleck Method of reconditioning exposed and developed photographic film
US3010270A (en) * 1957-03-01 1961-11-28 British Celanese Apparatus for producing voluminous yarn
US3044098A (en) * 1959-06-02 1962-07-17 United States Steel Corp Apparatus for cleaning wire rod
US3137152A (en) * 1962-12-26 1964-06-16 Du Pont Apparatus for the treatment of filamentary material
US3156752A (en) * 1961-09-11 1964-11-10 Du Pont Method and apparatus for heat treating filaments
US3241212A (en) * 1961-02-27 1966-03-22 Deering Milliken Res Corp Apparatus for crimping thermoplastic yarn
US3254427A (en) * 1962-07-23 1966-06-07 Mayer & Co Inc O Film treating apparatus
US3255508A (en) * 1959-06-02 1966-06-14 Du Pont Apparatus for crimping textile yarn
US3303548A (en) * 1963-11-12 1967-02-14 Monsanto Co Yarn treating apparatus
US3363041A (en) * 1964-06-09 1968-01-09 Uniroyal Inc Method of jet crimping for texturing thermoplastic yarn
US3364537A (en) * 1965-09-07 1968-01-23 Du Pont Apparatus for interlacing multifilament yarn
US3372446A (en) * 1964-06-09 1968-03-12 Uniroyal Inc Jet crimping and texturizing apparatus
US3379811A (en) * 1964-02-22 1968-04-23 Freudenberg Carl Apparatus and process for production of filaments
US3380242A (en) * 1957-03-01 1968-04-30 American Enka Corp Yarn and method of making same
US3382303A (en) * 1966-05-03 1968-05-07 Fred B. Stieg Process and apparatus for making regenerated cellulose sponges
US3403501A (en) * 1966-07-15 1968-10-01 Nuval Co Yarn-treatment, method and apparatus
US3413397A (en) * 1961-08-17 1968-11-26 Eastman Kodak Co Process for stretching polypropylene filaments
US3439391A (en) * 1965-09-20 1969-04-22 Deering Milliken Res Corp Apparatus and method for edgecrimping and/or heat treating yarn
US3452132A (en) * 1966-11-03 1969-06-24 Du Pont Process of steam drawing and annealing polyester yarn
US3452131A (en) * 1967-06-27 1969-06-24 Du Pont Process for stretching filaments
US3452130A (en) * 1967-02-02 1969-06-24 Du Pont Jet initiated drawing process
US3633256A (en) * 1969-08-15 1972-01-11 Monsanto Co Orientation drawing chamber for fibers
US3640063A (en) * 1968-09-13 1972-02-08 Basf Ag Process and apparatus for crimping yarns and the like
US3710460A (en) * 1971-03-17 1973-01-16 Du Pont Yarn treating jet having a guide fastened to its outlet end
US3965547A (en) * 1970-04-06 1976-06-29 John Heathcoat & Co. Ltd. Apparatus for producing bulked yarns
US4230158A (en) * 1977-11-07 1980-10-28 Sulzer Brothers Ltd. Cleaning means for a weaving machine
US20130008534A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2013-01-10 Unicharm Corporation Steam injection mechanism, product processing apparatus having the steam injection mechanism, and method of making the steam injection mechanism
US20160002830A1 (en) * 2013-02-28 2016-01-07 Oerlikon Textile Gmbh & Co. Kg Device for pneumatically conveying and guiding a multifilament thread

Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1837159A (en) * 1929-06-28 1931-12-15 Stanley Works Method of and apparatus for processing strip metal
US2142909A (en) * 1934-05-30 1939-01-03 Celanese Corp Treatment of artificial materials
US2360352A (en) * 1942-08-26 1944-10-17 American Viscose Corp Fluid treatment of filamentary material and apparatus therefor
US2371579A (en) * 1941-10-09 1945-03-13 Amercian Viscose Corp Method and apparatus for treating filamentary material
US2398856A (en) * 1942-07-29 1946-04-23 Celanese Corp Apparatus for the treatment of artificial materials
US2428681A (en) * 1943-10-28 1947-10-07 Pratt Apparatus for automatically processing film

Patent Citations (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1837159A (en) * 1929-06-28 1931-12-15 Stanley Works Method of and apparatus for processing strip metal
US2142909A (en) * 1934-05-30 1939-01-03 Celanese Corp Treatment of artificial materials
US2371579A (en) * 1941-10-09 1945-03-13 Amercian Viscose Corp Method and apparatus for treating filamentary material
US2398856A (en) * 1942-07-29 1946-04-23 Celanese Corp Apparatus for the treatment of artificial materials
US2360352A (en) * 1942-08-26 1944-10-17 American Viscose Corp Fluid treatment of filamentary material and apparatus therefor
US2428681A (en) * 1943-10-28 1947-10-07 Pratt Apparatus for automatically processing film

Cited By (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2775046A (en) * 1949-05-31 1956-12-25 Sucker Gmbh Geb Methods and apparatus for the processing of textile materials
US2787152A (en) * 1949-10-20 1957-04-02 American Enka Corp Jet suction device for tube spinning
US2766099A (en) * 1949-12-22 1956-10-09 British Celanese Production of artificial filaments
US2846334A (en) * 1953-03-23 1958-08-05 Lucile H Fleck Method of reconditioning exposed and developed photographic film
US3010270A (en) * 1957-03-01 1961-11-28 British Celanese Apparatus for producing voluminous yarn
US3380242A (en) * 1957-03-01 1968-04-30 American Enka Corp Yarn and method of making same
US3044098A (en) * 1959-06-02 1962-07-17 United States Steel Corp Apparatus for cleaning wire rod
US3255508A (en) * 1959-06-02 1966-06-14 Du Pont Apparatus for crimping textile yarn
US3241212A (en) * 1961-02-27 1966-03-22 Deering Milliken Res Corp Apparatus for crimping thermoplastic yarn
US3413397A (en) * 1961-08-17 1968-11-26 Eastman Kodak Co Process for stretching polypropylene filaments
US3156752A (en) * 1961-09-11 1964-11-10 Du Pont Method and apparatus for heat treating filaments
US3254427A (en) * 1962-07-23 1966-06-07 Mayer & Co Inc O Film treating apparatus
US3137152A (en) * 1962-12-26 1964-06-16 Du Pont Apparatus for the treatment of filamentary material
US3303548A (en) * 1963-11-12 1967-02-14 Monsanto Co Yarn treating apparatus
US3379811A (en) * 1964-02-22 1968-04-23 Freudenberg Carl Apparatus and process for production of filaments
US3372446A (en) * 1964-06-09 1968-03-12 Uniroyal Inc Jet crimping and texturizing apparatus
US3363041A (en) * 1964-06-09 1968-01-09 Uniroyal Inc Method of jet crimping for texturing thermoplastic yarn
US3364537A (en) * 1965-09-07 1968-01-23 Du Pont Apparatus for interlacing multifilament yarn
US3439391A (en) * 1965-09-20 1969-04-22 Deering Milliken Res Corp Apparatus and method for edgecrimping and/or heat treating yarn
US3382303A (en) * 1966-05-03 1968-05-07 Fred B. Stieg Process and apparatus for making regenerated cellulose sponges
US3403501A (en) * 1966-07-15 1968-10-01 Nuval Co Yarn-treatment, method and apparatus
US3452132A (en) * 1966-11-03 1969-06-24 Du Pont Process of steam drawing and annealing polyester yarn
US3452130A (en) * 1967-02-02 1969-06-24 Du Pont Jet initiated drawing process
US3452131A (en) * 1967-06-27 1969-06-24 Du Pont Process for stretching filaments
US3640063A (en) * 1968-09-13 1972-02-08 Basf Ag Process and apparatus for crimping yarns and the like
US3633256A (en) * 1969-08-15 1972-01-11 Monsanto Co Orientation drawing chamber for fibers
US3965547A (en) * 1970-04-06 1976-06-29 John Heathcoat & Co. Ltd. Apparatus for producing bulked yarns
US3710460A (en) * 1971-03-17 1973-01-16 Du Pont Yarn treating jet having a guide fastened to its outlet end
US4230158A (en) * 1977-11-07 1980-10-28 Sulzer Brothers Ltd. Cleaning means for a weaving machine
US20130008534A1 (en) * 2010-03-30 2013-01-10 Unicharm Corporation Steam injection mechanism, product processing apparatus having the steam injection mechanism, and method of making the steam injection mechanism
US20160002830A1 (en) * 2013-02-28 2016-01-07 Oerlikon Textile Gmbh & Co. Kg Device for pneumatically conveying and guiding a multifilament thread
US9631300B2 (en) * 2013-02-28 2017-04-25 Oerlikon Textile Gmbh & Co. Kg Device for pneumatically conveying and guiding a multifilament thread

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3069836A (en) Yarn relaxation process using fluid jets
US2686339A (en) Treatiment of acrylonitrile polymer fibers
US3009309A (en) Fluid jet twist crimping process
US3070839A (en) Controlled quenching apparatus
US4245001A (en) Textile filaments and yarns
US2379824A (en) Process and apparatus for treating artificial filaments
US2416535A (en) Apparatus for wet treatment and drying of a moving wet spun synthetic thread strand
US2343351A (en) Method and apparatus for modifying textile fabrics
US2807862A (en) Method for bulking yarn
US3261071A (en) Yarn treating jet
US2884756A (en) Apparatus and method for producing bulk yarn
US2974391A (en) Process and apparatus for making crimped filaments
US2734228A (en) Crimping apparatus
US3409956A (en) Apparatus and process for texturizing yarn
US4148179A (en) Method and apparatus for yarn treatment
US2447982A (en) Method and apparatus for handling continuous yarns and the like
US3156028A (en) Process for crimping textile yarn
US3226773A (en) Method and apparatus for opening and applying finishes to multifilament tows
US3482294A (en) Apparatus for fluid treating filamentary materials
US3691748A (en) Textured polyethylene terephthalate yarns
GB695536A (en) Improvements in or relating to apparatus adapted for use in manufacturing synthetic fibres
US1871100A (en) Process and apparatus for manipulating textile materials
US3714686A (en) Process and apparatus for texturing filaments
US2510135A (en) Method for spinning artificial filaments
US2622961A (en) Gaseous treatment of filamentary textile material at supersonic and subsonic gas velocities and apparatus therefor