US2565823A - Toy building blocks and base - Google Patents

Toy building blocks and base Download PDF

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US2565823A
US2565823A US658805A US65880546A US2565823A US 2565823 A US2565823 A US 2565823A US 658805 A US658805 A US 658805A US 65880546 A US65880546 A US 65880546A US 2565823 A US2565823 A US 2565823A
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block
base
toy building
ribs
blocks
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US658805A
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Pool Clarence
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Pool Clarence
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS OR BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/04Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts
    • A63H33/06Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled without the use of additional elements
    • A63H33/08Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled without the use of additional elements provided with complementary holes, grooves, or protuberances, e.g. dovetails
    • A63H33/084Building blocks, strips, or similar building parts to be assembled without the use of additional elements provided with complementary holes, grooves, or protuberances, e.g. dovetails with grooves

Description

Aug. 28, 1951 c. POOL TOY BUILDING BLOCKS AND BASE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 1, 1946 INVENTOR. d/arence 700/ Aug. 28, 1951 c. POOL 2,565,823
TOY BUILDING BLOCKS AND BASE Filed April 1, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. C /aren ce 7 0a E49 22 BY Aug. 28, 1951 c. POOL 2,565,823
TOY BUILDING BLOCKS AND BASE Filed April 1, 1946 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 T //a //2 I 4 20 V [I 1 i Z :'\-\.-:-1 r a t //2 L,. ,2 M17 Q 1/6 Fr Fr l-L i 2O INVENTOR. C/aren ca 7 00 Patented Aug. 28, 1951 UNITED STATES OFFICE.
The present invention relates to means adapted to effect an interlocked relationship between toy building blocks when the same are to be vertically stacked and/or upon being laid out in end to end relationship upon the floor of a play room as children are wont to do.
Neither the common faced toy building block, or the block which constitutes the subject matter of United States Patent Number 2,132,757, are capable of being stacked one upon another in lateral directions beyond a point which would constitute the medial vertical center of the second block of the series being stacked, because to do so would unbalance the upper block or blocks, and would cause toppling thereof to the base support of the first block of the series. And while this is particularly true of the common, plain faced block, it is equally true of the block which constitutes the subject matter of United States Letters Patent Number 2,132,757, because the grooves of this block are much wider than the ribs which it is proposed to fit therein, so
3 Claims. (Cl. 4625) (1) To provide an improved interlocking means whereby one toy building block may be joined to another similar block easily, quickly and in a positive manner.
(2) To provide an improved interlocking means for toy building blocks whereby such blocks may be stacked in over-hanging or stepped relationship pending attainment of the centerof gravity of the whole of the stacked blocks.
(3) To provide means in combination with my improved interlocking means for toy building that, in fact, the ribs lift from the grooves of this block without hindrance, whereby the upper or an upper block topples over if the upper block is unbalanced with respect to a lower supporting block.
To avoid this handicap in use, resort is usually made to placing another'block in an opposite position in the same plane and then joining these blocks with another block which spans the inter vening space between them, thereby correcting an unbalanced condition.
It is a further matter of common experience that the flooring upon which children play with building blocks is usually uneven and does not present a plane surface due to irregularities in the floor itself or in the carpeting or rugs thereon, with the result that building blocks can only be stacked a limited vertical height before they topple over due to base inclination of the first block of the stack built up. Also, and as a matter of fact, toy building blocks heretofore made, and of which I am cognizant, have been made solid, and hence it follows that such blocks possess considerable and unnecessary weight, and as such present an ever present hazard to windows and other fragile objects, for children are about as apt to occasionally throw a building block as they are to carefully and studiously build them into fanciful shapes.
The preceding matter has been directed to com ditions generally prevalent in or connected with currently used building blocks, and in view thereof the following may be stated as being among the objects of the present invention.
blocks, per se, whereby such blocks may be stacked to form arches and other inherently unstable structures extending over and beyond the base thereof.
i) To provide a toy building block which is hollow, whereby-the Weight thereof, in comparison with solid structures, is greatly lessened, thereby limiting the danger thereof when thrown as a missile, or when idly falling from an elevated point.
(5) To provide a novel mode of construction of a hollow toy building block whereby the point or points of assembly thereof of diverse component parts is practically invisible.
(8) To provide a building slab having a plane surface, excepting for, and upon which anchoring points are securedas a means to fixedly secure the first of a series of building blocks, whereby inherently unstable toy building block structures may be erected thereon.
(7) To provide asa structural element of the container in which toy building blocks are merchandised, a plane surface, excepting for, and upon which anchoring points are or may be secured as a means to fixedly secure the first of a series of toy building blocks whereby inherently unstable toy block structures may be erected thereon.
The preceding and-other objects, features and advantages of the invention may be noted: from the specification,- the accompanying drawing and the subjoined claims; 1
In the drawing of which there are three sheets:
Figure 1 is a view of a toy building block showing the-ribs and grooves of my improved interlocking means in end elevation.
Figure 2=is a side view of the block shown in Figure 1, the figureshowsa fragment thereof broken away to show the means I have devised to fixedly secure one of the faces of the block to the hollow cast portion thereof, whereby the point of cementing the two parts together is rendered invisible.
Figure 3 Ba top plan View of the block construction shown in Figures'l and 2.
Figure 4 is-a view of a toy building block having pins and recesses in opposite faces thereof, and which pins and recesses servesto hold like blocks in detachable union.
Figure 5 is a top plan view of the block shown in Figure 4.
Figure 6 is a sectional view taken substantially along line 66, in Figure 4, showing in particular the means used to fixedly secure one of the faces of the block to the hollow cast body portion thereof, whereby the point of cementing the two parts together is rendered invisible. 1
Figure 7 is a view showing a modification of the construction employed in connection with Figures 1 to 3, here the under-cut ribs and grooves are formed in four of the sides of the block, the broken portion of the figure is intended to show that the means used in connection with Figures 1 to 6, to secure one of the faces of the block to the hollow cast body thereof, is also used in connection with this further modification of my toy building block construction.
Figure 8 is a view of a side of the block shown in Figure 7; and,
Figure 9 is an end view of the block shown in Figures 7-8.
Figure 10 is a transverse sectional view of a toy building block showing a modified type of interlocking means adapted to fixedly secure two or more building blocks in union.
Figure 11 is a transverse sectional view of a building block having a further modified form of interlocking means whereby two or more toy building blocks may be fixedly joined in detachable union.
Figure 12 is a transverse sectional view of a toy building block showing a still further modified form of interlocking means whereby two or more toy building blocks may be fixedly joined in detachable union. 7
Figure 13 is a view showing the positive nature of my improved interlocking means in toy building blocks, here an irregular stack of toy blocks has been pyramided upon a single block as a base, the view is believed to definitely show the nonslip nature of my interlocking means, and while this figure shows the type of interlock used in Figures 1 to 3, and 7 to 9, it is equally applicable to the type of interlocking means shown in Figures 10, 11, and 12.
Figure 14 is an edge or side view of a base having anchoring points to non-tiltingly secure a base block member upon which other blocks may be secured in an arching or other overhanging and inherently unstable structure.
Figure 15 is a plan view of the type of base support shown in Figure 14, in which four convergingly arch-like toy block structures are anchored to the base support. v
Figure 16 is a sectional view showing the type of anchoring support shown in Figures 14 and 15 applied to the base of a merchandising container for toy building blocks.
Figure 17 is a view in section through a container in which building blocks may be merchandised and in which the cover of the container is provided with anchoring points for toy blocks, the anchoring points being similar to those shown in connection with Figures 14, 15, and 16.
Figure 18 is a plan view of a base support for toy building in which a plural number of the male interlocks of the type shown in Figures 1 to 3, and 7 through 12 may be cemented as a separate element to the plane base thereof, or
may be moulded as a unitary structure with the base, as a means to fixedly secure the first block of a series of blocks in inherently unstable structures.
Figure 19 is a side view of one of the premoulded interlocking strips shown in plan in Figure 18, the view being substantially that seen along line I9I9, in Figure 18; and,
Figure 20 is an end elevational view thereof.
Figure 21 is a view taken along line 2 |-2l in Figure 18 showing a fragment of the base, and in addition thereto, shows two blocks in interlocked relationship one with the other, while one of the blocks is interlocked with the base and/ or an interlocking element upon the base.
Figure 22 is a side elevational view showing a modified form of rib construction upon a toy building block, the construction illustrated is that of an undulating line whereby upon being joined the blocks cannot slip laterally of one another across the ribs shown.
In the specification the reference character so indicates a childs toy building block, which is of cubic form, and which is formed as a hollow moulded structure having one open end which is adapted to receive a cap as will be hereinafter more fully described. The block is formed of a thermal setting plastic for the prime reason that this type of material is resistant of the heat of boiling water, thus enabling the block to be sterilized before being given to young children to play with.
As the drawing shows, the opposite faces 22 and 24 are provided with the improved interlocking means which constitutes the present invention. The face 22 is formed with a plural number of outwardly projecting ribs or male interlocking members which extend substantially the length of the block, and which as the drawing shows, are each formed with a flat rectangular outer face 28 and have under-cut or over-hanging sides 30 which extend the full depth of the grooves 32 or female portion of the interlocking member with which they are adapted to nest at an angle of less than degrees, and which grooves are in all respects dimensionally compatible with the ribs aforedescribed thus enabling a nested relationship to be had. The relationship thus established can only be made by moving the ribs of one block into matched alignment with the grooves 32 of another block from lateral points and then sliding the ribs and grooves together, thereby forming an interlocked relationship that cannot, as shown in Figure 12, become disengaged by reason of gravitational force, when the ribs and grooves are in a horizontal plane, for the reason that the outwardly projecting sides 30 of the rib underlies the divergent sides 34 of the grooves 32, so that vertical withdrawal thereof is resisted by the sheer strength of the material used to form the block.
The positive nature of this type of interlocking joint enables children to build structures in which one block overhangs another block in irregular contour, as shown in Figure 13, and the stack or column of blocks thus formed will remain in placed position, pending passing through the center of gravity of the whole of the stack thus formed.
In Figures 7, 8, and 9, I show a toy building block having the aforedescribed type of interlocking joint upon four of the sides thereof, while the ends of the block are free for embellishment with alphabetical letters, numerals, or other insignia, thus providing a novel variant of block construction which enables children to buildrecesses 42 of like configuration formed in a dimensionally opposite face, form a simple and low cost type of interlocking means whereby oneblock may be physically joined to another in predetermined disen ageable relation.
The toy building block shown in Figures 10,- 11,
and 12 include variants of the type of interlocking means shown in Figures 1, 2, and 3, and '7, 8, and 9, in that while the ribs and grooves are of dissimilar cross-section, the ribs and grooves of each of the modifications shown fit within and under the overhanging sides of a groove formed in another and similar block.
Reference to Figure will show that the ribs 52! are substantially T-shaped in cross-section, and of course extend substantially the length of the block as mentioned in connection with the ribs 26 shown in Figure 1, while the grooves 52 are of like configuration and length, and are adapted to receive the ribs 50 nested therein, and the ribs and grooves are joined upon being slid together in end alignment. I
Ihe interlocked relationship thus established makes it impossible for one block to be vertically withdrawn from another either by physical effort or by gravitational force when the ribs and grooves are in a horizontal plane for vertical movement is resisted in this form of interlock by the shear strength of the material used in form-' ing the block in like manner to that set forth in connection with Figures 1, 2, and 3.
In Figure 11 a further modification of my theory of interlocking joints as applied to toy building blocks is shown. Here the ribs 60 are formed as shown in section with a circular or undulating contour in the outer portion thereof and the material intervening between this outer circular portion and the body of the block is concavcd in sufiicient degree so that the grooves 62 thus formed between any two ribs is sufficient in dimension and contour to receive the ribs of another like block, as shown in dotted lines, thus forming an undulating configuration of convex and concave surfaces which when in matched engagement is both positive and attractive. in appearance. The joint thus formed renders vertical withdrawal impossible, being limited only by the shear strength of the material used in making the block as previously mentioned in connection with the form of interlock set forth in connection with Figures 1, 2, 3, and 10, and makes possible fanciful block construction wherein upset due to withdrawal of the ribs of one block from the grooves of another like block by oven-balance is impossible as set forth above.
In Figure 12 I show a minor variant of the interlocking rib construction shown in Figure 10. Here the ribs Ill are substantially T-shaped in cross-section, being modified only in that the corners of the ribs and companion grooves 12 are formed with radii, otherwise the interlocking joint thus formed, the mode of assembly, and resistance to vertical withdrawal by upset, conforms with the statement previously made in connection with the construction shown in Figures 1 to 3, 7 to 9, and 10 and 11.
As previously mentioned in column 4 of this text, the toy building block herein described is 6. formed: as a hollow moulded article formed of a thermal setting plastic.
As a matter of practicability as well as of necessity, the block is moulded as a hollow rectangle having relatively thin sides, and from. which a core iswithdrawn upon completion of the moulding operation, thereby necessitating that one of the sides of the block remain open. The cover or cap 9|- for the open side of the block being of course formed as a separate article. Mating the side or cover 9| with the open end of the hollow block in such a manner as to conseal the cementing line between the block and cover presented a problem, which after many experiments resolved itself into the form of construction shown in Figures 2, 6, 7, 10, 11, and 12,
In each of the above referred to figures of the drawing, the block is moulded with the surfaces 9t, 92, 94, 96, and 98 (see Figure 9 and Figure 10), all of which are rectangular, and are formed integrally as a monolithic structure having one open side. As shown, for example in Figure 10 (which figure is typical), 1 form a step H19 in the walls 90, 92, 96 and 98 adjacent the upper or open end of the block, thereby forming a rectangular recess or lip upon which a matched rectangular and dependent shoulder m2 of. the cap or cover 9| is adapted to rest in uniformly mated position, and since the hol low block and the cap 9| are moulded to precision dimension, the line I64 which constitutes the point of mating of the block 20 and cap or cover 9| is invisible to ordinary observation.
The cap 9| is fixedly secured in the block 25 by first applying a suitable solvent or adhesive to the inner face of the stepped recess and to the outer face of the dependent shoulder Hi2, and then, "thereafter pressing the cap 9| into the open end of the block until the lower face Hi l of the shoulder or flange I02 rests upon the step [0B and is supported thereon in limitation of further movement.
The aforedescribed method of constructing the block and of assembly thereof into a unitary structure is relatively simple and constitutes the most practical method of which I am aware.- It makes for uniformity of dimension, and since the block is. hollow, a great saving of material and of weight is effected, but perhaps the most important consideration resides in the fact that the place or. point of mating the component elements of the finished block is lost to ordinary observation.
The structure shown in Figures 14 to 20 is concerned with a novel provision to establish a uniform base upon which toy building blocks may be erected, and to provide means to anchor a first building block, whereby a series of other blocks having the interlocking means aforedescribed, may be erected thereon in such inherently unstable structures as arches, or vertically zigzagging columns, or columns with interlocked and outwardly extended block projections.
The reference character H9 indicates a plane slab, preferably formed of a thermal setting plastic, and from what may be termed the upper surface thereof, a plural number of pegs ||2 project, as shown in Figures 14 and 15, and which pegs are preferably arranged in pairs of two, and which are adapted to snugly fit into openings I It formed in the block 20.
Figure 16 illustrates application of this form of anchoring to the base of a toy block merchandising container which may be formed in whole or in part of plastic material, and in which the bottom H6 of the container serves as the equivalent of the slab H as a horizontal base upon which blocks may be erected, while in Figure 17, I have used the cover H8 for the purpose of providing a horizontal base upon which the pegs H2 are secured as an anchoring means. In this instance the cover could be formed of plastic material while the remainder of the container could be formed of other suitable material, such as card-board having the color of the plastic cover.
Figure 18 is illustrative of a horizontal slab of plastic material upon which I propose to cement strips I20 having a plural number of the ribs 26, or their equivalent as shown in Figures 10, 11, and 12, as an anchoring means for the blocks, which may then be erected in over-hanging and other inherently unstable forms of construction.
Obviously the ribs 26 may be moulded as an integral part of the slab or sheet I I0, however, it is cheaper, just as efiicient, and I believe from the standpoint of child interest, preferable that the strips I20 be included as a part of the toy building block kit, together with a sufiicient quantity of cement to bond the strips upon the slab H0, whereby a child, under guidance, may cement the strip I20 to the sheet H0 in such location as may seem best.
If the peg type II 2 of anchor or tie-down is used upon a slab or sheet H0, the blocks are erected thereon as shown in elevation, Figure 14, and in plan in Figure 15. In other words, the first block H3 is placed with the openings H4 over the pegs H2, and since the dimensional clearance between the two elements is close, the block I I3 will be securely fixed upon the base H0, while in the disclosure made in Figure 18, a first block is slipped over the ribs 26 in the same manner as would be the case if the ribs 26 upon the strip I20 comprised the upper surface of a block being joined to a second block. In either case, the inclusion of a horizontal and plane base having anchoring or toy building block tie-down points thereon, in combination with cooperative and positive interlocking means in the blocks per se, whereby inherently unstable toy block structures may be erected thereon, is believed to be a material contribution to the art to which the invention appertains.
I claim:
1. A base for toy building blocks whereby inherently unstable stacks of toy blocks may be erected, in combination with at least one toy building block, means to interlock said base and said block in detachable union, said means coinprising a plural number of strips of material having under-cut ribs and grooves adhesively secured upon one of the surfaces of said base, and a plural number of similar ribs and grooves formed in certain of the faces of said block, the ribs and grooves of said block being matable with the ribs and grooves of said base upon being slidably moved together.
2. In a toy building block of cubic form and upon a plural number of the sides thereof, interlocking means whereby other similar toy building blocks may be joined in detachable physical union, said interlocking means comprising alternate similarly dimensioned ribs and grooves having sides formed at an angle of less than degrees whereby upon mating the ribs of one block with the grooves of another similar block, vertical withdrawal thereof is limited to the breaking resistance of the material comprising the sides of said ribs and grooves, and means to anchor at first block of a plural number of blocks whereby inherently unstable block structures may be erected, said means comprising a base of relatively thin sheet material having a plane surface on one of the sides thereof constituting a lower surface and formed with a plane upper surface constituting a work surface having relatively thin, elongated strips of ribbed and grooved material bonded thereto and in detached relationship to one another.
3. In a toy, comprising a base formed as a relatively thin rectilinear sheet of material, and building blocks, in combination, said base having pro-formed strips of material having tongues and grooves adhesively secured to the base so as to form fixed anchorage places and said building blocks having tongues and grooves adapted for interlocking with the tongues and grooves secured upon said base.
CLARENCE POOL.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,084,597 Anft Jan. 20, 1914 1,130,324 Owen Mar. 2, 1915 1,465,637 Goss Aug. 21, 1923 2,020,562 Miller Nov. 12, 1935 2,132,757 Paulson Oct. 11, 1938 2,217,374 Menzel Oct. 8, 1940 2,262,199 Paulson Nov. 11, 1941 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 596,752 France Aug. 14, 1925
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Cited By (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2915213A (en) * 1953-06-01 1959-12-01 Del Tra Company Pallet for carrying bread or the like
US3008581A (en) * 1961-01-18 1961-11-14 Western Textile Products Compa Sectional filing device
US3115229A (en) * 1960-12-12 1963-12-24 Erhard Hermann Handle constructions
US3139698A (en) * 1961-05-22 1964-07-07 Parker Brothers Inc Set of building blocks wherein each block has connecting means on three surfaces thereof
US3148477A (en) * 1960-02-05 1964-09-15 Irma Fabrikerne As Building block having flexible ribs to engage a similar block
US3180060A (en) * 1961-10-20 1965-04-27 Henry P C Keuls Building blocks
US3180059A (en) * 1961-10-20 1965-04-27 Henry P C Keuls Building blocks
DE1197003B (en) * 1959-10-15 1965-07-15 Hans Rolf Vom Feld Children's play construction kit composed of various components
US3220141A (en) * 1962-07-02 1965-11-30 Halsam Products Company Building blocks connectable in slideable or non-slideable relationship
US3224135A (en) * 1963-06-13 1965-12-21 Spalding A G & Bros Inc Construction set including members with plural connecting means
DE1290696B (en) * 1965-12-01 1969-03-13 Fischer Artur Hollow component made of elastic material for walls, ceilings or the like.
US3440788A (en) * 1965-06-11 1969-04-29 Arthur B Merget Building blocks with a shell containing a filler and having projections and depressions connected by tubes
DE1295786B (en) * 1965-03-03 1969-05-22 Keuls Henry P C For drywall construction, a thin-walled hollow component made of metal, plastic or the like.
US3456414A (en) * 1966-10-15 1969-07-22 Artur Fischer Structural element
DE2238319A1 (en) * 1971-08-09 1973-02-22 Klamer R B Toy building block or building block
US3999327A (en) * 1975-05-12 1976-12-28 Display Originals, Inc. Box-play module
US4008931A (en) * 1975-09-17 1977-02-22 Lincoln Manufacturing Company, Inc. End panel construction for modular units and modular unit embodying the end panel construction
DE2932520A1 (en) * 1979-08-10 1981-02-12 Heinz Doberstein Multipurpose modular constructional components - comprise triangular frames of angular sections with external coupling member for slidable engagement
DE3114693A1 (en) * 1980-11-18 1982-04-01 Politechnika Ipari Szovetkezet DESIGN TOY
DE3218072A1 (en) * 1981-05-20 1982-12-30 Book Loan Publishing Co TOY
EP0069188A1 (en) * 1981-06-26 1983-01-12 Shinsei Co., Ltd. Cubic plaything and its production
EP0192790A1 (en) * 1985-02-27 1986-09-03 T.R. Plast GmbH & Co. Toy building block
US5154656A (en) * 1991-05-09 1992-10-13 Linda Milstein Multi-connecting building blocks
US5509720A (en) * 1994-09-23 1996-04-23 Croom; Dorothy J. Alphabet block chair kit
US5788233A (en) * 1997-07-21 1998-08-04 Wolfe; Terry Lee Creative building game
US6250986B1 (en) * 1999-02-08 2001-06-26 Soren Christian Sorensen Building element for set of toy building blocks
US20080272632A1 (en) * 2007-05-01 2008-11-06 Ezra Eran Article of furniture with functional textual symbols
US20090168969A1 (en) * 2007-11-26 2009-07-02 Schmulenson Harold K Radiation sensing device and holder
US20100166151A1 (en) * 2008-12-29 2010-07-01 Schmulenson Harold K Holder for radiation sensing device
US20100210173A1 (en) * 2009-02-13 2010-08-19 Mattel, Inc. Toy building blocks
US20120274023A1 (en) * 2010-10-30 2012-11-01 Elizabeth Sharon Carpenter Building block toy with interconnecting edges
WO2014128511A1 (en) * 2013-02-25 2014-08-28 Chiswick Innovations Limited Constructional toy
US9044688B1 (en) 2012-01-09 2015-06-02 Cindy Janay Play platform with removable containers for building blocks and other child activities
US20150182868A1 (en) * 2014-01-02 2015-07-02 Fourstar Group Inc. Decorative and connectable display arrangement
US9782688B2 (en) * 2015-10-23 2017-10-10 Kma Concepts Limited Linkable toy elements with enhanced acoustic properties

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US1084597A (en) * 1912-09-03 1914-01-20 Paul Anft Toy building-block.
US1130324A (en) * 1913-08-22 1915-03-02 Robert C D Owen Building-block for wall constructions.
US1465637A (en) * 1920-01-26 1923-08-21 Halsam Products Company Playblock
FR596752A (en) * 1924-07-18 1925-10-31 Bascou Construction game
US2020562A (en) * 1933-07-25 1935-11-12 Theodore H Miller Toy block
US2132757A (en) * 1936-10-08 1938-10-11 Halsam Products Company Toy building block
US2217374A (en) * 1938-12-20 1940-10-08 Charles E Menzel Toy
US2262199A (en) * 1939-06-06 1941-11-11 Halsam Products Company Toy building brick

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Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1084597A (en) * 1912-09-03 1914-01-20 Paul Anft Toy building-block.
US1130324A (en) * 1913-08-22 1915-03-02 Robert C D Owen Building-block for wall constructions.
US1465637A (en) * 1920-01-26 1923-08-21 Halsam Products Company Playblock
FR596752A (en) * 1924-07-18 1925-10-31 Bascou Construction game
US2020562A (en) * 1933-07-25 1935-11-12 Theodore H Miller Toy block
US2132757A (en) * 1936-10-08 1938-10-11 Halsam Products Company Toy building block
US2217374A (en) * 1938-12-20 1940-10-08 Charles E Menzel Toy
US2262199A (en) * 1939-06-06 1941-11-11 Halsam Products Company Toy building brick

Cited By (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2915213A (en) * 1953-06-01 1959-12-01 Del Tra Company Pallet for carrying bread or the like
DE1197003B (en) * 1959-10-15 1965-07-15 Hans Rolf Vom Feld Children's play construction kit composed of various components
US3148477A (en) * 1960-02-05 1964-09-15 Irma Fabrikerne As Building block having flexible ribs to engage a similar block
US3115229A (en) * 1960-12-12 1963-12-24 Erhard Hermann Handle constructions
US3008581A (en) * 1961-01-18 1961-11-14 Western Textile Products Compa Sectional filing device
US3139698A (en) * 1961-05-22 1964-07-07 Parker Brothers Inc Set of building blocks wherein each block has connecting means on three surfaces thereof
US3180060A (en) * 1961-10-20 1965-04-27 Henry P C Keuls Building blocks
US3180059A (en) * 1961-10-20 1965-04-27 Henry P C Keuls Building blocks
US3220141A (en) * 1962-07-02 1965-11-30 Halsam Products Company Building blocks connectable in slideable or non-slideable relationship
US3224135A (en) * 1963-06-13 1965-12-21 Spalding A G & Bros Inc Construction set including members with plural connecting means
DE1295786B (en) * 1965-03-03 1969-05-22 Keuls Henry P C For drywall construction, a thin-walled hollow component made of metal, plastic or the like.
US3440788A (en) * 1965-06-11 1969-04-29 Arthur B Merget Building blocks with a shell containing a filler and having projections and depressions connected by tubes
DE1290696B (en) * 1965-12-01 1969-03-13 Fischer Artur Hollow component made of elastic material for walls, ceilings or the like.
US3456413A (en) * 1965-12-01 1969-07-22 Artur Fischer Structural element
US3456414A (en) * 1966-10-15 1969-07-22 Artur Fischer Structural element
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