US2557877A - Tuning head for stringed musical instruments - Google Patents

Tuning head for stringed musical instruments Download PDF

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Publication number
US2557877A
US2557877A US120159A US12015949A US2557877A US 2557877 A US2557877 A US 2557877A US 120159 A US120159 A US 120159A US 12015949 A US12015949 A US 12015949A US 2557877 A US2557877 A US 2557877A
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Prior art keywords
spindle
string
sleeve
end
aperture
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Expired - Lifetime
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US120159A
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John E Kluson
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Kluson Mfg Company
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/14Tuning devices, e.g. pegs, pins, friction discs
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/39Cord and rope holders
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T24/00Buckles, buttons, clasps, etc.
    • Y10T24/39Cord and rope holders
    • Y10T24/3936Pivoted part

Description

June 19, 1951 .1. E. KLusoN TUNING HEAD FOR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS Filed Oct, 7. 1949 lll..

jZUefzZf JD??? 26071 5%' Patented June 19, 1951 TUNING HEAD FOR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS John E. Kluson, Chicago, Ill., assignor to Kluson Manufacturing Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of: Illinois ApplicationOctober 7, 1949., SerialNo. 120,159

2 Claims. l

The present invention relates generally to tuning heads for stringed musical instruments, such, for example, as guitars, mandolins and banjos, More particularly the invention relates to that type of tuning head which is mounted on the outer end of the neck of the instrument with which it is used, and comprises a rotatableV spindle, one portion of which is exposed and has a transverse aperture for receiving the adjacent end of one of the strings of the'instrument, and another portion of which is provided with means whereby the spindle may be rotated in one direction or the other in order to adjust or vary the tension of the spring.

In connection with use of a tuning head of the aforementioned type it is customary when attaching the adjacent end of the string to the spindle first to insert the string end completely through thetransverse aperture in the spindle of the head and then after Wrapping the string around the apertured portion of the spindle so as to form a plurality of loops to insert the free or projecting endof the string under one of the loops in order to connect the string to the spindle. In practice it has been found that this method or mode of connecting the string to the spindle of the tuning head is subject to certain objections. In the first placeA connection of the string to the spindle requires-extreme care and is quite laborious. Secondly, it is necessary to use an extremely long string in order to permit the end thereof thatis adjacent the tuning head to be wrapped orlooped several times around the apertured portion of the spindle. Thirdly, the connection between the string and the spindle of the head is not in most instances truly fast and hence when the spindle is turned so as to increase the tension of the spring there is a marked tendency of thevstring to slipat its point of connection with the spindle.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a tuning" head which is an improvement upon, and eliminates the objections to, previously designed tuning heads. In general, the present tuning head comprises in addition to the spindle and spindle turning means, a sleeve which surrounds and is freely rotatable with respect to the exposed apertured portion of the spindle, has a pair of 'diametrically opposite string receiving holes and is adapted, after insertion of the adjacent end of the string through its holes and the aperture in the spindle and in response to string-tightening turning of the spindle, to coact with the spindle-in such manner that the adjacent end of the string is firmly clamped between the inner ends of the holes in the sleeve andthe ends of the aperture in the spindle. By employing a sleeve of this character connection of the string to the spindle of the tuning head is greatly facilitated, it is unnecessary to employ an unusually long string with the tuning head, and the ultimate connection between the string and the apertured portion of the spindle is so positive that slippage of the string with respect tothe spindle during turning of the latter for string tightening purposes is completely avoided.

A further object of the invention is to provide a tuning head which is generally of new and improved construction and effectively and efciently fulfills its intended purpose.

Other objects of the invention and the various advantages and characteristics of the present tuning head will be apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description.

The invention consists in the several novel features which are hereinafter set forth and are more particularly defined by claims at the conclusion hereof.

In the drawing which accompanies and forms a part of this specification or disclosure and in which like numerals of reference denote correspending parts throughout the several views:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the neck of a stringed instrument to which is applied a tuning head embodying the invention;

Figure 2 is a side view of the neck illustrating in detail the construction and design of the means for rotating or` turning the spindle in one direction or the other in order to adjust the tension ofthe .string with which the tuning head is associated;

Figure 3 is a vertical transverse section illustrating the cross sectional design and construction of the central portion of the sleeve of the tuning head and showing the string after the end thereof that is adjacent the tuning head is inserted through the holes in the sleeve and the aperture in the spindle, but before the spindle is turned relatively to the sleeve in order to effect clamping of the string between the innerends of the holes in the sleeve and the ends of the/aperture in the spindle; and

Figure 4 is a similar section showing the spindle after it has been turned relatively to the sleeve in order to effect clamping of the adjacent end ofthe string between the inner ends of the holes in the sleeve and the ends of the aperture in the spindle.

The tuning head which is shown in the drawing constitutes the preferred embodiment. of the invention. It is adapted for use with a stringed instrument having a neck N and as its principal parts or components comprises a spindle 5, a sleeve 6, and turning means -for the spindle. The neck N is shown in the drawing as being of the type that is used in connection with a guitar and embodies a shank part n and a head part nl' These two parts are positioned one in longitudinal alignment with the other and the shank part embodies a threaded finger board n2 on its top face. The portion of the head part that is joined to the shank part embodies a socalled extension nut 11.3 across which a string S extends. One end of the string is suitably attached to a tail piece (not shown) on the body of the instrument with which the tuning head is used and the other end of the string, i. e., the end that overlies the head part nl of the instrument neck N, is attached to the tuning head. The latter, as well understood in the art, serves as a medium or instrumentality for adjusting or varying the tension of the string S. The head part nl of the neck N embodies a flat side face n4 and is provided with a longitudinally extending, open top and open bottom sloth". The latter, as shown in Figure l of the drawing( is disposed directly inwards of the side face n4.

The spindle 5 of the tuning head is formedof steel or any Vother suitable hard, rigid material. It is Cylindrical as shown in the drawing and extends tranversely across the slot p5 in the head part of the neck. The inner end of the spindle is journalled or rotatably mounted in a hole 1 in the portion of the neck head part that defines the inner side ofthe slot 115. The outer end oi the spindle is journalled in, and extends completely through, a hole B which is aligned with the hole 'l and extends between, and through, the side face n4 of the neck head part nl and the outer side of the slot 115. The portion of the spindle Y5 that extends across the transverse slot 11,5 is provided with a cylindrical, open ended transverse aperture 9 through which the adjacent end of the string S is adapted to be inserted.

When the adjacent end of the string is anchored or attached to the apertured portion of the spindle as hereinafter described and the spindle is turned in a counterclockwise direction as viewed in'Figure 2 of the drawing the tension on the string is increased. Clockwise turning of the spindle as viewed in Figure 2 serves to reduce the tension of the string.

The sleeve ii coacts with the apertured portion of the sginrlle to attach, connect or anchor the adjacent end of the string S to the spindle. It has a truly cylindrical inner periphery and is loosely mounted on the apertured portion of the spindle to the end that the spindle is free to rotate relatively to the sleeve. The sides of the longitudinally extending slot h5 in the neck part of the instrument neck N coact with the ends of the sleeve to hold the sleeve against the axial displacement with respect to the spindle. Preferably the outer periphery of the sleeve is concave. In its central portion the sleeve i5y is provided with a pair of diametrically opposite cylindrical holes l. The latter are the same in diameter as the transverse aperture 9 in the spindle and are adapted in connection with attachment of the adjacent end of the string S to the spindle to be brought into registry or alignment with the aperture as shown in Figure 3. When it is desired to connect or attach the adjacent end of the string to the spindle the loosely mounted sleeve 5 is turned relatively to the spindle until the holes l therein are in registry or alignment with the aperture 9. Thereafter the adjacent end of the string is inserted completely through the holes and aperture, as shown or illustrated in Figure V3. After proper insertion of the adjacent end of the string S through the holes and aperture the spindle 5 is turned in acounterclockwise direction as viewed in Figure 2. VThis results in the spindle turning initially relatively to the sleeve and results in the end of the string being rmly clamped between the inner ends of the holes lil and the ends of the aperture 9, as shown in Figure 4. After clamping of the adjacent end of the string between .the inner ends of the holes I and the ends of the aperture 9 further counterclockwse turning of the spindle causes the sleeve to rotate with the spindle and results in the string S being Wound around the Vconcave outer periphery of the sleeve 6. When it is desired to release the adjacent end of the string from attached relation with the spindle the spindle is turned in a clockwise direction relatively to the sleeve until its aperture 9 is in alignment or registry with the holes I0 in the sleeve. This serves to unclamp or release the string so that it may be readily removed from the spindle by pulling it from the aperture 9 and the holes i8. By having the aperture 9 extending completely through the spindle and employing two holes lll in the sleeve the adjacent end of the string S when applied or attached to the spindle is clamped at two points and hence it isso positively connected to the spindle that slippage of the string cannot occur when thespindle is turned in a counterclockwise direction to effect tightening of the string. By having the outer periphery of the sleeve concave insertion of the neck end of the string through the holes in the sleeve in the'aperture in the spindle is materially facilitated by reason of the fact that the curved-or concave surface around the hole into which the neck end ofthe string is first inserted serves to guide said end ofthe string into such hole Any conventional or suitable means may be employed for turning the spindle 5 for string adjusting purposes The means shown or illustrated in the drawing consists of a mounting plate H, a pair of brackets I2, a shaft i3, a worm i4 and a worm gear l5. The mounting plate ll is xedly secured by screws or other attaching devices to the side face n4 of the head par 11.1 of the neck N and embodies a hole I6 which is aligned with, Vand the Vsame in diameter as, the hole 8 and has the outer end of lthe spindleE projecting through it. The brackets !2 are positioned in vertically spaced relation and are Connected to, and project outwards from, theV mounting plate ll. They are located atone side of the hole It in the mounting plate and have centrally disposed aligned holes Il in which one endL of the shaft i3 is journalled. rihe other vend of the shaft embodies a key I8 whereby the shaft may be turned or rotated. The worm ht is formed on the portion of the shaft I3 thatextends between the brackets l2. The worm gear l 5 meshes with the worm lli and is suitably xedlysecured to the outer end of the spindle 5. When the key IS is turned one direction the worm and worin gear serve toI turnthe spindle; 5 in one direction and when the key is'turne'd` in the opposits direction the worm and Worm gear operate to eifect reverse turning or rotation of the spindle. i v Y 1 The herein described tuning head effectively and eiciently fulills its intended purpose and is essentially characterized by the fact that it includes the sleeve 6 around the apertured portion of the spindle. The sleeve, as previously pointed out, coacts with the spindle firmly to anchor to the spindle the adjacent end of the string with which the tuning head is employed. By providing the sleeve as a part of the tuning head attachment of the string to the spindle is facilitated and the string when applied is secured to the spindle in a fast or positive manner. The sleeve makes it possible to utilize a comparatively short string in view of the fact that attachment of the string to the spindle does not necessitate wrapping or looping the string around the spindle to a great extent. The tuning head is essentially simple in design and hence may be produced at a low cost.

The invention is not to be understood as restricted to the details set forth since these may be modified within the scope of the appended claims without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

Having thus described the invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. As a new article of manufacture, a tuning head designed to have attached thereto one end of a string of a stringed musical instrument and comprising a rotatably mounted spindle embodying turning means therefor, having one portion truly cylindrical and provided with a diametric aperture for receiving said one end of the string, and adapted when turned in one direction to increase the tension of the string and when turned in the opposite direction to decrease the tension of the string, and a sleeve with a truly cylindrical inner periphery, extending loosely and rotatably around said one portion of the spindle, provided with a transverse hole adjacent one end of the aforementioned aperture, having associated therewith means for positively holding it against axial displacement in either direction relatively to the spindle, and adapted, after insertion of said one end of the string through the hole and into the aperture and in response to turning of the spindle in said one direction and relatively to the sleeve, to coact with the spindle in such manner that said one end of the string is firmly clamped between the inner end of the hole and said one end of the aperture.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a tuning head designed to have attached thereto one end of a string of a stringed musical instrument and comprising a rotatably mounted spindle embodying gear variety turning means therefor, having one portion truly cylindrical and provided with a diametric aperture for receiving said one end of the spring, and adapted when turned in one direction to increase the tension of the string and l when turned in the opposite direction to decrease the tension of the string, and a sleeve with a truly cylindrical inner periphery extending loosely and rotatably around said one portion of the spindle, provided with a concave outer periphery and in addition a transverse open ended hole in its portions of minimum thickness and adjacent one end of the aperture, having associated therewith means for positively holding it against axial displacement in either direction relatively to the spindle, and adapted, after insertion of said one end of the string through the hole and into the aperture and in response to turning of the spindle in said one direction and relatively to the sleeve, to coact with the spindle in such manner that said one end of the string is firmly clamped between said inner end of the hole and said one end of the aperture.

JOHN E. KLUSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,811,738 Williams June 23, 1931

US120159A 1949-10-07 1949-10-07 Tuning head for stringed musical instruments Expired - Lifetime US2557877A (en)

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Cited By (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2764838A (en) * 1952-03-10 1956-10-02 Herbert C Singer Combination casting and still fishing bobber
US2955503A (en) * 1958-05-01 1960-10-11 Philip D Braverman Tuning peg adjusting mechanism
US3059300A (en) * 1960-08-12 1962-10-23 American Viscose Corp Strap end holder
US3679199A (en) * 1970-06-15 1972-07-25 Ferdinand Christensen Strip material holder
JPS4990113U (en) * 1972-11-22 1974-08-05
US3958784A (en) * 1974-02-05 1976-05-25 Manufacture D'appareillage Electrique De Cahors Retaining device for an electric cable
US4069732A (en) * 1975-09-08 1978-01-24 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Electric guitar
WO1983003666A1 (en) * 1982-04-13 1983-10-27 Paul Reed Smith Pitch stabilized string suspension system for musical instruments
US4481695A (en) * 1981-10-27 1984-11-13 AUMOND-Fordererbau GmbH Maschinenfabrik Wire rope connector with length adjustment capacity
US4506568A (en) * 1983-06-16 1985-03-26 Aamodt Norman O Oil filter wrench
DE3522728A1 (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-01-02 Smith Paul Reed String attachment device for a stringed-instrument music
US4702443A (en) * 1986-08-08 1987-10-27 Callaway James J Cord holding device
US4770377A (en) * 1986-08-08 1988-09-13 Callaway James J Cord holding device
GB2276486A (en) * 1993-02-25 1994-09-28 Ronald William Bennett Combined clamp/tuning means for a guitar string
USD412522S (en) 1998-07-08 1999-08-03 Gibson Guitar Corp. Classical guitar peghead
US20030229361A1 (en) * 2002-06-06 2003-12-11 Jasper Jackson Stop-cock suture clamping system
US20090044441A1 (en) * 2007-08-13 2009-02-19 Ryan Neal Snap terminal tackle
US8093475B1 (en) 2010-10-06 2012-01-10 Sperzel Robert J Tuning device
US20140000822A1 (en) * 2012-05-08 2014-01-02 SAFE-T-SHADE, Inc. Apparatuses, systems and methods for locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings
US8950463B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2015-02-10 Safe-T-Shade Cordless coverings for architectural opening having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
US8967226B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2015-03-03 Safe-T-Shade Architectural cover operating assembly
US20150143974A1 (en) * 2011-08-22 2015-05-28 Bum-Jin Kim Guitar String Regulator
US20150209096A1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2015-07-30 Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc. Tensioning instrument
US9107655B2 (en) 2012-02-16 2015-08-18 Cook Medical Technologies Llc External suture securement devices and methods
US9151110B2 (en) 2010-03-02 2015-10-06 Safe-T-Shade Cordless blind systems having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
US9187952B2 (en) 2010-03-02 2015-11-17 Safe-T-Shade Cordless blind system and retro-fit method
US9719296B1 (en) 2014-10-06 2017-08-01 Safe-T-Shade Apparatuses and systems for selectively locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings
US10314635B2 (en) 2014-05-28 2019-06-11 A&E Advanced Closure Systems, Llc Tensioning instruments

Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1811738A (en) * 1930-05-23 1931-06-23 Calvert B Williams Musical instrument string securing device

Patent Citations (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US1811738A (en) * 1930-05-23 1931-06-23 Calvert B Williams Musical instrument string securing device

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2764838A (en) * 1952-03-10 1956-10-02 Herbert C Singer Combination casting and still fishing bobber
US2955503A (en) * 1958-05-01 1960-10-11 Philip D Braverman Tuning peg adjusting mechanism
US3059300A (en) * 1960-08-12 1962-10-23 American Viscose Corp Strap end holder
US3679199A (en) * 1970-06-15 1972-07-25 Ferdinand Christensen Strip material holder
JPS4990113U (en) * 1972-11-22 1974-08-05
US3958784A (en) * 1974-02-05 1976-05-25 Manufacture D'appareillage Electrique De Cahors Retaining device for an electric cable
US4069732A (en) * 1975-09-08 1978-01-24 Massachusetts Institute Of Technology Electric guitar
US4481695A (en) * 1981-10-27 1984-11-13 AUMOND-Fordererbau GmbH Maschinenfabrik Wire rope connector with length adjustment capacity
US4453443A (en) * 1982-04-13 1984-06-12 Smith Paul R Pitch stabilized string suspension system for musical instruments
WO1983003666A1 (en) * 1982-04-13 1983-10-27 Paul Reed Smith Pitch stabilized string suspension system for musical instruments
US4506568A (en) * 1983-06-16 1985-03-26 Aamodt Norman O Oil filter wrench
DE3522728A1 (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-01-02 Smith Paul Reed String attachment device for a stringed-instrument music
US4589321A (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-05-20 Paul Reed Smith String attachment means for a tuning machine
US4702443A (en) * 1986-08-08 1987-10-27 Callaway James J Cord holding device
US4770377A (en) * 1986-08-08 1988-09-13 Callaway James J Cord holding device
GB2276486A (en) * 1993-02-25 1994-09-28 Ronald William Bennett Combined clamp/tuning means for a guitar string
USD412522S (en) 1998-07-08 1999-08-03 Gibson Guitar Corp. Classical guitar peghead
US20030229361A1 (en) * 2002-06-06 2003-12-11 Jasper Jackson Stop-cock suture clamping system
US7416556B2 (en) * 2002-06-06 2008-08-26 Abbott Laboratories Stop-cock suture clamping system
US20090044441A1 (en) * 2007-08-13 2009-02-19 Ryan Neal Snap terminal tackle
US8950463B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2015-02-10 Safe-T-Shade Cordless coverings for architectural opening having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
US8967226B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2015-03-03 Safe-T-Shade Architectural cover operating assembly
US9151110B2 (en) 2010-03-02 2015-10-06 Safe-T-Shade Cordless blind systems having cord enclosures with a swivel feature and methods of assembling such cord enclosures
US9187952B2 (en) 2010-03-02 2015-11-17 Safe-T-Shade Cordless blind system and retro-fit method
US8093475B1 (en) 2010-10-06 2012-01-10 Sperzel Robert J Tuning device
US20150143974A1 (en) * 2011-08-22 2015-05-28 Bum-Jin Kim Guitar String Regulator
US9076411B2 (en) * 2011-08-22 2015-07-07 Bum-Jin Kim Guitar string regulator
US9398904B2 (en) 2012-02-16 2016-07-26 Cook Medical Technologies Llc External suture securement devices and methods
US9107655B2 (en) 2012-02-16 2015-08-18 Cook Medical Technologies Llc External suture securement devices and methods
US9149143B2 (en) * 2012-05-08 2015-10-06 Safe-T-Shade Apparatuses, systems and methods for locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings
US20140000822A1 (en) * 2012-05-08 2014-01-02 SAFE-T-SHADE, Inc. Apparatuses, systems and methods for locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings
US20150209096A1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2015-07-30 Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc. Tensioning instrument
US9333021B2 (en) * 2012-11-21 2016-05-10 Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc. Tensioning instrument
US9561064B2 (en) 2012-11-21 2017-02-07 Pioneer Surgical Technology, Inc. Bone plate system and method
US10314635B2 (en) 2014-05-28 2019-06-11 A&E Advanced Closure Systems, Llc Tensioning instruments
US9719296B1 (en) 2014-10-06 2017-08-01 Safe-T-Shade Apparatuses and systems for selectively locking lift cords used to lift architectural opening coverings

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