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US2541530A - Ammunition feed and control system - Google Patents

Ammunition feed and control system Download PDF

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US2541530A
US2541530A US58113145A US2541530A US 2541530 A US2541530 A US 2541530A US 58113145 A US58113145 A US 58113145A US 2541530 A US2541530 A US 2541530A
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gun
means
belt
ammunition
motor
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Edward J Meyer
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Curtiss-Wright Corp
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Curtiss-Wright Corp
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41AFUNCTIONAL FEATURES OR DETAILS COMMON TO BOTH SMALLARMS AND ORDNANCE, e.g. CANNONS; MOUNTINGS FOR SMALLARMS OR ORDNANCE
    • F41A9/00Feeding or loading of ammunition; Magazines; Guiding means for the extracting of cartridges
    • F41A9/50External power or control systems
    • F41A9/51Boosters, i.e. externally-powered motors

Description

1951 E. J. MEYER AMMUNITION FEED AND CONTROL SYSTEM 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. EDWARD J. MEYER Filed March 5, 1945 Feb. 13, I J MEYER AMMUNITION FEED AND CONTROL SYSTEM Filed March 5, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 WM 92 v l5 FIG. 6

v VENT0R.- EDWA J. MEYER 8? I TTORNY Feb. 13, 1951 J, MEYER 2,541,530

AMMUNITION FEED AND CONTROL SYSTEM Filed March 5, 1945 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 EDWARD J. MEYER Patentecl Feb. 13, 1951 AMMUNITION FEED AND CONTROL SYSTEM Edward J. Meyer, Normandy, Mm, assignor to Curtiss-Wright Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Application March 5, 1945, Serial No. 581,131

16 Claims.

The present invention relates to ordnance installations in general and is more particularly cerned with improvements in the operation of ammunition booster systems so that the feeding of ammunition to an automatic gun may be accurately synchronized with the gun operating cycle.

Heretofore, the attainment of free and unin terrupted gun firing operations has been exceedingly difficult in the cases where a booster device exists in the ammunition feed system. There are a number of reasons why these ammunition booster systems have failed to overcomethe objectionable characteristics prevailing, a principal objection being that the booster device has been permitted to function in the system as an independent and uncontolled agency thereby allowing the device to overfeed ammunition or to continue the feed when the gun has stopped firing. It has been found that the belt loads on the booster device are not sufiicient to bring the device to a rapid stop since the inertia effects of the belt moving t high speed produce a detrimental over-run or coast. Consequently the rounds of ammunition actually pile up in the [chute between the booster and gun and produce a jam impossible for the gun to break.

According to the present invention the system of boosting an ammunition belt toward the gun has been greatly improved, so much so that ammunition can not be caused to pile up or jam in the chute and thus produce or contribute to faulty gun operation. The improved booster system may be adapted for any arrangement of gun and remotely positioned ammunition case or magazine. In general, the present invention provides a simple and positive control for the ammunition booster device so that the action of the booster device is made to synchronize with and become a function of the gun operation thereby preventing the occurrence of chute jams, overfeed to the gun and objectionable ammunition belt drag loads on the gun feeding mechanism.

The invention has as its principal object the provision of a synchronized ammunition booster system for automatic guns so that operational failure of the guns will be minimized or substantially eliminated.

, It is an object to provide an ammunition booster control system which shall be rendered initially operative through the gun trigger system and which shall thereafter function to supply ammunition to the gun at a rate just sufficient to assure normal gun action.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide an ammunition booster system particular- 1y suitable for use in aircraft, and to utilize the booster for moving belted ammunition to an automatic gun from a remotely located magazine, thereby reducing the ammunition drag load on the gun, and especially the drag load developed during accelerated maneuvers of the aircraft.

An object of the invention is to provide a control. device for altering the operation of the synchronized booster system during the periods when gravitational accelerations developed by the gun carriers space movements produce forces sufficient to impede the free functioning of the synchronized system wherebythe impedance maybe overcome by the control device to permit continuous and free operation of the booster system.

Another object is to provide a control device of the noted character which is directly and adjustably responsive to centrifugal and gravitational forces for its operation and to relate the device with an electric power booster motor control switch in a manner causing the switch to have a control phase for synchronizing other parts of the system or to cutoff said switch thereby eliminating synchronized action in the system.

A further object resides in the form and construction of the controlling device to facilitate its assembly and'to give assurance of reliable operation, there being included provisions for making adjustments to provide a selective range of operation.

These and other objects will be set forth in greater detail in the following description relating to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary view, in perspective, of the ammunition booster unit and controlling system, certain portions of the structure being broken away for clarity,

Figure 2 is an end elevation of a typical automatic gun wherein certain detailsof the recoil type ammunition feed mechanism of the gun have been shown'in a schematic manner as will appear presently,

Figures 3 and 4 illustrate, schematically, successive positional phases of operation of the control mechanism associated with the ammunition booster unit,

Figure 5 is an electrical wiring circuit which may be incorporated in the control system for the ammunition booster unit,

Figure dis a side elevational view of a modified control device shown in operative position (full line) and in non-operative position (dotted line), certain portions being cut away to show details,-

Figure-'7 is apartialdetailed plan view from the'under side of the control device of Figure 6.-

Figure 8 is a detailed sectional elevation at line 8-8 of Figure 6 and Figure 9 is a general view in perspective of an automatic gun and turret installation in an aircraft indicated in outline only, the particular features, details of construction and assembly of the present invention being clearly emphasized in other views.

Specifically, the booster organization (Figure 1) includes a rotary drum it having a pair of axially spaced sprocket members Ii mounted thereon for rotation with the drum. A typical sprocket is shown clearly in Figures 3, 4 and 6. an electric motor i2 (Figure and driving connections (not shown) are housed internally of the drum is while the drum and sprocket unit is rotatably carried in a housing structure l3 as shown. The sprocket members it (only one being shown) are formed with tooth elements i4 (Figures 3 and 4;) suitably spaced to receive successive shell cases it of the ammunition belt. The belt is made up of the shells i5 linked together by the usual and well-known separate looped elements it which encircle the shell cases. This belt arrangement conforms to conventional practices and further description is believed unnecessary.

The belted rounds of ammunition are placed initially in a container or magazine 2%} such that the belt may be led out of the magazine at the zone 2| and into the path of travel of the booster sprockets l i where it is positioned in engagement with the sprocket teeth elements It. The ammunition belt is then directed through a sheet metal or other rigid type chute structure 22 extending along the top surface of the magazine and in the direction of the gun 23. The rigid chute structure 22 may extend the full distance to the gun 23 or it may be terminated at any desired point whereupon a flexible type chute structure (not shown) can be used to direct and confine the belt over the remaining distance to the gun. One practice is to employ a rigid chute which extends to within approximately twenty to twenty-five rounds of ammunition from the gun and to insert a flexible chute means over the remaining span. This allows considerable unrestrained movement of the gun for purposes of aiming at a rapidly moving target, such as a hostile airplane. Moreover, the rigid chute portion reduces the build-up of drag loads on the gun and produces definite improvement in the ability of the gun feed mechanism to draw in the belted shells positioned in the chute.

The feed mechanism (Figure 2) associated with and forming a part of the gun 23 is positioned in the feed chamber 24 and comprises a feed pawl 25 pivotally mounted on a reciprocating cross-head or slide block 26 which is, in turn, moved by an oscillating member 21 forming a part of the gun recoil unit (not shown). The feed pawl 25 is spring urged into positive engagement with the shell cases as shown so that as the driving member 2'! moves slide block 26 to the right, as viewed in Figure 2, the ammunition belt is drawn into the chamber 2 5 and the empty belt link it ejected at the opposite side from the ammunition feed side. The stroke of the slide block 2c is just sufiicient to advance each round of ammunition to the midpoint of the chamber where it may be withdrawn from the link and moved into the gun breech. The return movement of pawl 25 momentarily releases the ammunition belt and therefore a stop pawl 28 is provided to prevent the belt from backing out of the feed chamber. The gun feed mechanism just described conforms to conventional practice and under normal conditions is sufiiciently powerful to draw the ammunition belt into the gun directly from the magazine. A normal condition presupposes that the magazine will be placed near the gun and on approximately the same level so that the weight of the belt and shell cases will not impose too great a load or drag on the feed mechanism of the gun.

However, there are many gun installations and arrangements where it is impossible or impractical to place the ammunition magazine in a position suitable for minimizing the belt loads on the gun. A typical arrangement in this latter category is the turrent gun (Figure 9) wherein the gun is flexibly mounted at the upper portion of the turret structure and the magazine is positioned near the floor of the turret and consid erably below the level of the gun feed chamber. In this latter case it is the practice to provide a booster device, usually of electrical type, at some point in the line or" travel of the ammunition belt. The purpose of the booster device is to reduce the ammunition belt load on the gun by applying an extra push or boost so that the net load imposed upon and experienced by the gun feed mechanism is maintained within permissible limits. If the ammunition belt drag load is adjusted properly, the flow or movement of shells toward the gun can be facilitated and positive gun operation assured.

One form and arrangement of the synchronized booster control system is illustrated in the draw ing as an electrically operated booster unit related with the electric circuit (Figure 5), this circuit being controlled by a switch element movable with the gun trigger indicated diagrammatically at 29. The power line 38 for the motor l2, the latter being housed in booster drum I0, is led to a terminal block 31 (Figure 1) which is secured to a sheet metal bracket 32 carried on the booster supporting structure 53. The terminal block is provided with a series of cable connector posts, posts 33 and 3 being selected for the power input line 33. From terminal block posts 34, 35 and 36 three lines 31, 38 and. 39 connect with the motor 12 and are arranged to provide current for operating the motor forwardly or reversely. The direction of motor rotation is directly controlled by a single pole, double throw snap switch 40 mounted on the structure 53 and having circuit connections ii, 32 and #3 with the respective terminal block posts 33, 35 and M. A resistance unit or coil housed in member G8 and carried on supporting elements t? secured to the bracket 32 is suitably connected to terminal posts 36 and 5G by short leads &8 and 59 so as to be positioned in the motor circuit and on the reversing side thereof. The motor [2 (Figure 5) is provided with a field coil for forward rotation (clockwise when viewed from Figure 1) and a reversely wound field coil 5| for reverse rotation (counter-clockwise when viewed from Figure 1). Full line current is applied to the field coil 50 through lines El and 38, while the field coil 5| is connected in series with the resistance unit 45 so that a reduced line current is available for reverse rotation.

The means for controlling the operation of the motor i2 and its direction of rotation in accordance with the firing cycle of the automatic gun 23 is the snap switch so. This switch comprises (Figures 3, 4 and 5) a central contact arm which is forced to assume either of two positions by :means .of .a resilient ioperating- :arm 56 and a co-acting toggle spring :5]. The spring-5:1 is.car-

. ried :between the switch :arm 55 .and operating arm 56 and is .capableof assuming the .positions shown in Figures 3 and 4 whereby .the .arm 55 is forced to move with considerable snap in adirection opposite to the movement .of .arm .56. To either side of the contact arm .55 are fixedly positioned cooperating arms 58. and .59 whereby upon movement of the contact arm 55 acomplete 1 .electrical circuit is made through the motor field coils 50 and iii, respectively. The .arm .55 is provided with .a silver or other suitable double faced contact point Bit, as shown, while the arms 58 and .59. are provided with similar contact points 16;! and a2 respectively. The several switch .arms 55, '58 and 556 are mounted between a series of insulating blocks 53 andsecuredin assembly by suitable bolts 64, all as clearly shown.

Referring again to Figures .1, 3 and 4, it will be observed that snap switch is mounted, by means of a suitable bracket 5Z5, on the booster motor supporting and ,housi-ngstructure l3 .at-the end wall thereof and in a position overlying the line of travel of the belted cartridge oases l5.

More specificall the switch is positioned near the base portion of the shells where the spring leaf type operating arm 56 canbearranged in its most advantageous position closely adjacent the shell cases. The outer end of arm 56 is provided with a roller element 65 and roller mounting fork 66, the arrangement being such that the roller 65 projects into the path of travel of each shell case. As a consequence, operating arm 56 is made to move away from and toward the shells aseach thereof moves under and away from the roller 65. The arm 56 is given aninitial set or is placed in an initial position which urges the roller 65 into the path of the ammunition belt shells thereby assuring that the roller-will always be in rolling ,5

contact with the shell cases and will move into the spaces or depressions between the shell cases. For the purpose of further discussion the term crest will be understood to refer to the position of roller 65 when riding upon the shell case at the point of maximum riseor lift of the roller and associated arm. The terms depression or valley shall be taken to refer tothe position of the roller 65 when it rides down between adjacent shell cases with the resulting greatest possible fall. For example a crest position is shown in Figures 1 and 4, while the depression is shown in Figure 3.

In operation, the switch or trigger member 29 (Figure 5) is closed only when it is desired to fire the gun. The resulting recoil action of the gun will initiate a forward, step-by-step or jerky movement of the ammunition belt. 'IThis intermittent belt advance is necessarily established by the reciprocatory gun feed mechanism and it will always be present in the system. In prior boosted ammunition feed systems, the booster unit or device is a continuously-operating agency which has no coordinated relation with the action of the gun. However, with the present system of assisted ammunitionfeed the booster device is made to synchronize-its,operation with the gun action. This synchronized feed is accomplished by timing the action of the snap switch 40 with the intermittent action of the gun and also by placing this switch in direct control of the booster driving motor. The result is that switch 40 will cause booster motor to operate forwardly and reversely in alternatingoycles whichare exactly or substantially equalto the gun operatingcycles.

Referring to Figures 1 and 4, it will be observed that one possible initial position of the operating arm 5.6 .of switch .40 is on the crest of a shell .case 1.5. If at this time the gun is fired, closure of trigger switch 29 (Figure .5) will energize the booster motor as follows: Current will flow from line 30 through terminal .35, line 3], motor field 0011.50, return line 3.8, terminal .35, line .42, switch contacts BI and 60, line ll to terminal .33 and then back into the .power line .30 through trigger switch 29. Motor IE will immediately rotate clockwise (as viewed in Figure 1) and feed the ammunition toward the gun .23. The rotation of motor l2 will cause sprocket H to move the shell out of a crest position and thereby .permit the roller 66 and arm 56 to approach the position of depression which is between two adjacent shells (Figure 3). .At some preselected point in the fall of the roller 65, switch arm 55 will be snapped over to a position where contacts 16.0 and 62 are closed. In this position, the motor .reversingfield coil 5| is energized as follows: Current flows from line 3!! through terminal 3.4,line 3i, vfield coil'fii, return line 39, terminal 36, line 438, resistor coil .45, line 49, terminal i l, switch line 43, contacts 62 and 60, switch line ii, terminal 33 and back to the power line .30 through trigger switch29. The tendency of the motor will be to rotate counterclockwise (as viewed in Figure 1) thereby exerting aninfluence to return the roller 55 to its crest position on the same shell case, as before. If the time intervals for power reversal are equal to power forward time intervals the motor will simply oscillate between the same crest and depression positions and no forward movement of the ammunition can take place.

Forward movement or progressive feeding of the ammunition belt is accomplished by properly timing and correlating the position of the snap switch roller 65 and the current strength in each of the motor field coils 60 and M. The booster motor is generally rated at a speed of approximately 10,000 to 12,0000 R. ,P. M. on 24 volts direct current, but is equipped witha suitable gear reduction (not shown) so that the belt engaging sprockets rotate at the considerably reduced speed of approximately to 1.10 R. P. M. It is obvious that when full line voltage is thrown on the. motor the sprockets will come up to speed almost instantly and for purposes of this discussion it will be 50 considered. Therefore, the electrical system for the booster motor is arranged to supply full line current when the snap switch 4.0 is in the forward running position (Figure 4) which .corresponds to a full rise orcrest position. Also full line current is maintained over a substantialdeviation to either side of this crest. On the other hand the power reverse cycle for the motor .52

has been modified to an extent sufficient onlymomentarily to reverse the-current supply under normal operating conditions and with the roller 65 in a closely defined depressed zone. Furthermore, the tendency for the motor to reverse its rotation has been considerably dampened by the insertion of resistor A5 in series with the reversing field coil 6!. This resistor acts to reduce the line voltage thrown on the motor and hence cuts down the rapidity of motor reverse speed pick up. This latter action is generallyreferred to as plugging which means that by reversing the current the motor is effectively electrically braked for {quick stoppa .In this way an oscillating motion is imparted to the ammunition .belt which motion can be. made to coincide with the gun feed ;mo.t i on for assuring a positive and regulated flow of cartridges into the gun. The fact that full line current is made available for the belt feed cycle and reduced line current for the belt reverse cycle makes it entirely possible to carry the belt of ammunition over the periods of depression of the switch roller 65 and into the following crest periods or roller rise. This carry-over result obtains due to the powerful thrust of the motor in the feed direction and the relatively weak thrust developed in the reversing direction. Combined with this electrical circuit arrangement is the control switch 46 which is positioned with respect to the cartridge cases or shells l for maintaining the roller element 65 in its power on phase position during a time interval approximately three to four times the interval of roller phase position for power reverse. Thus the contact elements 6E6l are maintained in circuit make position for a longer time than for the period of circuit make position of reverse current contact elements 6l62.

It is also to be noted that the system operation thus far described takes place only during the periods of gun firing action and while it is possible for the ammunition belt to move forward in the chute without stoppage. When, however, an obstruction develops the forward progress of the belt between the booster unit and gun feed chamber is brought to a standstill and the booster motor, if not stopped, is slowed down considerably. This slowing down result permits the roller 65 a proportionately longer period of time or dwell in the depressed phase and thus increases the plugging effect on the motor. The final result is that the motor will simply oscillate or rock back and forth without actually feeding the ammunition. As long as the trigger switch 29 is depressed the motor oscillation or rocking will continue and the ammunition belt will be jerked back and forth with no actual forward progress. It should be obvious by how that any obstruction which may occur either in the chute structure between the booster device and the gun feed chamber or in the gun itself will slow down the booster motor and cause the switch 40 to alter the power on-power reverse cycles sufficiently to prevent any further forward progress of the belt.

When the above described control system is applied to a turret gun installation 68 such as that generally indicated in connection with the aircraft G9 in Figure 9 it frequently happens that the gun ceases to function properly during violent or accelerated flight maneuvers. The cause of this is attributed to induced gravitional forces, usually referred to as G effects. After repeated tests it has been determined that for acceleration forces of approximately 3 G or less the first described control sytsem will be adequate to maintain proper gun action. For values of approximately 3 G or greater the control system is rendered inoperative for continuing the flow of ammuntion toward the gun. Therefore, a modified control of the type hereinafter to be described will introduce a control means competent to respond to and measure the G effects and adjust the electric circuit control switch 39 accordingly. Normally this means is maintained inoperative and switch 40 continues to rise and fall as noted, but when the acceleration forces reach or exceed substantially 3 Gs the switch control means operates to hold the switch arm 56 in the power on or crest position (Figure 4) and the booster motor is free to feed ammunition continuously. By so doing, the full power of the booster motor 8 is available to force the rounds of ammunition through the chute at the time when the rubbing friction therebetween tends to retard or hamper the movement of ammunition toward the gun.

With reference to Figures 6, '7 and 8, the snap switch 40 is provided with a small U-shaped bracket 75 secured to the switch block by means of bolts 64 to provide a fixed mount for the switch controller member '58, the controller member being pivotally carried on this bracket by means of pivot pins 19 loosely carried in the bracket and peen-ed into the side walls of the member 18 as clearly shown in Figure 8. The assembly may be mounted in any convenient manner to a fixed structure as the bracket 53. The member 18, which is freely pivotally carried on the bracket i5, is formed into a channel configuration and is further provided with spaced and longitudinally extending arms 6! as an integral and continuous part of the side walls. Each of the arms 8| is bent inwardly an amount sufficient to bring the inturned finger portion 32 under the switch arm 56 when observed in plan view (Figure 7). Thus when the member E8 pivots counterclockwise about the pins 19 (Figure 6) the finger elements 32 (dotted line position) contact the arm 56 at either side and interfere with the normal oscillating motion thereof under the influence of the rounds of ammuntion.

Gravitational influence on member '38 is developed by an adjustable mass 33 mounted at the lower end of this member and secured thereto by means of a bolt 84 which is positioned in a longitudinal slot 85 and held in adjusted position by the nut 86. The slot 35 is formed in the base plate 8'! of the channel member as shown in Figure 7. The mass 33 consists of a cup member 38 filled with lead or other material 89 which will permit high weight concentration in the relatively small space provided. Lead is preferred because of its unit weight had because it is easily handled. Further, the lead may be poured into the cup when molten so as to fill the slot in the bolt head and act as the means to prevent bolt rotation when making positional adjustments of the mass 33.

The means for retaining the member it in the inoperative (full line) position as shown in Figure 6 and to oppose the action of the mass 83 under the effects of gravitational forces comprises a resilient member or coil spring at which at one end is soldered or otherwise secured to a small plate 95, the latter element being retained in position under the head of bolt ti l (Figure 7). The opposite end of this spring 96 is adapted to fit loosely over the upset head of a retaining rivet 92 positioned in the base plate 93 of the channel member it. Other spring retainer means such as a cup or recess formed in plate 2'33 may be provided for this same purpose.

The above described switch control members and its several parts and elements is easily fabricated and can be made as substantial and rugged as the conditions require. Some saving in weight can be effected by cutting away a portion of the channel base between the sections 8? and 93, the resulting aperture 94 will then provide the necessary access to the terminals of the switch block for the electrical wires (not shown) running between this switch and the remainder of the electrical system.

The control member F8 is adapted to respond to induced gravitational forces and in so doing the action thereof is transmitted to the osoillating switch arm 56 through the inturned finger elements 82 to'move the roller 55 out of the line of travel of the rounds of ammunition. Asbefore noted when this control mechanism is applied to aircraft gun installations (Figure 9) the initial setting for the mass 83 and the strength of spring 96 should be arranged to maintain the member T8 in its inoperative position for gravitational forces of values up to substantially 3 G and to permit the member to pivot into switch interrupting position for forces of 3 G and greater. In one test installation it was found that faulty gun firing action developed when the gravitational force was about 3' G. Not all installations will be so affected that a setting of the mass 83 may be made for 3 G effects alone without regard to other factors. A few tests will soon indicate at what G value or range of G values faulty gun action develops and an adjustment can be made accordingly. Each new installation, however, must be considered separately so that the full sensitivity and action of the device can be realized. The position of the switch dd relative to the path of travel of the ammunition belt, the direction and magnitude of calculated or 'expected gravitational influences and certain other factors shall all be directly determinative of the desired location and arrangement h reof and of the spring constant and mass values and settings to be made.

Obviously other system arrangements may be made or will suggest themselves after a study of the controlv system above described and certain structural modifications and changes will come to mind,.but it is the aim hereof to cover all such variations as come within the scope of the claims appearing below.

What is claimed is:

1. A system for controlling the movement of an ammunition belt toward a machine gun having recoil operated means for initiating the advance of the belt in accordance with its firing cycle, said system comprising a reversible electric motor, a source of electrical current and a circuit including said motor, means driven by said motor for moving the ammunition belt toward said machine gun, means disposed in said electrical circuit and responsive to the movement of said ammunition belt for conditioning the motor for forward and reverse impulses in cycles synchronized substantially with the operating cycle of said recoil operated means, and a gun trigger in said electrical circuit for completing the circuit between said motor and current source upon initiation of gun firing.

2; A system for regulating the feed movement of belted cartridges toward a machine gun having recoil operated means adapted to establish a cyclic advance of the cartridges, and a cartridge magazine remote from the machine gun, said system comprising power operated means for feeding or retarding thebelted cartridges in their movement from said magazine, and regulating means for cycling the power operated means to feed or retard the belted cartridges in accordance with the machine gun recoil cycle, said regulating means including an element arranged to have contact with thebelted cartridges as the same move toward the machine gun and oscillate between av crest and a depressed position whereby said regulating means is rendered effective to cycle saidlpower operated means.

3. A system for regulating the feed movement of belted cartridges toward a machine gun having recoil operated means adapted to establish a cyclic advance of the cartridges, and a cartridge magazine remote-from the machine gun, said system comprising power operated means of electrically reversible type for feeding or retarding the belted cartridges in their movement from said magazine, a source of electrical power for said power operated means, and regulating means for reversing the power for the power operated means to feed and retard the belted cartridges in cycles in accordance with the machine gun recoil cycle, said regulating means including an element arranged to-have contact with the belted cartridges as the same move toward the machine gun and oscillate between a crest and a depressed position whereby said regulating means is rendered effective to cycle saidpower operated means.

4. A system for feeding belted ammunition into an automatic gun which may be mounted on a highly maneuverable body such as an aircraft or the like the gun having means for advancing the belted ammunition thereinto in accordance with its firing cycle, comprising motor operated means for moving the belted ammunition toward thegun, control means normally operable intermittently for interrupting such operation of said. motor operated means substantially in synchronization with movement of the ammunition by said advancing means, and means sensitive and movable-in response to high acceleration of the entire system connected to said control means to override same upon movement of the acceleration responsive means, to energize said motor operated means for continuous operation in an ammunition advancing direction.

5. A- system for feeding a cartridge belt into an automatic gun of highly mobile type having means actuated by the automatic gun for moving the cartridge belt into the same in accordance with its firing cycle, comprising a reversible electric motor, means driven by saidmotor and engageable with the cartridge belt for moving the same, a motor reversing switch for determining the direction of rotation of said reversible motor including an operating element extending into the'path of movement of the cartridges such that successive cartridges will engage and cause said element to rise and'fall, the rise and fall of said element being effective to operate said reversing switch toforward and reversing positions respectively in substantial synchronism with the operating cycle of said gun actuated means for moving the cartridge belt, and means responsive to a predetermined gravitational influence as a result of accelerated movement of the mobile automatic gun for moving said operating element to its raised position whereby said electric motor is conditioned for continuous forward rotation.

6. A system: for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun which has means operated thereby for moving the cartridges thereinto as required by the gun firing cycle, said system comprising: reversible motor driven means for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, with the forward impulses of greater intensity than the reverse impulses, and means for controlling the application of said impulses to the belt in timed relation to the movement of cartridges past said motor driven means.

7. A system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun, said system comprising reversible drive means for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, and means for controlling the application of said impulses to the belt in timed relation to the movement of cartridges past said drive means and with the forward impulses of greater magnitude than the reverse impulses.

8. A system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun, said system comprising reversible drive means for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, with the forward impulses of greater intensity than the reverse impulses, and means for controlling the application of said impulses to the belt in timed relation to the movement of cartridges past said drive means and with the forward impulses of longer duration than the reverse impulses.

9. A system for feeding a train of cartridges into an automatic gun that is provided with means for receiving cartridges in timed relation to the gun firing cycle, said system comprising: reversible drive means for applying to said train alternating forward impulses to move the train toward the gun and reverse impulses, and means for controlling the application of said impulses to the train with the forward impulses of greater magnitude than the reverse impulses and in timed relation to the movement of cartridges past said motor drive means to move the train toward the gun in accordance with said firing cycle.

10. In a system for feeding a train of cartridges into an automatic gun, reversible drive means for applying to said train alternating forward impulses to move the train toward the gun and reverse impulses, a member for following the cartridges for movement thereby in timed relation to the passage of individual cartridges past the drive means, and means operated by said member for controlling the application of said impulses to the train with the forward impulses of greater magnitude than the reverse impulses.

11. In a system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun as required by the gun firing cycle, drive means for the belt including a reversib e motor for applying to the belt alternatin forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, means for causing the reverse impulses to be of less intensity than the forward impulses, and a reversing switch associated with the motor for controlling the application of said impulses to the belt in timed relation to the movement of cartridges past said drive means.

12. In a system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun as required by the gun firing cycle, drive means for the belt including a reversible motor for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses tomove the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, means for causing the reverse impulses to be of less intensity than the forward impulses, a member for following the cartridges for movement thereby in timed relation to the passage of individual cartridges past the drive means, and a reversing switch operated by said member for controlling the application of said impulses to the belt.

13. In a system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun as required by the gun firing cycle, drive means for the belt including a reversible motor for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, means for causing the reverse impulses to be of less intensity than the forward impulses, a member for following the cartridges for movement thereby in timed relation to the passage of individual cartridges past the drive means, a reversing switch operated by said member for controlling the motor, and snap action means connecting said member to the switch for holding the latter in forward or reverse positions.

14. In a system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun as required by the gun firing cycle, drive means for the belt including a reversible motor for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, means for causing the reverse impulses to be of less intensity than the forward impulses, a member for following the cartridges for movement thereby in timed relation to the passage of individual cartridges past the drive means, a reversing switch operated by said member for controlling the motor, and snap action means connecting said member to the switch for holding the latter in forward or reverse positions, said snap action means being arranged to hold the switch in forward position during a greater portion of belt travel than in reverse position thereof.

15. In a system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun, reversible drive means for applying to the belt alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, means for controlling the application of said alternating impulses to the belt in timed relation to the movement of cartridges past said drive means and with the forward impulses of greater magnitude than the reverse impulses, and means responsive to acceleration of the system of predetermined degree for causing the drive means to apply a continuous forward driving force to the belt.

16. In a system for feeding a belt of cartridges into an automatic gun mounted upon a mobile support, reversible drive means for applying alternating forward impulses to move the belt toward the gun and reverse impulses, means for controlling the drive means to effect the alternate application of forward and reverse impulses to the belt with the forward impulses of greater magnitude than the reverse impulses, and means responsive to acceleration of the said support of predetermined degree to cause the drive means to apply a continuous forward driving force to the belt.

EDWARD J. MEYER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date France June 17, 1930 Great Britain Dec. 29, 1941 Great Britain June 29, 1943 Number Number

US2541530A 1945-03-05 1945-03-05 Ammunition feed and control system Expired - Lifetime US2541530A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2804806A (en) * 1951-06-14 1957-09-03 Frank R Simpson Pre-engraved projectiles and gun for firing same
DE1063937B (en) * 1957-10-23 1959-08-20 Wegmann & Co Belt-fed for automatic weapons
US4881447A (en) * 1988-05-27 1989-11-21 Teleflex Incorporated Round-orienting replenisher for ammunition storage and transport system

Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR690426A (en) * 1930-02-22 1930-09-19 Improvements to machine guns
GB542119A (en) * 1938-07-26 1941-12-29 Roe A V & Co Ltd Improvements in ammunition belts for machine guns
GB554306A (en) * 1942-12-07 1943-06-29 Roe A V & Co Ltd Improved cartridge feeding mechanism for automatic guns
US2342065A (en) * 1942-02-09 1944-02-15 Bell Aircraft Corp Oednance
US2364309A (en) * 1939-08-26 1944-12-05 Boulton Aircraft Ltd Means for feeding ammunition belts to machine guns
US2372750A (en) * 1940-11-29 1945-04-03 Boulton Aircraft Ltd Friction clutch
US2382715A (en) * 1937-12-04 1945-08-14 Hertel Heinrich Ammunition container for aircraft
US2390477A (en) * 1941-02-07 1945-12-04 Bell Aircraft Corp Machine gun feed mechanism
US2403170A (en) * 1941-11-29 1946-07-02 North American Aviation Inc Ammunition feed booster
US2428414A (en) * 1941-06-13 1947-10-07 Glenn L Martin Co Machine gun feed

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR690426A (en) * 1930-02-22 1930-09-19 Improvements to machine guns
US2382715A (en) * 1937-12-04 1945-08-14 Hertel Heinrich Ammunition container for aircraft
GB542119A (en) * 1938-07-26 1941-12-29 Roe A V & Co Ltd Improvements in ammunition belts for machine guns
US2364309A (en) * 1939-08-26 1944-12-05 Boulton Aircraft Ltd Means for feeding ammunition belts to machine guns
US2372750A (en) * 1940-11-29 1945-04-03 Boulton Aircraft Ltd Friction clutch
US2390477A (en) * 1941-02-07 1945-12-04 Bell Aircraft Corp Machine gun feed mechanism
US2428414A (en) * 1941-06-13 1947-10-07 Glenn L Martin Co Machine gun feed
US2403170A (en) * 1941-11-29 1946-07-02 North American Aviation Inc Ammunition feed booster
US2342065A (en) * 1942-02-09 1944-02-15 Bell Aircraft Corp Oednance
GB554306A (en) * 1942-12-07 1943-06-29 Roe A V & Co Ltd Improved cartridge feeding mechanism for automatic guns

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2804806A (en) * 1951-06-14 1957-09-03 Frank R Simpson Pre-engraved projectiles and gun for firing same
DE1063937B (en) * 1957-10-23 1959-08-20 Wegmann & Co Belt-fed for automatic weapons
US4881447A (en) * 1988-05-27 1989-11-21 Teleflex Incorporated Round-orienting replenisher for ammunition storage and transport system

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