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US2536713A - Method of making picture frames - Google Patents

Method of making picture frames Download PDF

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US2536713A
US2536713A US78648047A US2536713A US 2536713 A US2536713 A US 2536713A US 78648047 A US78648047 A US 78648047A US 2536713 A US2536713 A US 2536713A
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picture
paper
edges
solution
portion
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Berg John Wesley
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Berg John Wesley
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31DMAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER, NOT PROVIDED FOR IN SUBCLASSES B31B OR B31C
    • B31D1/00Multiple-step processes for making flat articles ; Making flat articles
    • B31D1/0093Multiple-step processes for making flat articles ; Making flat articles involving impregnating
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE, IN GENERAL
    • B29CSHAPING OR JOINING OF PLASTICS; SHAPING OF MATERIAL IN A PLASTIC STATE, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR; AFTER-TREATMENT OF THE SHAPED PRODUCTS, e.g. REPAIRING
    • B29C43/00Compression moulding, i.e. applying external pressure to flow the moulding material; Apparatus therefor
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T156/00Adhesive bonding and miscellaneous chemical manufacture
    • Y10T156/10Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor
    • Y10T156/1002Methods of surface bonding and/or assembly therefor with permanent bending or reshaping or surface deformation of self sustaining lamina

Description

Jan. 2, 1951 J. w. BERG 2,536,713

METHOD OF MAKING PICTURE FRAMES Filed Nov. 17, 1947 IN VEN TOR.

Ja/m l/lsleyflely' BY ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 2, 1951 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE means METHOD or MAKINGPICTURE John Wesley Berg, Denver, 0010. -Application November 117, 1947', Serial No.'786,480

. "This invention relates to improvements in the method of making picture frames.

,Picture post cards are soldin all'parts of "the country and are purchased in great numbers. by tourists and others. Such cards usually depict some interesting scenery or some famous buildin'gs and are oftentimes real works of art.

At presentit is custorizary to vend such cards in the form of rectangular cardboards having the pictures on one side and space for message, address and postage stamp on the other side.

Since so many picture post cards are highly sartistic, ornamental and of general interest, many people desire to preserve them.

It is the object of this invention to produce an inexpensive, but highly ornamental and practical frame for use more particularly with picturepost cards, in which post cards of special interest may be mounted, thus increasing their ornamental and artistic appearance and efiect. n The frame, briefly described, consists of a piece of heavy paper having one surface finished and provided with suitable designs, formed into a shape in which the center is flat and in which the edges are subjected to a treatment by means of dies, chemicals and heat, so as to form an outer border of concavo convex cross section having the appearance offa picture .frame molding. The picture post card is secured to the flat center portion by a suitable adhesive,

v Another object is to produce a method by means of which pieces oipaper oi the proper shape and size may be formed with ornamental embossed edges that will retain their shape and will not be affected by climatic conditions.

Having thus explained the objects of the invention, and in a general way, the invention itself, the invention will now be described in detail, and for this purpose reference will be had to the accompanying drawing in which ithas been illustrated, and in which:

Figural is a front elevation showing the invention with a picture post card mounted therein;

Figure 2 is a rear View of a portion of the paper sheet from which the frame is made, showing the zone that has been moistened with a thermo hardening plastic solution;

Fig. 3 is a section taken on lines 3-.3, beio-rethe post card has been positioned in the frame;

Figure 4 isa section similar to that shown in Figure ii, but shows the post card in position; and

Figure 5 is a side elevation, partly insection, showing a simple apparatus iorcarrying out the method.

In the drawing referencenumeral i designates a :sheet of stifi paper, usually rectangular in shape, and-of a size larger than the post card or picture that is to be secured thereto. In 'Figure 2, the unshaded portion represents a portion of the surface to which the picture is to be adhesively secured and the shaded portion 1!, the zone orfaizea'that extends beyond the picture and whichis to be moistened by a thermo hardening plastic and formed by dies into picture molding '8 Claims. "(01. 18-56) shape. The picture post card has been designated by numeral l2.

.In 'orderto .form the paper sheet into aframe.

by means-ofdies, it is necessary to moisten those breaking or tearing. Themoistening might be accomplished by immersing the edges of the sheet in *water, preferably hot, and then subjecting it to a forming operation. If such a water moistened sheet is allowed to dry while-in position between forming dies, it will assume the shape shown, but it will :not retain that shape indefinitely. Aside from the fact that the desired shape is temporary only, the formed edges will be weak and easily torn or deformed.

.In order to make a frame that will-retain its shape and have sufiicient strength to resist the various forces to which it is subjected in .han dling, it is essential that the edges shall be so treated that they will become harder and stronger after the treatment. For the purpose of hardening and strengthening the edges, the solution with which they are moistened must possess such properties that itwilliharden during the forming and drying operation, leaving the edges harder and stronger than theoriginal paper.

It has been found that the desired results are obtained by moistening the edges of the paper sheet with a solution containing one of several thermo hardening plastics, preferably a thermo setting plastic. There are on the market today a number of thermohardening and thermo'setting plastics that may be obtained in liquid form.

Among the several plastics that may be ema ployed for this purpose are Bakelite, a phenol formaldehyde; nitrocellulose; acrylic plastics such as methyl methacrylate; and acrylic resins, generally known as Lucite and Plexiglas. In addition to the plastics above mentioned resorcinol formaldehyde and-urea formaldehyde may be used, both'oiwhich are thermo hardening.

One solution suitable for the purpose under consideration comprises:

Such a solution will'readily permeate paper and hardens w'hen'subjectedtoheat. Y There is on the market today a resorcinol solution sold under thetradename .of Resloom M75, manufactured by the Monsanto Chemical Compa y. t e exa t ingr d tsre no know This solution, however, contains resoreinol and formaldehyde and for applicants purpose six ounces of Resloom is mixed with one gallon of denatured alcohol after which one teaspooniul ofsaturated ammonium chloride is added to each nt of th so ut o I Thepa er b n s'a ter i g cut o th proper size and shape, are moistened'along their edges in the solution above identified, or in some similar solution containing a thermo setting plastic. A thermo plastic may be employed, but is not so desirable as a thermo setting plastic. The term plastie is used in a, sense broad enough to include both the thermo plastic and thermo setting plastics.

It is sufficient if the edges of the paper blank are moistened as shown in the drawing, but it is permissible to immerse the whole sheet in the solution if desired.

After the paper blank has been moistened, it

-is positioned in the forming machine that is shown in Figure 5, or in a machine of similar construction. 'The machine illustrated has been shown as an example and may be replaced by any other machine that is suitable for the pur- In Figure 5, reference numeral l3 designates a base having at least two guides I 4 projecting upwardly therefrom in spaced parallel relation.

The upper ends of guides M are connected by means of a strong bar to the undel'surface of which is secured a die 16 having incorporated therein an electric heating element [1. A cross 'head I8 is slidable on guides l4, and has removably secured to its upper surface a die 19 that is complemental to die I6. Guides M have shoulders at 20 that limit the downward movement of the cross head. Springs 21 urge the crosshead downwardly.

" A cylinder 22 is secured to base 13 by bolts '23 and has a removable cylinderhead 24. A piston 25 is mounted in the cylinder and has connected therewith a piston rod 26 whose upper end is connected with the crosshead.

Reference numeral 2! designates a supply of compressed air that is connected with the interior of the cylinder by means of pipes 28 in whichis positioned a valve 29 of such construction that when it is in one position, it communicates the interior of the cylinder with the compressed air and when in another position with the atmosphere. Die I9 is provided with a groove 39 that is rectangular and die I6 is provided with ridges 3| that are shaped to fit into grooves 30. The moistened paper blank is posi- 1 tioned on the top of die l9 and valve 29 operates to direct air under pressure into the cylinder whereupon die I 9 will move upwardly forcing the ridges 3| into grooves 30 bending the edge of the paper into the shape shown in Figures 3 and 4. The parts are now left until the solution has evaporated and the plastic has set or hardened after which the valve 29 is turned to exhaust position, permitting the parts to return to the position shown in Figure 5. The paper blank now' has the form shown in the drawing and the picture post card can then be adhesively secured thereto.

In order to expedite the forming or shaping operation, it is de irable that the solution shall be of such consistency that it will quickly penetrate the paper. and that it shall be vo atile. The use of alcohol or diethyl ether is principally for the purpose of obtaining a solution that will evaporate quickly.

Having described the invention what is claimed as new is:

1. The method of forming a picture fram from paper which consists in the steps of cutting a piece of paper to a desired shape and size. moistening only the edges of the aper with a solution containing a thermosetting plastic and a volatile liquid solvent, subjecting the moistened piece to a forming action of dies, the forming action altering the edges to produce a beaded non-planar cross section of uniform thickness, the central portion surrounded by the beaded edges being retained planar and the beaded edge being formed with all corresponding portions thereof lying in a plane substantially parallel to the plane of the central portion surrounding same outwardly thereof, subjecting th paper while in the forming dies to heat, the heat producing volatilization of the liquid solvent and hardening of the plastic to a rigid relatively undeformable state, and adhesively securing a picture to the central portion.

2. The method as defined by claim 1 wherein said edges are moistened with a solution containing resorcinal formaldehyde plastic and alcohol.

3. The method as defined by claim 1 wherein said edges are moistened with a solution containing resorcinal formaldehyde plastic, alcohol, and ammonium chloride. 1

4. The method as defined by claim 1 wherein the forming action produces a rectangular central portion.

5. The method'as defined by claim 1 wherein the beaded edge is'formed to a concavo-convex cross section, the convex side being embossed outwardly from the side of the central portion to which the picture is mounted.

6. The method as defined by claim 1 wherein the forming action produces a rectangular central portion surrounded by the beaded edge, the beaded edge being formed to a concavo-convex cross section, the convex side being embossed outwardly from the side of the central portion to which the picture is mounted.

7. The method as defined by claim 1 wherein said edges are moistened with a solution containing urea formaldehyde plastic and alcohol.

8. The method of forming a picture frame from paper which consists in the steps of cutting a piece of paper to a desired shape and size, moistening only the edges of the paper with a solution containing a thermosetting plastic and a volatile liquid solid, subjecting the moistened piece to a forming action of dies, the forming action producing a rectangular central portion substantially the size of a picture post card, surrounded b beaded edges, the edges being formed to a concavo-convex cross section, the convex side being embossed outwardly from one side of the central portion, and adhesively Securing a picture post card to the central portion on the last named side.

JOHN WESLEY BERG.

REFERENCES CITED The following references, are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

US2536713A 1947-11-17 1947-11-17 Method of making picture frames Expired - Lifetime US2536713A (en)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3146492A (en) * 1957-12-18 1964-09-01 Jerome H Lemelson Apparatus for making a lenticular display sheet
US3753831A (en) * 1970-08-28 1973-08-21 Boston Machine Works Co Folding apparatus
US4806195A (en) * 1987-09-28 1989-02-21 Edmond Namysl Printed circuit board laminating machine
US20070065646A1 (en) * 2005-09-22 2007-03-22 The Chaimberg 5 Holdings Inc./Gestion Chaimberg 5 Inc. Method of fabricating high-gloss liqui-finish artwork prints

Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US345158A (en) * 1886-07-06 Visiting or fancy card
US1415018A (en) * 1921-04-27 1922-05-09 Fed Products Company Die press
US1731194A (en) * 1925-05-09 1929-10-08 Ellis Carleton Cover for bottle stoppers
US1762083A (en) * 1929-06-21 1930-06-03 Jr George G Singer Art shield
US2118080A (en) * 1933-06-24 1938-05-24 American Seal Kap Corp Molding mechanism
US2190807A (en) * 1935-05-29 1940-02-20 Celanese Corp Method of making wearing apparel
US2221197A (en) * 1936-05-07 1940-11-12 American Seal Kap Corp Milk bottle cap and method of making the same
US2295855A (en) * 1939-10-18 1942-09-15 Bullard Co Protective headgear
US2296596A (en) * 1941-12-18 1942-09-22 Joseph H Brown Framing
US2354094A (en) * 1944-07-18 Method of making notebook plastic
US2378642A (en) * 1941-09-02 1945-06-19 Burkart Mfg Company F Process of making fiber-body articles
US2433643A (en) * 1943-11-11 1947-12-30 North American Aviation Inc Process of treating phenolic sheet

Patent Citations (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US345158A (en) * 1886-07-06 Visiting or fancy card
US2354094A (en) * 1944-07-18 Method of making notebook plastic
US1415018A (en) * 1921-04-27 1922-05-09 Fed Products Company Die press
US1731194A (en) * 1925-05-09 1929-10-08 Ellis Carleton Cover for bottle stoppers
US1762083A (en) * 1929-06-21 1930-06-03 Jr George G Singer Art shield
US2118080A (en) * 1933-06-24 1938-05-24 American Seal Kap Corp Molding mechanism
US2190807A (en) * 1935-05-29 1940-02-20 Celanese Corp Method of making wearing apparel
US2221197A (en) * 1936-05-07 1940-11-12 American Seal Kap Corp Milk bottle cap and method of making the same
US2295855A (en) * 1939-10-18 1942-09-15 Bullard Co Protective headgear
US2378642A (en) * 1941-09-02 1945-06-19 Burkart Mfg Company F Process of making fiber-body articles
US2296596A (en) * 1941-12-18 1942-09-22 Joseph H Brown Framing
US2433643A (en) * 1943-11-11 1947-12-30 North American Aviation Inc Process of treating phenolic sheet

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3146492A (en) * 1957-12-18 1964-09-01 Jerome H Lemelson Apparatus for making a lenticular display sheet
US3753831A (en) * 1970-08-28 1973-08-21 Boston Machine Works Co Folding apparatus
US4806195A (en) * 1987-09-28 1989-02-21 Edmond Namysl Printed circuit board laminating machine
US20070065646A1 (en) * 2005-09-22 2007-03-22 The Chaimberg 5 Holdings Inc./Gestion Chaimberg 5 Inc. Method of fabricating high-gloss liqui-finish artwork prints

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