US2511320A - Steering head for motorcycles - Google Patents

Steering head for motorcycles Download PDF

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US2511320A
US2511320A US28982A US2898248A US2511320A US 2511320 A US2511320 A US 2511320A US 28982 A US28982 A US 28982A US 2898248 A US2898248 A US 2898248A US 2511320 A US2511320 A US 2511320A
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fork stem
motor cycle
plate
plates
forks
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US28982A
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Benson Ben
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Benson Ben
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B62LAND VEHICLES FOR TRAVELLING OTHERWISE THAN ON RAILS
    • B62KCYCLES; CYCLE FRAMES; CYCLE STEERING DEVICES; RIDER-OPERATED TERMINAL CONTROLS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR CYCLES; CYCLE AXLE SUSPENSIONS; CYCLE SIDE-CARS, FORECARS, OR THE LIKE
    • B62K21/00Steering devices
    • B62K21/18Connections between forks and handlebars or handlebar stems

Description

June 13, 1950 B. BENSON STEERING HEAD FOR MOTORCYCLES 2 Sheecs-Shet l Filed May 25, 1948 lrlvelyfor Ben Benson June 13, 1950 B. BENSON 7 2,511,320
' STEERING HEAD Fok MOTORCYCLES Filed May 25, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 O 9 6' W 14 l =1= i 4 lqv'eq'for Ben Bcnaon Patented June 13, 1950 UNITED STATES ATENT OFFICE STEERING HEAD FOR MOTORCYCLES Ben Benson, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Application May 25, 1948, Serial No. 28,982
7 Claims.
The invention relates to a steering head for motor cycles and is to be used in conjunction with a pair of motor cycle forks which are described in my co-pending patent application Serial No. 659 (series of 1948) filed January 6, 1948, issued as Patent No. 2,475,774 on July 12, 1949.
The principal object of the present invention is to provide a steering head which can be quickly attached or removed from the motor cycle frame and will rigidly reinforce the forks to keep them aligned under all hazards of motor cycle operation.
A further object of the invention is to design the head in a knock-down construction for simplicity of manufacture and convenience of assembling or dismantling.
A further object of the invention is to construct the head for aligned reception of the forks, to support the front mudguard and for carrying the various attachments required on the front of the motor cycle.
A further object of the invention is to design the head for use with different types of motor cycle handle bars.
A still further object of the invention is to design the head with stops for limiting the turning movement of the front wheel of the motor cycle.
With the above important and other minor objects in view, which will become more apparent as the description proceeds, the invention consists essentially in the construction and arrangement of parts hereinafter more particularly described, references being had to the accompanying drawings in which:
Figure 1 is a vertical section centrally through my new steering head, showing one of the forks in full outline and the frame of the motor cycle, the mudguard, and part of the front wheel in dotted outline.
Figure 2 is a front face view of my new head with the handle bars attached and showing the upper part of the forks.
Figure 3 is a horizontal sectional view taken at 33, Figure 1 and showing the front part of the frame in dotted outline.
Figure 4 is a perspective view of my new head with the upper part of the forks attached thereto.
Figure 5 is a perspective view of the central connecting part of a pair of well known motor cycle handle bars.
Figure 6 is a perspective view of a special connection to adapt my head for cushion handle bars.
In the drawings, like characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in the several figures.
The principal parts of my steering head comprises a base casting l, a reinforcing plate 2, and a clamping plate 3.
The base casting I, is of a triangular-shape with the front face curved. The extreme outer ends or legs, are rounded and provided with holes I therethrough to receive the vertical tubings 4 of the forks described in my co-pending application above mentioned, In making this connection to the forks the legs of the base casting project through suitably provided apertures in the dust casings of said forks. The legs of the base casting are slotted to the holes, as shown at 5 so that bolts 6 can be connected across the legs to clamp same to the tubings. The rear central part of the casting is cut away in a circular lower shelf and provided with an upstanding vertical shaft 7. This shaft is suitably made a fixture on the casting and forms the fork stem for rotation in the motor cycle frame, which is indicated in dotted outline at 8. This fork stem is adapted to receive upper and lower ball bearings, one of which is indicated at 9, and these bearings make the necessary smooth connection with the frame so that the head can be freely turned thereon. The screw adjustment for regulating the clearance on the bearings is indicated at Iii and screws on to the upper end of the fork stem.
On the base casting and at either side of the fork stem, a pair of triangular-shaped lugs ii are cast as part of the base casting and these lugs project rearwardly and are adapted to contact the frame 8 when the fork stem is turned, to limit the turning movement of the head. The rear central part of the base casting is also provided with a downwardly extending plate l2. This plate is removably secured to the under side of the base casting and the lower end is; bent rearwardly and provided with a central hole I3 for a purpose later described.
The reinforcing plate 2 is crosswise curved to fit the curved front of the base casting to which it is secured by bolts I4. The lower end of this reinforcing plate projects below the base casting and is welded to a further plate l5, the rear end of which passes under the plate l2 and has a hole therethrough which registers with the hole l3. These holes are utilized to bolt and support the mudguard, indicated. at l3. Further bolts pass through the front end of the plate IE to support the'front part of the mudguard. The front end of the plate I5 is turned upwardly and provided with a pair of holes IS. The upper end of the reinforcing plate 2 is bent rearwardly, as at H, while the front face is provided with a bracket [8 having a downward ly turned lip. This lip is provided with holes H5. The holes It and I9 are for the purpose of securing the horn thereto. The lugs l9 secure the lower part of the headlight bracket, while suitable provision can be made on the reinforcing place 2 to carry spotlights, etcetera, if desired.
The clamping plate 3 is shaped similar to the base casting I by having a curving front face and side legs 2E3, but the rear portion thereof has the central part cut away in a semi-circle at 3 for the fork stem to project therethrough. On either side of the fork stem, a pair of rounded horns project rearwardly and are each provided with upstanding studs 2! for a purpose later described. The outer ends of the legs 21 are rounded. and provided with tapered holes 23' to receive the upper tapered ends of the tubings which are clamped to the legs 28 by circular nuts 2 The front central part of the clamp ing plate 3 is secured to the reinforcing plate 52 by bolts which screw into the bent-back portion l'i.
the above arrangement, it will be seen that the base casting l, the reinforcing plate 2 and the clamping plate 3 form what might be described as an H-shaped truss for the forks, so they are held in rigid alignment to stand the severe conditions and shocks to which they will be subjected. If desired, the forks can be attached to the head before the head is placed on the motor cycle frame. In this way the head and the forks may be connected or fen-loved as unit.
In connecting the head to the motor cycle frame the lower ball bearing is first slid down the fork stem. The fork stem is then passed up through the front steering knuckle of motor cycle frame until the ball bearing is received in position against the frame ball race. It will be noticed that the steering knuckle of the frame, indicated in dotted outline, is freely received by the cut away shelf portion of the base casting while the upper end of the knuckle is received within the semi-circular opening at the back of the clamping plate 3. The upper ball bearing and the race are then passed over the fork stem, the nut Iii screwed into place and as. justed. At this time, the upper threads of the fork stem will be projecting some distance above the nut iii.
A well known handle bar connection is shown in Figure 5. It will be noticed that this connection is provided with a central hole 24 and a pair of further holes 25 on either side. These handle bars are received by the rear part of the clamping plate 3, the holes 25 neatly receiving the studs 2! of the clamping plate while the central hole 24 of the handle bars receives the upper end of the fork stem 1. The small hole 25 receives the upper part of the headlight bracket, previously mentioned. A hexagon nut 26 then screws on to the upper end of the fork stern and securely holds the handle bars to the studs 2!. By this operation, the handle bar connection forms a bridge 24 from the clamping plate 3 to the fork stem and also completes the rigidity of the head. Further, due to this type of construction, by merely removing the nut 26, handle bar connection, and the adjusting nut ill, the fork stem, including the forks, can be quickly re- Cal moved from the frame for repairs or replacement, without the use of special tools and, if necessary, by the motor cycle rider himself. It can be replaced just as easily.
It will be noted that the type of handle bars, shown in Figure 5, form a rigid connection to the fork stem. Another well known type of handlebar is shown at 2? and 28 in Figure 6. The central part of the handle bars El are provided with forward and downwardly extending cranks 28 which terminate in hollow bases interiorly provided with rubber (not shown). This rubber is suitably locked to a central shaft (not shown) so that it permits a limited movement of the handle bars which I have termed Cushion handle bars. My steering head can be standardized so that it is applicable for attachment to either of these types of handle bars and to various types of motor cycles. The central part of the connection shown in Figure 6 is exactly the same as that shown in Figure 5 but instead of the handle bars coming from the connection, a circular boss 29 is built up at each end of the connection and a threaded stud 30 projects centrally from this boss. By this arrangement, the handle bars 2'! and 22, including the rubber can be connected to the studs 3c in the same manner as they now connect to the central shaft previously mentioned. The central connection can be received on the studs 2! of my clamping plate in the same manner as the connection shown in Figure 5. Further, by providing this new connection, any: motor cycle could be equipped with cushion handle bars, similar to Figure 6.
At the present time, the steering arrangement on most motor cycles is such, that the fastenings for the steering is independent of the handle bars and the handle bars are merely an attachment. By this arrangement, due to the semicircular opening in the clamping plate 3 and by using the handle bar connection as the final lock, removal or ire-connection of the head to the frame is extremely simple. Added to this, a strong H-shaped truss is provided from the fork stem to my new forks so that high speeds can be attained over extremely rough terrain with comparative comfort and without possibility of forks being strained out of alignment to interfere with their proper operation.
What I claim as my invention is:
1. A steering head for motor cycles, comprising: a pair of spaced plates connected by a reinforcing member, to form an H-shaped frame; one of said plates centrally provided with a cutout; said plate provided with a stud on either side of said cut-out; a fork stem secured to the other of said plates and projecting through said cut-out, in said first-mentioned plate; a bridging member releasably connecting said fork stem to said studs; and openings in the ends of said plates to receive the forks of said motor cycle.
2. A steering head for motor cycles, comprising: a pair of individual plates; a member releasably secured to said plates and spacing same thereapart; a central opening in one of said plates; a pair of projecting studs mounted on said latter plate, one on either side of said opening; a fork stem mounted on the other of said plates and projecting through the opening in said first-mentioned plate; handle bars receivable on said studs and the free end of said fork stem, to releasably connect said fork stem to said first mentioned plate; and openings in the ends of said plates to receive the forks of said motor cycle.
3. A steering head for motor cycles, comprising: a pair of plates; a reinforcing member releasably secured to said plates and spacing same thereapart; said reinforcing member projecting past one of said plates and provided with a bracket, for supporting a mudguard; the plate, remote from said bracket, provided with a central opening; said plate carrying a pair of studs, one on either side of said opening; the plate, adjacent said bracket, supporting a fork stem which projects through said opening in the other of said plates; means for releasably connecting said fork stem to said studs; and openings in the ends of said plates to receive the forks of said motor cycle.
4. In combination with a motor cycle frame; a steering head therefor, comprising: a pair of spaced plates connected by a reinforcing member; one of said plates having a central cut-out;
the other of said plates supporting a fork stem with the free end thereof projecting through said cut-out; said fork stem receivable through the front knuckle of said motor cycle frame, for pivoting movement therein, and with the end thereof extending past said knuckle; means for releasably connectin the free end of said fork stem to said first-mentioned plate; means on said latter-mentioned plate for contact with said motor cycle frame to limit said turning movement; and means on the outer ends of said plates for receiving and securing a pair of motor cycle front wheel forks thereto.
5. A steering head for a motor cycle frame, comprising: a relatively triangular-shaped casting having a fork stem projecting centrally therefrom and a pair of stop members projecting therefrom rearwardly, one at either side of said fork stem; a relatively triangular-shaped clamping plate, having a central rear cut-out therein and a pair of upstanding studs thereon, one on either side of said cut-out; a reinforcing plate centrally and releasably connecting said casting and said clamping plate in spaced relationship, with said fork stem projecting through and past said cut-out; said reinforcing plate extending past said casting to present a bracket, for supporting a mudguard; said fork stem rotatably receivable in the steering knuckle of said motor cycle frame and projecting therepast; means receivable on said studs and said fork stem for releasably connecting said fork stem to said clamping Plate;
said stop members contactable with said frame, for limiting the turning movement of said fork stem; and means on the ends of said casting and said clamping member for receiving and releasably securing a pair of wheel forks thereto.
6. In combination with a motor cycle frame; a steering head therefor, comprising: a pair of spaced plates connected by a reinforcing member; one of said plate having a central cut-out; the other of said plates supporting a fork stem with the free end thereof projecting through said cut-out; said fork stem receivable through the front knuckle of said motor cycle frame, for pivoting movement thereon, and with the end thereof extending past said knuckle; means for releasably connecting the free end of said fork stem to said first mentioned plate; and means on the outer ends of said plates for receiving a pair of motor cycle front wheel forks thereto.
'7. In combination with a motor cycle frame; a steering head therefor, comprising: a pair of spaced plates connected by a reinforcing member; one of said plates having a central cut-out; the other of said plates supporting a fork stem with the free end thereof projecting through said cut-out; said fork stern receivable through the front knuckle of said motor cycle frame for pivoting movement therein and with the end thereof extending past said knuckle; a pair of projecting studs mounted on said first mentioned plate, one on either side of said cut-out; handle bars receivable on said studs and the free end of said fork stem, to releasably connect said fork stem to said first mentioned plate; and means on the outer ends of said plates for receiving and securing a pair of motor cycle front wheel forks thereto.
BEN BENSON.
REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this :patent:
UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,834,308 Harley Dec. 1, 1931 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 10,834 Great Britain of 1897 21,436 Great Britain of 1910
US28982A 1948-05-25 1948-05-25 Steering head for motorcycles Expired - Lifetime US2511320A (en)

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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2583947A (en) * 1948-11-13 1952-01-29 Lord Mfg Co Handle bar mounting
US2768836A (en) * 1953-03-18 1956-10-30 Alfred Kreidler Telescopic forks for motorcycles or the like
DE965475C (en) * 1953-03-19 1957-06-06 Kreidler Dipl Ing Alfred Handlebar attachment for motorcycles with telescopic front suspension
US3045772A (en) * 1959-02-17 1962-07-24 Theodore R Nicolai Drive for motor bikes
US3162261A (en) * 1963-05-27 1964-12-22 Herbert L Everroad Motorized personnel carts
US3331617A (en) * 1965-04-01 1967-07-18 American Mach & Foundry Handle bar construction
US3655219A (en) * 1970-08-28 1972-04-11 Amf Inc Adjustable twin-strut handlebar construction
US4093262A (en) * 1975-10-24 1978-06-06 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Front fork for two-wheeled vehicles
US5060961A (en) * 1987-11-18 1991-10-29 Keith Bontrager Mechanically joined steering assembly
US5749590A (en) * 1995-07-13 1998-05-12 Roerig; Scott Suspension fork assembly
US6343806B1 (en) * 2001-03-29 2002-02-05 Qun-Yuan Lee Bicycle head set assembly
US20020153692A1 (en) * 2001-04-19 2002-10-24 Goldammer Roger David Scott One-piece curved yoke for motorcycles
US6471229B2 (en) 1999-12-01 2002-10-29 Gary L. Stewart Bicycle steering dampening apparatus and an apparatus for installing the same
US20080011538A1 (en) * 2005-01-27 2008-01-17 Showa Corporation Support structure of motor-driven steering assist apparatus
US20080258424A1 (en) * 2007-04-18 2008-10-23 John Paul Unitary vehicular front end and method of use thereof
US20100199801A1 (en) * 2009-02-12 2010-08-12 Giant Manufacturing Co., Ltd. Aerodynamically configured handlebar assembly for a bicycle
US20110121538A1 (en) * 2008-06-06 2011-05-26 Michel Giroux Fork assembly for a bicycle
US20140084563A1 (en) * 2012-08-27 2014-03-27 Jan Ehrhard Steering stop for bicycle handlebars
US20140174246A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-26 Tien Hsin Industries Co., Ltd. Handlebar
US20170252985A1 (en) * 2014-08-27 2017-09-07 Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology Co., Ltd. Vacuum assisted resin infusion protection coating, system and method for permanent magnet motor rotor

Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB189710834A (en) * 1897-05-01 1898-04-23 Charles Thomas Brock Sangster Improvements in Multicycles.
GB191021436A (en) * 1910-09-15 1911-08-31 John Ridgway Improvements in Spring Forks for Cycles and Motor Cycles.
US1834308A (en) * 1929-07-10 1931-12-01 Harley Davidson Motor Co Inc Motor cycle front fork and front fork assembly

Patent Citations (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
GB189710834A (en) * 1897-05-01 1898-04-23 Charles Thomas Brock Sangster Improvements in Multicycles.
GB191021436A (en) * 1910-09-15 1911-08-31 John Ridgway Improvements in Spring Forks for Cycles and Motor Cycles.
US1834308A (en) * 1929-07-10 1931-12-01 Harley Davidson Motor Co Inc Motor cycle front fork and front fork assembly

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2583947A (en) * 1948-11-13 1952-01-29 Lord Mfg Co Handle bar mounting
US2768836A (en) * 1953-03-18 1956-10-30 Alfred Kreidler Telescopic forks for motorcycles or the like
DE965475C (en) * 1953-03-19 1957-06-06 Kreidler Dipl Ing Alfred Handlebar attachment for motorcycles with telescopic front suspension
US3045772A (en) * 1959-02-17 1962-07-24 Theodore R Nicolai Drive for motor bikes
US3162261A (en) * 1963-05-27 1964-12-22 Herbert L Everroad Motorized personnel carts
US3331617A (en) * 1965-04-01 1967-07-18 American Mach & Foundry Handle bar construction
US3655219A (en) * 1970-08-28 1972-04-11 Amf Inc Adjustable twin-strut handlebar construction
US4093262A (en) * 1975-10-24 1978-06-06 Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha Front fork for two-wheeled vehicles
US5060961A (en) * 1987-11-18 1991-10-29 Keith Bontrager Mechanically joined steering assembly
US5290052A (en) * 1987-11-18 1994-03-01 Bontrager Ketih D Mechanically joined steering assembly
US5603521A (en) * 1987-11-18 1997-02-18 Bontrager Cycles, Inc. Mechanically joined steering assembly
US5749590A (en) * 1995-07-13 1998-05-12 Roerig; Scott Suspension fork assembly
US6471229B2 (en) 1999-12-01 2002-10-29 Gary L. Stewart Bicycle steering dampening apparatus and an apparatus for installing the same
US6343806B1 (en) * 2001-03-29 2002-02-05 Qun-Yuan Lee Bicycle head set assembly
US20020153692A1 (en) * 2001-04-19 2002-10-24 Goldammer Roger David Scott One-piece curved yoke for motorcycles
US20080011538A1 (en) * 2005-01-27 2008-01-17 Showa Corporation Support structure of motor-driven steering assist apparatus
US7540511B2 (en) * 2005-01-27 2009-06-02 Showa Corporation Support structure of motor-driven steering assist apparatus
US20080258424A1 (en) * 2007-04-18 2008-10-23 John Paul Unitary vehicular front end and method of use thereof
US20110121538A1 (en) * 2008-06-06 2011-05-26 Michel Giroux Fork assembly for a bicycle
US20100199801A1 (en) * 2009-02-12 2010-08-12 Giant Manufacturing Co., Ltd. Aerodynamically configured handlebar assembly for a bicycle
US20140084563A1 (en) * 2012-08-27 2014-03-27 Jan Ehrhard Steering stop for bicycle handlebars
US9475539B2 (en) * 2012-08-27 2016-10-25 Canyon Bicycles Gmbh Steering stop for bicycle handlebars
US20140174246A1 (en) * 2012-12-21 2014-06-26 Tien Hsin Industries Co., Ltd. Handlebar
US20170252985A1 (en) * 2014-08-27 2017-09-07 Xinjiang Goldwind Science & Technology Co., Ltd. Vacuum assisted resin infusion protection coating, system and method for permanent magnet motor rotor

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